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Academic English Preparation 3 Handbook (Module 2)

Academic English Preparation 3 Handbook (Module 2)

Academic English Preparation 3 Handbook (Module 2)
Academic English Preparation 3 Handbook (Module 2)

Academic English Preparation 3 Module 2 Handbook

Contents

Welcome to the AEP3 Course at ELS Sydney

3

AEP3 Assessment

3

AEP3 Module 2 Course Overview

5

AEP3 Module 2 Schedule

6

Learning Journal

7

Argument Essay

10

Presentations

21

Footnoting

25

Paraphrasing

30

Note-Taking

32

AEP3 Course Objectives and Performance Criteria

33

Assessment Criteria

36

AEP3 Module 2 Grammar & Vocabulary Tests

40

Answers to exercises

41

ELS Sydney Marking Scheme

42

ELS Sydney

Level 1, 17 O’Connell NSW 2000

Phone: +61 2 9283 1088

Email sydney@els.edu Website: www.sydney.els.edu Universal Education Centre Pty Ltd, ABN 19 003 525 764 CRICOS Provider Code: 00053J

Fax: +61 2 9283 1760

2

Welcome to the AEP3 Course at ELS Sydney

We hope that you will find the AEP3 course both challenging and useful for your future study.

The AEP3 course at ELS Sydney is a demanding program of study that requires commitment. You should be prepared to spend a considerable amount of time outside class working on assignments. In addition, the course has the following requirements:

Attendance & Punctuality You are expected to have 100% attendance and to arrive on time for each class. If you are absent or late, you will lose marks from learning strategies.

Submitting Work & Plagiarism

You must complete all assignments. If you submit assignments late, marks will be deducted from your assignments and in learning strategies. You must hand in your OWN work. Do not copy from books, the Internet or other students’ work. If you plagiarise, you will be given a warning and your assignment will not be marked.

AEP3 Organisation

AEP3 is a 10 to 20 week course divided into four 5 week modules.

AEP3 (10 to 20 weeks)

Module 1 (5 weeks)

Module 2 (5 weeks)

Module 3 (5 weeks)

Module 4 (5 weeks)

AEP3 Assessment

AEP3 assessment has 5 tasks.

Task

% of Overall Course

Task

% of Overall Course

Writing

30%

Academic Listening

20%

Speaking

20%

Learning Strategies

10%

Academic Reading

20%

   

Grading

AEP3 tasks get the following grades:

Mark

AEP2 Grade

<50%

D

50% -64%

C

65% -74%

B

75% +

A

Graduating

To enter a university course requiring IELTS 6.0 you need to:

- Study 10 weeks of AEP3

- Get an overall B grade

- Get a minimum C grade for each assessment task

To enter a university course requiring IELTS 6.5 you need to:

- Study 10 weeks of AEP3

- Get an overall A grade

- Get a minimum B grade for each assessment task

To enter a university course requiring IELTS 7.0 you need to:

- Study 10 weeks of AEP3

- Get an overall A+ grade

- Get a minimum A grade for each assessment task

Satisfactory Course Progress

If you do not get the grade you need to graduate, you can do further AEP3 modules.

If you repeat AEP3 modules, you need to get a higher grade than before. If you do not, you cannot repeat further modules.

If you start AEP3 but discontinue after the third week, you will be given a D grade.

The academic progress of students who repeat will be monitored by their class teacher and the AEP co-ordinator.

3

AEP3 Module 2 Assessment Components

Task

% of Module

Task

% of Module

Writing

 

Listening

 

- Argument Essay

10%

Academic Listening

15%

- Writing Test

10%

Note taking

5%

- Grammar & Vocabulary

5%

- Journal

5%

Speaking

 

Learning Strategies Participation, attendance, consultation, homework

 

- Presentation

10%

10%

- Discussion

10%

Reading

     

Academic Reading

15%

Note taking

5%

Course Materials

Textbooks:

Academic Connections 4

Focus on IELTS All materials used in the program are provided by ELS Sydney. In addition, you require a

portfolio folder It is also recommended that you have:

a plastic sleeve for Handbook

a memory stick to save assignments and homework tasks.

an A4 notebook

a vocabulary notebook

access to an on-line dictionary eg.

http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/

4

http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/ 4 Check it out! elsaep.weebly.com It has the: AEP3

Check it out!

elsaep.weebly.com

It has the:

AEP3 Handbooks

and links for:

- IELTS Practice - Reading

- Academic Vocab

- Grammar

AEP3 Module 2 Course Overview

Study Skills Introduced & Practised

1. Writing an essay plan

2. Writing an argument essay

3. Library & internet research

4. Paraphrasing

5. Footnoting

6. Giving presentations

7. Participation in discussions

8. Critical thinking

9. Skim/ scan reading & reading for detail

10. Listening for gist and detail

11. Note taking

12. Using an online classroom

13. Negotiating with teachers

IT Skills

1. Internet searching and evaluating

2. Word processing

3. PowerPoint

Tasks Assessed

1. An argument essay

2. An argument essay in-class test

3. Research for essay

4. Referencing- footnoting

5. A bibliography

6. A presentation

7. Participation in discussions

8. Critical thinking

9. Academic reading

10. Academic listening

11. Note taking- reading & listening

12. A PowerPoint presentation

13. Learning strategies

Grammar

1. Effect verbs

2. Topic sentence structures

3. Nominalisation

4. Cohesion

5. Conditionals

6. Cause/ effect language

7. Referencing structures

8. Participle phrases

9. Prepositions after nouns and adjectives

10. Dummy subjects

11. Prefixes

5

AEP3 Module 2 Schedule

Note: This schedule is a guide only.

Week

Time

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

 

8.45-

Student Intake

Writing Skills

Writing-

Writing-

Writing-

10.15

Argument Essay

Argument Essay

Argument Essay

10.30-

Orientation

Listening note

Writing-

Writing-

Writing-

12.00

taking

Argument Essay

Argument Essay

Argument Essay

1 Course

 

Computers-

Academic

Computers

Academic

12.45-

1.45

introduction

introduction to

Moodle

Reading

Reading

1.45-

 

Consultation

Consultation

Consultation

 

2.15

 

8.45-

Academic

Writing-

Grammar &

Writing-

Grammar &

10.15

Discussion

Argument Essay

vocabulary

Argument Essay

Vocabulary Test

10.30-

Reading Note

Writing-

Research Skills

Writing-

Writing-

2 taking

12.00

Argument Essay

Argument Essay

Argument Essay

12.45-

1.45

Academic

Listening

Computers

Academic

Listening

Computers

Academic

Reading

1.45-

 

Consultation

Consultation

Consultation

 

2.15

   

Academic

Practice

Practice

Presentation

Writing-

8.45-

10.15

Discussion

Academic

Reading Test

Academic

Listening Test

Skills

Argument Essay

10.30-

Grammar &

Listening Note

Referencing

Writing-

Writing-

12.00

3 vocabulary

taking

Skills- footnoting

Argument Essay

Argument Essay

12.45-

Academic

Computers

Academic

Computers

Academic

1.45

Reading

Listening

Listening

1.45-

Essay Outline

Consultation

Consultation

Consultation

 

2.15

Due

 

8.45-

Academic

Presentation

Reading

Reading

Grammar &

10.15

Discussion

Skills

Vocabulary Test

10.30-

Reading Note

Reading

Reading

Reading

Timed Writing

4 taking

12.00

12.45-

 

Computers

Academic

Essay Due

Academic

 

1.45

Listening

Listening

1.45-

 

Consultation

Consultation

Consultation

 

2.15

   

Journal

Academic

Presentations

Presentations

Reports

8.45-

Assessment

Listening Test

10.15

Speaking

Assessment

10.30-

12.00

5 Academic

Reading Test

Writing Test

Presentations

Presentations

Reports

12.45-

Listening Note

Computers

Presentations

Reading Note

Graduation

1.45

taking Test

taking Test

1.45-

 

Consultation

Consultation

Consultation

 

2.15

6

Learning Journal

A learning journal is a collection of your notes, observations, and thoughts over a period of study. Its purpose is to improve your learning through writing and thinking about your learning experiences. Your learning journal is personal and will reflect your personality and experiences.

Why use a learning journal?

To demonstrate how your learning is developing

To keep a record of your thoughts and ideas throughout your experiences of learning

To help you identify your strengths, weaknesses and preferences in learning

To help you engage with Australian behaviour customs and study methods

Essentially, a learning journal helps you to be reflective about your learning. This means that your learning journal should not be a purely descriptive account of what you did but an opportunity to communicate your thinking process: how and why you did what you did, and what you now think about what you did.

What is reflective learning?

Reflective learning is a process that requires time and practice. It is also an active process: involving thinking through issues yourself, asking questions and seeking out relevant information to aid your understanding.

Reflection is an important skill to develop, and requires you to think about how you personally are relating to what is happening on your course.

Guidelines for writing a journal entry

Think about a topic and write about it in different ways. Write on or two sentences on each of these areas to form a paragraph or paragraphs.

1. Explain the importance of the event you want to describe

2. Describe what happened

3. Identify your feelings, or any problems and misunderstandings

4. Describe the outcome

5. Reflect on what you have learned from the experience

6. Consider what you will do in future, based on this experience

7

Example

Read the following example of a student’s learning journal entry. Label the different sections with the labels in the box.

Feelings

Thinking

Event

Description

Future

Learning AEP language is hard. Note taking skills are difficult for me in class.

On day, in class, we were asked to take notes of a lecture on the environment.

At first, I was confident about my work, but my teacher said ‘Jin, did you have

a little sleep?’ You should have taken notes on both sides of the page.’ It was a

shock to me. I didn’t sleep, but I realised I hadn’t understood many things in the

lecture. I felt disappointed in my ability.

When I studied in Korea, note taking was a copying job meant for students to

write down the notes that had been put up on the board by the teacher. No

matter whether the students could keep up with the teacher’s words or not,

they could still pass the exam as long as their notes matched those on the board

because that was what the exam would be about. In Australia, however, the

situation is totally different. Even though handouts are given at the lecture,

students have to pay attention and take notes in class as well because there will

be more information given by the teacher. Therefore, good note taking skills are

very important in Australia. So I must make my listening better so I can

understand lectures at college when I get there.

So, I think I need to do some more listening practice so I can improve my note

taking skills. I could do some on-line listenings at home or in the computer

room. I think I also must concentrate more doing a listening.

Learning Journal Requirements

You need a standard 48 page exercise book to use as a learning journal.

Write your name and class on the cover

Each journal entry should have a title and a date

Each journal entry should be a minimum of 1 exercise book page; however, quality is more important than quantity.

Each week you will be given time in class to work on your journal

You need a minimum of one journal entry for each week (1-4) of the course (ie 4 entries min)

Your teacher will check your journal each week

Your journals must be handed in for assessment in week 5.

8

Learning Journal Suggested Topics Each week, choose a topic from the following list and write at least a page about it.

A situation in Australia where you were able to speak English

Habits or customs of Australians you have seen or met

A learning situation in AEP that is different from in your country

A cultural or local event you have experienced in Australia

A way you have improved your listening skills

A way you have improved your reading skills

A way you have improved your writing skills

A way you have improved your speaking skills

A way you have improved your vocabulary skills

A group work experience in AEP

Working with other students in AEP

Your weaknesses and strengths in AEP and your plans for improvement

Areas of AEP you find difficult or frustrating

Areas of AEP you enjoy

The similarities and/or differences between learning style in Australia and in your country

How much study you do outside of class

How you plan your study time

You are expected to write about a learning or cultural experience in your learning journal. Please don’t write about meeting your friends, going shopping, or problems catching the bus; your learning journal is not a diary!

9

Argument Essay

Private cars are a necessity in today’s cities. Do you agree?

Cities are becoming uninhabitable as the motor vehicle begins to take over. There is growing concern

over the social and environmental problems car culture is causing. The air in cities is foul and

choking; the streets are constantly clogged; and noise levels are rising. This is why private cars must

be banned in cities today.

Put this paragraph in the correct order

The CO 2 from cars results in the air in cities often being extremely unhealthy.

In some cities such as Seoul the poor quality of the air can cause health problems like breathing difficulties and allergies.

Cars also throw out a large amount of small particles from their tyres and exhausts, which coat the lungs of all city dwellers.

The extent of this problem can be seen in the fact that doctors often cannot distinguish between the lungs of a smoker and those of someone living in the inner city.

One argument for banning cars in urban environments is that the quality of the air in all major cities is declining due to the increasing number of cars using the roads.

Another reason for banning cars in cities is that they lead to severe traffic problems. The increasing

use of cars results in roads which are jammed with traffic, not only during peak hours, but at most

other times of the day. The car, which once made for convenience of movement around the city, is

now slowing transport down. In cities such as Bangkok and Los Angeles, traffic jams which last for

hours are normal. A consequence of this is the reduction of travelling speeds to less than before the

introduction of the motor vehicle. Moreover, as Holden points out, the expenditure of vast amounts

of money to build more roads only brings about an increase in the number of cars.

A further reason for banning cars in cities is the noise pollution they create. Cars produce roars from

their engines, groans from their brakes, squeals from their tyres, blasts from their horns, and wails

from their alarms: a cacophony that can reach almost 100 decibels. This noise has several adverse

health effects. It can result in damage to people’s hearing, it can ruin sleep, and it can lead to

increased stress levels. The noise from cars also makes city life unpleasant by disrupting people’s

peace and quiet and by making conversation on the street almost impossible. An outcome of

removing cars from cities would be the creation of pedestrian malls with extended sidewalk cafes

which are not overwhelmed by raucous noise.

In conclusion,

10

Find the following words in the text and look them up in the dictionary. Write down the word form and the definition.

 

Word

 

Form

Definition

foul

   

clogged

   

particles

   

distinguish

   

expenditure

   

roar

   

groan

   

squeal

   

cacophony

   

decibel

   

adverse

   

raucous

   

Overall Structure

 

Mark the appropriate parts of the text with the following labels -for the conclusion you’ll have to imagine

Evidence/explanation

-body

restatement of position

statement of position

paragraph

Preview

summary of main points

topic of body paragraph

Put in the main ideas from the different parts of the essay. -With your partner guess what they will be in the conclusion

Introduction

1.

2.

3.

Body paragraphs

1.

2.

3.

Conclusion

1.

2.

3.

Where did you find the main points in the body paragraphs?

What other information is there in these sentences?

11

How do these sentences begin?

1.

2.

3.

Why?

Conclusion

How would you begin the conclusion?

With your partner write a conclusion for this essay

Cause and Effect Structures

Smoking- your teacher will give you a reading on smoking.

SVO (X and Y = noun or noun group) Active

(Cause)

(Effect)

X

causes

Y

Smoking causes cancer.

leads to

brings about

results in

Passive

(Effect)

(Cause)

 

Y

is caused by is brought about by results from (not a real passive)

X

Cancer is caused by smoking.

Noun phrase introductions

 

An upshot of

X is Y

An upshot of smoking is cancer.

An outcome of

 

A

consequence of

Clause Linking (happens = verb)

 

Y

happens because of happens as a result of happens on account of happens as a consequence of

X

Cancer is increasing because of smoking. People get cancer as a result of smoking.

Because of X, Y happens As a result of On account of As a consequence of

X happens. Because of this, Y happens

As a result of this, On account of this, As a consequence of this,

As a result of smoking, cancer is increasing.

Many people smoke. Because of this, cancer is increasing.

12

Essay Outline

Private cars are a necessity in today's cities. Do you agree?

Introduction

A) General information/background Cities becoming uninhabitable + growing concern re: problems

A) Preview

1. Air pollution

2. Traffic jams

3. Noise pollution

B) Thesis statement - private cars must be banned in cities

Body

I. Air Quality Topic Sentence: Air quality decline increasing cars

A) Pollutants

1. Cars CO2 health problems eg. breathing difficulties + allergies (Muffleur)

2. Cars particles coat lungs lung problems similar to smokers (Mogg p.27)

II. Traffic Jams Topic Sentence: Cars traffic problems

A) More cars traffic jams eg Bangok/LA slower travelling speeds (Tripp p.211)

B) More roads more cars (Holden p.38)

III. Noise pollution Topic Sentence: Cars noise pollution

A) Noise levels - 100 decibels (Muffleur)

B) Noise health effects eg. hearing, stress

C) Noise city life unpleasant (Mogg p.91)

D) Ban cars pedestrian malls + peaceful cafes

Conclusion

A) General topic sentence Dependence on car cities unfit to live in

B) Summary of main ideas

1. Air pollution

2. Traffic jams

3. Noise pollution

C) Restatement of thesis - private cars in cities must be banned

13

Private cars are a necessity in today’s cities. Do you agree?

Cities are becoming uninhabitable as the motor vehicle begins to take over. There is growing concern over the social and environmental problems car culture is causing. The air in cities is foul and choking; the streets are constantly clogged; and noise levels keep going up. This is why private cars must be banned in cities today.

The quality of the air in all major cities is declining mainly due to the ever increasing number of cars using the roads. The CO 2 from cars results in the air in cities often being extremely unhealthy. In some cities such as Seoul the poor quality of the air can cause health problems like breathing difficulties and allergies. 1 Cars also throw out a large amount of small particles from their tyres and exhausts, which coat the lungs of all city dwellers. The extent of this problem can be seen in the fact that doctors often cannot distinguish between the lungs of a smoker and those of someone living in the inner city. 2

Another reason for banning cars in cities is that they lead to severe traffic problems. The increasing use of cars results in roads which are jammed with traffic, not only during peak hours, but at most other times of the day. The car, once made for convenience of movement around the city, is now slowing transport down. In cities such as Bangkok and Los Angeles, traffic jams which last for hours are normal. A consequence of this is the reduction of travelling speeds to less than before the introduction of the motor vehicle. 3 Moreover, as Holden 4 points out, the expenditure of vast amounts of money to build more roads only brings about an increase in the number of cars.

A further reason for banning cars in cities is the noise pollution they create. Cars produce roars from their engines, groans from their brakes, squeals from their tyres, blasts from their horns, and wails from their alarms: a cacophony that can reach almost 100 decibels. 5 This noise has several adverse health effects. It can result in damage to people’s hearing, it can ruin sleep, and it can lead to increased stress levels. The noise from cars also makes city life unpleasant by disrupting people’s peace and quiet and by making conversation on the street almost impossible. 6 An outcome of removing cars from cities would be the creation of pedestrian malls with extended sidewalk cafes which are not overwhelmed by raucous noise.

In conclusion, the modern dependence on the car is making cities unfit to live in. Pollution, jammed streets, and excessive noise create an environment that is unhealthy and anti-social. This adds up to one answer only: cities need to be made more liveable. Quality of life is not only about moving from point A to point B, but it is rather about being able to live under conditions that enhance well-being. This means the dominance of the car needs to be overcome. In other words, private cars in cities must be banned.

1 HD Muffleur, Hear It, Taste It, 2011, <http://www.killcars.com.hearittasteit>, viewed 1April 2011.

2 S Mogg, The Inside Story, Longman, NY, 2005, p.27.

3 D Tripp, On the Road Again, Nelson, Nashville, 2009, p.211.

4 FJ Holden, Paved with Gold? Penguin, Melbourne, 2010, p.38.

5 ibid, p.65.

6 S Mogg, The Inside Story, Longman, NY, 2005, p. 91.

14

Argument Essay Nominalisation

In Academic English, very general subjects such as people or humans are not commonly used. These types of clauses are usually changed into noun groups.

People destroyed the animals’ habitat. – (clause)

The destruction of animal habitat… (noun group)

Look at the example above and then fill in the blanks in the steps below.

1. Remove the

2. change the verb into a

3.

4.

5.

6. change the possessive relation into a compound noun if necessary.

move this

put a

put ‘

to the

after this noun

at the beginning

Task 1 Nominalise the following sentences

1. People cut down the forests.

2. We catch too many fish.

3. Humans build new motorways.

4. Humans destroy the environment.

5. People consume more energy.

6. People use nuclear energy.

7. Humans hunt animals

8. We watch a lot of violent programmes on television.

9. People spray pesticides on crops.

10. Many people eat endangered animals.

Task 2 Add one cause / effect and one effect / cause linker to the above noun groups to make 2 sentences for each with an appropriate ending from the list of sentences below. Before adding the ending, you will need to nominalise it.

Linkers

 

cause / effect

effect / cause

X

leads to

Y

X

is caused by

Z

results in

results from

brings about

is brought about by is a consequence of is an outcome of

15

Endings

a) Accidents occur.

b) Chemicals contaminate our food.

c) Fish stocks are collapsing.

d) Fossil fuels are declining.

e) Many animal species are disappearing.

f) Many species are lost.

g) Parents don’t control their children’s viewing habits.

h) People are not educated enough about the importance of biodiversity.

i) People destroy animals’ habitat.

j) People have destroyed the animals which ate the insects.

k) People have lost their connection with nature.

l) People need more farmland

m) People desire convenience.

n) Pollution is increasing

o) Some people use animals in traditional medicine.

p) The amount of pollution is growing.

q) The world is losing ecosystems.

r) Violence is increasing in society.

s) We manage the oceans poorly.

t) We use more electrical appliances.

Examples

Cause

Effect

The cutting down of forests leads to the destruction of animal habitat

Effect

The cutting down of forests results from the need for more farmland.

Cause

the destruction of animal habitat Effect The cutting down of forests results from the need for

16

Writing a Cause & Effect Paragraph

What causes problems for the environment?

Plan and then write a cause and effect paragraph - see the example below.

Use one of these ideas for your paragraph:

more roads

population

agriculture

Example Over packaging more household waste more rubbish tips loss of space

Over packaging is a trend that has serious environmental consequences. Everything that is bought in shops today is wrapped in at least three layers of packaging: a cardboard box, a skin of plastic, and a plastic bag. This over-packaging leads to an increase in household waste. This waste has to be disposed of somewhere, and as a consequence, the size and number of rubbish tips is increasing. On account of this growth, the natural environment is being lost under mountains of garbage.

Outline (point form)

Topic sentence

Explanation/definition

Cause & effect evidence

Paragraph

mountains of garbage. Outline (point form) Topic sentence Explanation/definition Cause & effect evidence Paragraph 17

17

Argument Essay Outline

Introduction

A) General information / background

B) Preview

1.

2.

3.

C) Thesis statement

Body (note form NOT full sentences)

Body Paragraph 1 Topic sentence (from point 1 in Preview)

Explanation / Definition (of point 1 in Preview)

Cause / Effect Evidence

(Example)

18

Body Paragraph 2 Topic sentence (from point 2 in Preview)

Explanation / Definition (of point 2 in Preview)

Cause / Effect Evidence

(Example)

Body Paragraph 3 Topic sentence (from point 3 in Preview)

Explanation / Definition (of point 3 in Preview)

Cause / Effect Evidence

(Example)

Conclusion

A) Summary of main points (1, 2 and 3)

B) Restatement of thesis

Argument Essay Checklist

Sources

3 sources minimum (1 must be a book)

highlighted photocopies of information from sources- order and numbered according to footnotes.

only include sources you have used in your essay

Referencing

footnotes - minimum 8, maximum 12

bibliography (A-Z)

Essay Outline

mostly note form with references (authors name / website is enough)

Essay Title & Introduction (approx 100 words)

title- the essay question is the title

general background information

preview

thesis statement

Essay Body Paragraphs 1, 2, 3 (approx 170 words each)

topic sentence

explanation / definition

cause and effect evidence (nominalisation)

example(s)

□ referencing phrase (According to …….)

Conclusion (approx 100 words)

topic sentence

restate preview points / give summary of preview points

(optional) opinion or recommendation

restatement of position

Formatting Requirements

title (size 16, bold)

□ full name and page numbers in footer

□ font (Times New Roman size 12 for essay, size 10/11 for footnotes)

□ double spaced and justified

□ 3cm margins

□ word count

20

Questions

Presentations

1. Apart from in Academic English, have you ever had to give a presentation? When/why?

2. When you give a talk, how do you feel? Why?

Before the talk? During the talk? After the talk?

3. What can you do to lessen any negative feelings?

4. What is the purpose of a presentation?

5. When you are giving a talk to a group of people, what are the four most important things you

should do?

6. When you are giving a talk, what can you do to help the audience?

Match the parts of a presentation to the signposts and put the parts of a presentation in the correct order

Asking for questions

So, to sum up…Today we have looked at…

Conclusion and summary

Today I’d like to talk to/speak to you about

Ending

has asked me… I’m sorry, I don’t have that information at the moment, but if you’d like to see me later, I’ll try to get it for you.

Focus questions

But before I begin, I’d like to ask a few questions.

Responding to question

If there are no more questions, I’d just like to thank you all very much.

Greeting

Now, it’s time to turn to We should now move on to This brings us to OK, let’s look at

Introduction of topic

Well, I've divided my talk into First/first up, I’m going to look at After that, we’ll turn to Following that/this, we’ll consider And finally, we’ll look at OK, let’s get started.

sections.

Preview / outline

This brings me to the end of my presentation, and I’d be happy to answer any questions you might have.

Starting a new section

Good morning everyone. My name’s

21

Argument Presentation Signposts

Greeting and Introduction Good morning everyone. My name’s

Introduce general topic And today I’d like to talk to/speak to you about

Focus questions/anecdote But, before I begin/we start/we get under way, I’d just like to ask you a few questions… Specific topic Today, we’re going to look at whether or not

Outline Well, I've divided my talk into three sections. First / first up, I’m going to look at Then, we’ll consider And finally, we’ll talk about

Thesis statement All of these lead me to believe that

There’ll be time for / a chance to ask questions at the end. OK, let’s get started.

Introducing new sections Now, it’s time to turn to my first point. This is We should now move on to another part of my talk, which is OK, let’s look at the final reason. This is the

Concluding So, to sum up. Today, we’ve looked at the reasons why We’ve talked about And we’ve seen Finally, we’ve discussed I think … (give an opinion about the topic)

Repeat Thesis Statement So, all of these arguments clearly show that

Asking for questions This brings me to the end of my presentation, and I’d be happy to answer any questions you might have.

Answering questions has asked me … (repeat question if unclear) Answer the question if you can; if you can’t, say:

I’m afraid I don’t have that information with me at the moment. If you’d like to see me later, I’ll see what I can do for you.

Closing If there are no more questions, I’d just like to finish by saying how much I’ve enjoyed speaking with you today. Thank you very much everyone.

22

1. During the presentation I felt:

a. in control

b. terrified

c. confused

2. After my presentation I felt:

a. satisfied

b. disappointed

c. exhausted

Post Presentation Reflection

3. Four things I did well in my presentation

4. Four things I need to improve

Reasons

Reasons

5. What I’m going to do to make my next presentation better before my presentation

during my presentation

6. Two things other students did that I should borrow

7. Two things other students did that I definitely shouldn’t copy.

23

Discussion Pre Essay Topics

Discuss the following questions:

1. Which animals are in danger of extinction in your country? Why?

2. Can you drink tap water in your country? Why or why not?

3. Do many homes in your country have solar panels on the roof? Why do you think that is?

4. Are movies censored in your country? Do you think movies should be censored

5. Would you eat genetically modified (GM) food? Why or why not?

6. Are you worried about climate change?

Argument Essay and Presentation

Choose one of the following topics:

1. Is animal extinction a cause for concern?

2. Is there a need to worry about the world’s water resources?

3. Is solar energy the power source of the future?

4. Should the media be censored?

5. Should genetically modified food be banned?

6. Is there a need to be worried about global warming?

You are expected to cite your sources in footnotes (8 min and 12 max) and a bibliography. You need to cite at least three sources, one of which must be from a book.

Photocopies of all sources and written notes must be presented with your essay. All information used must be highlighted and ordered accordingly.

Your essay must be 700 words min. and 800 words max.

In-Class Group Essay Practice

With a group of other students, write an essay on the following topic:

In many countries, students have to learn English; however, it is argued that is a waste of time for many students. Should English language education in schools be compulsory?

24

Objective

Footnoting

Oxford System

When you write an essay and include someone else’s ideas, you should immediately acknowledge this original source.

This is called referencing and the description of the source you provide is called a reference.

In this lesson, you will learn how to reference your sources of information using Footnoting, one of the more commonly used systems in Australia.

You will learn how to briefly acknowledge each source in a footnote, and then build a bibliography at the end of your document, giving the full details of the sources.

Why should you reference?

Referencing provides evidence that you have researched your topic thoroughly and have found sources that support your argument or the information you are providing in your document. Your document appears more authoritative.

Referencing is an acknowledgement of another person’s intellectual work, which rightfully belongs to that person.

If you use another person’s work without acknowledgement, it is called plagiarism. Plagiarism is the taking, using, and passing off as your own the ideas or words of another.

When to reference

You should reference if you:

quote (use their exact words)

copy (use their figures, tables or structure)

paraphrase (use their idea in your own words)

How to reference

You identify your source of information by making reference to it:

at the bottom of a page of your essay (called footnoting)

in a list at the end of your report or essay (called a bibliography).

the end of your report or essay (called a bibliography ). For further information see The

For further information see

The University of Wollongong referencing guide at:

https://uow.libguides.com/refcite/footnoting-

books

25

Footnoting Practice

There is a footnoting practice available

on-line at:

www.elsuecacademicenglish.weebly.com Your teacher will give you directions on what to do.

available on-line at: www.elsuecacademicenglish.weebly.com Your teacher will give you directions on what to do.

Footnoting

Footnotes acknowledge and give precise reference to the source of all quotations in an essay. Footnote identifiers should be placed at the end of a sentence, and follow any punctuation marks. Each footnote reference is made in the form of a separate, numbered note at the bottom of each page.

of a separate, numbered note at the bottom of each page. This point of view is

This point of view is shared by Watson. ¹

Text of Essay

1. J Watson, Dracula’s Legacy, Morrow and Brown, Dorrigo, 1979, p. 87.

Footnotes

When you cite (identify) references in the footnotes of your essay using the Oxford Style, you should include the following pieces of information.

author’s initials and surname(s)

title of book, in italics. Only use upper case for the first letter of the title and for proper names in the title

In an edited work, the title of the chapter or article cited comes before the title of the book. It has single quotation marks and it is not in italics. (See S. Holmes #2 below)

publisher

city of publication

year of publication.

page number

Abbreviations used in footnotes

ibid

(ibidum) means in the work cited immediately before.

Example:

1.

J Watson, Dracula’s Legacy, Morrow and Brown, Dorrigo, 1979, p.87.

2.

S Holmes, ‘The butcher’s work’ in D. Serge (ed) 1960, A Dracula Reader, Spectre, Cooma, 1953,

3.

p. 34. ibid

4.

A Cooper, ‘Transylvania revelation’, Horror Monthly, vol. 10, no. 15, 1939, p. 14.

5.

ibid, p. 16.

6.

S Holmes, ‘The butcher’s work’ in D. Serge (ed), A Dracula Reader, Spectre, Cooma, 1953, p. 130.

7.

J Watson, Dracula’s Legacy, Morrow and Brown, Dorrigo, 1979, p. 90.

8.

Dracula, Wikipedia.org, 2011, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dracula>,

viewed 1 April 2011.

26

If there is no author?

Use the title.

World Poverty, UNESCO, New York, 1999, p. 3.

Yeti, Wikipedia.org, 2017, < https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeti>, viewed 1 April 2017.

If there is more than one author?

Enter all the names.

K Adams, R Grose, and D Leeson, Family Values, Home Press, Sydney, 2003, p. 37.

If there is no date?

Use 'nd' (no date).

D Neeson, nd, Take a Long Line, Albert Publications, Melbourne, p. 1.

Your Bibliography

The bibliography is arranged alphabetically and placed at the end of your essay.

It includes full details of all the sources that you cited in your text. It does not include any sources

you read but did not cite in your text.

The list will be alphabetical by author's surname, except where the author is unknown. In this case,

the entry is by title. 'A', 'An' or 'The' are ignored in the listing.

References to Books

For a book, you should include the following pieces of information in the order given below.

all author’s surname(s) and initials

title of book, in italics. Only use upper case for the first letter of the title and for proper

names in the title.

publisher

city of publication

year of publication

Examples:

Gelber, K, ‘Free Speech and Civil Disobedience in Australia’ in J. Healey (ed), Censorship and Free Speech, The Spinney Press, Thirroul, 2004.

Watson, J, Dracula’s Legacy, Morrow and Brown, Dorrigo, 1979.

In the first example, the author is responsible for only a part of the books referenced. Gelber has written an article which has been collected by Healey. In this case, put the article or chapter title in single quotes, to distinguish it from the title of the book, which is in italics.

27

References to Magazines or Newspapers (Periodicals)

For magazine or newspaper articles, include the following pieces of information in this order:

author’s surname(s) and initials

title of article (in single quotation marks)

title of magazine or newspaper (in italics)

volume number (if applicable)

issue number or dates (if applicable)

year of publication Examples:

Cooper, A, ‘Transylvania revelation’, Horror Monthly, vol. 10, no. 15, December 1939. 'Out of the shadows, into the world', The Economist, June 19-25 2004.

References to Web pages

For Web pages the following pieces of information should be present.

author

title, in italics

year of publication

URL (Internet address) in angle brackets

date of viewing

If the document title is hard to identify then the title appearing in the title bar at the top of the screen may be used.

Examples:

Lee, I, A research guide for students, 2017, <http://www.aresearchguide.com> viewed 16 July

2018.

Guide to citing Internet sources, Bournemouth University, 2017, <http://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/library/guide_to_citing_internet_sourc.html>, viewed 30 July 2017.

Dracula, Wikipedia.org, 2018, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dracula>2011>, viewed 1 August 2018.

Example Bibliography Cooper, A, ‘Transylvania revelation’, Horror Monthly, vol. 10, no. 15, 1939. Dracula, Wikipedia.org, 2018, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dracula>, viewed 1 August 2011. Holmes, S, ‘The butcher’s work’ in D. Serge (ed) A Dracula Reader, Spectre, Cooma, 1953. Watson, J, Dracula’s Legacy, Morrow and Brown, Dorrigo, 1979.

28

Exercise

Five publications of various formats are described below.

1. Write a footnote for each reference.

2. Write a bibliography.

A book with the title: 'Animal Extinction’, with authors Robert Rose, Dave Jetson and Henry

Samuelson, published in Frenchs Forest, NSW by Pearson Education Australia in 2003, page 53. An article by Suzanne Carbone called 'Swearing on TV', written in 2003, found in a book edited by J. Healey, called 'Censorship and Free Speech' published in Thirroul by The Spinney Press in 2004, page 15 . An article called 'Fish for all' by C. Lyon, published in 1998 in the magazine 'Environment', volume 70, number 4, page 263.

A Web page with the title 'It ain’t half cold, mum', found at the address:

http://www.antarctica.com.au on 10 April 2008. No date on it. A Web page with the title 'Genetically Modified Food’, found at the address: http://en.wikipedia.org/

wiki/Genetically_modified_food on 15 July 2009, last modified on 25 March 2008.

A Web page with the title 'Genetically Modified Food’, found at the address: http://en.wikipedia.org/

wiki/Genetically_modified_food on 15 July 2009, last modified on 25 March 2008. An article called 'Fish for all' by C. Lyon, published in 1998 in the magazine 'Environment', volume 70, number 4, page 290.

Footnotes

C. Lyon, published in 1998 in the magazine 'Environment', volume 70, number 4, page 290. Footnotes

Bibliography

C. Lyon, published in 1998 in the magazine 'Environment', volume 70, number 4, page 290. Footnotes

29

Paraphrasing

Paraphrasing is an important academic skill. It is the changing of an author’s original words into your own words. Whenever you paraphrase, remember these two points:

1. You must provide a reference.

2. The paraphrase must be in your own words.

It can be difficult to find new words for an idea that is already well expressed. The following strategy will make the job of paraphrasing a lot easier:

1. When you are at the note-taking stage, and you come across a passage that may be useful

for your essay, do not copy the passage exactly unless you think you will want to quote it.

2. If you think you will want to paraphrase the passage, make notes only of the author's basic

point. You don't even need to use full sentences.

3. In your notes, you should already be writing the language of the original into your own

words. What matters is that you represent the original idea.

4. Make sure to include the page number of the original passage so that you can make a proper

reference later on.

When you write your essay, use your notes rather than the author's text. You will find it much easier to avoid plagiarising the original passage because you will not have recently seen it. Follow this simple sequence:

1. Convert the ideas from your notes into full sentences.

2. Provide a reference.

3. Go back to the original to ensure that (a) your paraphrase is accurate and (b) you have truly

said things in your own words.

30

Practice

Read the following information and then turn to page 62 to answer some questions without turning back to the text to see how much you can remember. Then use the information to write a paragraph explaining that rainforests should be protected because of the resources found in them. Paraphrase using the strategy outlined and don’t forget a topic sentence. Also, remember to include a reference (footnote).

Paradise Lost: The Ravaged Rain Forest

by Helen Hosmer

Tropical forests are located in some 70 countries, but about 80 percent are in Brazil, Colombia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Venezuela and Zaire. The rainforests are home to nearly half of all the plants, animals, and insects in the world; and according to the World Wildlife Fund, “More species of fish live in the Amazon River than in the entire Atlantic Ocean.”

Tropical plants produce chocolate, nuts, tannins, fruits, gums, coffee, waxes, wood and wood products, rubber and petroleum substitutes, and ingredients found in toothpaste, pesticides, fibres, and dyes.

In addition, several medical wonders of the twentieth century have come from plants found only in rainforests. These plants have been used to treat high blood pressure, Hodgkin’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. The tiny periwinkle flower from the rainforest in Madagascar, for example, is key to a drug that has been successfully used to treat lymphocytic leukaemia; and rainforests may hold the answer to treatment for several types of cancer. A study of the Costa Rican rain forest found that 15 percent of the plants studied had potential as anti-cancer agents.

“We are destroying the biological heritage that developed over billions of years and doing it in a matter of a few human generations,” says Paul Ehrlich of Stanford University. “Our descendants, if any, will be very much the poorer for it.”

Source: Excerpted from the Multinational Monitor, June 1987, p. 6.

Outline (point form) Topic sentence

Explanation/definition

Evidence (from text)

31

Questions

Note-Taking

1. When you were at university did you take notes?

2. What did you use your notes for?

Note-taking Techniques

Include main ideas.

Include important data such as figures & years.

Include references.

Use abbreviations and symbols.

Try not to use ‘small’ words such as articles, prepositions & auxiliary verbs.

Don’t write sentences.

Use clear headings & sub-headings.

Use indenting, underlining or highlighting for emphasis.

Organise your notes clearly by using ‘white’ space.

Write clearly.

Active Listening Note-taking Strategies

Think about the content of the lecture before it begins.

As you listen, identify areas you are unsure of.

As you listen, think about your own opinion of the ideas in the lecture.

Think of questions you can ask the lecturer.

1.

What do these abbreviations mean?

a) e.g.

c) i.e.

b) etc.

d) N.B.

2.

What do these initials stand for?

a) ILO

c) OPEC

b) WHO

d) UNESCO

3.

What do these short forms mean?

a) govt

c) prob

b) Eng

d) yr

4.

Write a symbol next to each of the meanings below, and visa versa.

equal to/same as

 

from … to/leads to/results in/causes

 

growth/increase

 

less than/fewer than

 

and/also/in addition/plus/positive

 

therefore/thus/so

32

AEP3 Course Objectives and Performance Criteria

The primary objective of AEP3 is to prepare you for study at University level.

Objective 1: Can use a range of strategies, learning techniques and research skills to achieve tertiary study goals Performance Criteria

Use online learning platform (Moodle)

Do preparatory work for ‘flipped’ classes

Complete assignments in class and set as homework

Submit work on time

Is punctual

Work with other students in pairs and groups

Participate in class discussions

Use a range of self-assessment strategies

Identify own learning needs

Accommodate cultural differences that result in various learning styles

Use a range of learning aids

Use a range of organisational skills

Employ a range of learning strategies to achieve goals

Show evidence of a range of research skills.

Objective 2: Can record information from an oral text Performance Criteria

Identify and record main points in note form

Use appropriate headings

Write notes that are later legible to the writer

Use appropriate abbreviations, key words and short phrases

Sequence notes coherently

Use vocabulary that is appropriate to the topic

Grammatical errors do not impede communication.

Objective 3: Can record and summarise information from a written text Performance Criteria

Identify and record main points in note form

Use appropriate headings

Take notes from a written source related to set research assignment

Take notes in a logical order

Notes are in form of key words, short sentences and phrases

Use appropriate vocabulary and grammatical structures

Produce legible handwriting

Summarise main ideas of text in a short paragraph.

Objective 4: Can write a report based on a chart and/or an analytical report Performance Criteria

Write a report which has appropriate structure, grammar and content

Structure reports with appropriate introduction, body and conclusion

Analyse chart information appropriately and draw reasonable conclusions

Use analysis structures cause/ effect, reason/ result, modality for speculation.

Structure text appropriately

Compose cohesive paragraphs using cohesive devices

Use present tense/present perfect simple

Use pronouns, articles and conjunctions to link ideas

Use specific vocabulary

Use logical connections (e.g. cause/effect, reason/result) and modality to express speculation.

33

Objective 5: Can write a discussion and/or an argument essay Performance Criteria

Write an essay which has appropriate structure (introduction/body/conclusion)

Research appropriate information from a variety of sources including books and the Internet

Incorporate relevant information , avoiding plagiarism

Paraphrase effectively

Use in-text referencing

Write a bibliography

Organise ideas logically

Use conjunctions to express logical connections between ideas

Present arguments for and against a point and support them with evidence

Reach conclusion based on evidence presented

Use appropriate tenses relevant to essay title/question

Use appropriate register/tenor

Use mostly accurate spelling and standard punctuation.

Objective 6: Can deliver short oral academic seminars Performance Criteria

Present researched information orally

Use appropriate signposting for text

Deliver facts/statements or arguments clearly

Elaborate on topics in response to direct questions

Respond to questions appropriately

Use suitable vocabulary and grammatical forms

Use appropriate register

Use comprehensible pronunciation/ stress/intonation

Interact with audience and maintain their interest

Make eye contact

Use verbal checks/pauses to ensure audience understands

Integrate a PowerPoint display into presentation.

Objective 7: Can take part in academic group discussion Performance Criteria

Identify the purpose of an oral academic exchange

Achieve the purpose of an academic exchange and obtain and give all essential information

Initiate, maintain and end a spoken exchange

Provide/request information as required

Propose solutions and negotiate

Explain circumstances, causes and consequences

Can take turns, interrupt, seek clarification, clarify and confirm as necessary

Can speak fluently and clearly.

Objective 8: Can use a word processing program and a presentation program. Performance Criteria

Use a word processing program to produce an academic assignment

Use different fonts, sizes and text formatting to present text

Cut, copy and paste text within a document

Use the spell-checker to edit a document

Create a table

Start Microsoft PowerPoint program an open, name and save a file to the correct directory

Search and find files

Use key words to communicate content

Use slide colour scheme, font, animation and slide transition features to enhance presentation

Transfer text and graphics from the internet to a PowerPoint file.

34

Objective 9: Can apply a range of listening skills relevant to academic contexts Performance Criteria

Predict information about an oral text

Use prior knowledge and personal experiences to help understand new information

Participate in discussions relating to prior knowledge and personal experiences

Note detail and specific information accurately from academic oral text types

Listen for sequential detail

Take notes in sequence

Produce written responses demonstrating an understanding of the overall meaning of academic oral text types

Respond to questions arising from academic oral text types

Interact and participate effectively in pair and group discussions arising from academic oral text types.

Objective 10: Can apply a range of academic reading skills Performance Criteria

Predict information about a text

Use prior knowledge and personal experiences to help assimilate new information

Participate in discussions relating to prior knowledge and personal experiences

Skim and scan for detail and specific information from a range of written text types relevant to academic study, identifying relevant information within set time limits

Adapt reading strategies to meet task requirements

Produce written responses demonstrating an understanding of the overall meaning of a range of academic written text types

Answer comprehension questions based on the intensive reading of an academic text type

Demonstrate the ability to differentiate fact from a writer’s opinion

Demonstrate the ability to predict content from headings and textual clues

Demonstrate the ability to predict the meaning of unknown words from context

Display knowledge of a text in a test taking situation

Demonstrate understanding of a text through student interaction and discussion

Personalise responses to an academic text.

Objective 11: Can search and evaluate Internet sites for academic purposes Performance Criteria

Use a variety of search engines to locate information relevant to academic tasks

Select a variety of key words to narrow search

Skim search results to choose most appropriate, relevant sites/pages for research purposes

Locate source of web pages to ascertain its validity as academic source

Skim web pages to locate key relevant information

Critically evaluate relevant information

Incorporate relevant information into in a text

Reference Internet information appropriately.

35

Assessment Criteria

Writing Assessment- Argument Essay

 

Task Achievement

Organisation

Grammar

Vocabulary

Grade

Critical thinking Extent of evidence Relevance of information Logical order of ideas Depth of research Persuasiveness

Title Introduction General background Preview Thesis/position statement Paragraphs Topic sentences Support Concluding sentences Cohesion and coherence Unity Conclusion Referencing Bibliography Page numbers Formatting

Tenses Tenses Sentence structure Reason and result structures Cause and effect structures Nominalisation Complex forms Grammatical accuracy Paraphrasing grammar Punctuation

Expression of ideas Range of word choice Paraphrasing vocabulary Parts of speech Reason and result vocabulary Cause and effect vocabulary Transition signals Spelling

 

25

25

25

25

All elements of content are relevant

Organisation is completed accurately

Grammar is completed to a high level & with sophistication. Complex structures are handled well & errors are very infrequent

Correct use of word choice word forms and spelling. A wide and sophisticated range of vocabulary is used.

&

extended. No more could

& with sophistication. Errors are rare.

A+

reasonably be added. Extensive research is evident (if required). Critical thinking is considered and thoughtful. Paraphrasing very well managed.

 

20

20

20

20

A

Content is relevant & complete. Little more could be reasonably added. sufficient Appropriate research is evident (if required). Critical thinking is good Paraphrasing well managed.

Organisation completed with a high level of accuracy. Some errors may occur.

Grammar is completed to a high level. Complex structures are used & errors are infrequent

Mostly correct use of word choice, word forms and spelling. Able to express ideas fully. A good range of vocabulary is used.

   

18

18

18

18

 

Grammar is mostly accurate. Complex

Vocabulary use is reasonable for

B

Most content is relevant but some parts could be more fully completed.

Reasonable research is evident (if required). Critical thinking is shown. Paraphrasing may have occasional lapses. Task is correct length.

Organisation is completed with a reasonable level of accuracy;

however, there are some errors.

structures are used but some errors occur.

expressing ideas. Some errors with word choice word forms and spelling.

   

15

15

15

15

Content is generally relevant. Some

Organisation is attempted but some

Complex structures are attempted but grammar errors occur often, and may detract from the overall message.

Vocabulary is somewhat limited for expressing ideas. Errors with word choice word forms and spelling are frequent.

C

parts could be completed more fully

parts may be incomplete or

&

some may be inappropriate.

inaccurate.

Research is limited. Critical thinking is limited. Paraphrasing has lapses.

   

10

10

10

10

Some content is irrelevant or missing.

Key elements are incomplete or

Complex structures are minimal and grammar errors frequently occur. Some parts are difficult to understand.

Vocabulary is inadequate for expressing many ideas clearly. There are numerous errors with word choice, word forms, and spelling

D

Research is inadequate. Critical thinking is inadequate. The task may be under length. Paraphrasing is insufficient.

missing.

Total points:

/100

Grade:

36

Journal Assessment

Assessment considers the following factors:

Ability to make critical observations

Ability to set & record learning goals

Ability to reflect on learning experiences

Ability to reflect on Australian customs & behaviour

Criteria

Mark

Extended & thoughtful completion of all tasks.

5.0

Thoughtful completion of all tasks

4.0

Satisfactory completion of all tasks.

3.5

Some tasks incomplete.

3.0

Most tasks incomplete.

2.0

Not submitted

0

Note taking Assessment

Assessment considers the following factors:

Include relevant details- names, figures, years

Organise clearly- headings, sub- headings,

Use emphasis- indenting, highlighting, underlining

Use note form- abbreviations and symbols, no sentences

Avoids direct copying

Criteria

Mark

Extended & thoughtful completion of all tasks.

5.0

Thorough completion of all tasks

4.0

Satisfactory completion of all tasks.

3.5

Some tasks incomplete.

3.0

Most tasks incomplete.

2.0

Not submitted

0

Speaking Assessment

Students are tested in groups of 3-4 students. Several days before the test, groups are assigned. Groups are allocated by the teacher. Students are not able to choose their groups. Students are given an individual mark. Format

Part

Time

Task

Focus

1

3- 4 mins

Provide personal information about general topics.

Tests ability to provide basic personal information on general topics.

 

4- 5mins

Talk with other one or two other

Tests ability to interact with other students, give and ask for opinions and work towards completing a task together.

2

students relating to an allocated topic.

3

4- 5

Answer questions relating to topic in part 2.

Tests ability to discuss and give opinions relating to a theme.

Grading

A+ -The student always demonstrates ability in this area all the time

         

A -The student demonstrates ability in this area about 80% of the time.

B -The student demonstrates ability in this area about 60% of the time.

C -The student shows some ability in this area, but not consistently.

A+

A

B

C

D

-The student does not demonstrate control over this objective. Frequent errors obscure communication.

D

Task

Identifies inconsistencies and ask for clarification

         

Achievement

Responds appropriately and in a detailed manner

20

16

14

12

8

Can perform Core class speaking objectives

Grammar

Uses clear sentences; errors rarely interfere with meaning

         

Incorporates a full range of grammatical forms, as appropriate

20

16

14

12

8

Easily constructs compound and complex sentences, as appropriate

Fluency

Can produce lengthy sentences with ideas that flow well

         

Can easily sustain discussions on specific topics from authentic material

20

16

14

12

8

Pronunciation

Pronunciation is clear and understandable

         

Stress and intonation patterns aid communication

20

16

14

12

8

Vocabulary

Wide vocabulary range allows precision and details

         

Can use some idioms and collocations

20

16

14

12

8

Presentation Assessment

Students are given an individual presentation assessment on a topic they have researched and prepared. Depending on the task, the presentation is between 10 and 15 minutes and done individually or in a group. Grading

A+ -The student always demonstrates ability in this area all the time

         

A -The student demonstrates ability in this area about 80% of the time.

B -The student demonstrates ability in this area about 60% of the time.

C -The student shows some ability in this area, but not consistently.

A+

A

B

C

D

D -The student does not demonstrate control over this objective. Frequent errors obscure communication.

Content and

Content is detailed and well explained

         

Visuals

Focus is maintained

Extensive research is evident

25

20

18

15

10

Visuals are thoughtful, engaging and relevant

Grammar and

Uses clear sentences; errors rarely interfere with meaning

         

Vocabulary

Incorporates a full range of grammatical forms, as appropriate

Easily constructs compound and complex sentences, as appropriate

Wide vocabulary range allows precision and details

25

20

18

15

10

Can use some idioms and collocations

Signpost language used accurately

Fluency and

Can produce lengthy sentences with ideas that flow well

         

Pronunciation

Can easily sustain discussions on specific topics from authentic material

Pronunciation is clear and understandable

25

20

18

15

10

Stress and intonation patterns aid communication

Presentation

Uses eye contact

         

Skills

Uses natural gestures

25

20

18

15

10

Engages with audience

Does not read presentation

         

38

Learning Strategies Assessment

Students are assessed on their overall learning strategies. These include:

Attendance and Punctuality

(2 marks)

Class Participation

(3 marks)

-

Participation in group work, discussions, adherence to EOP

Independent learning

(2 marks)

-

Preparation for ‘flipped’ classes, study for tests, completion of homework tasks and journal

Consultation with teachers

(2 marks)

- Willingness to do independent work on areas of weakness

Meeting deadlines Attendance measurement:

(1 mark)

Achieved 95-100% attendance throughout the AE course

+2

Achieved 90-94% attendance throughout the course

+1

Achieved 85-89% attendance throughout the course

0

Achieved 80-84% attendance throughout the course

-1

AE Course attendance under 80%

Automatically fail course

AEP3 Reading & Listening Test Score Conversion Table

 

AEP3

   

AEP3

 

Raw score

weighted

AEP3 grade

Raw score

weighted

AEP3 grade

score

score

4

   

19

7.5

C

5

   

20

8.3

C

6

1.8

D

21

9.0

C

7

2.0

D

22

9.3

C

8

2.3

D

23

9.8

B

9

2.8

D

24

10.5

B

10

3.0

D

25

10.8

B

11

3.5

D

26

11.3

A

12

3.8

D

27

11.5

A

13

4.3

D

28

11.8

A

14

4.5

D

29

12.0

A

15

5.3

D

30-32

12.8

A+

16

6.0

D

33-35

13.5

A+

17

6.8

D

36-37

14.3

A+

18

7.0

D

37+

15.0

A+

39

AEP3 Module 2 Grammar & Vocabulary Tests

Over the five weeks of the course you will need to complete the grammar and vocabulary exercises listed below IN YOUR OWN TIME. You should do the exercises in the suggested weeks as they have been scheduled to fit in with your written assignments. Every 2 weeks, your teachers will ask to see your progress and you will be tested on the units.

Module 2

Weeks 1 & 2 Grammar

Handbook: Argument essay

FOI: Units 6-7. Vocabulary Making Connections: Unit 2 Readings 1-2 FOI: p. 77.

Weeks 3 & 4 Grammar

Handbook: Argument essay

FOI: Units 8-10. Vocabulary Making Connections: Unit 2 Readings 3-5 FOI: p. 97.

40

Answers to exercises

Nominalisation Endings 1i. People destroy animals’ habitat. 1l. People need more farmland. 2c. Fish stocks are collapsing. 2s. We manage the oceans poorly. 3n. Pollution is increasing. 3m. People desire convenience. 4q. The world is losing ecosystems. 4k. People have lost their connection with nature. 5p. The amount of pollution is growing. 5t. We use more electrical appliances. 6a. Accidents regularly occur. 6d. Fossil fuels are declining. 7e. Many animal species are disappearing. 7o. Some people use animals in traditional medicine. 8r. Violence is increasing. 8g. Parents don’t control their children’s viewing habits.

9b. Chemicals contaminate our food. 9j. People have destroyed the animals which ate the insects. 10f. Many species are lost. 10h. People are not educated enough about the importance of biodiversity. Footnoting Footnotes

1. R Rose, D Jetson & H Samuelson, Animal Extinction, Pearson Education Australia, Frenchs Forest, 2003, p.53.

2. S Carbone, 'Swearing on TV', in J Healey (ed) 2004,