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001 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:54 PM Page 1

001 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:54 PM Page 1 Leading local news coverage on the
001 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:54 PM Page 1 Leading local news coverage on the
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Wednesday July 4, 2018 XVIII, Edition 271

www.smdailyjournal.com

Burlingame selects modern rec center design

Council picks contemporary, pavilion plan ahead of classic, mission look

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Under an impression that the design will blend well with its surroundings, offer more energy efficiency and func- tion better as a community hub, Burlingame officials selected this week a modern look for the new recre- ation center. The Burlingame City Council unani- mously agreed to build the contempo- rary, pavilions-style facility ahead of the classic, mission-inspired architec-

facility ahead of the classic, mission-inspired architec- Michael Brownrigg ture also considered as a finalist during

Michael

Brownrigg

ture also considered as a finalist during the meeting Monday, July 2. The decision con- cludes years of deliberation and planning, as coun- cilmembers win- nowed down design

options for the new center to be built with money from a recently-approved sales tax hike.

Councilmembers took time to acknowledge the difficult choice pre- sented through the high-quality render- ings for both options, but ultimately reached consensus around the more modern option, according to video of the meeting. “I am just a strong believer that the pavilions is a superior design for this use at this site,” said Mayor Michael Brownrigg, citing his opinion that the preferred design promotes interaction between the building and the adjacent

See DESIGN, Page 19

between the building and the adjacent See DESIGN , Page 19 A contemporary, pavilion design rendering

A contemporary, pavilion design rendering of the new Burlingame Community Center.

design rendering of the new Burlingame Community Center. AUSTIN WALSH/DAILY JOURNAL San Bruno resident Karen

AUSTIN WALSH/DAILY JOURNAL

San Bruno resident Karen Cunningham sells fireworks benefiting Parkside Intermediate School to the Hankins family in The Shops at Tanforan parking lot.

Police urge safety on the Fourth

Law enforcement keeping eye on firework, driver safety

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Expectant revelers circled the firework sale center in The Shops at Tanforan parking lot searching for just the right pyrotechnic to make their Independence Day party a blast. The last-minute shoppers visit- ed the stands early Tuesday, July 3, as San Bruno and Pacifica remain the only cities in San Mateo County where safe and sane fire- works are allowed.

But law enforcement officials note their tolerance is limited, as police officers will be sweeping the streets and ramping up their surveillance in pursuit of those detonating illegal combustibles. “In plain terms — anything that flies in the air or explodes is ille- gal and if you are seen using it in San Bruno, you will get a $1,000 ticket,” said San Bruno police Lt. Ryan Johansen. The same can be said in Pacifica, where legal fireworks are allowed between 9 a.m. and 11 p.m.

through Thursday, July 5, and per- mitted on a limited basis at Linda Mar Beach. Police also maintain a zero-tolerance policy regarding illegal fireworks, and no fireworks are allowed at Manor, Sharp Park or Rockaway beaches. “Illegal fireworks have long been a problem in Pacifica. We hear each year from community members who prefer to leave town for the holiday rather than listen to the illegal firework activity in

See SAFETY, Page 18

Surf Air sued for failure to pay operator

Lawsuit,tax lien trail airline that flies out of San Carlos

By Anna Schuessler

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

After months of waiting for Surf Air to make good on some $3.1 million in overdue payments, the former operator for the small-air- craft, members-only airline oper- ating flights in and out of the San Carlos Airport is suing the airline in the hopes of recovering the damages. Filed June 19 with the U.S. District Court in the Southern District of New York, the suit came just days after Surf Air sent a letter

York, the suit came just days after Surf Air sent a letter Steve Harfst terminating its

Steve Harfst

terminating its contract with Encompass Aviation late in the evening of June 15 when two of the for- mer operator’s fleet of eight Pilatus PC-12

aircraft were in the air operating Surf Air flights, said Encompass Aviation CEO Steve Harfst. He said his 46- employee company ceased all

See SURF AIR, Page 18

California revives 100-percent carbon-free energy legislation

By Jonathan J. Cooper

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — California lawmakers on Tuesday revived a long-stalled proposal to set a goal of generating 100 percent of the state’s energy from carbon-free sources.

With other controversial and high-stakes energy legislation also moving forward, California lawmakers face an array of deci- sions with vast implications for the Western energy grid, the future of renewable power and con-

See BILL, Page 19

sions with vast implications for the Western energy grid, the future of renewable power and con-
sions with vast implications for the Western energy grid, the future of renewable power and con-
sions with vast implications for the Western energy grid, the future of renewable power and con-
sions with vast implications for the Western energy grid, the future of renewable power and con-

002 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:16 PM Page 1

002 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:16 PM Page 1 2 Wednesday • July 4, 2018

2 Wednesday July 4, 2018

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“Intellectually, I know that America is no better than any other country; emotionally I know she is better than every other country.”

— Sinclair Lewis,American author

This Day in History

1776 The Declaration of Independence was

adopted by delegates to the Second

Continental Congress in

Philadelphia.

In 1 8 0 2 , the United States Military Academy officially opened at West Point, New York. In 1 8 1 7 , ground was broken for the Erie Canal in Rome, New York. The middle section of the waterway took three years to complete; the entire canal was finished in 1825. In 1 8 2 6 , 50 years to the day after the Declaration of Independence was adopted, former presidents John Adams and Thomas Jefferson both died.

the United States, James

Monroe, died in New York City at age 73. In 1 8 7 2 , the 30th president of the United States, Calvin Coolidge, was born in Plymouth, Vermont. In 1 9 1 7 , during a ceremony in Paris honoring the French hero of the American Revolution, U.S. Army Lt. Col. Charles E. Stanton, an aide to Maj. Gen. John J. Pershing, declared: “Lafayette, we are here!” In 1 9 3 9 , Lou Gehrig of the New York Yankees delivered his famous farewell speech in which he called himself “the luck- iest man on the face of the earth.” In 1 9 4 2 , Irving Berlin’s musical revue “This Is the Army” opened at the Broadway Theater in New York. In 1 9 4 7 , the small central California town of Hollister was overrun by thousands of motorcycling enthusiasts, dozens of whom ended up being arrested, most for drunken- ness, in what came to be called the “Hollister Riot.” In 1 9 6 6 , President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Freedom of Information Act, which went into effect the following year.

In 1 8 3 1 , the fifth president of

the following year. In 1 8 3 1 , the fifth president of Broadcast journalist Geraldo

Broadcast journalist Geraldo Rivera is 75.

Birthdays

TV personality Malia Obama is 20. Mike Sorrentino is 36.
TV personality
Malia Obama is 20.
Mike Sorrentino is
36.

Actress Eva Marie Saint is 94. Actress Gina Lollobrigida is 91. Playwright Neil Simon is 91. Country singer Ray Pillow is 81. Singer Bill Withers is 80. Actor Ed Bernard is 79. Actress Karolyn Grimes is 78. Rhythm and blues singer Annette Beard (Martha and the Vandellas) is 75. Vietnam War veteran and peace activist Ron Kovic is 72. Rhythm and blues musician Ralph Johnson (Earth, Wind and Fire) is 67. Rock musician Domingo Ortiz (Widespread Panic) is 66. Singer John Waite is 66. Rock musician Kirk Pengilly (INXS) is 60. Country musician Teddy Carr is 58. Rock DJ Zonka is 56. International Tennis Hall of Famer Pam Shriver is 56. Rock musician Matt Malley is 55. Christian rock singer Michael Sweet is 55. Actor-playwright-screenwriter Tracy Letts is 53. Actor Al Madrigal is 47. Actress Jenica Bergere is 44. Actor- singer John Lloyd Young is 43.

Jenica Bergere is 44. Actor- singer John Lloyd Young is 43. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

HACRI

 
HACRI  
HACRI  
HACRI  

©2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

ROBMO

 
       
       
       

GRAFLU

 
     
     
     
     

DEELTS

    GRAFLU         DEELTS Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
    GRAFLU         DEELTS Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans.

here:

Ans. here: “ ”
Ans. here: “ ”

Ans. here: “ ”
Ans. here: “ ”
Ans. here: “ ”
Ans. here: “ ”
Ans. here: “ ”

Ans. here: “ ”

Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) WATCH GRIND TIMELY UNTOLD

Answer: When Harry and Meghan splashed each other on

Jumbles:

their honeymoon, it was a — ROYAL “WETTING”

Jumbles: their honeymoon, it was a — ROYAL “WETTING” REUTERS Cast member Evangeline Lilly poses for

REUTERS

Cast member Evangeline Lilly poses for a portrait while promoting the movie ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ in Pasadena.

Modesto man attacks ex’s new boyfriend with hatchet

MODESTO — Police in central California say a man was arrested after hitting his ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend in the head with a small hatchet. The Modesto Bee reports that police arrested 34-year-old Shane Harden last weekend at his Modesto home on allegations of attempted murder, stalking, violating a restraining order and violating his probation. Police say Harden had been stalk- ing the couple since they started dat- ing more than a year ago and had argued with them several times. Modesto Police Department spokeswoman Sharon Bear says Harden showed up at his ex -gi rl - friend’s house on June 11 and hit her boyfriend in the head with the hatch- et, causing a four-inch lacerat

Contaminated heroin putting users at risk in Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES — Authorities say black tar heroin in Los Angeles may be contaminated with bacteria that can cause death, putting injection drug users at greatest risk. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health says Tuesday it’s investigating three sus- pected cases of wound botulism from

In other news

heroin use. The illness can be mis- taken for a drug overdose and includes symptoms including drooping eye- lids, blurred vision and trouble breathing. Officials warn that contaminated drugs look the same as drugs that do not contain bacteria. And “cooking,” or heating, the heroin will not kill the bacteria. Botulism can spread between users who share needles.

Woman who scammed scammer charged with theft

WOLFEBORO, N.H. — Police say a New Hampshire woman who answered a scammer’s ad to pick up and ship an illegally purchased computer has been charged with stealing the laptop and shipping magazines instead. Wolfeboro police in March were contacted by a business owner who said a hacker used their account to buy a computer. WMUR-TV reports police said 51- year-old Jennifer Wozmak answered an online “job” to ship the computer overseas. But they said she didn’t send the laptop, just magazines. She sold the computer to someone else. She’s been charged with theft. Wolfeboro Police Chief Dean Rondeau says she had no affiliation with the original scammer, other than the advertisement. It wasn’t immediately known if

Wozmak had an attorney, and a possi- ble number rang unanswered.

Andy Dick charged with groping woman on Los Angeles street

LOS ANGELES — Comedian Andy Dick has been charged with groping a

woman on a Los Angeles street ear- lier this year. City Atto rney ’s spokesman Frank Mateljan, says misdemeanor sexu- al battery and bat- tery charges were filed Wednesday.

He is scheduled to be arraigned on July 18. Mateljan says a woman reported that Dick groped her on April 5. Dick ’s rep resentatives did not immediately respond to an email request for comment about the charges. The 52-year-old comedian had a long-running stint in the 1990s on NBC’s “NewsRadio” and briefly had his own MTV program, “The Andy Dick Show.” He has been arrested and sued over several groping accusations, includ- ing a 2010 incident involving a bouncer and patron at a West Virginia bar. Criminal charges were dismissed after Dick completed a pretrial diver- sion program.

after Dick completed a pretrial diver- sion program. Andy Dick Lotto June 30 Powerball 3 9

Andy Dick

Lotto

June 30 Powerball 3 9 20 42 61 24 Powerball
June 30 Powerball
3 9
20
42 61
24
Powerball

July 3 Mega Millions

13 35 45 49 68 23 Mega number June 30 Super Lotto Plus 1 22
13 35
45 49
68
23
Mega number
June 30 Super Lotto Plus
1 22
23 26
36
4
Mega number

Fantasy Five

11
11
12
12
25
25
27
27
36
36

Daily Four

 
0
0
3
3
6
6
7
7

Daily three midday

 
1
1
2
2
4
4

Daily three evening

 
1
1
1
1
5
5
4 Daily three evening   1 1 5 The Daily Derby race winners are Winning Spirit,No.

The Daily Derby race winners are Winning Spirit,No. 9, in first place; Gorgeous George, No. 8, in second place; and Lucky Charms, No. 12, in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:48.51.

Local Weather Forecast

Independence Day : Mostly cloudy in

the morning then becoming sunny. Breezy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the upper 50s to mid 60s. Southwest winds 10 to 20 mph increasing to 20 to 30

mph in the afternoon. Wednes day ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming cloudy. Breezy.

Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming cloudy. Breezy. Lows in the lower to mid 50s.

Lows in the lower to mid 50s. Thurs day thro ug h Fri day : Mostly cloudy. Highs in upper 50s to lower 70s. Lows in the lower to mid 50s.

the

Fri day ni g ht and Saturday : Mostly clear. Lows in

the

lower 50s. Highs in the 60s to lower 70s. Saturday ni g ht: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming cloudy. Breezy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s. Southwest winds 20 to 30 mph decreasing to 10 to 20 mph after midnight.

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003 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:19 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:19 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Wednesday • July 4, 2018 3

LOCAL

Wednesday July 4, 2018

3

1 THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Wednesday • July 4, 2018 3 Men plead no contest in deadly Ghost

Men plead no contest in deadly Ghost Ship warehouse fire case

By Paul Elias

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Two men charged in a California warehouse fire that killed 36 peo- ple agreed to a plea deal Tuesday during an emotional hearing where the judge read the name of each victim aloud, bringing tears from loved ones in the courtroom. Under the terms of a plea agreement, Derick Almena and Max Harris each pleaded no contest to 36 counts of involuntary manslaughter involving the 2016 blaze at a dilapidated Oakland warehouse known as the “Ghost Ship” during an unlicensed concert. Almena could be sentenced to nine years in prison and Harris could face a six-year term when a judge sentences them next month. The men could have faced life in prison if convicted at a trial. Now, with good behav- ior, they are only expected to serve half their sentences after spending a year in jail. David Gregory, whose 20-year-old daugh- ter, Michela Gregory, was among the vic- tims, said hearing the defendants say no con- test was “some small sense of justice.” Still, he was dissatisfied with the outcome. “That’s 36 lives, you know,” he said out- side court. “We wanted fair justice, and we did- n’t get it.” Other family members declined comment. Authorities say the 48-year-old Almena

declined comment. Authorities say the 48-year-old Almena Derick Almena rented the warehouse and illegally converted

Derick Almena

rented the warehouse and illegally converted it into an entertainment venue and residences before the fire. The 28-year-old Harris helped him collect rent and schedule con- certs. Prosecutors say the men turned the cluttered build-

ing into a “death trap” with few exits, rickety stairs and dark and dangerous passageways. During Tuesday’s hearing, Alameda County Judge Morris Jacobson had the men say no contest as the name of each victim was read. The emotional process took 30 minutes, with family members and friends crying qui- etly when their loved ones were named. Harris also cried as he pleaded “no contest” to each count. Almena answered “no contest” quietly 36 times. Gregory said he and other families would have preferred a trial and sentences as long as life in prison. He cut off reporters’ questions when they asked how he felt when he heard his daughter’s name read in court. Prosecutor Autrey James said the two men were convicted “because they acted negli- gently running that building known as the Ghost Ship.” James declined to answer questions outside

Ghost Ship.” James declined to answer questions outside Max Harris court, saying the case was still

Max Harris

court, saying the case was still active until the men are formally sentenced. Almena’s attorney Tony Serra said his client agreed to the plea bargain to alle- viate “the pain and suffer- ing of all parties.” Serra previously said a plea deal would spare the

victims’ families from tes- tifying at a trial where photos of burned bod- ies and other emotionally fraught evidence would be shown. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms investigators said they could not determine the cause of the blaze. A typical manslaughter case often results in shorter sentences, Stanford University law school professor Robert Weisberg said, cit- ing a three-year sentence given to a transit officer in the region who mistook his gun for a stun gun and fatally shot a passenger. ‘On the other hand, there were 36 victims,” Weisberg said about the warehouse fire. “This was a manslaughter case that felt like a mur- der case.” Almena lived in the warehouse with his wife and three children. The family was stay- ing in a nearby hotel on the night of the fire. Harris also lived in the warehouse and escaped the fire unharmed.

Two plea to handling guns in music video

Two convicted felons accused of brandish- ing guns in a music video despite being pro- hibited from possessing firearms due to past criminal convictions pleaded no contest Monday, according to San Mateo County prosecutors. Prosecutors said the charges stemmed from a 2014 case in which the two men and two other co-defendants participated in a “rap video” called “Murder he Wrote” in which they all handled guns that investigators determined were real firearms. Luis Javier Mariscal, 32, and Marcel Dandre Rutherford-Chew, 24, both pleaded no contest to a felony charge of possession of a firearm by a felon and misdemeanor gang activity Monday during a pre-trial confer- ence. They were both sentenced to 16 months in state prison, but they already had 480 days credit for time served and were released from custody Monday night, according to District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.

Local briefs

Ronald Edward Culps, 27, and Dellory Marzell Crooks Jr., 28, are scheduled to go to jury trial on July 30. Culps is out of custody on $100,000 bail, and Crooks remains in custody on $600,000 bail. Defense attorney Michael Hroziencik, rep- resenting Culps, said he planned to issue a statement about the case later. Attorneys for the other three defendants did not immediately respond to requests for com- ment.

County fire spreads to 70K acres,5 percent contained

The County Fire burning in Yolo and Napa counties near Lake Berryessa has grown to 70,000 acres and is only 5 percent contained as of Tuesday morning, according to Cal Fire. The fire, which started at 2:12 p.m. Saturday, sent smoke that has spread over much of the Bay Area in the ensuing days. More than 2,000 fire personnel have

responded to the blaze, which prompted the evacuations of the Berryessa Highlands, Markley Cove Resort and Pleasure Cove Resort neighborhoods in Napa County, as well as parts of Yolo County north of state Highway 128, according to Cal Fire. Fire officials are asking residents to moni- tor news outlets for further updates and to

sign up for alerts by texting their zip code to

888777.

to sign up for alerts by texting their zip code to 888777. Police reports Pulled pork

Police reports

Pulled pork

Someone stole ham hocks on Baldwin Avenue in San Mateo, it was reported at 5:23 p.m. Tuesday, June 26.

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO

Narco ti cs . Someone was found with nar- cotics near a hospital on El Camino Real, it was reported at 10:51 p.m. Tuesday, June 19.

Mal i ci o us mi s chi e f . An incident of mali- cious mischief occurred at an apartment building on El Camino Real, it was reported at 7:18 p.m. Tuesday, June 19.

were stolen from a busi-

ness on El Camino Real, it was reported at 5:52 p.m. Tuesday, June 19. Burg l ary . Someone burglarized a restaurant on South Airport Boulevard, it was reported at 8:51 a.m. Tuesday, June 19. Burg l ary . Someone broke into a parking garage on East GrandAvenue, it was reported at 8:38 a.m. Tuesday, June 19. Burg l ary . Someone burglarized a dollar

store on El Camino Real, it was reported at 11:24 p.m. Monday, June 18.

SAN MATEO

The f t . A vehicle was broken into and items were stolen on First Avenue, it was reported at 11:55 a.m. Saturday, June 30. Vandal i s m . Someone threw a rock at a vehicle on West Fifth Avenue, it was report- ed at 12:52 a.m. Saturday, June 30. The f t . Someone stole money and identifica- tion on East 32nd Avenue, it was reported at 6:39 p.m. Friday, June 29. Sto l en v ehi cl e. A vehicle was stolen on South Amphlett Boulevard, it was reported at 4:36 p.m. Friday, June 29. Fraud. Someone was scammed by a caller claiming to be the IRS on 36th Avenue, it was reported at 4:10 p.m. Friday, June 29. Vandal i s m . A group of juveniles shot paintballs at vehicles and buildings on South El Camino Real, it was reported at 1:29 p.m. Friday, June 29.

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004 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 1:16 PM Page 1

4 Wednesday July 4, 2018

271 7/3/18 1:16 PM Page 1 4 Wednesday • July 4, 2018 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL & rescriptions

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005 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 6:52 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 6:52 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Wednesday • July 4, 2018 5

NATION

Wednesday July 4, 2018

5

Trump administration to stop encouraging student’s race as factor in school admission

By Eric Tucker

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

in school admission By Eric Tucker THE ASSOCIATED PRESS REUTERS Donald Trump delivers remarks at a

REUTERS

Donald Trump delivers remarks at a ‘Salute to Service’ dinner held in honor of the nation’s military at The Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs,W.Va.

expected to produce a more critical eye toward schools’ race-conscious admissions policies. The court’s most recent significant rul- ing on the subject bolstered colleges’ use

sion process. But the opinion’s author, Anthony Kennedy, announced his retire- ment last week, giving President Donald Trump a chance to replace him with a jus- tice who may be more reliably skeptical

ethnicity into account. The new policy dramatically departs from the stance of the Obama administration, which in a 2011 policy document said courts had recognized schools’ “compelling interest” in ensuring racially diverse popu- lations. The guidance said that while race shouldn’t be the primary factor in an admis- sion decision, schools could lawfully con- sider it in the interest of achieving diversi- ty. “Institutions are not required to imple- ment race-neutral approaches if, in their judgment, the approaches would be unwork- able,” the guidance said. “In some cases, race-neutral approaches will be unworkable because they will be ineffective to achieve the diversity the institution seeks.” That guidance has now been rescinded, as have more than a half-dozen other similar documents, including some that sought to explain court rulings affirming the use of race as one of several factors in the admis- sions process. In one such document, the Obama admin- istration stated, “As the Supreme Court has recognized, diversity has benefits for all students, and today’s students must be pre- pared to succeed in a diverse society and an

WASHINGTON — The Trump administra- tion on Tuesday rescinded Obama-era guid- ance that encouraged schools to take a stu- dent’s race into account to promote diversi- ty in admissions. The shift suggests schools will have the federal government’s blessing to leave race out of admissions and enrollment deci- sions, and it underscores the contentious politics that continue to surround affirma- tive action policies, which have repeatedly been challenged before the Supreme Court. The admissions memos were among 24 policy documents revoked by the Justice Department for being “unnecessary, outdat- ed, inconsistent with existing law, or other- wise improper.” Attorney General Jeff Sessions called the changes an effort to restore the “rule of law” and blamed past administrations for imposing new rules without seeking public comment. “That’s wrong, and it’s not good govern- ment,” Sessions said in a statement. The action comes amid a high-profile court fight over Harvard University admis-

sions as well as Supreme Court turnover of race among many factors in the admis- of admissions programs that take race and increasingly global workforce.”

Social issues roiling U.S. weigh heavy on Independence Day

Social issues roiling U.S. weigh heavy on Independence Day By Philip Marcelo THE ASSOCIATED PRESS BOSTON

By Philip Marcelo

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — In these complex times, a simple question about the quintessential American holiday of fireworks, cookouts and parades isn’t always so simple. As Americans prepare to celebrate the nation’s 242nd birthday, some feel a deep- er sense of patriotism. For others, the social issues roiling the country weigh heavy this Independence Day. Standing in front of Boston’s Faneuil Hall on Tuesday, tour guide Cara McIntyre said she takes special pride this time of the year in recounting the courage of American colonists like Samuel Adams, who called

courage of American colonists like Samuel Adams, who called for rebellion against the English crown in

for rebellion against the English crown in fiery speeches at the historic hall. But she laments that Americans’ ability to respectfully debate the toughest issues of the day — to disagree without being dis- agreeable — seems hopelessly lost. “This bitter divisiveness of the last decade, I think the Founding Fathers would be really sad about that,” said the 57-year- old Massachusetts native as she greeted passers-by in her floral-print, colonial-era dress. “Social media has made bullies of all of us. People say things there that they’d never say to someone’s face.” In Chicago, Philip Wiley, a 77-year-old retired public school counselor, is blunt about what’s ailing the nation.

“A lot of it has to do with the present administration in Washington, ” Wiley said as he stopped to admire a massive flag hanging from the city’s iconic Wrigley Building Tuesday.

south of Birmingham, Alabama. “I know it’s a big holiday and I love the holiday because it’s our independence,” said Champion, 77, of rural Shelby County. “But I have to sell this stuff, and I

Out in Anchorage, Alaska, Darl Schaaff says July Fourth should be a time for a deeply divided nation to put personal poli- tics aside. “This is not about politics,” he said as took a break from helping set up the city’s downtown celebration. “This is about the founding of our country and freedom.”

But in Alabama, retired truck driver make money.”

Floyd Champion is downright upbeat. He views these as the best of times in America. Champion plans to mark the holiday the way he spends most days — selling water- melons, tomatoes, corn, plums and other produce from the back of his truck along a highway about 30 miles (48 kilometers)

melons, tomatoes, corn, plums and other produce from the back of his truck along a highway
melons, tomatoes, corn, plums and other produce from the back of his truck along a highway
melons, tomatoes, corn, plums and other produce from the back of his truck along a highway
melons, tomatoes, corn, plums and other produce from the back of his truck along a highway
melons, tomatoes, corn, plums and other produce from the back of his truck along a highway
melons, tomatoes, corn, plums and other produce from the back of his truck along a highway

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6 Wednesday July 4, 2018

271 7/3/18 8:02 PM Page 1 6 Wednesday • July 4, 2018 L O C A

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

• July 4, 2018 L O C A L THE DAILY JOURNAL Anna Maravelias Anna Maravelias, age 86,

Anna Maravelias

Anna Maravelias, age 86, died Friday, June 22, 2018, in Yakima, Washington.

Born on Nov. 24, 1931, in Hutchinson, Kansas, Anna was the daughter of Charles and Maude (Powell) Rodgers and spent her early life in Yakima. After marrying, Anna moved to California where she

lived until 2015. In addition to her career as a nurse, Anna enjoyed many activities including sewing, gardening, baking, dancing and socializ- ing. She loved experiencing the world and traveled throughout her life. After retire-

ment, Anna worked as a volunteer helping children and her community. Anna is survived by her four children, Joanna (Frank) Dixon, John (Idit) Maravelias, Steven (Teresa) Maravelias and Peter (Monica) Maravelias; two sisters Fran (Lynn) Pfaff, Wanda LaCoste; two brothers, Art (Vonnie) Rodgers and Tim (Jill) Rodgers; sister-in-law Connie (Bob) Brown; nine grandchildren and four great- grandchildren. Anna was preceded in death by her parents Charles and Maude Rodgers, her husband Harry Maravelias, and her brothers Grant and Eugene Rodgers, sister-in-law Evelyn Rodgers and brother-in-law William La Coste. A remembrance reception will be held at the Cottage in Twin Pines Park, Belmont, Monday, July 9, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Obituaries

Betty Lou Szeden

Betty Lou Szeden, 90, died April 3, 2018,

at

the

Christwood

Nursing

and

90, died April 3, 2018, at the Christwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Shoreline, Washington. Born

Rehabilitation Center in

Shoreline, Washington. Born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on May 1, 1927, Betty was a graduate of George Washington High School in Los Angelas and received a Standard Designated Services

Credential from the state of California in

1971.

She was preceded in death by her parents George and Gretta Childers, sister Bernice Heir, brother Ernest Childers and daughter- in-law Nan Harrington. Betty married the late Robert Harrington in 1950; they had two sons, Richard (Beverly) and James (Missy). In 1975, Betty married the late William Szeden and gained a daughter, Loella (Ralph). Betty was a faithful and committed Christian. She was well known in California as an early childhood learning expert for having pioneered a very successful nursery school at the Burlingame First Presbyterian Church and was a “leader of leader” training teachers in other church schools. In addition to her three children, Betty is survived by four grandchildren, Shannon King, Steven Dotterer (Joelyn), Megan Canning (Ryan) and Caitlin Harrington. Services are 10 a.m. July 20 at the First Presbyterian Church of Burlingame.

Two plea to roles in drug smuggling jail ring

Two jail inmates involved in a 10-person scheme to smuggle methamphetamine into San Mateo County’s Maple Street Correctional Center last fall pleaded no con- test to attempting to bring drugs into the jail Tuesday, according to the San Mateo County District Attorney’s Office. East Palo Alto resident Peweli Pinkston, 27, and Pacifica resident Jean Stoller, 37, will join Pacifica resident Agnes Jane Banquerigo, 48, and former inmate and San Mateo resident Shelby Myers, 26, in mak- ing plea deals in the case, leaving six others to return to court Sept. 20 for preliminary hearings, according to prosecutors. Pinkston and Stoller were two of five inmates involved in an effort to send and receive mail laced with drugs in October, November and December while in custody for other crimes. The activities of the ring, which included five others, were brought to light in December when members of a Narcotics Task Force served search warrants in Burlingame, Daly City and San Francisco and the seized more than 10 ounces of meth and several thousand dollars Dec. 22, according to prosecutors and sheriff’s deputies previously. The monthslong investigation began when corrections staff inside the jail inter- cepted letters and cards with suspicious dis- coloration that were being sent to female inmates, according to prosecutors and sher- iff’s deputies previously. On July 17, 2017, Pinkston pleaded no contest to felony robbery related to a July 2016 incident in which she and an accom- plice attempted to rob a boyfriend and girl- friend on their way home from Courthouse Square in Redwood City at gunpoint. Already facing five years in state prison when she was charged in the drug smuggling case, Pinkston was awaiting sentencing and the trial of her accomplice in the robbery, 31-year-old Tyrone Barker. She was sen- tenced to five years, eight months state prison Tuesday and will receive 834 days credit for time served, according to prosecu- tors. Stoller was also in custody and received an eight-month prison term Tuesday. Having

Local briefs

received 504 days credit for time served, she is believed to have been released from jail later that day, according to prosecutors. Having pleaded no contest to the same felony charges May 29, Banquerigo and Myers were sentenced to eight months state prison and were released the same day with credit for good time served. Still awaiting preliminary hearing are 39-year-old Redwood City resident Bridgette Damon, 38-year-old San Francisco resident Rhiannon Lawler, 34-year-old San Francisco resident Sara Regan, 54-year-old Daly City resident Richard Wood, 44-year- old San Francisco resident Ephraim Manlapaz and 32-year-old San Francisco resident Nancy Mabel Sanchez, according to prosecutors. Alleged suppliers Manlapaz and Wood are believed to have worked with Sanchez to mail methamphetamine-laced cards into the jail, and jail calls revealed a conspiracy in which inmates communicated with Regan to coordinate the ring’s activities, according to prosecutors.

Plans for new Redwood City Tesla location scrapped

Plans for a new Tesla service center and sales showroom on Veterans Boulevard in Redwood City have hit a dead end. The electric carmaker’s 23,000-square- foot proposal would have occupied the for- mer home of Crunch Fitness gym and Chef Peking Chinese restaurant west of Highway 101. The project and its rezone request was OK’d by the Planning Commission in May, but Tesla later changed its mind about the sales showroom component of the proposal before it could go before the City Council for final approval. “After the Planning Commission meet- ing, they said we only want a service center, not sales and we said we can’t support that,” said Assistant City Manager Aaron Aknin. “It has to be extraordinary circumstances to do a rezone and the service station didn’t meet that criteria.” Aknin said there are currently no new plans for 515 Veterans Blvd., but there was “a lot” of interest in the property when Tesla submitted its application.

in the property when Tesla submitted its application. Obituary Alfred Holmes January 31, 1939 – June

Obituary

Obituary Alfred Holmes January 31, 1939 – June 14, 2018 Alfred Holmes, Al to his friends,

Alfred Holmes

January 31, 1939 – June 14, 2018

Alfred Holmes, Al to his friends, was a true native son of San Mateo. He was born here, graduated from San Mateo High School, class of 1957, went to College of San Mateo, and lived here most his life. He died at home on June 14th, of cancer. He was 79. In his 20’s, when Uncle Sam called on Al, he chose to

become a Medic in the Army, as a Conscientious Objector. After honorable discharge from the Army, he obtained his BA from S.F. State in Public Health. He then became a career employee of the US Postal Service, where he retired after 30 years of service. Al was a spiritual seeker, and his spiritual quests included Scientology (upper levels), Buddhism, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and United Church of Christ. Al was a lover of music, and spent many hours at the Monterrey Jazz Festival and at the Wagner Ring Cycle in Seattle. Al was a caretaker. For many years he took tender care of his disabled mother, Katherine Holmes, and after his retirement, he took on a second career as a caretaker

for others. Those who knew him best described him as an angel. Memorial services will be held 11am on Friday, July 6th at St. James AME Zion Church, 825 Monte Diablo, San Mateo.

angel. Memorial services will be held 11am on Friday, July 6th at St. James AME Zion
angel. Memorial services will be held 11am on Friday, July 6th at St. James AME Zion
angel. Memorial services will be held 11am on Friday, July 6th at St. James AME Zion

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wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 7:01 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Wednesday • July 4, 2018 7

NATION

Wednesday July 4, 2018

7

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Wednesday • July 4, 2018 7 REUTERS Flames rise from a treeline near an
THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Wednesday • July 4, 2018 7 REUTERS Flames rise from a treeline near an

REUTERS

Flames rise from a treeline near an emergency vehicle during efforts to contain the Spring Creek Fire in Costilla County, Colo.

Wildfire destroys more than 100 Colorado homes ahead of holiday

By Colleen Slevin

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DENVER — A growing wildfire destroyed more than 100 homes in the Colorado moun- tains, while other blazes across the parched U.S. West kept hundreds of other homes under evacuation orders Tuesday and derailed holi- day plans. Authorities announced late Monday that a fire near Fort Garland, about 205 miles south- west of Denver, had destroyed 104 homes in a mountain housing development started by multimillionaire publisher Malcolm Forbes in the 1970s. The damage toll could rise because the burn area is still being surveyed. Tamara Estes’ family cabin, which her par- ents had built in 1963 using wood and rocks from the land, was among the homes destroyed. “I think it’s sinking in more now. But we’re just crying,” she said. “My grandmother’s antique dining table and her hutch are gone.” “It was a sacred place to us,” she added. Andy and Robyn Kuehler watched flames approach their cabin via surveillance video from their primary residence in Nebraska. “We just got confirmation last night that

the house was completely gone. It’s

sickening feeling watching the fire coming towards the house,” the couple wrote in an email Tuesday. The blaze, labeled the Spring Fire, is one of six large wildfires burning in Colorado and is the largest at 123 square miles — about five times the size of Manhattan. While investi- gators believe it was started by a spark from a

a very

fire pit, other fires, like one that began burn- ing in wilderness near Fairplay, were started by lightning. Nearly 60 large, active blazes are burning across the West, including nine in New Mexico and six each in Utah and California, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. In Utah, authorities have evacuated 200 to 300 homes because of a growing wildfire near a popular fishing reservoir southeast of Salt Lake City amid hot temperatures and high winds. Several structures have been lost since the fire started Sunday, but it’s unclear how many, said Jason Curry of the Utah Division of Forest, Fire and State Lands. Darren Lewis and his extended family planned to spend the Fourth of July at a cabin built nearly 50 years ago by his father and uncle in a wilderness area nestled between canyons and near a mountain river. Instead, Lewis and his family will spend the holiday nervously waiting to hear if a half- century of family memories go up in smoke because of the fire, which has grown to 47 square miles. “There’s a lot of history and memories that go into this cabin,” said Lewis, 44, of Magna, Utah. “The cabin we could rebuild, but the trees that we love would be gone. We’re just hoping that the wind blows the other way.” Meanwhile, a wind-fueled wildfire in Northern California that continues to send a thick layer of smoke and ash south of San Francisco was threatening more than 900 buildings.

White House uses Twitter to push back at Democrats

By Ken Thomas

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The White House is using its official Twitter handle to target Democratic lawmakers who have criticized President Donald Trump’s immigration poli- cies, drawing complaints that government resources are being used to undercut poten- tial 2020 presidential rivals. The White House Twitter handle, which has more than 17. 3 million followers, falsely accused California Sen. Kamala Harris on Monday of “supporting the ani- mals of MS-13,” a violent gang that the president has sought to eradicate. In a separate tweet, the White House account erroneously asserted Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren was “supporting criminals moving weapons, drugs, and vic- tims” across the border. Watchdog groups said the use of the Twitter handle didn’t appear to violate any government laws but represented a politi- cization of the social media accounts at a

time when Republicans and Democrats are engaged in a vigorous debate over the nation’s immigration laws and the separa- tion of migrant children from their families at the U.S.-Mexican border. Responding on Twitter, Harris pointed to her work as a prosecutor who “went after gangs and transnational criminal organiza- tions. That’s being a leader on public safety. What is not, is ripping babies from their mothers.” Warren assailed Trump’s immigra- tion policies during a rally last Saturday, saying Trump seemed to think “the only way to have immigration rules is to rip parents from their families, is to treat rape victims and refugees like terrorists and to put chil- dren in cages. This is ugly. This is wrong.” The White House Twitter account is sepa- rate from Trump’s personal account, which has more than 53 million followers and is used daily by the president. The White House account is similar to Trump’s official presidential account, (at)POTUS, and tweets from the three accounts are preserved under the Presidential Records Act.

Suspect wrote his aim was to kill everyone at Maryland newsroom

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BALTIMORE — A man charged with gun- ning down five people at a Maryland news- paper sent three letters on the day of the attack, police said, including one that said he was on his way to the Capital Gazette newsroom with the aim “of killing every person present.” Sgt. Jacklyn Davis, a spokeswoman for Anne Arundel County police, said the letters were received Monday. They were mailed to an attorney for The Capital newspaper, a retired judge of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals and a Baltimore judge. The letter Jarrod Ramos sent to the Annapolis newspaper’s Baltimore-based lawyer was written to resemble a legal motion for reconsideration of his unsuc- cessful 2012 defamation lawsuit against the paper, a columnist and then-publisher

lawsuit against the paper, a columnist and then-publisher Jarrod Ramos Tom Marquardt. Marquardt shared a copy

Jarrod Ramos

Tom Marquardt. Marquardt shared a copy of the letter with the Associated Press. “If this is how the Maryland Judiciary oper- ates, the law now means nothing,” Ramos wrote. He quoted a description of the purpose of a defama-

tion suit, saying it was intended for a defamed person to “resort to the courts for relief instead of wreaking his own vengeance.” “’That’ is how your judiciary operates, you were too cowardly to confront those lies, and this is your receipt,” Ramos wrote. He signed it under the chilling statement: “I told you so.” Below that, he wrote that he was going to the newspaper’s office “with the objective of killing every person present.”

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008 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 7:10 PM Page 1

8 Wednesday July 4, 2018

271 7/3/18 7:10 PM Page 1 8 Wednesday • July 4, 2018 NATION/WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Experts see

NATION/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

• July 4, 2018 NATION/WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Experts see risks in U.S. plan to dismantle North Korea’s

Experts see risks in U.S. plan to dismantle North Korea’s nukes

By Deb Riechmann and Matthew Pennigton

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — As Secretary of State Mike Pompeo prepares to travel this week to North Korea, experts cautioned that the Trump administration’s plan to dismantle the North’s nuclear weapons and missiles in a year is both unrealistic and risky. The State Department said Pompeo would arrive Friday on his third visit to Pyongyang in three months. It will be the first visit by a senior U.S. official since President Donald Trump’s historic meeting with Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore, where the North Korean leader committed to “complete denuclearization” of the Korean Peninsula. Trump’s questionable claim afterward that the North was no longer a nuclear threat was soon displaced by doubts about how to achieve denuclearization, a goal that has eluded U.S. administrations for the past quarter-century since Pyongyang began pro- ducing fissile material for bombs. The president tweeted Tuesday that talks

material for bombs. The president tweeted Tuesday that talks Mike Pompeo on the next steps with

Mike Pompeo

on the next steps with North Korea are “going well” and claimed his efforts had defused any nuclear threat. “If not for me, we would now be at War with North Korea!” Trump tweeted. He said: “no Rocket Launches or Nuclear

Testing in 8 months. All of Asia is thrilled.” But experts say there is no proof North Korea’s halt of nuclear and missile tests means the North will take concrete steps to give up such weapons. They also say the U.S. has an unrealistic approach to North Korea’s denuclearization. Less than three weeks ago, Pompeo said the United States wanted North Korea to take “major” nuclear disarmament steps within the next two years — before the end of Trump’s first term in January 2021. Even that was viewed as bullish by nonprolifera- tion experts considering the scale of North

Korea’s weapons program and its history of evasion and reluctance to allow verification of disarmament agreements.

HHS: Congressional visits to migrants wasting resources

WASHINGTON — The Trump administra- tion says lawmakers’ visits to migrant chil- dren in federal shelters are wasting staff resources that could be used to help connect kids and parents. But Democrats say lawmakers should be granted immediate access to shelters housing about 12, 000 migrant children, including about 2, 000 who have been separated from their parents as a result of President Donald Trump ’s “zero toler-

Around the nation

ance” policy at the border. In a letter Tuesday to leaders of the Senate and House judiciary committees, the Health and Human Services Department says nearly 500 work hours have been devoted to arranging visits for more than 70 lawmak- ers. The letter says, “Many of these hours

verify-

would otherwise have been spent

ing parental relationships.” HHS is asking lawmakers to submit visit

requests two weeks in advance.

lawmakers to submit visit requests two weeks in advance. REUTERS Women walk past rubble of damaged
lawmakers to submit visit requests two weeks in advance. REUTERS Women walk past rubble of damaged

REUTERS

Women walk past rubble of damaged buildings in Raqqa, Syria.

Watchdog: Syrian group uncovering Islamic State mass graves needs help

By Bassem Mroue

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — Syrians working to uncover mass graves in an area once ruled by the Islamic State group need help to preserve evidence, identify human remains and shed more light on the horrors perpetrated by the militants, an international watchdog said Tuesday. Human Rights Watch said thousands of bodies — of civilians slain by the extrem- ists, residents killed in airstrikes by the U.S.-led coalition and of IS fighters — remain to be recovered in several mass graves in and around the city of Raqqa. The appeal came in a new report released Tuesday by the New York-based group. Local members of the Raqqa Civil Council, a governing body set up by U.S.- backed and Kurdish-led forces, are “strug- gling to cope with the logistical challenges of collecting and organizing information” on the bodies uncovered and providing it to families searching for missing or dead rela- tives, HRW said. Raqqa was the extremists’ de facto capital and the seat of their self-proclaimed caliphate, which at the height of their power

in 2014 stretched across a third of both Syria and Iraq. Since then an array of Syrian and Iraqi forces have driven IS from virtually all the territory it once held, but the group is still present in remote areas along the bor- der. The extremist group, which attracted fighters from around the world, carried out mass killings and other atrocities, including public beheadings. Women and men accused of adultery were stoned to death, while men believed to be gay were thrown from the tops of buildings and then pelted with stones. Human Rights Watch said identifying missing people and preserving evidence for possible prosecutions is critical for Syria’s future. “Raqqa city has at least nine mass graves, each one estimated to have dozens, if not hundreds, of bodies, making exhumations a monumental task,” said Priyanka Motaparthy, acting emergencies director at HRW. “Without the right technical assistance, these exhumations may not provide families with the answers they have been waiting for and could damage or destroy evidence crucial to future justice efforts,” she added.

answers they have been waiting for and could damage or destroy evidence crucial to future justice
answers they have been waiting for and could damage or destroy evidence crucial to future justice

009 0704 wed:1030 FRI 64 7/3/18 6:14 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

0704 wed:1030 FRI 64 7/3/18 6:14 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL OPINION Wednesday • July

OPINION

Wednesday July 4, 2018

9

1 THE DAILY JOURNAL OPINION Wednesday • July 4, 2018 9 Something to celebrate T oday

Something to celebrate

T oday is the day we as a nation celebrate our collective birth- day. It was 242 years ago

today that Congress approved the final text of the Declaration of Independence, later signed on Aug. 2. While independence was formally declared on July 2, it is July 4 that we celebrate in a variety of ways. Some do it simply, through tradi- tions of wearing our nation’s colors or flying our flag. There are parades,

festivals and fireworks across the patchwork that makes up our nation. For others, the celebration is more complex. This year is no different than others in that we are still marking the day that a small group of new Americans decided it was time to break free from colonial rule. Yet as with any celebra- tion, it changes over time. Some may contend that our nation is at a cross- roads, with dissent and protest and concern over our direction. Yet we have faced these types of times before and come out of it because of our shared ideals. Just what are those shared ideals? It may seem difficult to say what they are since there are so many different people here in the United States today. We have long-established resi-

Editorial

dents and recent immigrants all shar- ing our nation’s providence. Paraphrased from the Declaration of Independence, we might suggest that our shared ideals are that all are creat- ed equal, and that we all have certain unalienable rights, among them life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness and that the government derives its powers from the governed. These may seem to be obvious rights to us who have taken them for granted, and not yet attained for so many who do not believe them to be manifested com- pletely. Yet this nation is also a work in progress, derived from the words that intended to set us free from English rule. It is important to note that these words were simply part of a declaration, and that it took a revolu- tionary war to actually put them into action.

It is also important to note that the

declaration was a list of grievances against the king of England, and pro- vided the rationale for separation, and the United States of America’s ulti- mate freedom. The declaration was essentially an

argument for our independence and rationale for the war that followed. This declaration was also treasonous, and if the war was unsuccessful, the signers would surely have been pun- ished greatly, and not exalted in our history books as the Founding Fathers. So consider the importance of what actions led to the beginning of our nation: A growing discontent, organi- zation and a declaration of independ- ence based on grievances all under the threat that the effort may not have been successful and the fate of those participating was in peril. It is part of the American tradition to stand up for what is right and to work for change. If you now believe that our society needs to change, to grow, to get better, that precedent was established by the very Founding Fathers who signed their names to the Declaration of Independence 242 years ago to create a new nation. The

framework is here, the United States can become the shining example to the world envisioned at our founding. But as with anything, it takes toil, collaboration and a recognition that we have more in common than differ- ences. And that is something to cele- brate, today and always.

Letters to the editor

Bring back ice rinks and coaches

Editor, There was a time when the Peninsula served all recreational ice skaters, aspiring curlers, hockey players, figure skaters, speed skaters and other athletes so they could glide across an ice rink. Today’s limited ice rink situation has not only affected athletes who wish to skate, but also skating coaches and their hours of work. For example, figure skating coach Crystal Smith had to unfortunately move her business and housing to the East Coast. This was not for lack of students, but lack of ice rinks at which to skate and coach. Crystal contributed immensely to the skat- ing culture, and will be missed. Once upon a time, three ice rinks thrived on the Peninsula, utilized by half a million San Mateo County constituents. Out sprung Olympians like Kristi Yamaguchi, Brian Boitano, Charlie Tickner and Peggy Fleming from these rinks. But the lesser told story is the thousands of hockey, figure, curling and ice skaters of all ages who gained a healthier lifestyle and avoided obe- sity, addiction and depression by enjoying these sports.

I dream of a day where this can

happen again, and coaches can afford to live here and coach those skaters. The pent-up demand for three plus ice rinks have left the remaining rinks crowded and danger- ous, with coaching hours limited. I hope that Peninsula leaders can work together to shed light on the best way to fix this for current and future generations.

Sarah Feldman

Hillsborough

These dark ages of politics

Editor, To our Democratic leaders and can- didates: Forget trying to “expose” 45 for who he is. We all know. Learn from the old turtle whose human name is Mitch. OPPOSE everything and RESIST constantly. Do not: be shy during your cam- paign, run on being anti-45, knee- cap conservative leaning Democrats, allow the DNC to torpe- do future progressive candidates. Instead, be the Obama party, learn from our mistakes in 2016 and be bold. Embrace single payer humane

immigration reform, rational cli- mate change measures, reasonable gun control measures, pro-choice legislation (state and/or federal solutions) and other progressive issues. To the moderate Republicans (aka unicorns), our country and future generations need you now more than ever. The world needs you. Stand up. To the evangelical 45 supporter:

you’ve lost all moral authority. You are the money changers in the tem- ple. The god you serve is not the god you should be serving! To those voters who feel helpless, yes, it feels like the darkest part of the night before the dawn. We all know that 45 has weakened our democracy. We are all bruised and battered. However, do not despair or wage useless FB wars with trolls (Russian or otherwise). Instead, VOTE! Contribute! RESIST! Call your Federal and State representatives (even if they support 45) and let your voice be heard.

Dave Chandler

San Mateo

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Daily Journal editorial board and not any one individual. Independence Day “L iberty means responsibility. That’s

Independence Day

“L iberty means responsibility. That’s why men dread it.” — George Bernard Shaw.

Today, we commemorate Independence Day — the day when we are supposed to appreciate how fortunate we are to be living in freedom as we renew our allegiance to our flag. Yes, we are and we do, but I would like to be able to have pride in my country. I would love to think that this nation stands for something positive and glorious. It would be great to think that our leaders have the welfare of humanity at heart. It would be wonderful to look at them and get that good feeling that goes with honesty, forthrightness and compassion instead of that discouraging feeling that results from knowing that most are manipulated and influ- enced by greedy and powerful special interests. It would be reassuring to know that there are fewer people who are so clueless that they vote for a candidate who makes the most noise without consid- ering the serious state of his psychological dysfunc- tion. I would love to be able to gaze at the flag and think that it hasn’t been tarnished and smudged by insincere and opportunistic politicians. I would like to believe that our lawmakers have some real compassion for the hungry and homeless. I would like to feel that our children are not getting short shrift and that the children of migrants would not have been separated from their parents. Marianne Williamson, author of “The Healing of America,” described it graphically: “We have lost our spiri- tual rudder and without it we have neither individual or col- lective wisdom. Our national conscience is barely alive as we slither like snakes across a desert toward any hole where money lies. Nothing short of an internal awakening will heal this wounded nation.” How can we be truly proud of the only developed country where the income gap between the wealthy and the work- ing class is so wide? Where many corporations get away with paying no taxes on billions of profits? Where the drug addiction rate, the homicide rate, the teen pregnancy rate, the infant mortality rate, the poverty rate and the cost of medical care far outstrip those of most other industrial- ized nations? So what will you be thinking when the fireworks go off and the flags wave? If the flag is flying in front of your house, what does it mean to you? Are you telling those who pass by that you are patriotic — that you support our government, no matter what? Or maybe you’re thinking what a good thing it was when we declared our independ- ence in 1776? Or simply that you are proud of our country. Or maybe it’s because you want to support democracy by working for change when you believe it is needed. Or, possibly, you’ll just be standing there, watching the parade go by, so to speak, seeing only what you want to see. Several years ago, then U.S. Rep. Lynn Woolsey wrote:

“I believe that it is important that we remember the true meaning of patriotism. It is not enough to support a war or wave a flag. Genuine patriotism means affirming the values that have made America strong for more than two cen- turies. Patriotism means embracing, not stifling dissent. Truly patriotic policy empowers American families, help- ing them balance the competing demands of work and fam- ily. On the other hand, exploding deficits and tax cuts for the wealthy seem wholly inappropriate to me. And what is patriotic about sending billions of dollars to rebuild Iraq when our own communities desperately need investment?” It is important to remember that patriotism requires awareness and knowledge, plus some humility, so we are able to see where change might be needed, where we may be taking too much for granted and becoming complacent, when we might be becoming arrogant, or self-satisfied or lazy or unaware of government seeking too much power and/or not operating in a way not conducive to liberty and justice for all. “But for the right’s obscuring its aims and wrapping itself in the flag, I believe that most Americans would strongly oppose the direction this country is going. I have a vision — maybe just a hope — of a great revulsion: a moment in which the American people look at what is hap- pening, realize how their goodwill and patriotism have been abused and put a stop to this drive to destroy what is best in our country.” — Paul Krugman, “The Great Unraveling.” Yes, we still enjoy the freedom to gripe and complain. Thankfully, we can write and talk about what is bothering us about our system and what needs changing. If only more Americans would appreciate this freedom enough to shout from the rooftops, “help us be proud again!”

to shout from the rooftops, “help us be proud again!” Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written

Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 950 columns for v arious local newspapers. Her email address is gramsd@aceweb.com.

Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 950 columns for v arious local newspapers. Her email address

010 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 5:32 PM Page 1

10 Wednesday July 4, 2018

271 7/3/18 5:32 PM Page 1 10 Wednesday • July 4, 2018 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL Stocks finish

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks finish lower in light trading day

By Alex Veiga

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. stocks closed lower Tuesday following a swift sell-off in the final minutes of a shortened trading session ahead of the Independence Day holiday. The losses snapped a three-day winning streak for the stock mar- ket, wiping out modest gains from earlier in the day. Technology companies and banks led the market slide, out- weighing gains in health care and energy stocks. Gainers slightly outnumbered fallers on the New York Stock Exchange, with small- company stocks faring better than the overall market. Trading volume was lighter than usual going into Wednesday’s U.S. mar- ket holiday. The S&P 500 index fell 13.49 points, or 0.5 percent, to 2, 713. 22. The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 132. 36 points, or 0.5 percent, to 24, 174. 82. The Nasdaq lost 65.01 points, or 0.9 percent, to 7, 502. 67. Smaller-company stocks bucked the broader market decline. The Russell 2000 index picked up 5.33 points, or 0.3 per- cent, to 1,660.42. Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.83

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS High : 24,444.88 Low : 24,150.85 Close : 24,174.82 Change : -132.36

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS

High:

24,444.88

Low:

24,150.85

Close:

24,174.82

Change:

-132.36

OTHER INDEXES

S&P 500:

2713.22

-13.49

NYSE Index:

12,494.70

+9.12

Nasdaq:

7502.67

-65.01

NYSE MKT:

2743.68

+22.62

Russell 2000:

1660.42

+5.33

Wilshire 5000:

28,376.99

-104.96

10-Yr Bond:

2.83

-0.02

Oil (per barrel):

74.14

+0.20

Gold :

1,253.50

+11.80

percent from 2.87 percent late Monday. U.S. markets reopen on Thursday, and investors will have no shortage of reasons to snap out of the holiday lull by the end of the week. On Friday the U.S. will start imposing a 25 percent tariff on $34 billion worth of Chinese imports. And China is expected to strike back with tariffs on a simi- lar amount of U.S. exports. “The market might get worked up about a tit-for-tat retaliation, which we’ll probably see,” said Scott Wren, senior global equity strategist for the Wells Fargo

Investment Institute. “There’s a relatively low probability of an all-out trade war.” The Trump administration has said it won’t target an additional $16 billion worth of Chinese goods until it gathers further pub- lic comments. It’s also identify- ing an additional $200 billion in Chinese goods for 10 percent tar- iffs, which could take effect if Beijing retaliates. Uncertainty over U.S. trade pol- icy has overhung the market since late February. The S&P 500 post- ed two consecutive weekly declines heading into this week. Investors will also have their

eye Friday on the Labor Department’s latest monthly jobs and wage report. Analysts expect the report will show that hourly wages rose 2.8 percent last month. But if it comes in above 3 percent, that could be a bad day for the market, Wren said. “The market is paying very close attention to wage pressure, very close attention to anything that’s going to hurt corporate margins, anything that’s going to make the Fed want to quicken the pace and magnitude of interest rate hikes,” Wren said. Technology and bank stocks

took some of the heaviest losses in Tuesday’s shortened trading session. Chip maker Micron Technology slumped 5.5 percent

to $51.48, while Charles Schwab

dropped 2.1 percent to $50.24.

Traders sent shares in Campbell Soup higher after the New York Post reported an activist investor is in talks with shareholders about potentially selling the company. The stock gained 1.8 percent to $41.03. Crude oil futures pared some of their early gains. Benchmark U.S. crude added 20 cents to $74.14 a barrel in New York. The contract reached more than $75 a barrel in early trading. Brent crude, used to price international oils, rose 46 cents to $77.76 a barrel in London. The dollar fell to 110.62 yen from 110.86 yen on Monday. The euro strengthened to $1. 1652 from $1.1610. Gold rose $11.80, or 1 percent, to $1,253.50 an ounce. Silver gained 21 cents to $16.04 an ounce. Copper slipped 3 cents to $2.92 a pound. In other energy futures trading, heating oil gained 1 cent to $2.16

a gallon. Wholesale gasoline

added a penny to $2.12 a gallon. Natural gas rose a penny to $2.87

per 1,000 cubic feet.

Why they fight: U.S.and China brawl over high technology

Why they fight: U.S.and China brawl over high technology By Paul Wiseman THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON

By Paul Wiseman

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — To understand why the United States and China stand on the brink of a trade war, consider the near-death experience of American Superconductor Corp. The company, known as AMSC and based in Massachusetts, was reeling after a Chinese partner stole its technology — the elec- tronic brains that run wind tur- bines. The loss was devastating:

AMSC’s stock shed $1 billion in value, and the company cut 700 jobs, more than half its workforce.

“Attempted corporate homicide” is what CEO Daniel McGahn called it. In January, its Chinese partner, Sinovel Wind Group, was convict- ed in a U.S. court of stealing AMSC’s trade secrets. To the Trump administration, Sinovel’s predatory practices are hardly isolated. Beijing, it charges, is orchestrating a brass- knuckles campaign to supplant U.S. technological dominance and over the next few decades make Chinese companies global leaders in such fields as robotics and elec- tric vehicles. According to a report by the

“We’ve been in a trade war for a long time,

but we weren’t participating

We’ve awakened

This is a fundamental change.It’s a historic moment.”

— Richard Ellings, president of the National Bureau of Asian Research

Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, Beijing’s tactics include coercing American compa- nies to hand over trade secrets in return for access to the Chinese market; forcing U.S. businesses to license technology in China on unfavorable terms; using state funds to buy up American technol- ogy; and sometimes outright theft.

Critics have long asserted that China runs roughshod over intel- lectual property rights. But President Donald Trump, who ran for the White House on a vow to force China to reform its trade policies, is the first U.S. leader to risk a trade war between the world’s two biggest economies. “We’ve been in a trade war for a

long time, but we weren’t partici- pating,” said Richard Ellings, president of the National Bureau of Asian Research. “We’ve awakened. This is a fundamental change. It’s a historic moment.” Critics argue, though, that while Trump has picked the right fight, he has chosen the wrong weapon. They predict China will defy an array of U.S. tariffs set to take effect Friday and will retaliate immediately. And they warn that the escalating trade war will slow global growth and jeopardize the second-longest economic expan- sion in U.S. history.

the second-longest economic expan- sion in U.S. history. What’s new for Amazon’s Prime Day? Deals at

What’s new for Amazon’s Prime Day? Deals at Whole Foods

By Joseph Pisani

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Amazon’s Prime Day deals are coming to the aisles of Whole Foods as the online retail- er seeks to lure more people to its Prime membership after a recent price hike. This year’s sales event, which starts July 16, will be six hours longer than last year’s and will launch new products. Amazon

hopes to keep Prime attractive for current and would-be subscribers after raising the annual member- ship fee by 20 percent to $119 and to $12.99 for the month-to-month option. Outside of Prime Day,

Amazon has added special discounts for Prime members at its more than 460 Whole Foods U.S. stores and has been adding new TV shows and movies on its video streaming service. “They want Prime to be a must-

Suzanne Tager, who heads Bain & Co.’s retail and consumer products practices. Prime Day, created by Amazon in 2015 to mark its 20th anniversary, has inspired other e-commerce companies to invent their own shopping holidays. Online furni- ture seller Wayfair introduced Way Day in April, becoming its biggest revenue day ever. While Prime Day brings in more revenue for Amazon, too, it also helps boost its Prime

providing specific numbers. Here’s a look at what’s new for this year’s Prime Day:

WHOLE FOODS IN THE MIX: Expect discounts on gro- ceries as well as in-store events, such as cooking demonstrations, says Jamil Ghani, the global vice president of Amazon Prime. And at its more than a dozen Amazon Books stores, discounts will expand beyond devices. IT’S LONGER: After extending the daylong event to 30 hours in 2017, this year’s Prime Day will be 36 hours long, starting the after- noon of July 16 and running

through July 17. NEW PRODUCT LAUNCH- ES: Several companies have agreed to launch new products on Prime Day, Amazon says. Among them, a Fingerlings unicorn doll whose horn lights up and a Delta kitchen faucet that can be turned on through Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant. PRIVATE LABEL PUSH: Amazon has been increasing its line of store brands, and it’ll be offering deals such as 25 percent off its Rivet fur- niture brand, which didn’t exist a year ago. Other deals include 30 percent off its Mama Bear diapers and baby products.

30 percent off its Mama Bear diapers and baby products. h a v e memberships. It

h a v

e

memberships. It had more sign-ups

member-

during 2017’s event than any other

ship,”

day in the company’s history,

s a y

s

Amazon said at the time, without

event than any other ship,” day in the company’s history, s a y s Amazon said
event than any other ship,” day in the company’s history, s a y s Amazon said

011 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 10:47 PM Page 1

011 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 10:47 PM Page 1 COULD HAVE BEEN WORSE: THE NFL
COULD HAVE BEEN WORSE: THE NFL SUSPENDS 49ERS LB FOSTER FOR TWO GAMES >> PAGE
COULD HAVE BEEN WORSE: THE NFL SUSPENDS 49ERS LB FOSTER FOR TWO GAMES >> PAGE 12
Wednesday • July 4, 2018
Team raises Wolfenden’s game
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Postseason athletic honors tend to focus on
the individual, but the Daily Journal’s Girls’
Lacrosse Player of the Year, Menlo School’s
Page Wolfenden, understands that she would
not have reached the heights she did if not for
the rest of her team.
“We had really good chemistry, so I focused
on working for my teammates,” said
Wolfenden, an incoming junior at the Atherton
school. “A lot of my success came from my
team’s effort. I couldn’t have had a great season
without them.”
As much as the team means to Wolfenden,
the attacker certainly had a big hand in helping
the Knights to a 15-5 overall record and an 11-
1 mark and the West Bay Athletic League
Foothill Division championship. Wolfenden
finished second on the team in goals with 53,
behind Charlotte Swisher’s 65. Wolfenden was
also second in assists with 25, trailing only
Kendall Weigart’s 31.
But Wolfenden led the team in scoring with
78 points, earning her WBAL Attacker of the
Year accolades.
One of the things I want my team to do is
make all teammates look better,” said Menlo
head coach Liz Schaeffer. “No play is being run
See AOTS, Page 16
Liz Schaeffer. “No play is being run See AOTS, Page 16 HMB walks off with Majors

HMB walks off with Majors title

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Half Moon Bay All-Stars clean- up hitter Ian Armstrong came to the plate in the bottom of the sev- enth inning with the bases loaded, no outs and his team trailing 3-2 to Menlo-Atherton. Armstrong was just looking to hit the ball hard and drive in the game-tying run. He did way better than that. Facing an 0-2 count, Armstrong got ahold of the third pitch of the at-bat and drove it over the fence in left field for a walk-off grand slam and a 6-3 win to give HMB the District 52 Majors (11-12 year olds) championship. “I figured if I just hit the ball hard, maybe we score a run, maybe two,” Armstrong said, who hit six homers during the regular season. “I was stoked.” HMB will represent District 52 in the Section 3 tournament to held in Fremont next week, the next step on the road to South Williamsport, Pennsylvania and

the Little League World Series. It was dramatic ending to a dra- matic game that featured a slew of spectacular pitching, some big hits, solid defense and the walk-off winner. “[That HMB] group of kids bat- tle,” said M-A manager Shawn Pagee. As did M-A, which led at two dif- ferent times, but could not close the deal. It touched up HMB start- ing pitcher Liam Harrington for a pair of runs before he was pulled in the top of the third after 39 pitch- es. HMB manager Don Scatena wanted to make sure Harrington was available for a potential win- ner-take-all game against M-A Thursday. HMB, however, rallied for two runs in the bottom of third to tie the game at 2-all and it stayed that way into extra innings. Both teams had chances to win in regu- lation, but neither could take advantage due to the strong pitch- ing.

See HMB, Page 14

advantage due to the strong pitch- ing. See HMB , Page 14 NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL Half

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

Half Moon Bay manager Don Scatena, right, celebrates as Ian Armstrong heads home after hitting a walk-off grand slam in the bottom of the seventh to give HMB the District 52 Majors title.

England beats PK jinx, Colombia

By James Ellingworth

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOSCOW — The research paid off for Jordan Pickford. When Carlos Bacca stepped up to take Colombia’s fifth and final penalty, Pickford knew he was likely to shoot to the left. The 24-year-old goalkeeper, in just his seventh England appearance, trusted his research and leaped. Research wasn’t enough on its own — he also needed light- ning reactions to shoot his left arm up to

needed light- ning reactions to shoot his left arm up to Jordan Pickford paw away Bacca’s

Jordan

Pickford

paw away Bacca’s high shot.

The save gave England’s Eric Dier a chance to win the shootout, and he con- verted. England moves on 4-3 on penalties

and he con- verted. England moves on 4-3 on penalties sky-high. “Falcao is the only one

sky-high. “Falcao is the only one who didn’t go his way. I don’t care if I’m not the biggest keeper in the world. I have the power and agili- ty.” Pickford was just two years old when England last won a penalty shootout, a few days older when the now-England coach Gareth Southgate missed the deciding penalty

See SOCCER, Page 15

after

a

1-1

draw.

“I did a whole bunch of research,” Pickford said, his confidence

a whole bunch of research,” Pickford said, his confidence TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL Pacifica American’s Alex
a whole bunch of research,” Pickford said, his confidence TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL Pacifica American’s Alex

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Pacifica American’s Alex Wineinger, middle, celebrates with Reggie Fong,front,and Nate Fahey,back,afterTuesday’s 6-5 comeback win in the District 52 Little League All-Star 9-10s Tournament in Portola Valley.

Pacifica rallies for 9-10 crown

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

When the P-Town bats come to life, look out. Entering the District 52 Little League 9- 10s All-Star Tournament championship round through the winner’s bracket, Pacifica American was on the verge of its first loss of the tourney. Trailing San Mateo American by five runs going into the last inning Tuesday at Ford Field, the Pacifica offense had managed just one hit to that point. Then the green-and-gold caught fire, send- ing nine batters to the plate in the bottom of the sixth to rally for six runs and a momen- tous 6-5 come-from-behind win over San Mateo American to claim the District 52 9- 10s banner. “All of [the players] brought great energy and did a great job of picking each other up,”

See PAC AM, Page 14

012 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 10:36 PM Page 1

12 Wednesday July 4, 2018

271 7/3/18 10:36 PM Page 1 12 Wednesday • July 4, 2018 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL NFL suspends

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NFL suspends 49ers’Foster for two games

By Josh Dubow

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARA — San Francisco 49ers linebacker Reuben Foster was suspended Tuesday without pay for the first two games of the regular season for violating the NFL’s conduct and substance-abuse policy. The NFL said Foster will also be fined for violations from a weapons offense and mis- demeanor drug charge that were resolved ear- lier this offseason. Foster will miss San Francisco’s games against Minnesota and Detroit before being allowed to return on Sept. 17 before the Niners play Kansas City. “I accept the League’s decision and am sorry that my mistakes have hurt my team,” Foster said in a statement. “I have a respon-

my team,” Foster said in a statement. “I have a respon- Reuben Foster sibility to the

Reuben Foster

sibility to the 49ers, our fans and our community, and I am committed to learning from this situa- tion and making better choices in the future. The support I have received over the last five months has been humbling, and I do not take it for grant-

ed.” Foster was charged in January in Alabama with second-degree marijuana possession. That charge was eventually dismissed after he completed a first-time offender diversion course. Foster then faced more serious charges for an incident in California in February. He was initially charged in April with felonies

for domestic violence, making criminal threats and weapons possession after being accused of beating up his ex-girlfriend. A judge ruled there was no probable cause on the first two charges after the ex-girl-

friend recanted the allegations and the judge found no other evidence to support the charges. The weapons charge was reduced to

a misdemeanor and Foster pleaded no-con-

test to that in June. He was sentenced to two years’ probation, 232 hours of community service, and $235 in fines. He will not be allowed to own guns while he’s on probation. The 49ers initially told Foster to stay away from the offseason program after the felony charges were filed in the domestic violence case before welcoming him back after that was resolved in May.

“Our organization understands and sup- ports the League’s decision,” general man- ager John Lynch said. “Although we are dis- appointed that Reuben will not be with our team for the first two games of the season, we will continue to work with him on mak- ing better decisions and eliminating unnec- essary distractions. We are encouraged to see Reuben take responsibility for his mis- takes, and hopeful that he has learned from them as well.” The 49ers drafted Foster 31st overall last year after questions about his health and character caused him to drop from being a possible top 10 pick. Foster delivered on the field, ranking sec- ond on the team with 72 tackles in 10 games as a rookie and looking like a key part of San Francisco’s defensive future.

like a key part of San Francisco’s defensive future. Senzatela, Rockies shut down Giants THE ASSOCIATED

Senzatela, Rockies shut down Giants

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DENVER — Antonio Senzatela pitched seven scoreless innings in his first start of the season, Nolan Arenado hit his National League-leading 22nd home run and the Colorado Rockies beat the San Francisco Giants 8-1 on Tuesday night. Colorado’s Charlie Blackmon hadthree hits, including his first homer since June 20. Trevor Story had an RBI triple for the Rockies, who have won five of their last six games. D.J. LeMahieu added a run-scoring double for Colorado, which has beaten the Giants in 14 of the past 16 games at Coors Field dating to Sept. 7, 2016. Senzatela, recalled earlier in the day from Triple-A Albuquerque, struck out four and walked none while limiting the Giants to three hits. Senzatela started in the spot vacated by struggling Jon Gray, who started for the Rockies in their season opener but was optioned to Albuquerque last weekend. Senzatela (3-1) made the team out of spring training and began the season in the Rockies’ bullpen before being optioned on May 2 to Albuquerque, where he went 3-1 with a 2.15 ERA in eight starts prior to his recall. As a rookie last season, Senzatela had most of his success as a starter, going 10-5 with a 5.03 ERAin 20 starts. Chris Stratton (8-6) went 5 2/3 innings and allowed eight runs on 11 hits, including

Rockies 8, Giants 1

Blackmon’s solo shot in the first inning. The Giants broke through for a run on Alen Hanson’s RBI single in the eighth off reliever MikeDunn. The Giants were trailing 3-0 when Arenado broke the game open in the fifth

with a three-run homer. Stratton walked LeMahieu to start the inning and Blackmon singled before Arenado drove a 3-2 offering over the left-center field wall.

drove a 3-2 offering over the left-center field wall. Alen Hanson TRAINER’S ROOM Gi ants :

Alen Hanson

TRAINER’S ROOM

Gi ants : The team’s starting rotation is nearing full strength again. Manager Bruce Bochy said that RHP Johnny Cueto is slated to be reinstated from the 60-day disabled list on Thursday, when he’s scheduled to start against the St. Louis Cardinals. Cueto was placed on the DL, retroactive to April 29, because of a right elbow sprain. RHP Jeff Samardzija is slated to start Saturday’s game against St. Louis after being reinstat- ed from the 10-day DL. Samardzija went on the DL after leaving a May 30 start against Colorado following one inning due to tight- ness in his pitching shoulder.

Lowrie’s double carries A’s to win

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Jed Lowrie loves the feeling

of coming through with a clutch hit late to lift

his team, and he just keeps showing a knack for it. He is a big reason the A’s are rarely out of games even when down by a couple of runs. The Oakland second baseman delivered his 12th game-winning RBI after filling in beautifully at third base during Matt Chapman’s absence, hit- ting a three-run double in the decisive sixth to help rally the Athletics past the San Diego Padres 6-2 on Tuesday night. If that’s not enough to

make Lowrie an All-Star for the first time in an 11- year career and at age 34, manager Bob Melvin might just throw his hands up in dis- belief. “It would be the icing on the cake. I feel like I’ve been close a couple times and haven’t been there,” Lowrie said. “So that would be something I would always be able to say.” Mark Canha added a solo homer in the sixth and Chad Pinder connected in the seventh. The A’s finally got to San Diego starter

in the seventh. The A’s finally got to San Diego starter Jed Lowrie A’s 6, Padres

Jed Lowrie

A’s 6, Padres 2

Clayton Richard (7-8). Pinder walked to start the sixth as the first five hitters reached base. Khris Davis followed Lowrie’s double with a run-scoring single before Canha’s 11th home run, after a double play. Emilio Pagan (2-0) pitched 1 1/3 innings for the win in relief of A’s starter Chris Bassitt. Chapman went 0 for 3 in his return from the disabled list after missing 16 games with a recurring right hand injury that began bother- ing him during the offseason. He had played in 149 straight games before the DL stint. Wil Myers hit a run-scoring double in the fifth right after Eric Hosmer’s RBI groundout got the Padres on the board. Bassitt, who has just one win in five starts since being called up last month, escaped jams in the first and third innings as the Padres stranded five baserunners. The A’s made a pair of forceouts at home in the third, includ- ing first baseman Matt Olson’s nifty throw after a backhanded stop. Myers’ double chased Bassitt. He was tagged for two runs on seven hits in 4 2/3 innings, struck out six and walked three. Richard allowed five runs and six hits, walked a season-high five batters over six innings and struck out two in his second straight defeat.

runs and six hits, walked a season-high five batters over six innings and struck out two
runs and six hits, walked a season-high five batters over six innings and struck out two
runs and six hits, walked a season-high five batters over six innings and struck out two
runs and six hits, walked a season-high five batters over six innings and struck out two

013 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 10:37 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

wed 271 7/3/18 10:37 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Wednesday • July 4, 2018 13 T.O.

SPORTS

Wednesday July 4, 2018

13

T.O. says he will give induction speech at alma mater

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Terrell Owens has decided to celebrate his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame at Chattanooga, where he played college football. The former NFL All-Pro receiver, who has

said he was not attending the induction cere- mony in Canton, Ohio, released a statement on Tuesday saying he would give his accept- ance speech at his alma mater.

“I have decided to give my Hall of Fame

speech at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in McKenzie Arena on Saturday, August 4,” Owens posted on Twitter. “The event, which is free and open to the public, starts at 3:17 p.m.” Owens added that he is “proud to be a Moc, and I’m honored to be able to share this experience with my family, friends, team- mates and fans at the place that provided me an opportunity beyond high school and where I truly began to find myself as an ath- lete.” The 44-year-old Owens said he is looking

forward to the event, and “Getcha popcorn ready.” Owens was a three- sport athlete at Chattanooga, where he played football from 1992-95. He also played basketball and ran track for the Mocs. Owens said he “realized just how

much I want to celebrate what will inevitably be the best weekend of my life at a place that means so much to me.” He was voted into the hall in February after being denied in his first two years of eligi- bility. His announcement last month that he was skipping the Aug. 4 induction ceremony at the Pro Football Hall of Fame is unprece- dented by an enshrinee.

In a statement released last month by his publicist, Owens said: “While I am incredi- bly appreciative of this opportunity, I have made the decision to publicly decline my invitation to attend the induction ceremony in Canton.

my invitation to attend the induction ceremony in Canton. Terrell Owens “After visiting Canton earlier this

Terrell Owens

“After visiting Canton earlier this year, I came to the realization that I wish to cele- brate what will be one of the most memo- rable days of my life, elsewhere,” Owens added. “At a later date, I will announce where and when I will celebrate my induction.” Chattanooga athletic director Mark Wharton said Tuesday that Owens first spoke with school officials “several months ago” about the possibility of having some type of event in Chattanooga. At the time, Owens hadn’t yet indicated he was skipping the Canton induction ceremony. Wharton said Owens spoke with them again “two to three weeks ago” about the possibility of giving his induction speech on campus and that officials were “ecstatic” about the idea. “Obviously we supported him going to Canton,” Wharton said. “At the time, there hadn’t been any living Hall of Fame mem- bers who did not go to Canton, so our assumption was that he was (going to Canton). But in multiple conversations with him and his team, he felt most comfortable

doing it in a place that molded him into the player and person he is today.” Wharton said the specifics of the Aug. 4 ceremony haven’t been finalized, but he expects a weekend full of events around town honoring Owens. Owens entered the league as a third-round pick by San Francisco in 1996 and devel- oped into a star known for some memorable playoff appearances, including his winning 25-yard TD catch to beat Green Bay in 1999; his 177 yards in a comeback win against the Giants in 2003; and his nine catches for 122 yards in the 2004 Super Bowl against New England just seven weeks after breaking his leg. He ranks second to Jerry Rice with 15,934 yards receiving and is third on the all-time touchdowns receiving list with 153. Owens heavily criticized the voting process when he failed to be elected in 2016 and 2017. Among the reasons he fell short were his being considered a divisive team- mate and negative presence in the locker room.

team- mate and negative presence in the locker room. Former champions Sharapova, Kvitova beaten at Wimbledon

Former champions Sharapova, Kvitova beaten at Wimbledon

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON— These are not the sorts of match- es Maria Sharapova is supposed to lose, letting lead after lead slip away Tuesday against a quali- fier ranked 132nd — and in the first round of Wimbledon, no less. Then again, at this edition of The Championships, as they prefer to call the event around here, the initial 48 hours have provided more surprising exits than anyone’s accus- tomed to: A total of seven top-10 men’s and women’s seeds departed in the opening round, more than in any previous year in the profes- sional era’s half-century. That includes two-time champion and No. 8 seed Petra Kvitova, who was sent home by Aliaksandra Sasnovich of Belarus 6-4, 4-6, 6-0 a few hours before 2004 titlist Sharapova fold- ed against Vitalia Diatchenko in a 6-7 (3), 7-6 (3), 6-4 loss she seemingly controlled time and again before dropping the last three games. “Sometimes,” Sharapova said, “you put your- self in a better or winning position, and you don’t finish.”

A 15-month doping ban kept her out of the

grass-court Grand Slam tournament in 2016, and an injury sidelined her a year ago. It looked as if it would be a pleasant, straightforward return when she went ahead by a set and a break at 5-2. Sharapova then served for the match at 5-3, but faltered. After being pushed to a third set, Sharapova went up a break at 2-1. That edge dis- appeared right away. She went up another break at 4-3. That advantage, too, was given right back. Sharapova’s collapse eventually ended, perhaps fittingly, with her 11th double-fault. How unlikely was this result? Since losing the first two Grand Slam match- es of her career as a teenager, Sharapova was 49- 1 in openers at majors, 13-0 at Wimbledon. She’s a former No. 1, now seeded 24th, who owns five Grand Slam titles. And Diatchenko? Repeatedly sidetrackedby injuries of one sort or another — “I think I will write a book after I finish playing,” Diatchenko joked about her health history — the 27-year-old Russian came into the day 0-2 at Wimbledon and 8-25 overall in main-draw matches at all tour-level events.

8-25 overall in main-draw matches at all tour-level events. Sports brief Eating titans take on hot

Sports brief

Eating titans take on hot dog contest

NEW YORK — It’s frankly amazing. Chowdown champions will face off Wednesday at Nathan’s Famous July Fourth hot dog eating contest, where the men’s record stands at 72 frankfurters and buns in 10 minutes. Ten-time winner Joey “Jaws” Chestnut will confront 20 other men on New York’s Coney Island boardwalk. He set the record last year. Miki Sudo (MIHK’-ee SOO’-doh) is seek- ing a fifth women’s title in a row. The 19-

woman field includes record-holder Sonya “The Black Widow” Thomas. Sudo downed 41 franks and buns last year. Thomas’ record is 45, but she managed 30 last year. The event attracts thousands of in-person spectators and is televised on ESPN. Last year, animal rights activists tried to unfold a banner amid the crowd. Five pro- testers were taken into custody for question- ing and released. The contest is shown on ESPN 2, with the women’s contest going off at 7:50 a.m., followed by the men’s contest at 9 a.m.

contest is shown on ESPN 2, with the women’s contest going off at 7:50 a.m., followed
contest is shown on ESPN 2, with the women’s contest going off at 7:50 a.m., followed
contest is shown on ESPN 2, with the women’s contest going off at 7:50 a.m., followed

014 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 10:51 PM Page 1

14 Wednesday July 4, 2018

271 7/3/18 10:51 PM Page 1 14 Wednesday • July 4, 2018 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL HMB Continued

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Wednesday • July 4, 2018 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL HMB Continued from page 11 M-A scored the go-ahead

HMB

Continued from page 11

M-A scored the go-ahead run in the top of the seventh before Armstrong’s heroics ended it in the bottom of the frame. “We knew it would be a tough game,” Scatena said. M-A jumped out to a quick 1-0 lead in the first against the hard-throwing Harrington. M-A leadoff hitter Mikey McGrath, who was saddled with the loss after a stellar three- plus innings of relief, led off the game with a full-count walk. He went to second on an Oliver Kwan sacrifice bunt and scored on Kelly Rowant’s hard shot to center field. Kwan, who hurt his knee as he tried to beat out his bunt and had to leave the game, was replaced by Calem Filipek at second base and wouldn’t you know it but HMB’s leadoff hitter Ben Cleary smoked a hard grounder right Filipek, who went to his knees to snare the grounder, nearly knocking him over. He stayed with the play, however, and recorded the out at first. Filipek then came to the plate in the top of the third and hammered a 3-2 pitch over the center-field fence to put M-A up 2-0 against a team that beat it 8-2 in the win- ner’s bracket final earlier in the tournament. HMB, which was making good contact but had nothing to show for it through the first two innings, finally broke through in the third. It’s first hit was a swinging bunt off the bat of Ben Cleary, a squibber up the third base line that Cleary beat out and went to second on an overthrow. He would have scored regardless of where he was on the basepaths as two batters later, Harrington smashed a two-run bomb over the fence in left field to tie the game at 2. Both teams then wasted bases-loaded opportunities. In the top of the fourth, James Gray walked and Davonnie Bower sin- gled. After a strikeout, Shawny Pagee walked to load the bases. Scatena turned to Cleary to relieve Gavin

to load the bases. Scatena turned to Cleary to relieve Gavin NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL M-A’s Calem

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

M-A’s Calem Filipek hits a solo home run in the top of the third inning to give his team a 2-0 lead.

Glyan and he got a strikeout for the second out and then struck out the next batter. But the HMB catcher dropped the third strike. As the batter hustled down the first- base line, Armstrong, who was also HMB’s starting catcher, grabbed the lose ball and tagged out the base runner coming from third base to get out of the jam. “When the bases were loaded, we needed two strikeouts and [Cleary] is the guy,” Scatena said. HMB loaded the bases in the bottom of the fifth, also with one out, but McGrath wiggled out of trouble, getting back-to- back strikeouts, including the final out looking. “[McGrath] did a great job,” Manager Pagee said. M-A retook the lead in the top of seventh in similar fashion as its run in the first. With two outs, McGrath reached base for the third time in the game with a single to left. He moved to second on a passed ball and scored on a Filipek double to the fence in center. That only set up Armstrong’s heroics in the bottom of the inning. “(Hitting that home) brought me back to my first (Little League) homer. ‘Am I dream- ing?’” Armstrong said after he raced around the bases. “I wanted to get all the way around so I could celebrate with my teammates.”

PAC AM

Continued from page 11

Pacifica American manager Scott Nemes said. “I saw they were in this game (as the rally pro- gressed) and that they could get this thing done. So, I think it’s a testament to the whole team. I couldn’t be happier for them.” Austin Snead capped the six-run rally with a clutch bases-loaded, two-run double. Snead said he knew the moment he made contact with the liner up the right-center field gap it would be enough to score Kagan Plumb with the tying run andNate Fahey from secondwith the game-winner. “I knew we were going to win it,” Snead said, “because it was almost to the fence and they were fast runners.” APacifica win seemed the unlikeliest of sce- narios at the start of the inning though, espe- cially considering how San Mateo American starting pitcher Hugo Guzman was throwing. In a rematch of last Friday’s winners’ bracket semifinal, Guzman again squared off against Pacifica left-hander Nate Balmy. While Balmy dominated last week’s semifi- nal — Guzman was still sensationally, need- ing just 59 pitches to record a complete-game in the hard-luck loss — this time it was Guzman who emerged with the upper hand, allowing just one hit through five-plus innings of work, while shutting out Pacifica through the first five frames. “He gave us 11 awesome, dominant innings in the tournament,” San Mateo American manager Jason Gordon said. “I think we need- ed to finish it for him.” Guzman departed after issuing a hit batsman and a walk to start the sixth. Then, Pacifica went to work. Balmy scorched an RBI double to right-center to score D.J Delaney. Brody Hatch followed with a two-run double to plate Alex Wineinger and Balmy. After a single by Plumb, the pinch-hitter Fahey bounced back from an 0-2 count to draw a walk to load the bases. No. 9 hitter Reggie Fong then laced an RBI single to score Hatch, closing the score to 5-4 and setting the stage for Snead’s hero- ics. “They picked it up,” said Nemes, who said his team seemed a little lethargic earlier in the game. “They seemed to have a little more hop in their step.” Plumb opened with a rough first inning, though the left-hander certainly caught some bad breaks as San Mateo rallied for a three-run first. But after Guzman andXavier Cruz opened the game with back-to-back singles, Plumb nearly escaped the jam with a would-be triple play, but a controversial call went against Pacifica to open the floodgates for San Mateo’s big inning. The strange play was a result of a fly ball to right-center off the bat of San Mateo’s Chase

Gordon. As the Pacifica right fielder Plumb and center fielder Delaney converged, Plumb gloved the ball as he and Delaney collided. Both hit the ground with Plumb apparently catching the ball, but the umpire immediately gave the safe call, signaling the ball had been dropped. Plumb said he held on to the ball. “Me and D.J., we weren’t talking, so we just crashed into each other,” Plumb said. “And then I just caught the ball — I thought I caught the ball so I didn’t think I needed to throw it in.” As a result, Guzman motored around to score, giving San Mateo a 1-0 lead. According to four different accounts by fans along the outfield fence who had the best vantage point of the play, it was unanimous Plumb made the catch. “It was a helluva play by that right fielder,” Gordon said. “To hang on to that ball, if he did, that’s a great play.” San Mateo took advantage as Lonzo Montorio added an RBI single. Then with run- ners at the corners, Montorio got into a run- down between first and second to allow Gordon to swipe home plate, giving San Mateo a 3-0 lead. San Mateo added a run in the second when R.J. Church scored on a wild pitch. Then in the fifth, facing the Pacifica bullpen, San Mateo added another run after a single by Ruiz and a double by Chase Gordon, when Ruiz scored on a wild pitch. After Pacifica’s Fong pitched the fifth inning in relief, Nemes lifted him to keep him available for a possible Wednesday game which, at the time, looked inevitable. “It wasn’t looking good,” Nemes said. “So we felt we needed to do that.” Delaney entered to pitch the sixth, working through one of four Pacifica errors to breeze through the inning on just nine pitches. It turned out to be the winning effort. Pacifica American now advances to the Section 3 tournament, starting next Thursday in Fremont.

Hillsborough is 10-11 champions

Through four wins to reach the champi- onship round of the District 52 Little League All-Star 10-11s Tournament, Hillsborough had relied on the dominant pitching of Anakin Manuel and power bat of Beau Schaffer. In Tuesday’s showdown with Foster City at the Belmont Sports Complex, Hillsborough flipped the script in an 8-2 victory to claim the District 52 banner. Manuel was Hillsborough’s big bopper, going 2 for 3 with a home run and four RBIs, and Schaffer pitched into the sixth inning, going 5 2/3 to earn the win. Hillsborough leadoff hitter Nate Coughlin was 3 for 3 with four runs scored. Devin Saltzgaber added two hits, while Joshua Mayol and Rustam Fouret had two hits apiece for Foster City.

runs scored. Devin Saltzgaber added two hits, while Joshua Mayol and Rustam Fouret had two hits
runs scored. Devin Saltzgaber added two hits, while Joshua Mayol and Rustam Fouret had two hits
runs scored. Devin Saltzgaber added two hits, while Joshua Mayol and Rustam Fouret had two hits

015 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:55 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:55 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Wednesday • July 4, 2018 15

SPORTS

Wednesday July 4, 2018

15

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Wednesday • July 4, 2018 15 Forsberg delivers for Sweden THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ST.

Forsberg delivers for Sweden

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia — Shy, diminutive and without

that distinctive ponytail, Emil Forsberg couldn’t be more differ- ent than the larger-than-life Zlatan Ibrahimovic. They share an ability to conjure something out of nothing on a soccer field, though, as Forsberg showed in leading Sweden into the World Cup quarterfinals for the first

time in 24 years. Forsberg dropped his shoulder to create space at the edge of the area and scored with a deflected shot to earn the Swedes a 1-0 vic- tory over Switzerland on Tuesday. “It brings tears to my eyes,” Forsberg said, “and makes me so proud.” The 26-year-old Forsberg arrived in Russia shouldering much of Sweden’s cre- ative burden following the international

retirement of Ibrahimovic, who ruled the national team for more than a decade and is the greatest player the country ever produced. Forsberg was quiet in the group stage but the attacking mid- fielder’s skills and slick movement stood out against Switzerland in an otherwise scrappy game between two of Europe’s less-decorated nations. “He has developed in terms of the holistic approach to his game,” Sweden coach Janne Andersson said. “Even if he doesn’t succeedin every dribble, in every part of his game he contributes in so many ways and he has those decisive moments.” Forsberg didn’t get much power behind his shot and it was likely heading straight for Switzerland goalkeeper Yann

was likely heading straight for Switzerland goalkeeper Yann Emil Forsberg Sommer. However, it took a deflection

Emil Forsberg

Sommer. However, it took a deflection off the foot of center back Manuel Akanji and bounced up and into the net. Sweden became the fifth European team to reach the quarterfi- nals and will next play England on Saturday in Samara. Limited but with a highly effective game plan, the Swedes should not be underestimated. This was another opportunity spurnedby the Swiss, who have reached the last 16 in four of their last five appearances at the World Cup only to be eliminated without scoring a goal. They haven’t scored in a knockout game in soccer’s biggest tourna- ment in 64 years, when they last reached in the quarterfinals at home in 1954. They finished the game with 10 men after right back Michael Lang was sent off in stoppage time for a professional foul on Sweden substitute Martin Olsson. The referee initially awarded a penalty kick but later gave a free kick on the edge of the area after a video review. Switzerland was fortunate to still be in the match at that point. Ibrahimovic, now 36 and playing out his illustrious career in the United States, would surely have put away some of the first- half chances created by his countrymen against a fragile Switzerland defense which was missing the suspended Fabian Schaer and Stephan Lichtsteiner. Striker Marcus Berg was the biggest culprit, spurning two openings in quick succession, while Albin Ekdal volleyed over with the goal at his mercy. The Swedes were limited but played to the strengths that got them past Italy in the two-leg World Cup playoff and to the top of a group containing defending champion Germany, Mexico and South Korea. Their long balls forward caused panic and they were more bullish in their tackling in midfield.

SOCCER

Continued from page 11

in a European Championship semifinal loss to Germany. That defeat at home was treated almost as a national trauma, as was the penalty loss to Argentina two years later. Pickford only emerged as a leading Premier League keeper last year and made his debut for England in November. But he has rapidly become part of Gareth Southgate’s new generation of English talent. On an evening that ended with such frenetic energy, Pickford had little to do earlier. Colombia was on the defensive for most of the first half and lacked bite in attack. England took the lead on a Harry Kane penalty in the 57th and Colombia came charging back. In stoppage time Mateus Uribe fired a stinging shot from long range and Pickford leaped to keep it out with one outstretched hand, sending it wide of the goal and cannoning into the advertising boards. Pickford could do nothing about the subsequent corner. Colombia defender Yerry Mina rose above Harry Maguire and headed the ball off the turf and in despite Kieran Trippier’s headed clearance attempt. Extra time and penalties loomed, and fans felt the weight of those 22 years without a shootout win. It wasn’t just England’s miserable record which seemed to stack the odds against the team. Its penalty takers lacked experience of major tournaments — though none of the penal- ty takers had been involved in any of those shootout losses — and had to stare down a stand packed with raucous Colombian fans. While Colombia’s David Ospina stood taciturn, staring down England’s penalty takers, Pickford was a ball of energy. He jumped and jiggled on the line.

was a ball of energy. He jumped and jiggled on the line. REUTERS/KAI PFAFFENBACH England goalkeeper

REUTERS/KAI PFAFFENBACH

England goalkeeper Jordan Pickford makes a save on Colombia’s fifth penalty kick of a shootout.

Falcao sent Pickford diving headlong before placing the ball through the unguarded center. Juan Cuadrado put the ball high and left, far beyond Pickford’s reach. Luis Muriel sent him diving the wrong way. With England 3-2 down and facing elimination, Pickford leaped to touch the crossbar as Mateus Uribe stepped up, and the Colombian blasted the ball into the bar. Trippier made it 3-3, and Pickford was up again to face Bacca. After saving from the AC Milan forward, he squatted to the side of the penalty area, frog-like in his green uniform. Dier hit the winning penalty low and left for England and Pickford’s teammates charged toward him to celebrate in a group hug. The joy of victory was built on self-belief, Pickford said. “Our mindset and mentality, we never stopped,” he said. “We knew we had this game even if it went to penalties.”

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Sports briefs

Source:Warriors to re-sign big man Kevon Looney

OAKLAND — A person with direct knowledge of the agree-

ment says versatile big man Kevon Looney will re-sign with the Golden State Warriors. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Tuesday because Looney’s deal cannot become official until he signs after the moratorium period is lifted Friday. Bringing back Looney, a power forward and center, was a top priority for general manager Bob Myers to keep the young core of the two-time defending NBA champions together.

Looney lost about 30 pounds last offsea-

son to transform his body, make himself faster and give him a regular spot in coach Steve Kerr’s rota- tion, even earning starts in five postseason games during the absence of Andre Iguodala. While the Warriors lost center JaVale McGee to the Lakers, they added DeMarcus Cousins on Monday to give Golden State five potential All-Star starters once Cousins returns from a torn Achilles tendon that required surgery.

NFL confirms Edelman must serve four-game suspension

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016 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 10:38 PM Page 1

16 Wednesday July 4, 2018

7/3/18 10:38 PM Page 1 1 6 Wednesday • July 4, 2018 S P O R

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

AOTS

Continued from page 11

through one person … but she def- initely knows how to turn it to a different level. (She knows when to) just have a great game when we need her to.” Wolfenden scored five goals twice this season and netted four goals six times this season. What might be most impressive, how- ever, was her shooting percent- age. Coming in the flow of the Menlo offense, Wolfenden scored on nearly 61 percent of her shots, scoring 53 goals on just 87 shots. As a team, Menlo scored on 55 percent of its shots. “I think it’s really important to keep a well-rounded attack. I want everyone working together,” Schaeffer said. “One thing I want our attack to know is, I don’t care what your stat book is, anybody can shut down one player. Everyone (on our team) has the mindset of making everyone

(around them) better.” A lot of Wolfenden’s success can be attributed to the fact she has been playing the game since sec- ond-grade, giving her tremendous knowledge of the game and a high lacrosse IQ. Her experience allows Wolfenden to survey the field and use her skills to get in positions that prove most dangerous. “She understands how to make the defenders move,” Schaeffer said. “She has great footwork, a hard dodge and has a good shot. She can pretty much play any- where. She’s pretty versatile.” Said Wolfenden: “I have a pretty good knowledge of the game and how it works.” As long as she’s been playing lacrosse, Wolfenden has actually played soccer for a longer amount of time but doesn’t play club soc- cer, focusing instead on lacrosse year-round. Yet Wolfenden still plays for the Menlo girls’ soccer team. And while she has excelled as an attacker on the lacrosse field, on the soccer pitch she is an outside defender. There seems to be little

in common between the two posi- tions, but Wolfenden believes her defensive play in soccer can help her attack in lacrosse. “It’s kind of cool to get both perspectives,” Wolfenden said. “Being a defender in soccer, you see the whole field. I think some of that can transfer over to lacrosse.” The Knights got off to a bit of a shaky start this past season, going 5-5 against a tough sched- ule, including a 7-6 loss to rival Sacred Heart Prep in the fourth game of the year to even the Knights’ record at 2-2. But after suffering an 18-12, non-league loss to Amador Valley- Plesanton, the Knights ripped off 10 straight wins to end the season. They avenged their one league loss to the rival Gators, 10-5, in the season finale. “I think we definitely improved a lot over the season,” Wolfenden said. “At the beginning, we had some pretty tough games out of league. But everyone gave 100 percent.”

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL American League LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Reinstated RHP-OF Shohei Ohtani from the 10-day DL. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Reinstated 3B Matt Chapman from the 10-day DL. Optioned INF Franklin Barreto to Nashville (PCL). NBA CHICAGO BULLS — Signed C Wendell Carter Jr. and F Chandler Hutchison.

DENVER NUGGETS — Agreed to terms with F Michael Porter Jr. on a multiyear contract. GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS — Signed C DeMar- cus Cousins to a one-year contract. NEW YORK KNICKS — Signed F Isaiah Hicks and G Allonzo Trier. ORLANDO MAGIC — Signed C Mo Bamba. NFL NFL — Suspended Green Bay RB Aaron Jones,San Francisco LB Reuben Foster and Los Angeles Rams

G Jamon Brown for the first two games and New England Patriots WR Julian Edelman four games of the 2018 regular season for violating the NFL Pol- icy and Program for Substances of Abuse.

TENNIS

TENNIS INTEGRITY UNIT — Announced Egypt- ian player Karim Hossam was banned for life and fined $15,000 after being convicted of multiple match-fixing offenses.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

East Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Boston

58

29

.667

New York

55

28

.663

1

Tampa Bay

43

42

.506

14

Toronto

40

45

.471

17

Baltimore

24

60

.286

32 1/2

Central Division

 

Cleveland

47

37

.560

Detroit

38

49

.437

10 1/2

Minnesota

35

47

.427

11

Chicago

30

55

.353

17 1/2

Kansas City

25

60

.294

22 1/2

West Division

Houston

56

31

.644

Seattle

55

31

.640

1/2

A’s

47

39

.547

8 1/2

Los Angeles

43

43

.500

12 1/2

Texas

38

48

.442

17 1/2

Tuesday’sGames Chicago Cubs 5,Detroit 3 Milwaukee 2,Minnesota 0 Boston 11,Washington 4 N.Y.Yankees 8,Atlanta 5 Philadelphia 3,Baltimore 2 Toronto 8,N.Y.Mets 6 Chicago White Sox 12,Cincinnati 8,12 innings Tampa Bay 9,Miami 6,16 innings Houston 5,Texas 3 Cleveland 6,Kansas City 4 Oakland 6,San Diego 2 Seattle 4,L.A.Angels 1 Wednesday’s Games

Boston

(Rodriguez 9-3)

atWashington (Fedde 1-3),8:05

a.m.

Atlanta

(Teheran 6-5) at

N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 5-3),10:05

a.m.

Tampa Bay (TBD) at Miami (Urena 2-9),10:10 a.m. Detroit (Liriano 3-4) at Cubs (Quintana 6-6),11:20 a.m. Baltimore (Hess 2-5) at Philly (Nola 10-2),1:05 p.m. San Diego (Lauer 3-5) at A’s (Manaea 8-6),1:05 p.m. L.A.Angels (TBD) at Seattle (Leake 8-4),1:10 p.m.

Minnesota(Berrios8-6)atMilwaukee(Anderson6-6),1:10p.m.

Houston (McCullers 9-3) at Texas (Minor 6-4),4:05 p.m. Mets (Oswalt 0-1) at Toronto (Stroman 1-5),4:07 p.m.

at Cincinnati (Romano 4-8),4:10 p.m.

White Sox (Covey 3-3)

Cleveland (Bauer 7-6) at KC(Kennedy 1-8),5:15 p.m. Thursday’sGames

Texas at Detroit,4:10 p.m. Baltimore at Minnesota,5:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Houston,5:10 p.m. L.A.Angels at Seattle,7:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

East Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Atlanta

49

35

.583

Philadelphia

46

37

.554

2 1/2

Washington

42

42

.500

7

New York

33

49

.402

15

Miami

35

52

.402

15 1/2

Central Division

 

Milwaukee

50

35

.588

Chicago

48

35

.578

1

St. Louis

43

41

.512

6 1/2

Pittsburgh

40

45

.471

10

Cincinnati

37

49

.430

13 1/2

West Division

Arizona

48

38

.558

Los Angeles

46

39

.541

1 1/2

Giants

45

42

.517

3 1/2

Colorado

43

43

.500

5

San Diego

37

50

.425

11 1/2

Tuesday’s Games

Chicago Cubs 5, Detroit 3 Milwaukee 2, Minnesota 0 Boston 11,Washington 4 N.Y.Yankees 8, Atlanta 5 Philadelphia 3, Baltimore 2 Toronto 8, N.Y. Mets 6 Chicago White Sox 12, Cincinnati 8, 12 innings Tampa Bay 9, Miami 6, 16 innings Colorado 8, San Francisco 1 Oakland 6, San Diego 2 Arizona 4, St. Louis 2 L.A. Dodgers 8, Pittsburgh 3 Wednesday’s Games

Boston (Rodriguez 9-3) atWashington (Fedde 1-3),8:05 a.m.

Atlanta (Teheran 6-5) atYankees (Sabathia 5-3),10:05 a.m. Tampa Bay (TBD) at Miami (Urena 2-9), 10:10 a.m. Detroit (Liriano 3-4) at Cubs (Quintana 6-6),11:20 a.m. Baltimore (Hess 2-5) at Philly (Nola 10-2), 1:05 p.m. San Diego (Lauer 3-5) at A’s (Manaea 8-6),1:05 p.m.

Minnesota(Berrios8-6)atMilwaukee(Anderson6-6),1:10p.m.

Mets (Oswalt 0-1) at Toronto (Stroman 1-5),4:07 p.m.

White Sox (Covey 3-3)

at Cincinnati (Romano 4-8),4:10 p.m.

Giants(Suarez 3-4) at Colorado (Anderson 5-3),5:10 p.m. St.Louis (Mikolas 8-3) at Arizona (Corbin 6-3),7:10 p.m. Thursday’s Games

Miami at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.

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017 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:19 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:19 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL FOOD Wednesday • July 4, 2018 17

FOOD

Wednesday July 4, 2018

17

Simple American buttercream improves flag sheet cake

2018 17 Simple American buttercream improves flag sheet cake THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A big flag sheet

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A big flag sheet cake is the perfect Fourth of July dessert; and at a time when patriotic- colored berries are at their best, vibrant blueberries and red raspberries are a fitting topping. We knew that our workhorse yellow sheet cake was the ideal base for the cake, so our challenge when developing this recipe was simply determining the best frosting. Whipped cream, the most common top- ping for this summer cake, had little stay- ing power and the juicy berries bled into the cream. A simple American buttercream in the form of our vanilla frosting worked much better and ably glued the stars and stripes to the cake. Once our cake was topped with berries, we were able to bring the flag to the table. You may have extra frosting after coating the tops and sides of the cake. Wait until a few hours before serving to arrange the berries to ensure that they taste fresh at serving time.

FLAG CAKE

Servings: 12-15

Start to finish: 1 hour and 30 minutes, plus 2 hours to cool the cake Yellow Sheet Cake:

2 1/2 cups (10 ounces) cake flour

1 3/4 cups (12 1/4 ounces) sugar

1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda 3/4 teaspoon salt

1 cup buttermilk, room temperature

3 large eggs, separated, plus 3 large yolks, room temperature

10 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled

3

tablespoons vegetable oil

2

teaspoons vanilla extract

Pinch cream of tartar

5 cups Vanilla Frosting:

1 pound (4 sticks) unsalted butter, each stick cut into quarters and softened 1/4 cup heavy cream

stick cut into quarters and softened 1/4 cup heavy cream A simple American buttercream in the

A simple American buttercream in the form of vanilla frosting works much better than whipped cream and ably glues the stars and stripes to the cake.

1 tablespoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon salt

4 cups (16 ounces) confectioners’ sugar Toppings:

5 ounces (1 cup) blueberries

15 ounces (3 cups) raspberries Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 325 F. Grease and flour 13 by 9-inch baking pan. Whisk flour, 1 1/2 cups sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt together in bowl. Whisk buttermilk, egg yolks, melted butter, oil, and vanilla together in second bowl. Whisk flour, 1 1/2 cups sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt together in bowl. Whisk buttermilk, egg yolks, melted butter, oil, and vanilla together in second bowl. Using stand mixer fitted with whisk

attachment, whip egg whites and cream of tartar on medium-low speed until foamy, about 1 minute. Increase speed to medium-

high and whip whites to soft billowy mounds, about 1 minute. Gradually add remaining 1/4 cup sugar and whip until glossy, stiff peaks form, 2 to 3 minutes; transfer to third bowl. Add flour mixture to now-empty mixer bowl and mix on low speed, gradually adding buttermilk mixture and mixing until almost incorporated (a few streaks of dry flour will remain), about 15 seconds. Scrape down bowl, then mix on medium-low speed until smooth and fully incorporated, 10 to 15 seconds. Using rubber spatula, stir one-third of whites into batter. Gently fold remaining whites into batter until no white streaks remain. Transfer batter to prepared pan and smooth top with rub- ber spatula. Gently tap pan on counter to settle batter. Bake until toothpick insert-

on counter to settle batter. Bake until toothpick insert- ed in center comes out clean, 28

ed in center comes out clean, 28 minutes to 32 minutes, rotating pan halfway through baking. Let cake cool completely in pan on wire rack, about 2 hours. While cake cools, assemble the frosting. Using stand mixer fitted with paddle, beat butter, cream, vanilla, and salt on medium- high speed until smooth, about 1 minute. Reduce speed to medium-low, slowly add sugar, and beat until incorporated and smooth, about 4 minutes. Increase speed to medium-high and beat until frosting is light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. (Frosting can be refrigerated for up to 3 days; let soften at room temperature, about 2 hours, then rewhip on medium speed until smooth, 2 to 5 minutes.) To assemble, line edges of cake platter with 4 strips of parchment to keep platter clean. Place cake on platter. Spread frosting evenly over top and sides of cake. Using blueberries, outline 6 by 4 1/2-inch rectan- gle in top left corner of cake. Make diago-

nal rows of blueberries within outline, leav- ing single blueberry’s width between rows. Lay additional blueberries evenly between rows to make blueberry checkerboard. Gently press blueberries to adhere. For red stripes, lay raspberries on their side and gently nestle them next to one another. There should be 4 short rows of raspberry stripes across top of cake and 3 long rows of raspberry stripes across bot- tom of cake. Gently press raspberries to adhere. Serve. Nutrition information per serving: 765 calories; 379 calories from fat; 43 g fat (24

g saturated; 2 g trans fats); 199 mg choles-

terol; 295 mg sodium; 92 g carbohydrate; 3

g fiber; 65 g sugar; 6 g protein.

g saturated; 2 g trans fats); 199 mg choles- terol; 295 mg sodium; 92 g carbohydrate;
g saturated; 2 g trans fats); 199 mg choles- terol; 295 mg sodium; 92 g carbohydrate;
g saturated; 2 g trans fats); 199 mg choles- terol; 295 mg sodium; 92 g carbohydrate;
g saturated; 2 g trans fats); 199 mg choles- terol; 295 mg sodium; 92 g carbohydrate;

018 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:31 PM Page 1

18 Wednesday July 4, 2018

7/3/18 8:31 PM Page 1 1 8 Wednesday • July 4, 2018 L O C A

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SURF AIR

Continued from page 1

operations for Surf Air June 15 and has been working to refocus its efforts in the coming weeks. “We’ll restructure and recover and get through this,” he said. “But it’s a pretty heavy blow when your one and only cus- tomer walks away.” The sudden shift in Surf Air’s operator from Encompass Aviation, which signed on with the airline in May of 2017, to another Southern California-based company, AdvancedAir, which announced the new part- nership in a press release June 16, marks the latest in a string of agreement violations Surf Air committed in the yearlong contract between the two, according to the suit. Surf Air did not respond to requests for comment on the suit or a tax lien filed by county offi- cials against Surf Air in 2017 to the tune of

$131,372.51.

Failing to pay for flights two weeks in advance, defaulting on its payments and

breaking a February written promise from Surf Air’s Executive Chairman Sudhin Shahani that the airline would catch up on overdue payments and turn over to the former operator 25 percent of new capital raised on account of overdue payments are among other ways the airline violated agreements with Encompass Aviation, according to the suit. The change in Surf Air’s operator has also marked a shift in its operations at the coun- ty-owned San Carlos Airport, where a reduced number of Surf Air flights has been recorded, confirmed airport manager Gretchen Kelly. Surf Air is a commuter airline that offers unlimited flight service for a fixed monthly fee. Though it has operated flights in and out of the San Carlos Airport since 2013, the air- line has drawn the ire of some residents in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties who have voiced concerns about the airline’s role in noise emanating from the general aviation airport where pilots of small aircraft have historically trained. Under Encompass Aviation’s operations of Surf Air flights, the airline averaged 9.1 daily arrivals and 10.2 daily arrivals at the San Carlos Airport in the first and second quarters

of 2018, respectively. Those numbers dropped to a daily average of 1.7 arrivals the week of June 18 and 2.9 arrivals the week of June 25 after the airline’s operations shifted to Advanced Air, according to Kelly and air- port communications specialist Davi Howard. Measures to stem the effects of Surf Air flights have ramped up in recent years and include the creation of a cross-jurisdictional working group, including the Federal Aviation Administration, elected officials, San Carlos Airport staff and Surf Air repre- sentatives. The group designed and executed a six-month trial in the second half of 2016 of a flight route directing Surf Air flights in and out of the San Carlos Airport over the Bay instead of over Peninsula neighbor- hoods, one of several strategies aimed at mit- igating the airplane noise for residents. Though the route, dubbed the Bayside Visual Approach, was deemed feasible, the FAA is conducting an environmental review of the trial. FAA spokesman Ian Gregor con- firmed the environmental review for Surf Air’s proposed Bayside Visual Approach has yet to be finished and a completion date for the study has yet to be set.

After the 2016 trial of the Bayside Visual Approach, some Surf Air pilots had received approval from the FAA to use the route on days with good weather, but Kelly said in operating Surf Air flights, Advanced Air does not yet have permission to fly the test path. To explore noise mitigation strategies, county officials have also hired a consultant to explore other alternate routes pilots can take into the airport that don’t affect neigh- borhoods, installed an updated monitoring system providing real-time data on the path pilots are using and ramped up communica- tion with pilots regarding noise abatement procedures. Though Harfst declined to comment on what’s ahead for the next operator of Surf Air flights at the San Carlos Airport, he acknowledged the intricacies of working in the crowded airspace near the San Francisco International Airport and said his company was committed to working with the jurisdic- tions and agencies involved in the airport’s noise mitigation efforts. “As an operator, we really worked hard to be a good steward of our operation with San Mateo County and the airport,” he said.

SAFETY

Continued from page 1

their neighborhoods,” according to a state- ment from Police Chief Daniel Steidle. For Johansen, he said the entire depart- ment will work through the holiday and a majority of the personnel will be responding to calls and complaints regarding fireworks. On any given year, he said his department fields between 200 and 400 nuisance reports, which last year resulted in about 25 citations for illegal fireworks. “It’s very challenging to make arrests for

these violations,” he said. “It only takes a couple of seconds for something to be launched and it is hard to be at the right place at the right time.” In recognition of those challenges, he said the department will send undercover and plain-clothes officers on the lookout for ille- gal fireworks and also deploy enhanced sur- veillance with cameras mounted on police cruisers. Yet despite their best efforts, Johansen rec- ognizes the looming threat that exists for fireworks to cause significant personal injury or property damage. “Every year we deal with some brush and roof fires that are problematic for public safety. … And we’ve had several incidences

for public safety. … And we’ve had several incidences SAN CARLOS FARMERS’ MARKET Sunday, July 8,

SAN CARLOS FARMERS’ MARKET

Sunday, July 8, 10 AM – 2 PM Meet Council Member Mark Olbert Music by Pan Extasy!

 

Special performance by San Carlos Children’s Theater at noon

Rain or Shine

Rain or Shine

Rain or Shine
Rain or Shine
Rain or Shine
Rain or Shine
performance by San Carlos Children’s Theater at noon Rain or Shine For more information, visit: SanCarlosChamber.org
performance by San Carlos Children’s Theater at noon Rain or Shine For more information, visit: SanCarlosChamber.org
performance by San Carlos Children’s Theater at noon Rain or Shine For more information, visit: SanCarlosChamber.org
performance by San Carlos Children’s Theater at noon Rain or Shine For more information, visit: SanCarlosChamber.org
performance by San Carlos Children’s Theater at noon Rain or Shine For more information, visit: SanCarlosChamber.org

For more information, visit: SanCarlosChamber.org

of fingers being blown off, or eardrums blown out or car windows getting blown out,” he said. Such risks are cited by John Healy, chief of the San Mateo Consolidated Fire Department, as justification for the prohibi- tion stamped on all fireworks in those com- munities. “Fireworks not only cause immediate physical harm to those improperly using them, but they also pose significant wildfire risks to our urban interface areas,” he said in an email. “Now in the midst of wildfire sea- son, it only takes one spark to cause irre- versible damage. This holiday, we are part- nering with our local police departments to take a zero-tolerance approach and crack down on the illicit possession or use of fire- works, which can result in fines of up to

$1,000.”

Johansen also acknowledged awareness of fire danger is heightened as ash and smoke lingers above the Peninsula, generated by wildfires burning in the North Bay. Outside of the danger posed by fireworks, police officers along the Peninsula are reminding drivers to stay safe by avoiding inebriated driving. Enforcement will span beyond drunk driving, as legalized marijuana means police will keep a watchful eye out for those high and behind the wheel. “Alcohol or drug impaired driving is ille- gal, but it’s also deadly,” Jeff Azzopardi, South San Francisco police chief, said in a prepared statement. “We’re imploring you:

Please ensure you have a sober driver lined up to get you home safely from your holiday festivities. Doing so could save a life.” For those seeking a family-friendly cele-

bration, the San Mateo Parks and Recreation Department will host a party featuring music, arts, crafts, face painting, an obsta- cle course and more at Martin Luther King Jr. Park from noon until 2 p.m., at the corner of Monte Diablo Avenue and North Fremont Street. Locals looking for a larger fireworks dis- play should visit Leo Ryan Park in Foster City, when the 9 p.m. show starts or the Port of Redwood City, when a 9:30 p.m. show begins. While San Bruno does not sponsor a big- ger fireworks bonanza, Johansen said the local community is not short on patriotism, which is one of the reasons legal fireworks are still allowed. “San Bruno tends to be more old school and blue collar and there is some value to the celebration of our country and our independ- ence and preserving that has been important to our community,” he said. Beyond that, he noted fireworks stands are a primary source of fundraising for communi- ty organizations such as local schools, the Rotary Club and even the police association. “All these groups rely very heavily on this fundraising and they build their business models around the money they generate when selling fireworks,” he said. Outside of the monetary benefits, he noted legal fireworks can offer those celebrating a safe way to recognize their nation’s history without offending their neighbors. “I’ve worked this detail for 13 years and we have very, very, very few problems with safe and sane fireworks. The people who buy them usually don’t create the headache for their community,” he said.

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019 0704 wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:37 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

wed:0704 wed 271 7/3/18 8:37 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL DATEBOOK Wednesday • July 4, 2018 19

DATEBOOK

Wednesday July 4, 2018

19

DATEBOOK Wednesday • July 4, 2018 19 Calendar WEDNESDAY, JULY 4 p.m. Historic Main Street,

Calendar

WEDNESDAY, JULY 4

p.m. Historic Main Street, 501 Main

required. For more information call

48th Ol’ Fashioned Fourth of July

522-7490.

Parade and Block Party. 8 a.m. to 3

St., Half Moon Bay. A mini-Mardi Gras style celebration for the Fourth of July. For more information call 726-

Make-It Summer. 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Sign up today to use 3-D Printer,Vinyl Cutter or Virtual

Public Access Television

8380.

Reality System free of charge. 30

Caldwell Gallery presents ‘Pathways.’ 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 400 County Center at the Hall of Justice, Redwood City. Touching community and solitude through the Printmaking and acrylic paintings of

Celina Rachelle Paul. For more infor-

minute blocks of time will be avail- able for patrons to reserve these maker technologies. Patrons must be 13 and up for Virtual Reality use. To RSVP call 591-8286.

Orientation and Tour. 6 p.m. to 7

mation

contact

p.m. Midpen Media Center, 900 San

celinapaul1@gmail.com.

Antonio Road, Palo Alto. Learn the

Drop-In Computer Help. 10 a.m. to Noon. Redwood City Public Library, 1044 Middlefield Road, Redwood City. Free. For more information call

basics about your public access channels and how you can best make use of them. Free for all ages. For more information call 494-8686.

780-7098.

San Mateo Public Library’s Book

FRIDAY, JULY 6

Celina Rachelle Paul. For more infor-

Ol’ Fashioned Fourth of July Exhibition. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo County History Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Come experience traditional Independence Day crafts and foods. Cost $2 to $3. For more information call 299-0104.

40th Annual Fourth of July Woodside Junior Rodeo. 10 a.m. to 6:35 p.m. 521 Kings Mountain Road, Woodside. Classic Horse events, Pig Scramble, food, Jewelry, hats, DIY

Discussion Group. 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. San Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Meets in Cedar Room. For more information contact cmccarthy@cityofsanma- teo.org.

Caldwell Gallery presents ‘Pathways.’ 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 400 County Center at the Hall of Justice, Redwood City. Touching community and solitude through the Printmaking and acrylic paintings of

crafts, etc. For more information call

mation

contact

851-8300.

celinapaul1@gmail.com.

Toastmasters Public Speaking and Leadership Skills Development. Noon to 1 p.m. BKF Engineers, 255 Shoreline Drive, Suite 200, Redwood Shores. Join us in a friendly and sup- portive atmosphere while learning to improve your communication and leadership skills. For more infor-

Coffee and Coloring. 10 a.m. to noon. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Take a break from your day and relax at the library! Color a page or two and enjoy some refreshments and conversation. Coloring sheets and colored pencils will be provided but

mation call (202) 390-7555.

feel free to bring your own supplies. Free. For more information call 591-

The Bible and Current Events. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Hope Evangelican Lutheran Church, 600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo. For more information contact helc@pacbell.net.

Let Freedom Ring. 2 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Good Shepherd Episcopal Church, 1300 Fifth Ave., Belmont. Bell ringing ceremony to celebrate Independence Day. Church bells ring at 2 p.m. just as the Liberty Ball rang to commemorate the signing of the Declaration of Independence. The great bell will ring 13 times for each of the original colonies, while chapel bell rings 50 times for each of our states. Afterwards, sing patriotic songs, read some of our country’s historical documents and pray for our country and peace around the world. Children can take a turn ring- ing the bell following the ceremony. For more information call 593-4844.

Make-It Summer. 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Sign up today to use 3-D Printer,Vinyl Cutter or Virtual Reality System free of charge. 30 minute blocks of time will be avail- able for patrons to reserve these maker technologies. Patrons must be 13 and up for Virtual Reality use. To RSVP call 591-8286.

Better Choices, Better Health. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. San Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Learn about stress man- agement, dealing with pain and fatigue, weight management and decision making. Registration required. For more information con- tact ashong@cityofsanmateo.org.

TheatreWorks Silicon Valley Presents ‘Native Gardens.’ 7:30 p.m. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. Cost $40 to $100, savings available for educators, sen- iors and patrons 35 and under. For more information contact boxof- fice@theatreworks.org.

THURSDAY, JULY 5 Caldwell Gallery presents ‘Pathways.’ 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 400 County Center at the Hall of Justice, Redwood City. Touching community and solitude through the Printmaking and acrylic paintings of

Celina Rachelle Paul. For more infor-

mation

contact

celinapaul1@gmail.com.

ESL Conversation Club. 10:30 p.m. to noon. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Come practice speaking and listen- ing in English. Improve your gram- mar, vocabulary and pronunciation while meeting people from all over the world. Free. For more informa- tion, call 591-8286.

Mystery Book Club. Noon. South San Francisco Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave., South San Francisco. July’s theme is any cozy mystery by Kate Carlisle. Free. For more informa- tion call 829-3860.

Supervised Play. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. San Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Must have completed Play of the Hand course or have basic knowl- edge and experience with the game. Cost $115 to $140. Registration

8286.

3-D Printing at the Library. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Learn and create a unique design with our 3-D printers! Reserve two

at

www.smcl.org/3Dprinting or by call- ing 591-8286.

Free First Friday. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo County History Museum,

2200 Broadway, Redwood City. For

more information call 299-0104.

Make-It Summer. 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Sign up today to use 3-D Printer,Vinyl Cutter or Virtual Reality System free of charge. 30 minute blocks of time will be avail- able for patrons to reserve these maker technologies. Patrons must be 13 and up for Virtual Reality use. To RSVP call 591-8286.

CuriOdyssey First Friday Family

Night. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. CuriOdyssey,

1651 Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo.

Hour

blocks

of

Admission is $9.50 to $12.50. Swing into the weekend with music, sci- ence, food and fun. For more infor- mation call 342-7755.

Friday Art Series. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Burlingame Library, 480 Primrose Road, Burlingame. Event features screen printing from Eric Kneeland. Free for all ages. For more informa- tion call 558-7400.

SATURDAY, JULY 7 Walking Tour: Sweeney Ridge. 9 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Sweeney Ridge, West End of Sneath Lane San Bruno. Join San Mateo County Historical Association President Mitch Postel as he leads a hike to the top of Sweeney Ridge. Difficulty level:

Difficult (paved but steep in places).

Please

at parks.smcgov.org/take-a-hike.

Windchime Craft for Adults. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Menlo Park Belle Haven Library, 413 Ivy Drive, Menlo Park. Adults will get to create windchimes out of metal washers during a spe- cial craft session. Free. For more information call 330-2540.

Artist showing by Igor Muskatblit. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Marcela’s Village Gallery, 883 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo Park. Chilean born artist Igor Muskatblit will be showing his latest collection of paintings entitled ‘Spring Flowers.’ Free. For more infor- mation call 262-4367.

Wendy Waller One Night Live Performance. 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Dala’s Nest, 371 O’Connor St., Menlo Park. Jazz, folk, gospel and much more. $20. Advance registration is available. For more information con- tact www.WendyWaller.com.

Concer t and Sing-along.

p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Molloy’s Tavern, 1655 Mission Road, South San Francisco. San Francisco Banjo Band. Listen and sing-along. The band plays music from the 1920’s all the way up to the ’60s including all genres: standards, show tunes, jazz, folk and country. Free. For more information call 544-3623.

Live

6:35

RSVP

For more events visit smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

DESIGN

Continued from page 1

Washington Park. Councilwoman Ann Keighran shared a similar perspective. “I think the pavilions integrates the park, and that is what we are trying to accomplish in that area,” she said. “We want people to appreciate the inside and outside and this is an example of how that can be attained.” Under the decision, Group 4 Architecture will move from the con- ceptual design phase to drawing schematics. Design development will continue into next year, leading to plan check, a construction bid award and groundbreaking expected around the start of 2020, said firm representa- tive Dawn Merkes. The new center is slated to be built over the footprint of the existing facility, 850 Burlingame Ave. Its 37,000 square feet will be occupied by an active lounge, community room, classroom, music studio, tech shop, ceramics and fine arts workshops, teen center, fitness studio and more. The project is expected to cost in the neighborhood of $40 million, as offi- cials previously refined designs to trim the building’s budget which was rising due to construction cost increas- es. A majority of the cost is slated to be addressed with revenue generated through a quarter-cent sales tax hike approved by voters. Public opinion on the preferred design was split, as a survey with more than 1,600 responses showed 51 per- cent support for the classic architec-

showed 51 per- cent support for the classic architec- The classic,mission-style rendering of the facility which

The classic,mission-style rendering of the facility which officials were considering.

ture and 49 percent for the contempo- rary design. Some proponents of the mission look claimed it fit better with the city’s other landmark buildings such as the train station, library and high school. Others, such as resident Tom Paine, claimed their preference stemmed from a dislike of modern architecture. “I’m here to urge the council to select the traditional, mission-style over the contemporary design. I have the impression that contemporary designs, before they are completed, they are already dated,” he said, during public comment. Councilman Ricardo Ortiz acknowl- edged the classic building would blend well with the city’s existing civic style, but also suggested the mission design too much resembled a school, which would be inappropriate for a

recreation facility. Beyond the functionality concerns, Councilwoman Emily Beach said she appreciated the modern design’s enhanced capacity to accommodate photovoltaic panels on the roof. The pavilions look is better suited to host such panels, according to Merkes, and the modern design would require building more panels over the parking garage to generate the same amount of energy savings. “The sustainable aspects are really important to this council,” said Beach, in justifying her vote for the mission design. For her part, Vice Mayor Donna Colson expressed her admiration for both designs, but said ultimately she would prefer the same design as her colleagues. “I would bend toward the pavilions,” she said.

BILL

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sumers’ electric bills. A state legislative committee sent the 100 percent clean energy bill to the full Assembly, setting up a vote later this year. The bill’s revival is a tentative vic- tory for its author, Democratic Sen. Kevin de Leon, who is waging an uphill battle to unseat Democratic U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein in the November election. De Leon fought agg ressively to push the bill forward in the final days of last year’s legislative session but

was unsuccessful. The bill would bump up California’s energy mandate, known as the renew- able portfolio standard, from 50 per- cent to 60 percent by 2030. That ener- gy would have to come from specific renewable resources including wind, solar, geothermal and small dams. It would then set a goal of getting all remaining energy from resources that don’t produce climate changing gases by 2045, leaving details of the plan to be hashed out later. “This will put us on the pathway to clean renewable energy and economic growth for the future of California,” de Leon said. Critics include business interests and utilities, which warn that industri- al power users, like factories and food

processors, and consumers will be left paying higher prices. They worry that the bill would prematurely make fossil fuel plants obsolete, rendering them stranded assets that don’t generate rev- enue but still must be paid off by ratepayers. “Not now,” said Assemblyman Jim Patterson, a Republican from Fresno. “This is a leap of faith and a gamble.” The action came as the Senate also considers legislation to turn California’s energy grid manager, the Independent System Operator, into a regional entity open to utilities across the West, and as Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders consider making it easier for utilities to reduce liability for wildfire damage. The issues could get linked in negotiations.

making it easier for utilities to reduce liability for wildfire damage. The issues could get linked
making it easier for utilities to reduce liability for wildfire damage. The issues could get linked

making it easier for utilities to reduce liability for wildfire damage. The issues could get linked