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HOGWARTS PRIVATE COLLEGE

H OGWARTS P RIVATE C OLLEGE Assessment Task

Assessment Task

 

Stage 6 Biology, Year 12 (HSC) 2018

 

Module 7- Infectious Diseases

TASK 3 OF 3: Information Report

 

DATE OF ISSUE: Week 5 Term 2

MODE OF ASSESSMENT:

MODE OF ASSESSMENT: In class Take-home DUE DATE:

In class

Take-home

Take-home

DUE DATE:

 

Draft Report: Week 7 Term 2 Final Report: Week 9 Term 2

MARKS:

/20

WEIGHTING: 20%

OUTCOMES TO BE ASSESSED:

 

BIO 12-14 Analyses infectious disease in terms of cause, transmission, management and the organism’s response, including the human immune system BIO 11/12-3 Conducts investigations to collect valid and reliable primary and secondary data and information BIO 11/12-4 Selects and processes appropriate qualitative and quantitative data and information using a range of appropriate media BIO 11/12-5 Analyses and evaluates primary and secondary data and information Bio 11/12-7 Communicates scientific understanding using suitable language and terminology for a specific audience or purpose

IN THIS TASK YOU WILL BE ASSESSED ON HOW WELL YOU:

 

- Explain how your choice of infectious disease is caused and explain the mode of transmission to the host and to humans

- Analyse how the host and human immune systems respond to your chosen infectious disease

- Analyse how your chosen infectious disease can be treated and controlled

- Discuss the methods of prevention

 

- Explain the health impacts your chosen infectious disease has to society

- Select and extract information from a range of reliable secondary sources and uses Harvard referencing style correctly

- Effectively presents work

 

STUDENTS TO COMPLETE:

 

Student’s Name:

   

Biology Teacher’s Name:

   

CONTEXT:

In this module you have investigated transmission, responses, prevention, treatment and control for a variety of infectious diseases within Australia and globally. You will use the skills and knowledge obtained from this unit and prior modules to write an information report. You will choose ONE of the following infectious diseases listed below to analyse the impacts it has to humans and to society. You must only choose ONE of these infectious diseases:

Malaria

Small Pox

Ebola

TASK DESCRIPTION:

This is a research-based task where you will submit a Word-processed information report which analyses the impacts of your chosen infectious disease has to humans and society.

- In your report you must include headings for each paragraph for example: Abstract, introduction, cause and transmission, immune responses, treatment and control, prevention, impacts to society and conclusion.

- It must be within 1000-1500 words and use Harvard referencing where appropriate. Include in-text citations as well as provide a reference list

and reliable secondary data and information from at least 5 peer-reviewed journal articles, books etc. Non- credible websites should be avoided.

- Attached to this assessment task is a scaffolded draft to assist in writing the information report. You may submit this draft on Week 7 Term 2 to receive feedback for the final information report.

-

Some class time will be allocated to conduct research and to ask questions.

INSTRUCTION FOR SUBMISSION:

- You may submit the scaffolded draft information report (attached on the following pages) in Week 7 Term 2 for feedback from your class teacher during class time

- You will submit a typed final information report within 1000-1500 words in Week 9 Term 2 to their class teacher during class time

- The draft and final report should be stapled together

TIPS FOR SUCCESS:

- Utilise class time wisely

- Complete the scaffolded draft provided and get your teacher to provide feedback

- Submit a draft information report by Week 7 Term 2 for feedback

- Use feedback to improve final report

STATEMENT OF AUTHENTICITY AND ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

I certify that:

The planning, development, content and presentation of this task is my own work in every respect

It has not been copied from another person’s work or from books or from the internet or any other source

I have used appropriate research methods and have not used words, ideas, designs, skills, or workmanship of others in the task or its development without appropriate acknowledgement

STUDENT SIGNATURE: ………………………………

DATE: …………………

DATE: …………………   Submission Receipt: ( Retained by Student )
 

Submission Receipt:

(Retained by Student)

Student Name

 

Subject

 

Teacher

 

Assessment Task

 

Assignment Received

 

Date Due

 

Date Submitted

 

Signed

 

HOGWARTS

PRIVATE

COLLEGE

H OGWARTS P RIVATE C OLLEGE Stage 6, Year 12 Biology (HSC) Report MARKING RUBRIC AND

Stage 6, Year 12 Biology (HSC) Report

MARKING RUBRIC AND FEEDBACK

STUDENT NAME:

OUTCOMES ASSESSED

CRITERIA

ALLOCATED MARKS

STUDENT MARK

BIO 12-14

BIO 12/11-5

Identifies and make explicit relationships between the impacts of your chosen infectious disease to humans and society

Includes all 8 of the headings required

Provides explicit cause and effect about the health impacts of your chosen infectious disease and supports this with secondary sources

8-7

Identifies and make thorough relationships between the impacts of your chosen infectious disease to humans and society

Includes between 5 and 7 of the headings required

Provides thorough cause and effect about the health impacts of your chosen infectious disease and supports this with secondary sources

6-5

Identifies and make sound relationships between the impacts of your chosen infectious disease to humans and society

Includes between 2 and 4 of the headings required

Provides some cause and effect about the health impacts of your chosen infectious disease and supports this with secondary sources

4-3

 

Identifies and make basic relationships between the impacts of your chosen infectious disease to humans and society

 

Includes 1 of the headings required

Provides minimal cause and effect about the health impacts of your chosen infectious disease and supports this with secondary sources

2-1

Does not identify or make relationships between the impacts of your chosen infectious disease to humans and society

 

Does not include the headings required

0

Does not provide cause and effect about the health impacts of your chosen infectious disease

 

A selection of 5 or more reliable secondary sources

 

Correct use of Harvard referencing both in-text and reference list

4

A selection of 4 reliable secondary sources

 

Correct use of Harvard referencing both in-text and reference list

3

BIO 11/12-3

A selection of 3 secondary sources

 

Use of Harvard referencing both in-text and reference list with some errors

2

A selection of less than 3 secondary sources

 

Use of Harvard referencing both in-text and reference list with some errors

1

Provides no secondary sources nor in- text and reference list

0

 

Provides relevant graphs and photos where appropriate and label them correctly

 

BIO 11/12-4

8-7

BIO 11/12-7

Excellent structure and presentation of report; paragraphs flow well

Adheres to the word count 1000-1500 words

Provides some graphs and/or photos and labels them correctly

6-5

Good structure and presentation of report; paragraphs flow well

 

Adheres to the word count 1000-1500

Provides either graphs or photos and attempts to label them correctly

 

Sound structure and presentation of report

4-3

Adheres to the word count 1000-1500

Provides either graphs or photos, does not label them correctly

 

Basic structure and presentation of report

2-1

Adheres to the word count 1000-1500

Does not provide graphs or photos

 

Limited structure and presentation of report

0

Does not adhere to the word count

PEEL Scaffold- Paragraph structure

PEEL Scaffold- Paragraph structure

DRAFT

Abstract

Write this section when the report is finished

It is a general summary of the report

Consists of major points and conclusions

Include all relevant information

points and conclusions • Include all relevant information DRAFT Introduction • Explanation of what the report

DRAFT

Introduction

Explanation of what the report is focusing on

Definitions of terms need to be included

Details of how the report is arranged

of what the report is focusing on • Definitions of terms need to be included •

DRAFT

 

Main Idea 1

Point:

 

Topic sentence

DRAFT   Main Idea 1 Point:   Topic sentence Explanation:   Explain topic sentence Example:

Explanation:

 

Explain topic

sentence

Topic sentence Explanation:   Explain topic sentence Example:   Secondary research to help reader

Example:

 

Secondary research to help reader understand your explanation

research to help reader understand your explanation Link:   Linking statement to tie example back to

Link:

 

Linking statement to tie example back to the point

research to help reader understand your explanation Link:   Linking statement to tie example back to
 

DRAFT

 

Conclusion

Summarises main points of the report

 

Restates research question

General statement about importance of research question, implications for the future.

 
 

DRAFT

Reference List

Show valid and reliable secondary resources used

(minimum of 5)

Reflection On My Achievement

Some questions you should consider when reflecting on your draft task after you have received feedback

What did you do well?

task after you have received feedback What did you do well? What do you need to

What do you need to improve?

you have received feedback What did you do well? What do you need to improve? How

How do you plan to improve your report?

you have received feedback What did you do well? What do you need to improve? How

Evaluation

Assessment in stage 6 is an essential component in student learning as it reflects teaching and learning practices and supports students for future success (Butt, 2010). According to NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) assessment is defined as the process of classifying, collecting and analysing information about student achievement. (NSW Education Standards Authority, 2018). There are different forms of assessments which teachers need to understand so they are applied to retrieve the correct information these include diagnostic, formative and summative assessment (Harlen & James, 1997). Effective feedback is important in stage 6 assessment tasks as it highlights students strengths, areas to improve and suggestions on how they can improve in the future (Hattie & Timperley, 2007). Assessment design is another important factor to consider when developing a stage 6 assessment task. Principles of good assessment need to be employed to ensure an effective assessment is designed. The principles include fairness, appropriate, valid, reliable, transparent, authentic and manageable (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). In the assessment attached, it is based on the Biology syllabus for year 12, stage 6 students and focuses on Module 7 Infectious Diseases. It requires students to write an information report analysing the impacts of either Malaria, Small pox or Ebola to humans and society. This paper will highlight the importance of assessment, feedback and assessment design.

Assessment is the fundamental factor between teaching and learning as data gathered from tasks can indicate teaching and learning strategies have or have not been successful (Butt, 2010). Assessment is essentially the measure of student progress in terms of knowledge, understanding and/or skills which can be analysed. However, there are various forms of assessment including diagnostic, formative and summative that are useful to acquire different information about student progress before a unit of work, during a unit of work and at the end of a unit of work, respectively (Stobart, 2008). These forms of assessments can be expresses as formal or informal, though summative assessments are usually only formal (Harlen & James, 1997). Informal assessments can include observations, group discussions or questioning and can be less intimidating for students to express their knowledge (Harlen & James, 1997). Disadvantages of this is that it may be difficult to collect information for analysis and students may not take these forms of assessment as seriously comparing to formal assessments (Harlen & James, 1997). Formal assessment can include exams, essays or projects and allow teachers to generate a mark which can be used for analysis (Harlen & James, 1997). Formal assessments have its benefits however, it also possesses disadvantages as high-stake assessments such as the Higher School Certificate (HSC) may be stressful for students causing them to not test well (Harlen & James, 1997). Since high- stake assessments like the HSC in stage 6 are not likely to be disregarded by NESA, it is important for teachers and the school to prepare students and suggest strategies to overcome some stressful and anxious behaviours (Harlen & James, 1997). In the attached assessment task,

it is designed to assess the knowledge, understanding and skills at the end of Module 7. It is an

example of a formal summative assessment that students are permitted to submit on the due date.

Feedback is an essential component of student learning as it is useful for the development of student’s achievement. It does this by clarifying how their knowledge, skills and understanding are progressing in relation to syllabus outcomes and content (Hattie & Timperley, 2007). As well as this, it offers students with advice on how to improve their learning and which areas they should

focus on. However, feedback is only beneficial if it is effective. According to Hattie and Timperley (2007) effective feedback must answer three questions including; Where am I going?, How am I going?, and Where to next?. The first question refers to the learning goals of the students (Hattie

& Timperley, 2007). By establishing learning goals, it can promote positive attitudes to achieve the

goal and motivate students to persist through challenging obstacles in the task (Bargh, Gollwitzer, Lee-Chai, Barndollar & Trotschel, 2001). To support this, research from Black and William (1998) found that providing students with challenging assessments and effective feedback correlates with higher student engagement and therefore, greater success. Consequently, setting learning objectives is beneficial for students to stay motivated and achieve their goals (Black & William, 1998). The second question involves providing information relating to elements of an assessment task (Hattie & Timperley, 2007). The third question is about the future possibilities of student learning in which gives suggestions and recommendations to be implemented in the future (Hattie

& Timperley, 2007). These three levels can be seen in the attached assessment task under the

rubric. The questions include the student’s strengths, where they can improve on and what they can do for future tasks. It also includes which areas students have improved on from the draft submission they could have submitted. The draft submission itself allows the teacher to give written feedback to students so they can implement the advice into the final task. Students also have a section for self-reflection and feedback on their draft. This allows them to think about which aspects they believe they have done well.

Good assessment design is essential when creating a task as it should reveal information it is

designed to. There are principles for good assessment design which need to be followed to create

a successful assessment task. The principles include being fair, appropriate, valid, reliable,

transparent, authentic and manageable (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). A fair assessment task allows all students equitable and equal opportunity to show the knowledge and skills of their learning (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). In the assessment attached it is fair to students as it contains differentiation and scaffolding. Differentiation is illustrated as students can pick which infectious disease they want to write the information report about. Some students may have a current understanding or general interest in one infectious disease options given and therefore, can

showcase their understanding and skills more effectively compared to the other two options. Hence, differentiation is important as it can lead to greater student learning. Scaffolding is also

provided in the assessment task to give each student equal opportunity for assistance (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). The scaffold in this assessment is a structure of the information report. It contains what students should be including in each section of the report. The scaffold is also used as the draft submission where students may fill in and hand back for feedback. Shepard (2005) draws information from work of Vygotsky (1978) to suggest that scaffolding and formative assessment are fundamentally the same as both cater to the development of learning. Formative assessment is where information is collected and analysed to give the student additional support to meet there needs (Shepard, 2005). Therefore, the scaffold provided in the task demonstrates a form of formative assessment when students submit the draft. A fair assessment is also about ensuring students have exposure and practise with knowledge and skills needed to undertake the task (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). Hence, it can be assumed that the students would have been taught and practiced through the unit how to research effectively, write an information report, how to reference and understand the concepts in infectious diseases.

Assessments are appropriate and valid when the method is suitable for the intended learning outcomes being assessed (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). The assessment task should only measure what the student is learning. In the attached assessment, it is considered an appropriate and valid as it is assessing the knowledge and skills outcomes within Module 7 (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). The task is also reliable as it includes one marking criteria for all students which provides consistency. Clear expectations or transparency is an essential principle of good assessment (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). The students need to understand what they are required to do in order to succeed, this can be illustrated by including a clear task description and a set of criteria and standards. The task description as well as the criteria are both included in the assessment task thus, clearly outlining what the students should do to succeed (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). The task assists students with future work as they can use skills learnt beyond school. By achieving this, it makes the assessment authentic which motivates students to complete the task (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). The assessment is manageable as it gives student sufficient amount of time to complete the task (Bloxham & Boyd, 2007). They are given four weeks to submit the final task and can submit the draft report two weeks after the issue date. It is important not to overload the student with too much work as this can have negative results.

In conclusion, effective assessment is important in stage 6 to test relevant knowledge, understanding and/or skills. Different types of assessment need to be used accurately to successfully extract the correct information. In the assessment attached it has aspects of both formative and summative assessment as the task is assessing the module at the end of the unit while containing areas of feedback. It also includes principles of good assessment to make the assessment effective.

References

Bargh, J. A., Gollwitzer, P. M., Lee-Chai, A., Barndollar, K., & Trotschel, R. (2001). The automated will: Nonconscious activation and pursuit of behavioral goals. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81(6), 10141027.

Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998). Assessment and classroom learning. Assessment in Education, 5(1), 775.

Bloxham, S., & Boyd, P.F. (2007). Developing effective assessment in higher education: A practical guide. Retrieved from

Butt, G. (2010). Making assessment matter. Retrieved from

Harlen, W., & James, M. (1997). Assessment and learning: Differences and relationships between formative and summative assessment. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice, 4(3), 365-379. doi: 10.1080/0969594970040304

Hattie, J., & Timperley, H. (2007). The power of feedback. Review of Educational Research, 77(1),

81-112.

NSW Education Standards Authority. (2018). Purpose of assessment. Retrieved 30 April, 2018, from http://educationstandards.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/nesa/11-12/Understanding-the- curriculum/assessment/assessment-in-practice/purpose-of-assessment

Shepard, L. A. (2005). Linking formative assessment to scaffolding. Educational Leadership, 63(3), 67-70

Stobart, G. (2008). Testing times: The uses and abuses of assessment. Retrieved from

Vygotsky, L.S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press