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ENGLISH GRAMMAR EXERCISES

By Tanzil Al Gazmir

SMASHWORDS EDITION

***~~~***

PUBLISHED BY:

Tanzil Al Gazmir on Smashwords

English Grammar Exercises Copyright © 2014 by Tanzil Al Gazmir

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

DISCLAIMER

All the material contained in this book is provided for educational and informational purposes only. No responsibility can be taken for any results or outcomes resulting from the use of this material.

While every attempt has been made to provide information that is both accurate and effective, the author does not assume any responsibility for the accuracy or use/misuse of this information.

***~~~***

A small note: I know I need to edit this book. I have a plan to edit or revise this book at a later time. Now I am busy adding questions to my site. If you find any error, please feel free to send me a message from here: http://englishgrammarpass.com/exercises/contact.html

Question 1: They came

(a)

by

(b)

on

(c)

with

(d)

in

tram.

Question 2: These products are inferior

that products.

(a)

from

(b)

than

(c)

by

(d)

to

Question 3: The manager could not excuse him

(a)

for be

(b)

to be

(c)

be

(d)

being

dishonest.

Question 4: Since she worked hard, she

successful.

(a)

had be

(b)

have been

(c)

had been

(d)

has been

Question 5: The teacher believed that I

(a)

shall

(b)

should

(c)

shall be

(d)

should be

Question 6: The judge did not excuse the thief

(a)

(b)

(c)

being

of be

be

keep my promise.

unpunished.

Question 7: I said that he

(a)

will

(b)

may

(c)

shall

(d)

might

Question 8: Does he

(a)

worked

(b)

works

(c)

working

(d)

work

Question 9: Adam shot

(a)

on

(b)

to

(c)

-

(d)

of

come tomorrow.

hard?

the angry snake.

Question 10: The police offer could not risk

(a)

fire

(b)

firing

(c)

to fire

(d)

fires

at the mob.

Answers: 1. (a) 2. (d) 3. (d) 4. (d) 5. (b) 6. (a) 7. (d) 8. (d) 9. (c) 10. (b)

Explanation 1: We say "by tram".

Explanation 2: "Inferior" takes "to".

Explanation 3: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Excuse + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 4: Suppose a sentence has two parts.

One part is a "since" clause.

If the "since" clause explains or answers the other part, we need to use the Presnt Perfect tense in the other part.

Present Perfect = has/have + Past Participle

Example: Since he was lazy, he has failed in the exam.

In the above example, the "since" explained why he failed in the exam.

Explanation 5: You should always use "should" instead of "shall" if the verb in the principal is in the past tense.

Explanation 6: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Excuse + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 7: You should always use "might" instead of "may" if the verb in the principal is in the past tense.

Explanation 8: "Does" is an auxiliary verb.

After "Does", you should always use present infinitive without "to".

Example 1: "Does" she "like" it?

Example 2: She "does" not "like" it.

Explanation 9: "Shoot" without preposition indicates "to kill".

Explanation 10: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Risk + -ing" is the correct usage.

Question 11: The suspect failed

drug test.

(a)

in

(b)

with

(c)

on

(d)

to

Question 12: When she joined this office, she had no one senior

(a)

than

(b)

from

(c)

for

(d)

to

her.

Question 13: The bird was quick

finding its prey.

(a)

to

(b)

in

(c)

at

(d)

for

Question 14: Don't throw the ball

me.

(a)

at

(b)

to

(c)

on

(d)

of

Question 15: The old man was taking rest

(a)

into

(b)

on

(c)

in

(d)

from

Question 16: Sara persists

her studies.

an arm-chair.

(a)

in

(b)

for

(c)

with

(d)

on

Question 17: She told me that she

(a)

(b)

(c)

may

had

must

find a job.

Question 18: They rejoiced

(a)

from

(b)

at

(c)

by

(d)

to

getting good marks.

Question 19: She has doubt

(a)

of

(b)

with

(c)

on

(d)

in

the authenticity of this news.

Question 20: The beauty queen looks down

(a)

upon

(b)

to

(c)

in

(d)

for

other girls.

Answers: 11. (a) 12. (d) 13. (c) 14. (a) 15. (c) 16. (a) 17. (c) 18. (b) 19. (a) 20. (a)

Explanation 11: "Fail" takes "in".

Explanation 12: "senior" takes "to".

Explanation 13: "Quick" takes "at".

Explanation 14: The preposition "at" with "aim" indicates direction.

Explanation 15: We say "in an arm-chair".

Explanation 16: "Persist" takes "in".

Explanation 17: We should not use "must" or "ought" as past tenses.

Rule 1: If a past duty was not done, we may use the perfect infinitive after "ought" or "should".

The structure ‘have + past participle’ is called a perfect infinitive.

Rule 2: Alternatively, we can also use "had to" or "was obliged to".

Exception: We may use "must" and "ought" in indirect speech.

Explanation 18: "Rejoice" takes "at" or "in" such as "rejoice at" or "rejoice in".

Explanation 19: "Doubt" takes "of" or "about" such as "doubt of" or "doubt about".

Explanation 20: "Look" takes "down upon" when we mean "have a low opinion of".

Question 21: Jim was vexed

the hot weather.

(a)

on

(b)

to

(c)

with

(d)

at

Question 22: The officer was glad

(a)

with

(b)

on

(c)

about

(d)

for

the unexpected bonus.

Question 23: Do you believe

(a)

in

(b)

on

(c)

to

(d)

about

God?

Question 24: The injured bird was shaking

(a)

for

(b)

from

(c)

with

(d)

in

pain.

Question 25: The kid was able

the bucket.

(a)

lift

(b)

of lifting

(c)

lifting

(d) to lift

Question 26: Sara is accustomed

(a)

to

(b)

in

(c)

with

(d)

of

long traffic jams.

Question 27: The old man is used to

hard.

(a)

working

(b)

worked

(c)

work

(d)

of working

Question 28: The worker was delighted

the bonus.

(a)

for

(b)

from

(c)

with

(d)

to

Question 29: She arrived

a motor car.

(a)

from

(b)

with

(c)

on

(d)

in

Question 30: I

(a)

have had

(b)

had

(c)

have

(d)

was

just finished my lunch.

Answers: 21. (d) 22. (c) 23. (a) 24. (c) 25. (d) 26. (a) 27. (a) 28. (c) 29. (d) 30. (c)

Explanation 21: We use vexed "with" a person but vexed "at" a thing.

Explanation 22: "Glad" takes "of" or "about" such as "glad of" or "glad about".

But when we say "glad at", it means we are "glad at" a result. For example, the coach was glad at winning the match.

Explanation 23: "Believe in" means "to have faith in". But only believe (without "in") means "to regard as true".

Explanation 24: "Shake" takes "with".

Explanation 25: Although "Capable of + -ing" is the correct usage, the two words "able" and "unable" should be followed by the infinitive.

Explanation 26: "accustom" takes "to".

Explanation 27: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Used to + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 28: "Delighted" takes "with".

Explanation 29: We say "in a motor car".

Explanation 30: For an action just finished, we should always use the present perfect tense.

Present Perfect = has/have + Past Participle

Question 31: Does she

the dress?

(a)

buying

(b)

buy

(c)

buys

(d)

bought

Question 32: You

the meeting yesterday.

(a)

ought to attended

(b)

ought to have attended

(c)

must to attend

Question 33: Don't say that there is no harm in

(a)

be smoker

(b)

to smoke

(c)

smoking

(d)

smoke

Question 34: I was not alarmed

(a)

at

(b)

to

(c)

by

(d)

for

the danger.

Question 35: The student could not finish

the problem.

(a)

to solve

(b)

solve

(c)

be solving

(d)

solving

Question 36: The man cannot give up

(a)

take

(b)

be taken

(c)

to take

(d)

taking

Question 37: It's no use

a bonus.

bribe.

(a)

demanded

(b)

demanding

(c)

to demand

(d)

demand

Question 38: I

no merit in this case.

(a)

see

(b)

am seeing

(c)

be see

(d)

was seeing

Question 39: We were delighted

(a)

(b)

for

from

the good news.

(c)

by

(d) with

Question 40: They traveled many cities

(a)

by

(b)

with

(c)

on

(d)

into

motor car.

Answers: 31. (b) 32. (b) 33. (c) 34. (a) 35. (d) 36. (d) 37. (b) 38. (a) 39. (d) 40. (a)

Explanation 31: "Does" is an auxiliary verb.

After "Does", you should always use present infinitive without "to".

Example 1: "Does" she "like" it?

Example 2: She "does" not "like" it.

Explanation 32: We should not use "must" or "ought" as past tenses.

Rule 1: If a past duty was not done, we may use the perfect infinitive after "ought" or "should".

The structure ‘have + past participle’ is called a perfect infinitive.

Rule 2: Alternatively, we can also use "had to" or "was obliged to".

Exception: We may use "must" and "ought" in indirect speech.

Explanation 33: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"There is no harm in + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 34: "Alarmed" takes "at".

Explanation 35: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Finish + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 36: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Give up + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 37: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"It's no use + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 38: Some verbs indicate a state rather than an action.

These verbs are - "believe", "belong", "consist", "hear", "know", "like", "love", "mean", "prefer", "see", "understand", etc.

These verbs do NOT have continuous forms.

Explanation 39: "Delighted" takes "with".

Explanation 40: We say "by motor car".

Question 41: The farmer bound his cattle

(a)

to

(b)

with

(c)

for

(d)

in

Question 42: The goods were transported

(a)

by

(b)

with

(c)

in

(d)

on

Question 43: The teacher was astonished

a tall tree.

boat.

her caliber.

(a)

with

(b)

to

(c)

by

(d)

at

Question 44: The hijacker snatched her necklace

(a)

with

(b)

by

(c)

in

(d)

into

the hand.

Question 45: The family could not be content

(a)

from

(b)

for

(c)

to

(d)

with

their new home.

Question 46: The soldier could not bind the angry horse

(a)

from

(b)

with

(c)

to

(d)

in

the post.

Question 47: The player was indignant

(a)

with

(b)

to

(c)

on

(d)

at

Question 48: James was thinking of

(a)

leave

(b)

leaves

(c)

leaving

(d)

to leave

Question 49: The boy was absorbed

(a)

(b)

(c)

up to

in

off

his coach.

this part-time job.

a book.

Question 50: She was waiting for long time and then she

(a)

have gotten

(b)

get

(c)

gets

(d)

got

angry.

Answers: 41. (a) 42. (a) 43. (d) 44. (b) 45. (d) 46. (c) 47. (a) 48. (c) 49. (b) 50. (d)

Explanation 41: "Bind" takes "to".

Explanation 42: We say "by boat".

Explanation 43: "Astonished" takes "at".

Explanation 44: "Snatch" takes "by".

Explanation 45: "Content" takes "with".

Explanation 46: "Bind" takes "to".

Explanation 47: We use indignant "with" a person but indignant "at" a thing.

Explanation 48: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Think of + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 49: We use "absorbed in" to indicate intensely engaged.

Explanation 50: These words "yesterday", "last night", "last week", "last year", "then", "ago" indicate an action was completed in the past.

We should always use a past tense when we see those words and phrases in the sentence.

Question 51: Which sentence is grammatically correct?

(a)

If you will not give me mango, I give you orange.

(b)

If you give me mango, I will give you orange.

(c)

If you will give me mango, I give you orange.

(d)

If you will give me mango, I will give you orange.

Question 52: Fresh food is preferable

(a)

from

(b)

to

(c)

for

(d)

in

stale food.

Question 53: She prefers

(a)

bought

(b)

buy

(c)

been buying

(d)

to buy

colorful dresses.

Question 54: The child liked sweets more than he

(a)

were linking

(b)

likes

(c)

like

(d)

was liking

vegetables.

Question 55: The child was playing instead of

(a)

did not sleep

(b)

to sleep

(c)

try sleep

(d)

sleeping

Question 56: It was no good

(a)

to fight

(b)

be fought

(c)

fighting

(d)

fight

with the stupid man.

Question 57: The farmer agreed to give all his crops in exchange

(a)

(b)

(c)

with

in

for

cash.

Question 58: You cannot join the new job without

(a)

leaving

(b)

by leaving

(c)

leave

(d)

to leave

your current job.

Question 59: The leader always insists

(a)

in

(b)

for

(c)

on

(d)

with

Question 60: The old man loves

(a)

be smoking

(b)

smoking

(c)

smoke

(d)

been smoking

his political views.

this cigarette.

Answers: 51. (b) 52. (b) 53. (d) 54. (b) 55. (d) 56. (c) 57. (c) 58. (a) 59. (c) 60. (b)

Explanation 51: In a simple future condition, we should use the present tense in condition cause or "if" clause. We should use the future tense in the other clause.

Exception: If future tense is used with "if" clause, it expresses a request. Example: I will remember it forever if you will help me now.

Explanation 52: "Preferable" takes "to".

Explanation 53: "Prefer" can be followed by either the infinitive or the gerund.

Use this rule for all these verbs - begin, like, dislike, hate, love and prefer.

Explanation 54: You should always use a past tense if the verb in the principal is in the past tense.

There are three exceptions to this rule:

Exception 1: When the verb is within quotations. Example: She said, "I am a teacher".

Exception 2: When the verb is related a fact that is always true. Example: Adam said that the sun rises in the east.

Exception 3: When the verb is used in a comparison. Example: She liked New York more than she likes London.

Explanation 55: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Instead of + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 56: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"It's no good + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 57: "Exchange" takes "for". But we also say "in exchange for".

Explanation 58: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Without + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 59: "Insist" takes "on".

Explanation 60: "Love" can be followed by either the infinitive or the gerund.

Use this rule for all these verbs - begin, like, dislike, hate, love and prefer.

Question 61: The man did not

(a)

had understood

(b)

was understanding

(c)

understood

(d)

understand

the meaning of the joke.

Question 62: She must

you the truth.

(a)

tells

(b)

telling

(c)

be tells

(d)

tell

Question 63: The workers look

their boss.

(a)

up

(b)

to

(c)

with

(d)

up to

Question 64: The tribe passed the desert

foot.

(a)

with

(b)

on

(c)

in

(d)

by

Question 65: After

(a)

to win

(b)

winning

(c)

won

(d)

win

the race, she received a gold medal.

Question 66: At last, she was cured

cancer.

(a)

from

(b)

of

(c)

with

(d)

on

Question 67: The fighter jet aimed

the tank.

(a)

on

(b)

to

(c)

in

(d)

at

Question 68: The class

(a)

was consisting

(b)

is consisting

(c)

consists

of thirty students.

Question 69: The strong lion was capable of

(a)

to defeat

(b)

defeating

(c)

defeats

(d)

defeat

Question 70: The children were disgusted

(a)

for

(b)

to

(c)

with

(d)

from

the buffalo.

the food.

Answers: 61. (d) 62. (d) 63. (d) 64. (b) 65. (b) 66. (b) 67. (d) 68. (c) 69. (b) 70. (c)

Explanation 61: "Did" is an auxiliary verb.

After "Did", you should always use present infinitive without "to".

Example 1: "Did" you "go" there?

Example 2: "I did not go there."

Explanation 62: You should always use the present infinitive after these verbs - "can", "may", "shall", "will", and "must".

Explanation 63: "Look" takes "up to" when we mean "respect".

Explanation 64: We say "on foot".

Explanation 65: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"After + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 66: "Cure" typically takes "of" when "cure" is a verb. But when it is a noun, it takes "for".

Explanation 67: "Aim at" indicates direction.

Explanation 68: Some verbs indicate a state rather than an action.

These verbs are - "believe", "belong", "consist", "hear", "know", "like", "love", "mean", "prefer", "see", "understand", etc.

These verbs do NOT have continuous forms.

Explanation 69: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Capable of + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 70: "Disgusted" takes "with".

Question 71: The orphan child died

(a)

by

(b)

with

(c)

from

(d)

through

Question 72: The old lady repented

(a)

with

(b)

for

(c)

of

(d)

to

Question 73: The student was weak

(a)

for

(b)

on

(c)

in

(d)

to

Question 74: They are planning to travel

(a)

(b)

(c)

from

in

on

neglect.

all the mistakes she had made.

advanced language courses.

a motor car.

Question 75: I was angry

(a)

with

(b)

to

(c)

at

(d)

on

Question 76: Many people died

(a)

from

(b)

by

(c)

with

(d)

for

the loud music.

pestilence.

Question 77: The general was found guilty

(a)

with

(b)

in

(c)

of

(d)

for

Question 78: The boss arrived

the office.

killing hundreds of innocent people.

(a)

at

(b)

for

(c)

in

(d)

to

Question 79: The man was absorbed

the drama.

(a)

with

(b)

to

(c)

in

(d)

of

Question 80: This machine is superior

(a)

to

(b)

than

(c)

by

(d)

from

that machine.

Answers: 71. (d) 72. (c) 73. (c) 74. (b) 75. (c) 76. (b) 77. (c) 78. (a) 79. (c) 80. (a)

Explanation 71: We "die through" neglect.

Explanation 72: "Repent" takes "of" whereas "repentance" takes "for".

Explanation 73: "Weak" takes "in".

Explanation 74: We say "in a motor car".

Explanation 75: We use angry "with" a person but angry "at" a thing.

Explanation 76: We "die by" pestilence.

Explanation 77: "Guilty" takes "of".

Explanation 78: We use "arrive in" in case of countries or large cities whereas "arrive at" is used in case of small places.

Explanation 79: "be absorbed in" often indicates take up the attention of someone or interest greatly.

Explanation 80: "Superior" takes "to".

Question 81: It was no use

(a)

fighting

(b)

fight

(c)

to be fought

(d)

to fight

for democracy.

Question 82: The trainer warned the player

(a)

against

(b)

for

(c)

to

(d)

of

Question 83: She filled the box

(a)

(b)

to

with

food.

his laziness.

(c)

from

(d) on

Question 84: I used to write

chalk when I was a kid.

(a)

with

(b)

into

(c)

for

(d)

in

Question 85: The retired woman is dependent

her pension.

(a)

for

(b)

with

(c)

in

(d)

on

Question 86: The major warned the soldier

his cruelty.

(a)

to

(b)

of

(c)

for

(d)

against

Question 87: The parents were glad

(a)

of

(b)

from

(c)

on

(d)

for

his achievements.

Question 88: I

out to lunch after five minutes.

(a)

am going

(b)

went

(c)

go

(d)

was going

Question 89: The manager was disappointed

(a)

with

(b)

to

(c)

of

(d)

in

Question 90: The family live

Tim's income.

her promotion.

(a)

in

(b)

on

(c)

with

(d)

from

Answers: 81. (a) 82. (a) 83. (b) 84. (d) 85. (d) 86. (d) 87. (a) 88. (a) 89. (c) 90. (b)

Explanation 81: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"It's no use + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 82: We warn (a person) "of" danger whereas we warn (a person) "against" a fault.

Explanation 83: "Fill" takes "with".

Explanation 84: Write takes "in" when we mean we use something to create the marks.

But write takes "with" when we mean we write with the help of something.

Correct: write in ink Correct: write in pencil Correct: write in chalk Correct: write with a pen Correct: write with a pencil Correct: write with a piece of chalk

Explanation 85: "Depend" takes "on" and "Dependent" also takes "on".

Explanation 86: We warn (a person) "of" danger whereas we warn (a person) "against" a fault.

Explanation 87: "Glad" takes "of" or "about" such as "glad of" or "glad about".

But when we say "glad at", it means we are "glad at" a result. For example, the coach was glad at winning the match.

Explanation 88: For actions in the near future, we need to use the present continuous tense.

We especially do this with these motion verbs - "come", "go", "walk", "run", "hurry", "leave", etc.

Explanation 89: "Disappoint" takes "in" when we find something that is not what we expected or desired.

But "Disappoint" takes "of" when we fail to get something.

Explanation 90: We say "live on" to indicate someone or something depends on as a source of income or support.

Question 91: Which statement is correct?

(a)

"Lit" as the past tense of "light" is more common than "lighted" in the UK.

(b)

"Lit" as the past tense of "light" is more common than "lighted" in the US.

(c)

"Lit" as the past tense of "light" is more common than "lighted" in both US and UK English.

(d)

None of the avobe is correct.

Question 92: The old lady is passing

(a)

into

(b)

by

(c)

in

(d)

to

the temple.

Question 93: The student was bad

(a)

for

(b)

about

(c)

in

(d)

at

chemistry.

Question 94: The young employee was indifferent

(a)

with

(b)

in

(c)

for

(d)

to

his duties.

Question 95: We could not be pleased

what we saw in the papers.

(a)

(b)

(c)

to

at

for

Question 96: The student was standing

(a)

on

(b)

at

(c)

onto

(d)

into

Question 97: It will be risky if you depend

(a)

to

(b)

on

(c)

in

(d)

for

Question 98: The cat was

the sofa.

the bench.

her.

(a)

up to

(b)

into

(c)

on

(d)

onto

Question 99: The students were weary

(a)

to

(b)

of

(c)

from

(d)

with

the boring classes.

Question 100: The man

(a)

be telling

(b)

is telling

(c)

tells

(d)

is being telling

a lie every day.

Answers: 91. (a) 92. (b) 93. (d) 94. (d) 95. (b) 96. (a) 97. (b) 98. (c) 99. (b) 100. (c)

Explanation 91: "Lit" as the past tense of "light" is more common than "lighted" in the UK; American English uses "lit" to mean "set afire" / "kindled" / "made to emit light" but "lighted" to mean "cast light upon" (e.g., "The stagehand lighted the set and then lit a cigarette.")

Explanation 92: We pass "by" a place.

Explanation 93: "Bad" takes "at".

Explanation 94: "Indifferent" takes "to".

Explanation 95: "Pleased" takes "with".

So, we are pleased "with" someone.

But we are pleased "at" or "with" something when an abstract noun or a clause follows. Notice that both "pleased at" and "pleased with" are correct.

Explanation 96: We say "on a bench".

Explanation 97: "Depend" takes "on" and "Dependent" also takes "on".

Explanation 98: We say "on a sofa".

Explanation 99: "Weary" takes "of".

But do not confuse "weary of" with "weary with".

"Weary of" means "to become tired of something or bored with it".

But "weary with" means "with no energy or strength left".

Explanation 100: We should use the present simple tense to express a "present habitual action".

Exception 1: If the habitual action is expressed with the word "always", we may use the present continuous tense. Example: He is always overspending.

Exception 2: If the verb expresses a continuous state, we may use the present continuous tense. Example: She is living in New York.

Question 101: The child declined to go there

(a)

onto

(b)

on

(c)

into

(d)

in

horseback.

Question 102: "She is always biting her nails". Is the sentence inside quotation marks grammatically correct?

(a)

(b)

No

Yes

Question 103: The leader arrived

(a)

in

(b)

at

(c)

to

(d)

on

Germany.

Question 104: Does the child go to school? Yes, it

(a)

had gone

(b)

had been going

(c)

goes

(d)

went

Question 105: She

last year.

(a)

graduated

(b)

is graduate

(c)

have been graduated

(d)

have graduated

to school.

Question 106: Which sentence is grammatically correct if we want to express a request?

(a)

I shall be very grateful if you do not send the money now.

(b)

I shall be very grateful if you send the money now.

(c)

I shall be very grateful if you will send the money now.

(d)

I should be very grateful if you will send the money now.

Question 107: The leader had doubt

(a)

in

(b)

with

(c)

on

(d)

about

the loyalty of his followers.

Question 108: The actress tried to get rid

(a)

from

(b)

with

(c)

on

(d)

of

Question 109: No one was at home to look

her fans.

the caged bird.

(a)

to

(b)

into

(c)

after

(d)

in

Question 110: She pretends as if she

(a)

is being

(b)

is

(c)

were

(d)

is been

the boss.

Answers: 101. (b) 102. (b) 103. (a) 104. (c) 105. (a) 106. (c) 107. (d) 108. (d) 109. (c) 110. (c)

Explanation 101: We say "on horseback".

Explanation 102: We should use the present simple tense to express a "present habitual action".

Exception 1: If the habitual action is expressed with the word "always", we may use the present continuous tense. Example: He is always overspending.

Exception 2: If the verb expresses a continuous state, we may use the present continuous tense. Example: She is living in New York.

Explanation 103: We use "arrive in" in case of countries or large cities whereas "arrive at" is used in case of small places.

Explanation 104: If a question starts with "Does", the answer will always be in the present tense.

Explanation 105: These words "yesterday", "last night", "last week", "last year", "then", "ago" indicate an action was completed in the past.

We should always use a past tense when we see those words and phrases in the sentence.

Explanation 106: In a simple future condition, we should use the present tense in condition cause or "if" clause. We should use the future tense in the other clause.

Exception: If future tense is used with "if" clause, it expresses a request. Example: I will remember it forever if you will help me now.

Explanation 107: "Doubt" takes "of" or "about" such as "doubt of" or "doubt about".

Explanation 108: "Get rid" takes "of".

Explanation 109: "Look" takes "after" when we mean "take care of".

Explanation 110: We should use the past tense after these two phrases - "as if" and "as though".

If we need to use a "to be" verb after "as if", the subjunctive "were" is often used. Example: He acts as if he were the manager of this company.

Question 111: The child filled the bucket

sand.

(a)

to

(b)

from

(c)

with

(d)

for

Question 112: His is playing

(a)

with

(b)

by

(c)

for

(d)

from

the highest paying team.

Question 113: The scientist was absorbed

in his researches.

(a)

with

(b)

into

(c)

of

(d)

in

Question 114: Hello boys!

(a)

Have you had

(b)

Have you been

(c)

Are you going

(d)

Were you going

Question 115: Would you mind

(a)

(b)

going

go

to school now?

with me?

(c)

to go

(d) be gone

Question 116: She

to be alone.

(a)

has been preferring

(b)

was preferring

(c)

prefers

(d)

is preferring

Question 117: She was junior

(a)

by

(b)

than

(c)

to

(d)

from

other officers.

Question 118: Einstein was good

(a)

with

(b)

on

(c)

at

(d)

in

mathematics and physics.

Question 119: The officer derived benefit

(a)

from

(b)

with

(c)

on

(d)

by

Question 120: She said, "I

not interested".

mysterious ways.

(a)

am

(b)

were

(c)

should

(d)

had

Answers: 111. (c) 112. (c) 113. (d) 114. (c) 115. (a) 116. (c) 117. (c) 118. (c) 119. (a) 120. (a)

Explanation 111: "Fill" takes "with".

Explanation 112: We play "for" a team.

Explanation 113: "be absorbed in" often indicates take up the attention of someone or interest greatly.

Explanation 114: If an action is going on at the time of speaking, we should always use the present continuous tense.

Explanation 115: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Would you mind + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 116: Some verbs indicate a state rather than an action.

These verbs are - "believe", "belong", "consist", "hear", "know", "like", "love", "mean", "prefer", "see", "understand", etc.

These verbs do NOT have continuous forms.

Explanation 117: "junior" takes "to".

Explanation 118: "Good" takes "at" to indicate skill or expertise whereas "good in" indicates the conduct of someone is good.

Explanation 119: The preposition "from" is used at the end of "benefit" if "get" or "derive" is used at the beginning. For example, "get benefit from" and "derive benefit from" are correct. Otherwise, we should use "benefit by".

Explanation 120: You should always use a past tense if the verb in the principal is in the past tense.

There are three exceptions to this rule:

Exception 1: When the verb is within quotations. Example: She said, "I am a teacher".

Exception 2: When the verb is related a fact that is always true. Example: Adam said that the sun rises in the east.

Exception 3: When the verb is used in a comparison. Example: She liked New York more than she likes London.

Question 121: They returned

(a)

from

(b)

on

(c)

with

(d)

in

a taxi.

Question 122: Her parents have arrived

(a)

at

(b)

to

(c)

on

(d)

in

Question 123: Jenny said that she

(a)

ought to

(b)

had

(c)

may

(d)

have

New York.

cook rice.

Question 124: She went to school

(a)

with

(b)

in

(c)

by

(d)

on

a bicycle.

Question 125: He promised that he would look

(a)

to

(b)

at

(c)

for

(d)

upon

Question 126: She may

(a)

worked

(b)

work

(c)

working

(d)

works

alone.

our request.

Question 127: The patient was unable

(a)

to speak

(b)

speaking

(c)

of speaking

(d) speaks

Question 128: The police department suspected the foreigner

(a)

for

(b)

from

(c)

to

(d)

of

spying.

Question 129: The farmer is glad

(a)

about

(b)

at

(c)

from

(d)

of

getting high yield this year.

Question 130: The tanks were firing

(a)

to

(b)

of

(c)

at

(d)

on

the plane.

Answers: 121. (d) 122. (d) 123. (a) 124. (d) 125. (d) 126. (b) 127. (a) 128. (d) 129. (b) 130. (c)

Explanation 121: We say "in a taxi".

Explanation 122: We use "arrive in" in case of countries or large cities whereas "arrive at" is used in case of small places.

Explanation 123: We should not use "must" or "ought" as past tenses.

Rule 1: If a past duty was not done, we may use the perfect infinitive after "ought" or "should".

The structure ‘have + past participle’ is called a perfect infinitive.

Rule 2: Alternatively, we can also use "had to" or "was obliged to".

Exception: We may use "must" and "ought" in indirect speech.

Explanation 124: We say "on a bicycle".

Explanation 125: "Look" takes "upon" when we mean "consider".

Explanation 126: You should always use the present infinitive after these verbs - "can", "may", "shall", "will", and "must".

Explanation 127: Although "Capable of + -ing" is the correct usage, the two words "able" and "unable" should be followed by the infinitive.

Explanation 128: "Suspect" takes "of".

Explanation 129: "Glad" takes "of" or "about" such as "glad of" or "glad about".

But when we say "glad at", it means we are "glad at" a result. For example, the coach was glad at winning the match.

Explanation 130: The preposition "at" with "fire" indicates direction.

Question 131: The audience rejoiced

(a)

from

(b)

to

(c)

by

(d)

at

the opening music.

Question 132: The captive soldier was shaking

(a)

in

(b)

from

(c)

with

(d)

for

Question 133: We were content

the service.

death fear.

(a)

with

(b)

from

(c)

for

(d)

to

Question 134: The kid wrote his homework

(a)

(b)

into

in

pencil.

(c)

from

(d) with

Question 135: Are you coming

(a)

in

(b)

by

(c)

on

(d)

into

air?

Question 136: The boss was senior

(a)

from

(b)

than

(c)

to

(d)

by

any other employee in this office.

Question 137: I

there every morning.

(a)

have been used to

(b)

am used to

(c)

use to

(d)

go

Question 138: As the military occupied the country, the people were deprived rights.

(a)

of

(b)

on

(c)

into

(d)

upon

Question 139: He arrived at the university

(a)

on

(b)

with

(c)

from

(d)

by

Question 140: The police held the criminal

(a)

(b)

(c)

to

in

with

taxi.

the hand.

democratic

Answers: 131. (d) 132. (c) 133. (a) 134. (b) 135. (b) 136. (c) 137. (d) 138. (a) 139. (d) 140. (d)

Explanation 131: "Rejoice" takes "at" or "in" such as "rejoice at" or "rejoice in".

Explanation 132: "Shake" takes "with".

Explanation 133: "Content" takes "with".

Explanation 134: Write takes "in" when we mean we use something to create the marks.

But write takes "with" when we mean we write with the help of something.

Correct: write in ink Correct: write in pencil Correct: write in chalk Correct: write with a pen Correct: write with a pencil Correct: write with a piece of chalk

Explanation 135: We say "by air".

Explanation 136: "senior" takes "to".

Explanation 137: There is a difference between "to use" in the past tense and "to use" in the present tense.

In the present tense, "to use" means just use. Example: I use this ball-point pen.

In the past tense, "to use" expresses a past habitual action such as a remove habit or a habit no longer followed. Example: She used to play for that band.

Explanation 138: "Deprive" takes "of".

Explanation 139: We say "by taxi".

Explanation 140: "Hold" takes "by".

Question 141: The young soldier hates

innocent people.

(a)

been killing

(b)

killed

(c)

killing

(d)

kills

Question 142: This kid

chocolates.

(a)

was liking

(b)

has been liking

(c)

is liking

(d)

likes

Question 143: The patient died

(a)

through

(b)

by

(c)

for

(d)

from

Question 144: You cannot avoid

neglect.

bullied in this school.

(a)

get

(b)

be

(c)

got

(d)

being

Question 145: Jenny used to sit

(a)

onto

(b)

at

(c)

on

(d)

up to

her desk.

Question 146: The prisoners were tired

(a)

with

(b)

of

(c)

for

(d)

in

Question 147: We saw a wild bird

the same vegetarian food.

a tree.

(a)

(b)

(c)

in

onto

up to

Question 148: The old man had no money to spend

(a)

on

(b)

with

(c)

to

(d)

for

his treatment.

Question 149: The manager was pleased

(a)

with

(b)

for

(c)

to

(d)

in

his efficiency.

Question 150: When she was a child, she succeeded

a vast amount of lands.

(a)

in

(b)

for

(c)

to

(d)

at

Answers: 141. (c) 142. (d) 143. (a) 144. (d) 145. (b) 146. (b) 147. (a) 148. (a) 149. (a) 150. (c)

Explanation 141: "Hate" can be followed by either the infinitive or the gerund.

Use this rule for all these verbs - begin, like, dislike, hate, love and prefer.

Explanation 142: Some verbs indicate a state rather than an action.

These verbs are - "believe", "belong", "consist", "hear", "know", "like", "love", "mean", "prefer", "see", "understand", etc.

These verbs do NOT have continuous forms.

Explanation 143: We "die through" neglect.

Explanation 144: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Avoid + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 145: We say "sit at a desk".

Explanation 146: "Tired" takes "of".

But do not confuse "tired of" with "tired with".

"Tired of" means "having a strong distaste from overfeed" or "to become tired of something or bored with it".

But "tired with" means "with no energy or strength left".

Explanation 147: We say "in a tree" or "up a tree".

Explanation 148: "Spend" takes "on".

Explanation 149: "Pleased" takes "with".

So, we are pleased "with" someone.

But we are pleased "at" or "with" something when an abstract noun or a clause follows. Notice that both "pleased at" and "pleased with" are correct.

Explanation 150: "Succeed" takes "in".

But do not confuse "succeed to" with "succeed in". We "succeed to" a property, a title or an office.

Question 151: The manager divided the work

(a)

to

(b)

into

(c)

in

(d)

by

Question 152: The criminal was charged

(a)

of

(b)

in

(c)

to

(d)

with

Question 153: The soldier crossed the river

half.

a violent crime.

horseback.

(a)

in

(b)

onto

(c)

into

(d)

on

Question 154: The murdered died

(a)

from

(b)

on

(c)

by

(d)

to

the scaffold.

Question 155: Did you watch the movie? Yes, I

(a)

had done

(b)

done

(c)

do

(d)

did

Question 156: Albert failed to preside

(a)

to

(b)

for

(c)

in

(d)

over

the meeting.

Question 157: Everyone was shocked

(a)

from

(b)

to

(c)

by

(d)

at

the news.

Question 158: It will take longer if you travel

(a)

in

(b)

by

(c)

with

(d)

on

land.

Question 159: "She is smoking every hour." Is the sentence inside quotation marks grammatically correct?

(a)

(b)

No

Yes

Question 160: She rejoiced

(a)

for

(b)

from

(c)

in

(d)

to

the good news.

Answers: 151. (c) 152. (d) 153. (d) 154. (b) 155. (d) 156. (d) 157. (d) 158. (b) 159. (b) 160. (c)

Explanation 151: We divide something "in half" or "in two".

Explanation 152: "Charge" takes "with".

Explanation 153: We say "on horseback".

Explanation 154: We "die on" the scaffold.

Explanation 155: If a question starts with "Did", the answer will always be in the past tense.

Explanation 156: "Preside" takes "at" or "over" such as "preside at" or "preside over".

Explanation 157: "Shocked" takes "at".

Explanation 158: We say "by land".

Explanation 159: We should use the present simple tense to express a "present habitual action".

Exception 1: If the habitual action is expressed with the word "always", we may use the present continuous tense. Example: He is always overspending.

Exception 2: If the verb expresses a continuous state, we may use the present continuous tense. Example: She is living in New York.

Explanation 160: "Rejoice" takes "at" or "in" such as "rejoice at" or "rejoice in".

Question 161: I took the baby

the hand.

(a)

from

(b)

with

(c)

to

(d)

by

Question 162: The rich customer does not mind

more.

(a)

paid

(b)

to pay

(c)

paying

(d)

pays

Question 163: The old man does not depend

his children.

(a)

on

(b)

with

(c)

of

(d)

to

Question 164: The patriot died

the scaffold.

(a)

by

(b)

from

(c)

on

(d)

for

Question 165: He looked

hear from her within a week.

(a)

from

(b)

for

(c)

by

(d)

to

Question 166: The kid did not enjoy

the new food.

(a)

ate

(b)

to eat

(c)

eat

(d)

eating

Question 167: She

(a)

has been used to pick

(b)

picks

(c)

is use to pick

flowers every morning.

Question 168: She was married

(a)

for

(b)

to

(c)

with

(d)

into

Question 169: The soldier was died

(a)

to

(b)

by

(c)

of

(d)

from

Question 170: The machine

(a)

is consisting

(b)

was consisting

(c)

consists

(d)

been consist

an old man.

the sword.

of five parts.

Answers: 161. (d) 162. (c) 163. (a) 164. (c) 165. (d) 166. (d) 167. (b) 168. (b) 169. (b) 170. (c)

Explanation 161: "Take" takes "by".

Explanation 162: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Mind + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 163: "Depend" takes "on" or "upon". We say "depend on" or "depend upon".

Explanation 164: We "die on" the scaffold.

Explanation 165: "Look" takes "to" when we mean "to expect or hope to" or "to be excited or anxious about".

Explanation 166: Gerund: an English noun formed from a verb by adding -ing

We should use a "gerund" after prepositions or preposition phrases.

"Enjoy + -ing" is the correct usage.

Explanation 167: There is a difference between "to use" in the past tense and "to use" in the present tense.

In the present tense, "to use" means just use. Example: I use this ball-point pen.