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001 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 8:38 PM Page 1

001 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 8:38 PM Page 1 ‘OCEAN’S 8’OPENS TO $41.5 MILLION DATEBOOK

‘OCEAN’S 8’OPENS TO $41.5 MILLION

DATEBOOK PAGE 17

1 ‘OCEAN’S 8’OPENS TO $41.5 MILLION DATEBOOK PAGE 17 COMBATIVESTANCE TRUMP’S TWEETS SLAM CANADA,TRUDEAU ANEW
1 ‘OCEAN’S 8’OPENS TO $41.5 MILLION DATEBOOK PAGE 17 COMBATIVESTANCE TRUMP’S TWEETS SLAM CANADA,TRUDEAU ANEW

COMBATIVESTANCE

TRUMP’S TWEETS SLAM CANADA,TRUDEAU ANEW FROM

SINGAPORE

BUSINESS PAGE 10

SOX FLEX POWER IN PALOMINO OPENER

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Monday June 11, 2018 XVIII, Edition 251

www.smdailyjournal.com

Auto shop lift requirements get another look

San Mateo officials weighing rules ensuring safety and sufficient parking

By Anna Schuessler

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

HowtoencourageownersofSan

Mateoautorepairshopstoapply

forpermitsforvehicleliftswasa

focusforofficialslastweekintak-

inganotherlookatrulesaimedat improvingsafetyandparkingon streets where auto-related busi- nessesareclustered.

streets where auto-related busi- nessesareclustered. Maureen Freschet Relaxing strikeabalancebetweenensuring

Maureen

Freschet

Relaxing

strikeabalancebetweenensuring

thosewhoworkandlivenearauto

parking stan-

dardsandrequir- shopsaresafeandallowinglong-

timebusinessestooperateinthe city. Acknowledging the challenge business owners face in finding parking spots for the cars they workon,CouncilwomanMaureen Freschet said she would support relaxingparkingrequirementstied

ing a special use permit to operatevehicle lifts outside wereamongthe rules officials considered as they aimed to

to the building permits owners must obtain to operate vehicle lifts. She also emphasized the importanceofpermittingthelifts so officials can determine how manythereareinthecityandwhat theirconditionis. “Ithinktheautorepairshopsin

ourcity…provideareallyvalu- areprovidingsufficientparkingat

ableservicetoourcommunitysoI

wanttodowhateverwecantohelp

tyoremployeesafety,”shesaid,

accordingtoavideoofthemeet-

doesnotcompromisepublicsafe-

support thesebusinesses as long as wecan do it in amannerthat

ingMonday,June4.

Officialshavebeenconsidering ways to regulate use of vehicle lifts andensure business owners

See LIFTS, Page 19

lifts andensure business owners See LIFTS , Page 19 ZACHARY CLARK/DAILY JOURNAL (ABOVE), PHOTO COURTESY OF
lifts andensure business owners See LIFTS , Page 19 ZACHARY CLARK/DAILY JOURNAL (ABOVE), PHOTO COURTESY OF
lifts andensure business owners See LIFTS , Page 19 ZACHARY CLARK/DAILY JOURNAL (ABOVE), PHOTO COURTESY OF

ZACHARY CLARK/DAILY JOURNAL (ABOVE), PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HARBOR DISTRICT (BOTTOM)

Clockwise from top:Demolition of the iconic Romeo Pier in Half Moon Bay began last week.The pier began to fall into misuse in the 1980s.Workers carefully remove hazardous materials in preparation of its demolition.

Iconic pier teardown underway

Romeo Pier in Half Moon Bay will be disposed of in three to four weeks

By Zachary Clark

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Demolition of the iconic, but dilapidated Romeo Pier in Half Moon Bay began last week, a process expectedto takethreeto

fourweeksandcost$2.3million.

Builtin1944,thepierwasahub

of fishing activities for decades,

butfellintodisuseinthe1980s.

Sincethen,chunksofthedeterio-

ratingstructurehavebeenfalling into the ocean with every major storm, posing health, safety and environmentalrisks.

“Therehavebeennosignificant

injuriesonthepier,butit’sbeena

constantchallengeforourstaff,”

saidJohnMoren,directorofoper-

ations fortheSan Mateo County

HarborDistrict, addingthatlarge piecesoflumberandotherdebris fromthepierhavetoberemoved fromtheoceanandbeachacouple oftimesamonthandpaintchips flakeoffintothewaterdaily. Thisshouldbethefinalcleanup effortandMorensaidtheprocess hasbeenanordeal.

See PIER, Page 8

Rent growth slows, prices remain high

San Mateo rents flattening but questions linger over sustainability of market cooling

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Manhattan. San Francisco. Boston.SanMateo?

So goes the ranking of most expensive rental markets in the nation, according to a recent report fromonlinehousing data- baseRentcafe. San Mateo’s average rent was

$3,170inMay,onlyacouplehun-

dred dollars cheaper than San Francisco and Boston and about $900 less than the epicenter of NewYork City, according to the list.

Whiletheeye-poppingamounts

City, according to the list. Whiletheeye-poppingamounts DAILY JOURNAL FILE A sign showing a two-bedroom, two-bath

DAILY JOURNAL FILE

A sign showing a two-bedroom, two-bath apartment for rent near Central Park in San Mateo.

paidmay stun those who do not

considerthePeninsulaadestina-

tion comparable to other cities

See RENT, Page 19

Burlingame weighs land plans

Officials eye competing interests in redeveloping StateLandsCommissionpropertyonthe Bayfront

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Whiletheremaynotbeconsen-

sus among Burlingame coun- cilmembersoverthepreferredpath for redeveloping a malnourished piece of Bayfront land, officials unanimously agree improvement workshouldstartimmediately. “Therecommonpointofviewis

thatsomethinghastobedone,it has to betimely andthefencing has to come down,” said Vice MayorDonnaColson, duringthe Monday, June 4, discussion of State Lands Commission proper- ty. Councilmembers weighedthree competingproposals—twofora

See LAND, Page 27

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002 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 8:24 PM Page 1

002 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 8:24 PM Page 1 2 Monday • June 11, 2018

2 Monday June 11, 2018

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“Neither in the life of the individual nor in that of mankind is it desirable to know the future.”

— Jakob Burckhardt,Swiss historian

This Day in History

1776 The Continental Congress formed a

committee to draft a Declaration of

Independencecallingforfreedomfrom

Britain.

In 1509, England’s King Henry VIII married his first wife,CatherineofAragon.

In 1770, CaptainJamesCook,commanderoftheBritish ship Endeavour, “discovered” the Great Barrier Reef off Australiabyrunningontoit. In 1919, SirBartonwontheBelmontStakes, becoming horseracing’sfirstTripleCrownwinner. In 1938, Johnny Vander Meer pitched the first of two

consecutiveno-hittersasheledtheCincinnatiRedstoa3-

0 victory overtheBoston Bees. (Fourdays later, Vander MeerrefusedtogiveupahittotheBrooklynDodgers,who

lost,6-0.)

In 1942,theUnitedStatesandtheSovietUnionsigneda lend-leaseagreementtoaidtheSovietwareffortinWorld WarII. In 1947, the government announced the end of sugar rationing for households and“institutional users” (e.g., restaurantsandhotels)asofmidnight.

In 1955, in motorracing’s worst disaster, morethan 80

peoplewerekilledduringthe24HoursofLeMansinFrance

whentwoofthecarscollidedandcrashedintospectators. In 1962, threeprisonersatAlcatrazinSanFranciscoBay stagedan escape, leaving theislandon amakeshift raft; theywereneverfoundorheardfromagain. In 1978,JosephFreemanJr.becamethefirstblackpriest ordained in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. In 1985, KarenAnnQuinlan,thecomatosepatientwhose casepromptedahistoricright-to-diecourt decision, died

inMorrisPlains,NewJersey,atage31.

Birthdays

decision, died inMorrisPlains,NewJersey,atage31. Birthdays Pro Football Hall of Famer Joe Montana is 62. Former U.S.
decision, died inMorrisPlains,NewJersey,atage31. Birthdays Pro Football Hall of Famer Joe Montana is 62. Former U.S.

Pro Football Hall of Famer Joe Montana is 62.

Former U.S. Rep. Charles B. Rangel, D-N.Y., is 88. Comedian Johnny Brown is 81. International Motorsports Hall ofFamerJackieStewart is 79. SingerJoey Deeis 78. ActressAdrienneBarbeauis73. RockmusicianFrankBeard

(ZZTop)is69.AnimalrightsactivistIngridNewkirkis69.

RocksingerDonnieVanZantis66.ActorPeterBergmanis

65.SouthDakotaGov.DennisDaugaardis65.TVpersonali-

tyMehmetOz,M.D.,is58.SingerGioiaBruno(Expose)is

55.RockmusicianDanLavery(Tonic)is52.Countrysinger-

songwriterBruceRobison is 52.Actress ClareCarey is 51. Actor Peter Dinklage is 49. Country musician Smilin’Jay

McDowellis49.ActorLennyJacobsonis44.Rockmusician

TaiAnderson(ThirdDay)is42.ActorJoshuaJacksonis40.

Americana musician Gabe Witcher (Punch Brothers) is 40.

ChristianrockmusicianRyanShroutis38.

Actor Hugh Laurie is 59.

Actor Shia LaBeouf is 32.

Actor Hugh Laurie is 59. Actor Shia LaBeouf is 32. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

CUOST

letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. CUOST ©2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All
letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. CUOST ©2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All
letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. CUOST ©2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All

©2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

LOEHL

Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. LOEHL TNYERD RATMUI Check out the new, free JUST
Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. LOEHL TNYERD RATMUI Check out the new, free JUST

TNYERD

Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. LOEHL TNYERD RATMUI Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. LOEHL TNYERD RATMUI Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. LOEHL TNYERD RATMUI Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE

RATMUI

Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. LOEHL TNYERD RATMUI Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. LOEHL TNYERD RATMUI Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. LOEHL TNYERD RATMUI Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Jumbles: (Answers tomorrow) HUTCH FORCE SEESAW PELLET Saturday’s Answer: When the chicken converted the old
Jumbles:
(Answers tomorrow)
HUTCH FORCE SEESAW PELLET
Saturday’s
Answer: When the chicken converted the old sports car

into a helicopter, she — FLEW THE “COUPE”

sports car into a helicopter, she — FLEW THE “COUPE” NICK ROSE/DAILY JOURNAL Gerardo Zaragoza won

NICK ROSE/DAILY JOURNAL

Gerardo Zaragoza won the Extreme Apple Bobbing contest at the San Mateo County Fair on Saturday.Each day at 4:30 p.m. the fair will hold a different contest.Located at 1346 Saratoga Drive in San Mateo,the 84th annual fair runs through June 17. Visit sanmateocountyfair.com for more information.

California valedictorian veers off script, has mic silenced

PETALUMA—ANorthernCalifornia high school valedictorian is upset her graduationspeechtoclassmateswascut off after she veeredfrom an approved script. The Press Democrat of Santa Rosa reports that Lulabel Seitzwas appalled the microphone was muted during her

June2speech.

Petaluma High School officials say speakers had been warned their mics wouldbesilencediftheydivertedfrom approvedscripts. Seitz says she had been sexually assaultedoncampusandwantedtoshow

frustration for a lack of action by the

school.InaYouTubevideoofheruncen-

soredspeech, shecriticizedthedefense of perpetrators and silencing of vic- tims.

Principal David Stirrat says the school hadbeen tippedoffin advance thatSeitzmightdeviatefromherscript. SeitzwillattendStanfordUniversity.

Suspect shot after struggle with LAPD officers in hospital

LOSANGELES—Aman in thecus-

todyofLosAngelespolicewascritical-

ly wounded Saturday after being shot during astrugglewith officers insidea hospitalexamroom.

The man hadbeen arrestedby gang

In other news

officersonafelonychargeandwasata

found722packagesofmarijuanahidden

policestationwhenhe“sufferedamed- insideboxes.Intotal,theysaythetruck

ical emergency,” said Det. Meghan Aguilar, an LAPD spokeswoman. He

was taken to WhiteMemorial Medical

CenterintheBoyleHeightsneighbor- alinvestigators.

hood.

Whilethemanwasinanexamination

room—adjacenttothehospital’semer-

gency room — he began struggling withtwoofficers,Aguilarsaid.Atleast oneoftheofficersopenedfire,striking thesuspect.

canceledandhewasturnedovertofeder-

Authorities say thedriver’s visawas

hadnearly15,000poundsofmarijuana.

California moves to expand access to opioid antidote

SACRAMENTO—Californiaismov-

ingtoexpandaccesstoanantidotefor

opioidoverdosesbyallowingorganiza-

tionsthatmaynothaveamedicaldirec-

tortodistributeandadministerthedrug,

statehealthofficialssaidFriday. Under a new order from the state

healthdepartment,groupswithsyringe

exchangeprogramsandotherorganiza-

tionswillnowbeabletoaccessnalox-

one, which works almost immediately to reverse an opioid overdose, the CaliforniaDepartmentofHealthsaid. More than half of U.S. states have similarpolicies,CaliforniaDepartment ofHealthDirectorKarenSmithsaid. California since 2015 has allowed patients to buy naloxonefromaphar- macywithoutaprescription,butnotall pharmaciescarryit. “(Naloxone) has virtually no side effects,”Smithsaid. “It’saremarkably

safedrug andeffectiveat what it does, which is why weareconfident wecan provide it without prescriptions and

whywe’recomfortablehavingastand-

ingorderlikethisone.”

“There was a medical examination that was about to take place and it occurredatthatpoint,”Aguilarsaid.

$8.6M marijuana load found in truck at San Diego border

SANDIEGO—Authoritiessaya7-ton

loadofmarijuana,worthabout$8.6mil-

lion, was foundinside the trailer of a trucktryingtocrossintotheU.S.from Mexico.

U.S. Customs andBorder Protection

officerssaidFridaytheloadwasdiscov-

eredduring an X-ray inspection at the Otay Mesa border crossing in San Diego. The truck’s driver, a 45-year-old Mexican citizen, was carrying amani- fest that claimedhewas hauling metal racks. Officials said officers saw “an anomaly”ontheX-rayandapolicedog detecteddrugs. Whenofficersopenedthetrailer,they

Lotto

June 9 Powerball 6 10 15 25 36 14 P owerball
June 9 Powerball
6
10
15
25 36
14
P owerball

Fantasy Five

1 17 24 26 38
1
17
24
26
38

June 8 Mega Millions

14 30 33 44 56 13 Mega number June 9 Super Lotto Plus 5 11
14 30
33
44 56
13
Mega number
June 9 Super Lotto Plus
5
11
27 33
47 18
Mega number

Daily Four

7 2 7 1
7
2
7
1

Daily three midday

5 2 2
5
2
2

Daily three evening

0 2 7
0
2
7
7 1 Daily three midday 5 2 2 Daily three evening 0 2 7 The Daily

The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka,No.7,in first place; California Classic, No. 5, in second place; and Money Bags,No.11,in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:47.86.

Local Weather Forecast

Monday:Sunny.Highsintheupper50s

tolower70s.Westwinds10to20mph.

Monday night: Clear. Lows in themid

50s. Southwestwinds10to20mph.

Tuesday:Sunny.Highsinthelower60s

to mid 70s. Southwest winds 5 to 15

west 15 to 20 mph in

Tuesday night: Clear, breezy. Lowsinthemid50s.

Wednesday:Sunny.Highsintheupper50stolower70s.

Wednesday night and Thursday: Clear. Lows in the

lower50s. Highsintheupper50stolower70s. Thursday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 50s.

mph

theafternoon.

Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 50s. mph theafternoon. becoming Highsintheupper50stomid60s. Friday:

becoming

Highsintheupper50stomid60s.

Friday: Clear.Lowsinthelower50s.Highsintheupper

50stolower70s.

The San Mateo Daily Journal

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Publisher: Jerry Lee jerry@smdailyjournal.com

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Editor in Chief: Jon Mays jon@smdailyjournal.com

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As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing if space allows.To submit obituaries,email information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar.If you would like to have an obituary printed more than once,longer than 200 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

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003 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 7:01 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

mon 251 6/10/18 7:01 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • June 11, 2018 3 Half

LOCAL

Monday June 11, 2018

3

1 THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • June 11, 2018 3 Half Moon Bay adopts budget By Zachary

Half Moon Bay adopts budget

By Zachary Clark

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

TheHalfMoon Bay City Council unani- mouslyadoptedthebalancedoperatingand capital budget for fiscal year 2018-19, which includes a structural surplus to be spent,inpart,onupgradestoCarterPark.

Thesurplustotals$704,116,withgeneral

fundrevenueat$16,540,058—up3.5per-

centoverfiscalyear2017-18—andexpen-

ditures at $15,835,942, which is 7.3 per-

cent more than the previous fiscal year, largelybecauseoftheitemsapprovedinthe council’sbudgetstudysessioninMay,said Yulia Carter, acting deputy city manager, administrativeservicesandfinance. The Carter Park project is one of those

items,and$80,000foritsdesign,environ-

mental review and Coastal Development Permithasbeenallocatedinthebudgetfor fiscal year2018-19, which begins July 1, and $1.1 million in construction will be part ofthebudget forthefollowing fiscal year.

will be part ofthebudget forthefollowing fiscal year. Comment on or share this story at www.smdailyjournal.com

Comment on or share this story at www.smdailyjournal.com

While the details of the Carter Park

improvementshaveyettobedecided,coun-

cilmembersseemedtoenvisionacommuni-

ty gathering place for regular events and concerts that could also boost economic activitydowntown. OtherchangestothebudgetsincetheMay study session include the addition of two limited-time office assistant positions in the City Clerk’s Office, which were approvedby the council, andother minor cleanup adjustments, such as $50,000 in annual transfers that was counted twice. Those adjustments have no impact on the scopeortimingofprojects,Cartersaid. Atotal of $1,918,704 has been trans- ferredfromthegeneral fundto thecapital improvementprogram,whichisthebudget forinfrastructureandmaintenanceprojects, andtotals $12,886,500 forthenewfiscal

year,

while

the

five-year

CIP

is

$77,531,940.

 

Accordingtoastaffreport, theprojected

generalfundbalanceof$7.4millionrepre-

sents46percentofthebudgetedoperating

general fundexpenditures, well above the guidelines of the Government Finance OfficersAssociation,whichhasawardedthe cityforitsfiscalstewardship.

Despitethegoodnews,staffisconcerned

about the long-term sustainability of the

city’ssewerfunds,andiscurrentlyconduct-

ingastudythatcouldlikelyresultinasewer rateincreaseinthecomingyears,according to the report. Sewer capital needs are

assessedat$18.5millionoverthenextfive

years.

Otherpotential futurechallenges include

risingCalPERSpensioncostsandthepos-

sibility of a future recession, which of coursearenotuniquetoHalfMoonBay.

T h e Pl an n i n g C o m m i s s i o n w i l l re v i e w t h e CI P an d de t e rm i n e i f i t c o n f o rm s t o t h e c i t y ’s g e n e ral p l an at a m e e t i n g J un e 1 2 .

Breed maintains lead over Leno with 1,580 more votes

BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

Withmorethan25,000ballotslefttobe

counted, Board of Supervisors President London Breed is maintaining her lead againstformerstateSen.MarkLenointhe San Francisco mayoral race. Numbers released Sunday afternoon put Breed at

103,388votes,50.38percent,overLeno's

101,808 votes, 49.62 percent. Breed regained her lead on Saturday and had

49.62 percent. Breed regained her lead on Saturday and had London Breed 94,771 votes with Leno

London Breed

94,771 votes with Leno at 94,273 votes. The margin grew from 498 votes to 1,580 votes

separatingthetwocandi-

dates.Electionsofficials have counted almost 17,000 more ballots

since Saturday. Of the estimated 25,000 bal-

more ballots since Saturday. Of the estimated 25,000 bal- Mark Leno lots remaining, 14,000 are provisional

Mark Leno

lots remaining, 14,000 are provisional ballots. Officials will begin countingtheprovisional ballots on Monday. The winner of the race will servetheremainderofthe lateMayorEdLee'sterm, which runs through

January2020.

Police reports

Room for improvement

Ahotelguestwasarrestedafterrefusing to leave on Airport Boulevard in Burlingame, it was reported at 10:28

a.m.Monday,May21.

MILLBRAE

M i s de m e a n o r w a rra n t . ASanMateoresi- dent was cited and released for a misde- meanor warrant out of Pacifica on Taylor Boulevard, it was reported at 11 p.m.

Monday.May14.

M i s de m e a n o r w a rra n t . ASanBrunoresi- dent was cited for having a misdemeanor warrant out of San Mateo County on East Millbrae Avenue, it was reported at 1:50

a.m.Sunday,May13.

S us p e n de d l i c e n s e . ASanMateoresident

was cited for driving with a suspended license on Magnolia Avenue and Park Boulevard, it was reported at 8:58 a.m.

Saturday,May12.

M i s de m e a n o r w a rra n t . ASan Francisco resident was cited for a Palo Alto misde- meanorwarrant on El Camino Real, it was

reportedat2:48a.m.Saturday,May12.

BURLINGAME

P e t t y t h e f t . Alicenseplatewasstolenon

Bloomfield Road, it was reported at 9:29

a.m.Friday,May25.

A rre s t . A person was arrested after they

refusedto leave a bus andfor resisting an officeronAirportBoulevard,itwasreported

at9:09a.m.Friday,May25.

M a l i c i o us m i s c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay, it was reportedat 5:47 a.m.

Friday,May25.

c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,
c h i e f . Graffiti was found sprayed on school campus grounds on ManginiWay,

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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

mon 251 6/10/18 7:08 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • June 11, 2018 5 Six

LOCAL

Monday June 11, 2018

5

1 THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • June 11, 2018 5 Six homeless puppies and their mom rescued

Six homeless puppies and their mom rescued by Good Samaritan, animal shelter

By Janis Mara

BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

Things are looking up for six homeless newborn puppies andtheirmotherwho were foundin East Palo Alto in April, thanks to members ofthepublicandaSan Mateo ani- mal shelter. The saga began when a Good Samaritan encountered a starving stray dog in East Palo Alto April 17, according to Buffy Martin Tarbox, a spokeswoman for the HumaneSociety. The man called the Humane Society, whichquicklysentrescuestaffers. Whenthe rescuers arrived, they determined that the small, hungry female terrier mix had just given birth. Sureenough, themotherdog ledthemto a nest with six tiny week-oldpuppies, Tarbox said. “Themotherdog was malnourished, andif wehadn’tfoundher, it’sunlikelysheandher pups would have survived,” Tarbox said in an interview. The Humane Society found a temporary foster home for the mom and six puppies, all of whom are now healthy and thriving,

and six puppies, all of whom are now healthy and thriving, PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PENINSULA

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PENINSULA HUMANE SOCIETY & SPCA

Peopleinterestedinmeetingthepuppiescan visit the shelter at 1450 Rollins Road or call at (650) 340-7022.

according to thespokeswoman. The now-2-month-old pups have been weaned and are ready for adoption, Tarbox said. One of the pups has been adopted, as well as the puppies’ mother, the spokes- woman said—with fivepups to go. People interestedin meeting the puppies

canvisittheshelterat1450RollinsRoador

call at (650)340-7022.

Police investigate attempted robbery

Police in Pacifica are investigating an attempted armed robbery that occurred Wednesday at aWalgreens. Officers with the Pacifica Police Department responded Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. to the Walgreens on the 500 block of Palmetto Avenue on a report of an attempted robbery. Police said the suspect entered the store, confrontedapharmacist andhandedthephar- macist a note demanding medication. The pharmacist told the suspect the pharmacist didnothaveaccesstothemedication, andthe suspect repeated his demands and threatened to shoot thepharmacist. No weapon was seen during the incident, and the suspect eventually left the business on foot. He was last seen walking west on West Manor Drive. There were no reported injuries during theincident. ThesuspectisdescribedasaMiddleEastern

man,20to30yearsold,withcurlyblackhair,

abeardandamustache. Hewaswearingablue baseball hat, agray jacket andblack pants. Policebelievethesuspect was involvedin

Local briefs

asimilarincident at apharmacy in Daly City laterWednesday night.

Two-alarm house fire spreads to neighboring home,two displaced

Firefighters successfully extinguished a two-alarm fire that burned two San Mateo homes Saturday evening and displaced two people. Theblazewas first reportedat 6:51 p.m. at atwo-storyhouseat327N. EldoradoSt., San Mateo FireDepartment officials said. Onceat the scene, firefighters saw that the fire had spreadto an adjacent home, locatedat 330 N. Delaware St. Firefighters first extinguished the main fire andthen extinguishedthe sec- ondblaze. Heavy winds were blamed for helping the fire spread. No occupants were inside the

homesatthetimeandnoinjurieswerereport-

ed, according to fireofficials. The displaced residents are being assisted

by theAmerican RedCross.

residents are being assisted by theAmerican RedCross. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PENINSULA HUMANE SOCIETY & SPCA

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PENINSULA HUMANE SOCIETY & SPCA

Foster mom JennWalsh and the six puppies.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PENINSULA HUMANE SOCIETY & SPCA Foster mom JennWalsh and the six puppies.
info@sancarloselms.com
info@sancarloselms.com

006 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 8:07 PM Page 1

6 Monday June 11, 2018

251 6/10/18 8:07 PM Page 1 6 Monday • June 11, 2018 S T A T

STATE/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Mitt Romney and Donald Trump? ‘It’s really complicated’

By Steve Peoples and Lindsay Whitehurst

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARK CITY, Utah — On the edge of a mountaintop in Utah, it’s getting compli- catedforMittRomney. With the sun setting over his shoulder, theformerRepublicanpresidentialnominee and would-be senator tells his audience, gathered on the patio of a resort, that President DonaldTrump will win a second

term.Romneyalsosaysthatannual$1tril-

liondeficitsunderTrumpare“highlystimu-

lative.”AndignoringTrump’snewtradetar-

iffs, Romney says there’s nothing already onthehorizonthatwillpushtheU.S.into arecession.

Oncethefaceofthe“NeverTrump”move-

ment, Romney appears to be embracing Trump’spresidencyashere-entersnational politics, this time as a 71-year-oldcandi- datefortheSenatefromUtah.

this time as a 71-year-oldcandi- datefortheSenatefromUtah. Mitt Romney Perhaps no Republican leader demonstrates the

Mitt Romney

Perhaps

no

Republican leader demonstrates the trans- formation of the mod- ern-daypartybetterthan Romney.

Two years ago, Romney attacked Trump’s very samepoli- cies on trade, spending

and national security. Today, like other candidates across the country this election season, Romney is takinganapproachthatsuggeststhere’sno room for an outspoken Trump critic in RepublicanParty. “Whateverthedisagreementshavebeen,I thinkthey’veputthembehindeachother,” saidAnthonyScaramucci,aformerRomney fundraiser who briefly served as Trump’s communicationsdirector. Scaramucci was among dozens of high- profile business and political leaders at

Romney’sannualsummitinParkCitythis weekend.OutspokenTrumpsupporterswere scarce. The president has forgiven Romney, Scaramucci said, and Romney “can be an ally.” Itmaynotbethatsimple.

ManyRomneyloyalists,incommentsin the hallways of the Stein Eriksen Lodge, said Romney remains deeply concerned aboutTrump’spoliciesandleadershipstyle. For many among the Trump faithful, Romney will never be forgiven for his speech two years ago when he laidout in

starktermshiscaseforwhyaTrumppresi- RomneymustmakeitthroughtheJune26

primary and the general election in November, but most see it as a foregone conclusion that he will succeed retiring GOP Sen. Orrin Hatch in this Republican stronghold. Thefocus,therefore,hasalreadybegunto shift towardRomney’s fit in Trump’s GOP oncehegetstoWashington.

dencywouldbeadisaster.

“Mitt’s astraight shooter—whetherpeo- plelovehimordon’tlovehim.” The backhandedcompliment is evidence of the lingering tension between Republican heavyweights who represent differentwingsoftheGOP. Romneyisthefaceoftheestablishment. Hespentmuchofthepastdecadeworkingto strengthentheconservativemovementand electRepublicans.Trumphastakenoverthe GOPby attacking its own leaders at times with abrandofpopulismthat defies long- cherishedconservativepositions on trade, fiscaldisciplineandforeignpolicy.

Publicly,thetwomenhavebeenrespect-

ful to each other, at a distance, since the

2016election.

Trump endorsedRomney’s Senatebidon Twitterearlierthisyear.AndonFriday, the president had this to say after learning Romney predicted a 2020 Trump victory:

Charter schools regroup after big California election loss

By Sall Ho

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Charter school supporters are deciding wheretodirecttheirconsiderableresources after pouring money into the California governor primary to support a longtime ally who failedto moveon to November’s election. The fallout may signal future uncertainty for the school choice move- mentinastatewithsomeofthemostrobust charterschoollawsintheUnitedStates. Thefront-runnerforgovernor, Democrat

Gavin Newsom, could hamper or threaten the progress of charters — privately run schools that use public money and have divided parents and politicians. He has

mostlyemphasizedhissupportoftradition-

alpublicschoolsandcalledformorecharter schoolaccountability. Newsom’scampaignsaiditwouldseekto temporarilyhaltcharterschoolopeningsto considertransparency issues but that “suc- cessful” charters would thrive under his leadership. In theJune5 race, hebeat out former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio

Villaraigosa, a key ally of the California CharterSchoolsAssociationAdvocates. The powerful organization and its big- name donors, including Netflix CEOReed Hastings, former New York City Mayor MichaelBloombergandWalmartheirAlice

Walton,gavenearly$23milliontosupport

Villaraigosa, whofinishedbehindNewsom andRepublicanbusinessmanJohnCox. Now,thegroupsaidit’sworkingonanew strategy that could include supporting Newsom or Cox, despite the Republican’s endorsementfromPresidentDonaldTrump.

The heavily blue state is helping lead a national resistance to his administration. ThecharterAdvocatesisinatightspotafter running attack ads against both candidates whoadvancedtothegeneralelection. Theprimary is seen as afailedoffensive for the charter group anda loss for advo- cates that won enough seats last year to control the board of the Los Angeles UnifiedSchoolDistrict, thesecond-largest U.S.schoolsystem,forthefirsttime.Their $8.5 million added to the unprecedented totalspentonalocalschoolboardrace.

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007 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 8:09 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

mon 251 6/10/18 8:09 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION/WORLD Monday • June 11, 2018 7 REUTERS

NATION/WORLD

Monday June 11, 2018

7

NATION/WORLD Monday • June 11, 2018 7 REUTERS

REUTERS

AwomanwalkspastaTVbroadcastinganewsreportontheupcomingsummitbetweenthe U.S.and North Korea,in Seoul,South Korea.

Isolated Kim takes big gamble leaving home for Trump summit

By Foster Klug

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

home for Trump summit By Foster Klug THE ASSOCIATED PRESS SINGAPORE—Spareamoment, as you

SINGAPORE—Spareamoment, as you anticipateoneofthemostunusualsummits in modern history, to consider North

Korea’sleaderashelefttheall-encompass-

ing bubbleofhis locked-down stronghold

ofPyongyangonSundayandsteppedoffa

jetontoSingaporesoilforhisplannedsit-

down with President Donald Trump on Tuesday. There’s just no recent precedent for the gambleKimJongUnistaking. Asfarasweknow,hisdespotfatheronly

traveled out of the country by train, and

rarelyatthat,becauseoffearsofassassina-

tion. Kim, up until his recent high-profile summitwithSouthKorea’spresidentonthe

southernsideoftheirsharedborder,hasusu-

allyhunkereddownbehindhisvastpropa-

gandaandsecurity services, ormadeshort tripstoautocrat-friendlyChina. While Singapore has authoritarian lean-

ings,itisstillathrivingbastionofcapital-

ismandwealth,andKimwillbeperforming

hishigh-stakesdiplomatictight-ropewalk

infrontof3,000internationaljournalists,

includingahugecontingentfromtheultra-

aggressive South Korean press — some- timesreferredtobyPyongyangas“reptile media” — two of whom were arrested by Singaporepoliceinvestigating areport of trespassing at the residence of the North

Koreanambassador. While he famously attended school in Switzerland, traveling this far as supreme leader is an entirely different matter for someone used to being the most revered, most protected, most deferredto human in

his country of25 million. Kimis, essen- tially, upsetting two decades of carefully choreographedNorth Korean statecraft and steppingintotheunknown. There’s wildspeculation about howKim will performon theworldstage, although one question was answered Sunday: His grim-faced, well-muscled bodyguards marchedalongsidehisarmoredlimousineat one point in Singapore, just as they did when he met the South Korean leader in April. But amid the curiosity is an even

morefundamentalquestion:Whyishetak-

ingthisriskatall? How do you protect what many North

Koreansconsidertheirsinglemostprecious

resource,thethirdmemberoftheKimfami-

ly to ruleandadirect descendant ofNorth Korea’sworshippedfounderKimIlSung? HundredsofNorthKoreansecurityexperts have no doubt been up nights wondering howtosafeguardKimJongUnsinceTrump shockedtheworldbyacceptingtheNorth’s invitationtomeet. KimarrivedSunday on aChineseplane, not his official plane, which is called

“Chammae-1”andnamedafterthegoshawk,

NorthKorea’snationalbird.

Three World Trade Center to open after years of delays

By Karen Matthews

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEWYORK—An 80-story officebuild- ingsettoopenthisweekattheWorldTrade Center will be the third completed sky- scraper at the site where the twin towers stood. Monday’s ribbon-cutting for the 1,079- foot 3 WorldTrade Center marks a major stepintherebuildingofthesite,stalledfor

yearsbydisputesamonggovernmentagen-

cies,

Silverstein,insurersand9/11victims’fam-

center developer Larry

trade

ilymemberswhowantedtheentiresitetobe preservedforeternityasamemorial. Thenew$2.7 billion building, designed byPritzkerPrize-winningarchitectRichard Rogers, has been thefifth-tallest building inNewYorkCitysinceconstructiontopped

outin2016.

Thatdesignationseemedelusivein2009

outin2016. Thatdesignationseemedelusivein2009 when the Port Authority of NewYork and

when the Port Authority of NewYork and NewJersey,whichownsthetradecentersite andwasbattlingwithSilversteinovercosts associatedwithrebuilding,soughttoreduce

3WorldTradetoafour-story“stump.”

After arbitration in the dispute between

Monday’s ribbon-cutting for the 1,079-foot 3 World Trade Center marks a major step in the rebuilding of the site.

Thefinancialsituationimprovedin2012,

Silverstein said. “It was like somebody

thedeveloperandthepropertyowner,con- cameto us andsaid, ‘Thecurtain has gone

up,youcannowaccessthispooloffinanc-

sevenstoriesduetoalackoffinancing.

struction startedin 2010 but was haltedat

ing.”’

Sheriff: Jailed immigrant killed self despite camera, checks

RIOGRANDECITY,Texas—AHonduran

Around the nation

Sheriff’s Office says in an incident report

filedJune5withtheTexasattorneygener-

himselfinaTexasjaildespiteguardscheck-

ingonhimeveryhalf-hourandacamerain hispaddedcell,authoritiessay. Marco Antonio Munoz, 39, was found unresponsiveinhiscellonthemorningof

May13,adayafterU.S.CustomsandBorder

Protection agents brought him to the jail

andtwodaysafterhewasdetainedforenter- beforetheyeventuallyfoundhimunrespon-

ingthecountryillegally, theStarrCounty

Munozbecamecombativeduringthebook-

man who enteredthe U.S. illegally killed

al’s office and obtained Sunday by the AssociatedPress. Accordingtothereport,jailofficerssaid

ingprocessandwasrestrainedandplacedin a padded cell overnight. They said they

checked on him every 30 minutes and at least once more during the morning shift

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008 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 8:16 PM Page 1

8 Monday June 11, 2018

mon 251 6/10/18 8:16 PM Page 1 8 Monday • June 11, 2018 NATION/WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Around

NATION/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Around the world

Spain rescues 334 migrants from Mediterranean, finds four dead

MADRID—Spain’s maritimerescueservicehas saved

334migrantsandrecoveredfourbodiesfromboatsitinter-

cepted trying to reach Europe by crossing the MediterraneanSea.

Therescueservicesaysitspatrolcraftreachedninediffer-

ent boats carrying migrants that had left from African

shoresthroughoutSaturdayandearlySunday. One boat foundSunday was carrying four deadbodies

alongwith49migrants.Therescueservicesaidthecauseof

deathhasyettobedetermined.

Drivenbyviolentconflictsandextremepoverty,tensof thousands of migrants attempt to reach southern Europe each year by crossing the Mediterranean in smugglers’

boats.Mostoftheboatsareunfitforopenwater,andthou-

sandsdrownannually.

Cuba releases details of incident involving U.S. official

HAVANA—Cubareleaseddetails Sunday on thelatest mysterious health incident involving aU.S. diplomat in the country, saying that Cuban officials learned of the episodelatelastmonthwhentheU.S.saidthatanembassy officialfeltillafterhearing“undefinedsounds”inherhome inHavana. CubasaidinastatementreleasedbyitsForeignMinistry

thatU.S.officialsreportedonMay29thatafemaleembassy

officialhadreportedexperiencing“healthsymptoms”after

hearingthesoundsinherhometwodaysearlier.

Cubasaiditsentinvestigatorstothehomewhofoundno

potentialsourceofasoundandwerenotgrantedaccessto

theofficial.

theofficial. ‘The Band’s Visit’ and ‘Harry Potter’ win big at

‘The Band’s Visit’ and ‘Harry Potter’ win big at the Tonys

By Mark Kennedy

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEWYORK — The acclaimed and sprawlingBritishimport“HarryPotter andthe CursedChild” andthe shim- mering, American, grown-up musical “TheBand’sVisit”werethebig win- nersattheTonyAwardsonSunday.

“TheBand’sVisit,”basedona2007

Israelifilmofthesamenameaboutan

Egyptianbandthatgoestothewrong

Israelitown,wonseven—bestdirec-

tion,orchestration,sounddesign,best book ofamusical, lighting andfea-

turedactorAri’elStachel,whogavea

heartfeltspeechabouthispast.

“ForsomanyyearsofmylifeIpre-

tendedIwasnotaMiddleEasternper-

son,”hesaid, addressing his parents in the audience. He thankedthe cre- ators of the show “for being coura- geous fortelling asmall story about Arabs andIsraelis getting along at a timethatweneedthatmorethanever.”

He added: “I am part of a cast of actorswhoneverbelievedthatthey’d beabletoportraytheirownraces,and we’redoingthat.” Theshow’sdirector, DavidCromer,

saidthemusicalisalsoaboutloneli-

ness anddespair, andaskedeveryone to reach out to anyone for whom “despairisoverwhelming.”

Thetwo-partspectacle“HarryPotter

Thetwo-partspectacle“HarryPotter REUTERS Author JackThorne holds the award after‘Harry

REUTERS

Author JackThorne holds the award after‘Harry Potter and the Cursed Child,Parts One andTwo’won for Best Play.

andtheCursedChild”hadcapturedsix,

including best play, book, lighting,

sounddesign,orchestrationsanddirec-

torJohnTiffany,whoaskedthecrowd to sing “Happy Birthday” to his boyfriend.Theyobliged. AndrewGarfieldwonhisfirstTony, for best leading actor in a play, for playingayounggaymanlivingwith AIDS in the sprawling, seven-hour revival“AngelsinAmerica”opposite

Lane. Hewon his third, forbest fea-

turedactorinaplay.

Garfield dedicated the win to the LGBTQ community, who he said foughtanddiedfortherighttolove.

Hesaidtheplayisarejectionofbig-

otry,shameandoppression. “Weareallsacredandweallbelong,” Garfieldsaid. Hethen referencedlast

week’s U.S. Supreme Court decision whichruledinfavorofabaker’sright to deny agay coupleawedding cake basedonhisbeliefs.

PIER

Continued from page 1

Pier,whichisintheheavily-usedinner harbor where boats of the county’s mainfishingfleetresides. Yearsago, therewastalkofrestor-

processistheproperdisposalofhaz-

ardous materials, which include

asbestos, timber treated with lead- based paint and creosote, mercury lighttubesandotheruniversalwastes. Those materials will be removed

openingarestaurantorcreatinganoth-

beforethepierisdismantled,andnet- er type of attraction never material-

ized. The pier was sold to the district

around1996beforeitofficiallyclosed

toalltrafficin2002duetosafetycon-

cerns,whichultimatelymotivatedthe Harbor District to demolish the 74-

year-oldpier. Moren saidwoodpiers normally last about 30 years, after which time it makes more sense to replaceratherthanmaintainthem. “Alot ofpeoplehavehistory with

thepierandwe’reallsadtoseeahis-

toricpierlikethisgoawaybutIthink

TheRomeoPierisintheouterhar- everyoneisinagreementthatitneeds

togo,it’soutlivedit’susefullife,”he

Duringitspeak,itwasusedtosup-

ing the property, but ideas such as

After years of obtaining permits from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, California Coastal Commission and National Marine

FisheriesService,thedistrictcomplet- processispermitcompliant.

edin lateMay pre-abatement assess- ments,anaviansurveyandunderwater dives to ensuremarinemammals and

fishwouldnotbeaffectedbythedemo-

lition.

Almostallofthe690-foot-longpier

will beremovedby water; a250-ton crawler crane brought in on a 200- foot-long barge will handle most of the heavy lifting anddebris will be collected in an additional hopper barge. The most expensive part of the

tingwillbeinstalledtopreventdebris

fromfallingintotheocean.Abiologi-

cal monitor will also make sure the

Theonceprivately-ownedpierwas built by Joseph Romeo, president of the A. Romeo Fish and Oyster

Companyandreportedlycost$44,000

toconstruct.

port a bustling sardine and fishing

industry that onceoccupiedsurround- ingwarehouses.

borandwas constructedanumberof yearsbeforetheneighboringJohnson

said.

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009 0611 mon:1030 FRI 64 6/10/18 6:21 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

mon:1030 FRI 64 6/10/18 6:21 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL OPINION Monday • June 11,

OPINION

Monday June 11, 2018

9

Three biggest issues in governor’s race

June 11, 2018 9 Three biggest issues in governor’s race Other voices importantlegislationthatwouldforce

Other voices

importantlegislationthatwouldforce

localgovernmentstoacceptmore

housing.ACalifornianative,

Newsom,atleast,hasviewsthatare

The San Diego Union-Tribune

C aliforniavotershavespo-

ken.DemocraticLt.Gov.

GavinNewsom,theformer

aboutbringingcompetitiontoeduca-

tion.Heneedstopresentanactual

reformroadmapandshowarecogniz-

ablevisionforpublicschools.

Oncriminaljusticeissues,Newsom

isstronglysupportiveofandCoxis

highlycriticalofso-calledsanctuary

statelawsthatlimitstatecooperation

withfederalimmigrationenforcement

SanFranciscomayor,orRepublican

JohnCox,theRanchoSantaFebusi-

nessman,willbethestate'snextgov- transplant,doesn'tseemtograspthat

ernor.GivenNewsom'sreadinessto

declinedebatesearlierthisyear,if

snappollsshowhimwitha20per-

centagepointleadonCox,hemay

nuancedontheissue.Cox,anIllinois

localgovernmentsarethebiggest

NIMBYvillainsofall.Bothmenneed

toofferstronger,clearerviewsonfix- rightforpoliticalreasons.Newsom

ingthehousingnightmare. Oneducation,Newsomsayshe wantsreformstoastateeducation

fundingsystemadoptedin2013that

makesastrongcaseforbailreform,

—lawswhoseallegednegative

effectshavebeenginnedupbythe

justgoonextendedvacation,believ-

inghiselectionisassured.Inthe

heavilyDemocraticGoldenState,that

maywellbetrue.

ButforthegoodofCalifornians,

bothNewsomandCoxneedtorun

full,vigorouscampaignsthataddress

thebiggestissuesinthestate.

Onthestate'shousingcrisis,both

NewsomandCoxsaytherightthings

abouttheneedtoaddhundredsof

thousandsofhousingunitsincoming

yearsbymakingiteasierforprojects

togetapprovedandbuilt.Butwhenit

comesdowntospecifics,Newsomhas

attimestriedtoseemallthingstoall

people.AsCALmattersreported,

Newsomisopentosomenewtypesof

rentcontrol—evenasheacknowl- issuesliketeachertenureandthe

edgesthatarepealofthestatelaw

restrictingrentcontrolwoulddepress

already-limitedconstruction.Tohis

credit,Coxrejectsrentcontrolas

solvingnothing.ButbothNewsom

andCoxhavereservationsabout

sayingtherearewaystoensuresus-

pectsshowupfortrialswithoutharm-

ingtheirfamilies,careersand

themupfornotmakingbail.Healso

saysthereshouldbeindependent

andsayslocalpoliceagenciescan

handleinvestigationsintopolice

shootingsjustfine.Heseemscom-

pletelyunawarethatthereisaconser-

vativecaseforsweepingcriminaljus-

hasfailedtomeetitsprimarygoalof

prospectsforbetterlivesbylocking

helpingEnglish-languagelearners

andthatschoolsmustdoamuchbet-

terjobpreparingstudentsfor21st- investigationsofpoliceuse-of-force

centurycareers.Buthisendorsement

bytheCaliforniaTeachers

Association—andhisassertionthat

thestate'sbiggesteducationcrisisis

"thedemoralizationofourteachers"

incidents.Coxopposesbailchanges

—arehugewarningsignsthathe

wouldbeyetanotherDemocraticgov- ticereformbasedontheideathatthe

ernorwhocaresmoreaboutschool

employeesthanschoolchildren.To

counterthisimpression,Newsom

shouldofferspecificviewsonbig

state'sattemptstoblockmeaningful

evaluationsofteachers,schoolsand

districts.Cox'schallengeiseven

greater.Hisideasaboutimproving

schoolsseemtobeginandendwith

addingmorechartersandcliches

presentU.S.systemisfarcostlierand

morepunitivethanthoseinother

advancednationsyetdoesn'tmake

Americanssafer.

NewsomandCoxalreadyoffer

strikingcontrasts.Buttheystillneed

tofillinmanyblanksonwherethey

wanttotakeCaliforniaandhowthey

wouldgetthere.Thecandidatesoweit

toCalifornianstotreatthisresponsi-

bilitywiththegravityitdeserves.

Letters to the editor

Congratulations and personal challenge

Editor, CarlosBolanosmayhavewonthe

electionforcountysheriffwith59

percentofthevotes,buthefailedto

winthetrustofmorethan40percent

ofvoters.

Observingthezerotoleranceofthe

JusticeDepartmentregardingillegal

immigration,hasraisedtwoquestions

forme.

First,whydoweonlyseeHispanic

illegalimmigrantsbeingarrestedby

ICE?Aretherenootherillegalimmi-

grantsofothernationalities?

Second,ifthejusticedepartment

ingknowledgeandexperienceasan

educator.Heisrelentlessinhispur-

suitofqualityeducationopportunities

forallstudents.Hestayscurrenton

educationalpolicyandpractices.

Maybemostimportantofall,Tomis

honest,openandwalkshistalk.

Undersheriffsmaybeforcedto

haszerotolerance,whydowenotsee

orhearofthearrestoftheemployers

Skyline,CollegeofSanMateoand

Cañadaaremodelsforthenationand

excellentinstitutionsofhighereduca-

tion.Tomknowsthisashebringsa

senseofurgencyandfocustohis

workontheboard.There’stoomuch

atstakeforthecommunityforTom

Mohrtonotrunforre-election.

TomMohristherightguyatthe

righttime.

Sarah Perkins

Marina

Theletterwriteris theformervice president of instruction at Cañada

respecttheirsuperior’spositionor

title,butthepeople’strustissome- usingtheseillegalimmigrants?

thingthatthesheriffmustearnhim-

self. Inlawenforcement,thepeople’s trustintheSheriff’sOfficemayaffect theeffectivenessoftheundersheriffs. Theundersheriffs’trustintheirsheriff mayaffecttheirsurvival.Therefore,

Bolanoshastoconvincealmost100

percentofthepeoplethathecanbe

trusted100percentofthetime.

Bob Krainz

Belmont

Support Tom Mohr

Editor,

TomMohrisupforre-electionto

theSanMateoCountyCommunity

CollegeDistrictBoardofTrustees.

Tom’syearsofexperienceareirre-

placeable.

HavingworkedforthenPresident

Jeffrey Tong

San Bruno

MohratCañadaCollege,Isawfirst-

handthedepthofhiscareforstu-

dents,facultyandthewell-beingof

hiscommunity.Isawhisdeepwork- Collegeandat SkylineCollege.

Immigration: Zero tolerance

Editor,

Jerry Lee , Publisher Jon Mays, Editor in Chief Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor Erik Oeverndiek,

Jerry Lee, Publisher

Jon Mays, Editor in Chief

Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor

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Daily Journal editorial board and not any one individual. Reflecting on June election T

Reflecting on June election

T heCaliforniaprimarywasnotasexcitingassome

hadanticipated.Despitethejungle—ortop-two

—primary,mostracesendedupwithaDemocrat

andaRepublicansettofightitoutinNovember.Buta

closerlookattheoutcomemayposesomeproblemsfor

Democratswhoarecountingonpickingupsomeformerly

RepublicancongressionalseatsinCalifornia.

ThebiggestproblemisthatthereisaRepublicancandi-

dateforgovernorontheballot.JohnCoxcameinsecond

eventhoughheisarelativenewcomertoCaliforniaand

mostofhisrecenthistoryisinIllinoiswhereheunsuc-

cessfullyranfortheU.S.Senate.Hewasrecruitedby

HouseMajorityLeaderKevinMcCarthy,R-Bakersfield,

whoislookingforwardto

replacingPaulRyanas

speaker.JustgettingCox

tothefinalswasan

achievementbecausehe

willhelpturnoutthe

Republicanvotein

November.IfformerLos

AngelesMayorAntonio

Villaraigosa,aDemocrat,

hadcomeinsecondand

lockedRepublicansoutof

thegovernor’srace,it

wouldhavebeengreat

newsforthepartyandits

hopeofwinningenough

seatstotakeoverthe

HouseofRepresentatives.

EventhoughLt.Gov.

GavinNewsomisexpectedtowin,aRepublicanonthe

topoftheticketwillencourageGOPturnout.

Meanwhile,Democratsarehopingforabiggerturnout

inthegeneralelectionthanintheprimary.Theywillneed

thisturnouttotakebacktheHouseofRepresentatives.In

thesevenCaliforniacongressionalseatstargetedfora

Democraticflip,Republicansledineach.Democratswere

relievedthattheyhadacandidateinsecondplaceineach

ofthesebutitwilltakeworkforthosecandidatestopre-

vailinthegeneralunlessDemocraticturnoutishighand

theDemocratswholostintheprimarywillactuallywork

tosupporttheirparty’scandidate.Itwilltakemorethan

lipserviceandanendorsementbutconvincingtheirsup-

porterstovoteforthewinningcandidate. Politicscanbeintoxicatinginabadway.Candidatesare socarriedawaybytheirownsuperioritythatmanymay findithardtosupportsomeonewhobeatthem,evenifit isinthebestinterestsofthepartyandthecountry.Let’s hopethatdoesn’thappen. ***

hopethatdoesn’thappen. *** Thecongressionaldistrictstowatcharethe10thwhere
hopethatdoesn’thappen. *** Thecongressionaldistrictstowatcharethe10thwhere

Thecongressionaldistrictstowatcharethe10thwhere

incumbentJeffDenhamisseekingafourthterm.Thetop Democrat,JoshHarder,beatoutafellowDemocratwho almostbeatDenhamthelasttime.StillDenhamhadtwice asmanyvotesasHarderatlastcount.Butiftheseveral otherDemocraticcandidatesintheracehelpHarderand Democraticturnoutishigh,thatcouldbeawinner.

InDistrict21,DemocratT.J.Coxfinishedsecondto

incumbentRepublicanDavidValadao.Coxmovedfrom

the10thbecausehethoughthehadabetterchancehere.

Butagain,Valadaowaswayahead.

InDistrict25,RepublicanSteveKnightwillface

DemocratchallengerKatieHill.InDistrict39,inOrange

County,anewRepublicancandidateYoungKimwillface DemocratGilCisneros.Kimwasaskedtoruntoappealto thegrowingAsianpopulationinthatpartofthestate.In

District45,twowomenwillcompeteinNovember,the

incumbentRepublicanMimiWaltersagainsttheDemocrat KatiePorter.Hereagain,Watershadmorethantwiceas manyvotesasPorter.

InDistrict48,incumbentRepublicanDanaRohrabacher

ledtheticketbuttwoDemocratsarebattlingforsecond place,HansKeirsteadandHarleyRouda.Thecombined votesofthetwoDemocratsaremorethantheendangered

Republicans.Indistrict49,theseatonceheldby

RepublicanDarrellIssaisupforgrabs.RepublicanDiane

HarkeyledafieldofeightRepublicanswhileDemocrat

MikeLevinrosetothetopofthefourplusDemocratsrun-

ning.LevinbeatoutthecandidatewhoalmostbeatIssa

thelasttimearound.WiththeunpopularIssaoffthetick-

et,itwillbemoredifficultfortheDemocratstowinthis

seat.

***

Butthisisn’tjustaboutCalifornia.It’saboutwhowill

wintheHouseinNovember.Itisalsoaboutwhowillhold

DonaldTrumpaccountableforhismisdeeds.Todate,the

onlyRepublicanswhoarewillingtodosoarethosewho

areretiring.Trump’stweetsandRudyGiuliani’sbombasts

aredirectedtoCongress.TheHouseandSenateare

Trump’sfirewallagainstanimpeachmentoranyaction

followinganindictment.

SueLempert is theformermayorof San Mateo. Hercolumn runs every Monday. Shecan bereachedat sue@smdailyjour- nal.com.

010 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 7:52 PM Page 1

10 Monday June 11, 2018

251 6/10/18 7:52 PM Page 1 10 Monday • June 11, 2018 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL Why Trump’s

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday • June 11, 2018 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL Why Trump’s combative trade stance toward allies poses

Why Trump’s combative trade stance toward allies poses risks

By Paul Wiseman

waswithdrawingitsendorsementoftheG-

7’s communique, in part over what he

calledTrudeau’s “falsestatements”about U.S.tariffsatanewsconference. “Ithinkthewaythisplaysoutisweend upwithourtradingpartnersrespondingin

alienating allies andthreatening to sus- pend business with other countries:

PresidentDonaldTrumpwasinfulltrade-

kind—athreatforathreat,atarifffortar-

iff,”saidRodHunter, alawyerat Baker McKenzieandaformereconomicofficial ontheNationalSecurityCouncil.“Youend upwithgradualescalation.”

The summit at Quebec’s Charlevoix resort failedto produce any truce in an intensifying trade conflict. Trump has imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum importedtotheUnitedStatesfromtheEU, CanadaandMexico. Hehasjustifiedthe

Saturday,Trumpthreatenedto“stoptrad- tariffsbyclaimingthatarelianceonfor-

eign steel andaluminum threatens U.S. nationalsecurity. Outraged, theallieshaverespondedby targeting American products, including

iffs,slowcommerce,disruptcorporations

thatrelyonglobalsupplychainsandjeop-

markets,inflatepricesofgoodshitbytar-

warriorformfortheweekendsummitofthe Group of Seven wealthy democracies in Canada. Thepresident’sacrimonyraisedtherisk ofatradewarthatcouldspookfinancial

dishonestandweak,”TrumpsaidtheU.S.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Insulting the host,

ardizethehealthiestexpansiontheworld

economyhasenjoyedinadecade.

Leaving the conclave in Quebec on

ing”withAmerica’salliesiftheydefiedhis demands to lower trade barriers. Andhe shruggedofftheriskthathiscombative stancewouldigniteescalatingtariffsand

counter-tariffs between theUnitedStates andits friends — the European Union, Canada,JapanandMexico. “Wewinthatwarathousandtimesoutof athousand,”thepresidentdeclaredbefore

jettingofftonegotiatethedenucleariza-

tionoftheKoreanpeninsula. Later,hepickedaTwitterfightwiththe hostoftheG-7conclave. CallingPrime MinisterJustin TrudeauofCanada“very

cheese, bourbon andpork. On Saturday, Trump warned that “if they retaliate, they’remakingabigmistake.” Trudeau’sassessmentwasglum. “Iftheexpectationwasthataweekendin

beautifulCharlevoixwithallsortsoflove-

lypeoplewasgoingtotransformthepres-

ident’soutlookintheworld,”theCanadian

primeministersaid,“thenwedidn’tquite

reachthatbar.”

Gas prices remain steady with average of $3.01 per gallon

CAMARILLO—Theaveragepriceofreg-

ular-gradegasolineintheU.S.hasremained relativelysteadyforthepastthreeweeks

withanationalaverageof$3.01pergallon.

IndustryanalystTrilbyLundbergofthe

LundbergSurveysaidSundaythatadropin

crudepriceshasnotbeenseenatthepump.

Lundbergsaysthatstationoperatorskept

thedifferencebetweenwholesaleandretail

Business brief

pricestomakeupfortightmargins. Theaverageon May 18 was afraction

under$3agallon.

Thehighestaveragepriceinthecontigu-

ous 48 states was $3.81 in the San

FranciscoBayArea.Thelowestwas$2.54

inBatonRouge,Louisiana.

Theaveragepricefordieselfuelrose4

cents,to$3.27.

Theaveragepricefordieselfuelrose4 cents,to$3.27. REUTERS
Theaveragepricefordieselfuelrose4 cents,to$3.27. REUTERS

REUTERS

DonaldTrumpshakeshandswithCanada’sPrimeMinisterJustinTrudeauinabilateralmeeting at the G7 Summit in in Charlevoix,Quebec,Canada.

Trump’s tweets slam Canada, Trudeau anew from Singapore

Unbowed, Trump tweetedanewMonday morning from Singapore: “Fair Trade is nowto becalledFool Tradeifit is not Reciprocal.AccordingtoaCanadarelease,

QUEBEC CITY — President Donald TrumptookmoreswipesatCanadaandits

primeministerovertradeissuesasheset-

tledinforamultidaysummitwithNorth

Headded:“WhyshouldI,asPresidentof

TradeisnowtobecalledFoolTradeifitis

tinuetomakeMassiveTradeSurpluses,as theyhavefordecades,whileourFarmers, Workers&Taxpayershavesuchabigand unfairpricetopay?NotfairtothePEOPLE of America! $800 Billion Trade Deficit Andaddtothatthefactthatthe

inCanadabyfirstagreeingtoagroupstate-

ment on trade only to withdrawfrom it

whilecomplainingthathehadbeenblind-

sidedby Canadian PrimeMinisterJustin Trudeau’scriticismofTrump’stariffthreats atasummit-endingnewsconference.Ashe flewfrom Canada to Singapore Saturday night,TrumpdisplayedhisireviaTwitter, whichhealsoemployedtoinsultTrudeauas “dishonest”and“weak.” Theattack on alongtimeally andits leader drew sharp criticism. German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who also attendedthesummit, toldGerman public

televisionthatshefoundTrump’stweetdis- NATO,whilewepay4%ofaMUCHlarger

“Germanypays1%(slowly)ofGDPtowards

notReciprocal.”

KoreainSingapore,contendingthat“Fair

theUnitedStates,allowcountriestocon-

By Rob Giles, Ken Thomas and Catherine Lucey

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

theymakealmost100BillionDollarsin

TradewithU.S.(guesstheywerebragging andgot caught!). Minimumis 17B. Tax

Dairyfromusat270%.ThenJustinacts

hurtwhencalledout!”

TrumproiledtheGroupofSevenmeeting

U.S.paysclosetotheentirecostofNATO-

protecting many ofthesesamecountries thatripusoffonTrade(theypayonlya fraction of the cost-and laugh!). The European Union had a $151 Billion Surplus-should pay much more for Military!” AndhebroughtinMerkel’sgovernment:

avowingtheG-7statement“sobering”and

“alittledepressing.”Merkelalsosaidthe European Union would“act” against the U.S.trademeasures.

GDP. Does anybody believe that makes sense?WeprotectEurope(whichisgood)at greatfinancialloss,andthengetunfairly clobberedonTrade.Changeiscoming!”

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011 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 10:39 PM Page 1

011 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 10:39 PM Page 1 GOLF RETURNS HOME: GOLFERS ARRIVE FOR
GOLF RETURNS HOME: GOLFERS ARRIVE FOR U.S. OPEN AT SHINNECOCK HILLS WHERE SPORT WAS FIRST
GOLF RETURNS HOME: GOLFERS ARRIVE FOR U.S. OPEN AT SHINNECOCK HILLS WHERE SPORT WAS FIRST PLAYED IN AMERICA >> PAGE 12
<<< Page 13, Chapman powers A’s
to four-game series win over Royals
Monday • June 11, 2018

Crawford, Giants solve Scherzer

By Harvey Valentine

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON—BrandonCrawford

didsomethingonSundaythatfewhit-

tershavedonethisseason.Hegotthe bestofMaxScherzer.

Crawfordwent4for4withatwo-run

homer, andtheGiants dealt Scherzer his first loss in more than two

months,defeatingtheNationals2-0to

winthethree-gameseries.

AfterPabloSandovalwalkedleading

offthefourth,Crawfordhomeredinto

Giants 2, Nationals 0

theseconddeckinrightforhiseighth oftheseason. Hesingledinthefirst anddoubledin thesixth offScherzer andaddedadoubleoffMattGraceinthe eighth. “Ithrewgoodpitchestohim.Heput great swings on them. He wins, I lose,”Scherzersaid.“That’sassimple as that. He’s hot. Ihaveto bebetter thanhim.Today,hewasgreat.” Crawfordhasbeengreatforthepast

sixweeks.SinceMay1,heishitting

anMLB-best.439(58for132)andhas

raisedhisaverageto.338.

“It’sbeenimpressive.Itreallyhas. To sustain thequality at-bats that he hasforthislong.That’swhyyesterday Igavehimaday,”saidmanagerBruce Bochy, who limited Crawford to a pinch-hittingappearanceonSaturday. Crawford admitted he might have costhimselfthecyclewhenhelashed

See GIANTS, Page 13

have costhimselfthecyclewhenhelashed See GIANTS , Page 13 BRAD MILLS/USA TODAY SPORTS

BRAD MILLS/USA TODAY SPORTS

BrandonCrawfordenjoyspostgamehigh-fivesafterafour-hit day in the Giants’2-0 win overWashington at Nationals Park.

Big summer debut for Carlmont grad

at Nationals Park. Big summer debut for Carlmont grad Mitchell Plane has 8-for-8 day at plate

Mitchell Plane has 8-for-8 day at plate in Sox’s DH sweep

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It’sastorymanyahighschoolgraduate

tellsofgradnight—partytillthesuncomes

up,functiononzerosleepthenextday.

MitchellPlane’sstory,however,isarare one indeed. The recent Carlmont senior graduatedFriday,then—aftergoingfulltilt ongradnight—turnedthreehoursofsleep into an 8-for-8 day at the plate as the PenCities White Sox opened the season withadoubleheadersweepoftheSantaCruz WarriorsSaturdayatSequoiaHighSchool. “He was a monster today,” White Sox managerSouzasaid.

Planewokeupwitha4-for-4gameinthe

opener,withtwodoubles,threerunsscored

andtwoRBIsina13-3mercy-rulewin.Once

hewaswarmedup,Planeturnedinanother4-

for-4 performance in the 15-0 win in the nightcapwithtwodoubles,twohomeruns, fourrunsscoredandeightRBIs. “Wesmash theball 1 through 9,”Plane

said.“We’remissinglikesixguys…andwe haveabunchofpitchingwedidn’tevenneed tousetoday.So,we’rejustreallydeep.That shouldgetusfarattheendoftheseason.”

LastseasoninthePalomino18-and-under

teamwas onewin away fromreaching the national stage and the Palomino World Series. After reaching the championship roundoftheWestZoneRegionalqualifierin Compton,theWhiteSoxlosttwostraight toendtheirseason. “Webuiltthisonetogoalittlefurther,” Souzasaid.

See PALOMINO, Page 14

Souzasaid. See PALOMINO , Page 14 TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL PenCitiesWhiteSoxleadoff

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

PenCitiesWhiteSoxleadoff hitterMitchellPlaneclubsatwo-rundoubleinSaturday’s15-0win over the Santa Cruz Warriors in the second game of a doubleheader on opening day of the Palomino League at Sequoia High School.

No. 11 for Nadal at French Open

By Howard Fendrich

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARIS — In full control of the French

Open final, a rather familiar position for him,RafaelNadalsuddenlywasworried. Heledbytwosetsplusabreakearlyinthe

third,whenthemiddlefingeronhisracket-

wieldinglefthandwascrampingsobadlyhe couldn’tstraightenit.Afterservingafault, Nadal took theunusual step ofheading to thesidelineinthemiddleofagame.

“Toughmoment,”Nadalwouldsaylater.“I wasveryscared.” Upinthestands, Nadal’suncleToni, his formercoach, wasnervous, too, “becauseI thoughtmaybewecanhaveaproblem,”he

said.“Butintheend,itwasnottoodifficult.”

ItrarelyisforNadalataplacehehaslord-

edoverthewaynoothermaneverhasatany Grand Slam tournament. Nadal dealt with that ultimately minor inconvenience and

See TENNIS, Page 16

ultimately minor inconvenience and See TENNIS , Page 16 PASCAL ROSSIGNOL/REUTERS Rafael Nadal celebrates after

PASCAL ROSSIGNOL/REUTERS

Rafael Nadal celebrates after winning the French Open final against DominicThiem.

after winning the French Open final against DominicThiem. MIKE SEGAR/REUTERS Justify with jockey Mike Smith aboard
after winning the French Open final against DominicThiem. MIKE SEGAR/REUTERS Justify with jockey Mike Smith aboard

MIKE SEGAR/REUTERS

Justify with jockey Mike Smith aboard wins the 150th running of the Belmont Stakes at Belmont Park Saturday in Elmont,NewYork.

Belmont Stakes at Belmont Park Saturday in Elmont,NewYork. Triple Crown winner Justify will race again By

Triple Crown winner Justify will race again

By Beth Harris

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Triple Crown winner Justify will get a well-deservedbreak and thenraceagainthisyear,althoughnodate orlocation has been targetedyet afterthe coltcameoutofhisBelmontStakesvictory ingoodcondition.

Elliott Walden of WinStar Farm said Sundaythemulti-ownergroupthatcontrols Justify wants to share the horse with the

publicbyracinghim.Aplanwillbeformu-

latedoncethechestnutcoltrecoversfroma compressedschedulethat sawhimwin six

See JUSTIFY, Page 16

San Bruno still first in Colt race

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

ThePeninsulaColtLeagueregularseason isheadingintothehome stretch, and the first- placeSan Bruno Orioles areflyinghigh. San Bruno (11-1)

extendeditscurrentwin-

ning streak to nine games Saturday with a doubleheader sweep of

streak to nine games Saturday with a doubleheader sweep of Frankie Pellegrini thePenCitiesColts.45s (8-5). The Orioles

Frankie

Pellegrini

thePenCitiesColts.45s

(8-5). The Orioles

openedthedaywitha4-1

winatLaraFieldbehindfivequalityinnings

See COLT, Page 14

012 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 8:25 PM Page 1

12 Monday June 11, 2018

251 6/10/18 8:25 PM Page 1 12 Monday • June 11, 2018 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Players arrive

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Players arrive for U.S.Open with high praise for Shinnecock

By Doug Ferguson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. — Shinnecock Hills was a lot bigger than Graeme McDowellexpected.Butnottoobig. McDowell was among those who began preparingSundayfortheU.S.Openonacourse

wheregolffirstwasplayedin1891,andwhere

theU.S.Openwaslastplayed14yearsago.He

hadneverbeenouttotheHamptons—“Only asfarasBethpage, ifthat’sevenconsidered

partofLongIsland,”hesaid—andhisimagi-

nationtolditwouldbeagolfcoursetuckedin amonghigh-endrealestate,likePebbleBeach. Morethan thesizeofShinnecock Hills wasthewayitplayed. “It’sbacktobeingapureU.S. Openwith serious discipline in your iron play,” said

McDowell,the2010OpenchampionatPebble

Beach.“Idon’tlookatitandsay,‘I’mnotlong

enough to win here.’Andthat excites me. I haven’tseenanythingthathasupsetme.” TigerWoods, playingtheU.S. Openfor the first time since 2015, arrived late Sunday afternoon andteedoffwith Jordan Spieth. Adam Scott, Rory McIlroy and HidekiMatsuyamawerealsoonthecourse.

Only19playersfromthe2004U.S.Open

Only19playersfromthe2004U.S.Open The historic course at Shinnecock Hills will host the

The historic course at Shinnecock Hills will host the U.S.Open for the first time in 14 years.

golf,includingacourse-record63fromthe

championshipteesin2013(arecordbroken

thefollowingyearbyKevinStadler).

right beforethePresidents Cup, andright whenthefairwayshrinkagebegan. “Iplayedthedaytheyweretransplantingthe

fescue,”hesaid.“Isawthatwasgoingtohap-

pen.It’sconsiderablywiderandmoregenerous

offtheteethanitwasin‘04.It’sveryfairoff

thetee.Andit’sverypenalifyoumiss.”

That’swhattheUSGAhopesfor,especial-

ly aftercriticismlast yearthat Erin Hills

was far too generous off the tee. Brooks

Koepkawonat16-under272,matchingthe

recordtoparataU.S.Open.

TheU.S.Openhasahistoryofnothaving

Shinnecock,whichhadfairwaysthataver-

aged26yardswidein2004fortheU.S.Open,

wentthrougharestorationprojecttowiden

thefairwaystoabout65yards,andrestorethe

angles and shot values architect William Flynn intended. But after wide-open Erin Hillsallowedforrecordscoringlastyear—

sevenplayersfinishedat10underorbetter—

theUSGAdecidedtoreplacesome200,000

Scott.Justdon’tgettheideathatScottneed- squarefeetofshortgrasswithfescuetobring

are back for this year’s edition at ShinnecockHills,ashortlistthatincludes

edtobereacquaintedwithShinnecock. He hasplayedwhathesaidwasa“fairbit”of

thefairwaysintoabout40yards.

ThelasttimeScottplayedwasinOctober,

successiveyearsoflowscoring.

TheyearafterJohnnyMillerhadtheonly

63 in thefinal roundofaU.S. Open, Hale

IrwinwonatWingedFootwithascore7-over

par.ThelasttimeatShinnecockHillsin2004

was one year after Jim Furyk matchedthe

recordscore(atthetime)of272atOlympia

Fields.AndtheyearafterRoryMcIlroysetthe

recordof268atCongressional,noonebroke

paratTheOlympicClub.

“Ithink they’vegot thebalanceright,” Scott said. “It’s a great course. Youdon’t havetodomuch.”

Differenceaboutthecourse14yearslater

is the closely mown areas around the greens, whichwillcausegolfballstoroll

15yardsormoreaway.KevinKisnertrieda

fewshots behindthe green on the par-3

11thbyusingahybridtorollituptheslope

sodeephecouldn’tseethegreen.

“Whereisthatgoing?”heaskedhiscad-

die,DuaneBock. “In thebunker,”Bock replied, reaching over with a wedge to keep the ball from rollingoffthefrontofthegreen. Kisnerhitanotherone. “Whereisthatonegoing?”heasked. “Inthebunker,”Bocksaid. Theforecastwasformostlydryconditions withperhapsnotasmuchwindasthispartof LongIslandtypicallygetsinJune.Butafter walkingthebacknineSaturdayeveningand

playing the front nine Sunday afternoon, McDowellwasconvincedofonething.

“Ithinkwe’rebacktoaU.S.Openmentali-

ty,”hesaid.

“Ithinkwe’rebacktoaU.S.Openmentali- ty,”hesaid. DJ reclaims top spot at St. Jude MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Dustin

DJ reclaims top spot at St. Jude

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Dustin Johnson is back in his spot as theworld’s top-ranked golferthankstoadominantvictorycapped byanabsolutelyamazinghole-outforeagle. “Whatacoolwaytoendtheday,”Johnson said.

Johnsonshota4-under66onSundaymak-

ingtheSt.JudeClassichissecondPGATour victory this yearand18th ofhis careerto

takebacktheNo.1rankingheheldfor64

yearand18th ofhis careerto takebacktheNo.1rankingheheldfor64 Dustin Johnson PGA brief

Dustin Johnson

PGA brief

firsttimeinhiscareer.Heshot72andfinished

at13under.

PreparingfortheU.S.Open,Johnsontook

theleadtohimselfwithaparonNo.1,while

Putnam double-bogeyed, andcruisedto the $1.18 million winner’s check. Johnson

turnedinthelowestscoreunderparbyawin-

nerheresinceDavidTomsat20underin2003

—beforethecoursewasredesigneddropping

parfrom71to70afterthe2004tournament.

straight weeks before falling to No. 2 behind Justin Thomas a month ago . Johnson won the eventforthesecondtime, finishingwiththeeagle, threebirdiesandabogey

fora19-under261total.

Andrew Putnam started thefinalroundwithashareoftheleadforthe

Johnson,whowontheU.S.Openin2016,

heads to Shinnecock Hills after stringing

togetherfourstraightroundsinthe60s.He

went 67, 63 and65 beforewrapping up a

final roundthat felt almost likeapractice roundwiththeonlyquestionremaininghow

lowJohnsonwouldgountilhisfinaldramat-

icshot.

NobodyhaseverwononthePGATourand followedbywinningtheU.S.Open.Theway Johnson’splaying, heseesnoreasonwhy hecouldn’tbethefirst.

followedbywinningtheU.S.Open.Theway Johnson’splaying, heseesnoreasonwhy hecouldn’tbethefirst. ’ Available at
’
’ Available at

Available at

’ Available at
’ Available at
followedbywinningtheU.S.Open.Theway Johnson’splaying, heseesnoreasonwhy hecouldn’tbethefirst. ’ Available at
followedbywinningtheU.S.Open.Theway Johnson’splaying, heseesnoreasonwhy hecouldn’tbethefirst. ’ Available at

013 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 10:26 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

mon 251 6/10/18 10:26 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • June 11, 2018 13 Chapman’s

SPORTS

Monday June 11, 2018

13

Chapman’s homer in 8th lifts A’s past Royals

By Michael Wagaman

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND—Marcus Semien didn’t have much time to think after making a diving stop on Salvador Perez’s sharp grounder in theeighthinning.WithKansasCity’sWhit Merrifield off third base and breaking for home, the Oakland shortstop had no one choicebuttothrowtotheplate. ItworkedoutperfectlyforbothSemienand theA’s.

ItworkedoutperfectlyforbothSemienand theA’s. Matt Chapman before. A’s 3, Royals 2 withnowalks.

Matt Chapman

before.

A’s 3, Royals 2

withnowalks.

Perezhithis11thhomerunfortheRoyals,

whohavelostsevenofeight. Kansas City’s offensive funk continued, althoughMoustakasgavehisballclubajolt inthefirstinningwhenhelaiddownabuntto

beat Oakland’s defensive shift.

Moustakaswasstrandedatsecond,oneoffour runnerstheRoyalsleftinscoringposition. AlexGordondoubledoffTreinenwithone out in the ninth and moved to third on a groundout before DrewButera fouledout to Lucroytoendthegame.

But

Who needs a glove?

Afan sitting in the second deck behind

homeplatecaughttwofoulballsonconsecu-

tivepitches,bothofthembare-handed.

Trainer’s room

OpeningdaystarterKendallGravemancon-

tinuestorehabinArizonabutMelvindoesn’t

expecttheright-handerbackanytimesoon.

2BJedLowriewasgiventhedayoff.Chad

Jake

Smolinski was called up from Triple-A Nashvillebeforethegame.RHPChrisBassitt

wasoptionedtoTriple-ANashville.

hiskneestonailasliding Merrifield. “Chapmanmadeagreat swing but that swing doesn’t get us the win if Marcusdoesn’tmakethat play,” Treinen said. “We were trying to call a sinker there because

(Perez)swung through agoodonedown the

High percentage

groundball/swing-and-misspitchandheputa

prettygoodswingonit.Marcusmadeabetter

play.”

MattChapmanhomeredleadingoffthebot- pitch

tom of the eighth, moments after Semien’s defensivegemcutdownthego-aheadrun,and

theA’sbeattheRoyals3-2Sunday.

“Justreaction,”Semiensaid.“Ihadatough grip.IhadmywholepalmontheballsoIjust triedtothrowitashardasIcouldfromthere. Merrifield’sprettyquicksoyougottogetthe transferandthethrowthereas quick as you can.Thatwasgood.” OaklandmanagerBobMelvincalleditone ofthebest plays ofSemien’s career. Closer BlakeTreinen,whowasonthemoundandhad aperfectview,termedit‘incredible.’ MerrifielddoubledoffA’sstarterSeanManaea and advanced to third on Mike Moustakas’ groundout. Treinen replaced Manaea and got

PereztohitagrounderthatSemienmadeadiv-

ingstopon,andthrewtohomewhilestillon

Melvinagreed.

“That’sareallygoodrunneratthirdgoing

oncontact,”Melvinsaid.“Todivelikethat,

getupandhavetothrowitoffbalanceonthe

money like that, no legs underneath him . game-winner.” Stephen Piscotty and Jonathan Lucroy bothdroveinrunsfortheA’s,whosquandered numerous scoring chances before Chapman came through with a solo home run off

RoyalsrelieverJasonAdam(0-1).

Treinen(3-1)retiredfivebatterstowinfol- Pinder started in place of

lowingastrongstartManaea.Winlesssince May 14, Manaea allowed six hits and two

runsover71/3inningsandhadsixstrikeouts

GIANTS

Continued from page 11

GIANTS Continued from page 11 ahit down theleft-fieldlinein theeighth

ahit down theleft-fieldlinein theeighth andendedupwithhisseconddouble. “RightwhenIhititIwasthinkingabout itandIwasrunninghardoutoftheboxand then Isawit was curving pretty hardandI thoughtitwasgoingtogofoulandIslowed

upforsecond,”hesaid.“Iwasalittledisap-

pointedinmyself.” Derek Holland (4-6), a 10-year veteran

facing Washington for the first time, allowed three hits and two walks in five innings as five pitchers combinedfor the three-hitter. Hunter Strickland pitched the

ninthforhis13thsave.

Scherzer(10-2)hadwonninestraightdeci-

sions since his last loss on April 4. He allowedtworunsandfourhitswhilestriking out nineoverseven innings. Hestruck out

thesideon11pitchesinthesecondinning

inthemidstofsixstraightstrikeouts. AustinJacksonhadtheGiants’onlyother hitagainstScherzer. HollandallowedthefirsttwoNationalsto reach in the second but induced a double-

play grounder from Michael A. Taylor and struckoutWilmerDifo.

Trainer’s room

OFGorkysHernandez,whowashitinthe ribsintheeighthinningSaturday, wasout of the lineup. Bochy said Hernandez was

available to pinch hit Sunday andto play

Monday

removed on June 1) will begin taking

swings

(right elbow inflammation) and RHP Jeff Samardzija (right shoulder tightness) are both expected to throw 40-pitch bullpen sessionsMonday.

1B/OFBrandonBelt(appendix

RHP Johnny Cueto

Huskies earn first-ever trip to College WS

By Eric Olson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BeforeSunday, Washingtonwastheonly team in the tradition-rich Pac-12 to never makeittotheCollegeWorldSeries. TheHuskiesfinallyaregoingtoOmaha. KaiserWeiss’bases-loadedsacrificeflyin the bottom of the 10th inning gave Washington a6-5 win overhost Cal State Fullerton in a wildGame 3 of their NCAA Tournamentbest-of-threesuperregional. The Huskies join fellowPac-12 member OregonStateandNorthCarolinaintheCWS startingSaturday. Mississippi State and Vanderbilt also advanced with a Game 3 win 10-6 in 11 innings over Vanderbilt Sunday night. North CarolinaandOregon Statewon their superregionalsSaturday. Therestoftheeight-teamCWSfieldwill

befilledoutMondayafterfourwinner-take-

allGame3s.Auburn,Texas,SouthCarolina

andDukewon Sunday to forcethosedecid- inggames. Washington was cruising along against Fullerton with Joe DeMers carrying a per- fect gameuntil Hank LoFortedoubledlead- ingofftheseventhinning. TheTitansscoredthreerunsintheninthto

goup4-3,butWashingtongottherunback

in the bottom half. LoForte barely cleared theright-fieldwallwithtwooutsinthetop

ofthe10th forhis secondhomerun ofthe seasonandaone-runleadforFullerton. But two errors in the bottom half allowed Washington to loadthebases beforeWeiss liftedhiswinningsacrificeflytoleft. Luke Jarvis’ walk-off RBI single in the

bottomoftheninthinninggaveAuburna3-

2winoverthedefendingnationalchampion

and No. 1 overall seed Gators in Gainesville,Florida.

and No. 1 overall seed Gators in Gainesville,Florida. LEI LUO, DDS San Bruno Over 20 years

LEI LUO, DDS San Bruno Over 20 years of experience 2009-2017 American Top Dentists

LEI LUO, DDS

San Bruno

Over 20 years of experience 2009-2017 American Top Dentists

Gators in Gainesville,Florida. LEI LUO, DDS San Bruno Over 20 years of experience 2009-2017 American Top

014 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 9:42 PM Page 1

14 Monday June 11, 2018

251 6/10/18 9:42 PM Page 1 14 Monday • June 11, 2018 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL CO LT

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CO LT

Continued from page 11

offs —thethirdtierofthepostseason, fol- lowing league and sectional play — which theyfellshortoflastseason.

“It’s a very balanced team in my opin- ion,”Tursisaid. “Ihave18kidsonmyros- terandIutilizeall ofthemwhen Ifeel nec- essary. Irun it likeahigh school program. …It’ssummer, soit’stimeforeveryoneto have fun and learn. But it’s also time for kidstogetreadyfornextyear.” Pellegrini’s recent success only adds to the depth. The right-handed pitcher made his summer debut Saturday, June 2 after

beingshutdownmidwaythroughCap’sjun- inning. Tyler Firpo ledoff the game with a

double,PatrickVolkmanfollowedwithasin-

gle,JoshGarcia—afterloggingtwoRBIsin-

ingindouble-digitsinsixgames. Saturday’s nightcap was the latest outburst, with the Orioles rallying for four runs in the first

1/2runspergamethisseason,includingscor-

solidrotation.OliverOtakeemergedfromthe bullpen in Saturday’s opener, firing two shutout innings to earn a save. Then after Meyerdealtforfiveinningstoearnthewinin the nightcap, Conor Meehan closed it out withtwoinningsofrelief. “Ican’tcomplain,”Tursisaid.“Ihaveeight livearms.” San Bruno’s offensehas averagednearly 7

from starting pitcher Frankie Pellegrini. Then they closedout the twin bill with an

11-4victoryinthenightcapbackedbyfive

inningsfromDevinMeyer. With the sweep, San Bruno officially clinchedapostseasonspot.Now,theOrioles are gunning for a league championship and home-field advantage throughout the play- offs. The top six teams of the eight-team

ior-varsityseason. “Heactuallyjustcamebacktwoweeksago …andallthekiddoesisthrowstrikes, force contact,”Tursisaid. Pellegrinihasquicklymadeacaseastheace

leaguequalifyforthesingle-eliminationpost-

seasonformat. “This year, basedon the way we’ve been

playing,Ithinkwe’llbeOK,”Oriolesmanag- ofthestaff,postinga2-0recordthroughtwo

starts. Heopenedwith afive-inning, mercy- ruleshutoutinhisseasondebutagainstSouth City. Then, Saturday against PenCities, he allowedonerunthroughfiveinnings. “It’sgoodtohaveaceinthebackpocket,” Tursisaid. Pellegrini adds to the depth of an already

talentbacktotheColtLeagueregionalplay-

Capuchinojunior-varsityteaminthespring. TheOrioles arelooking to ridethedepth of

es, a majority of which composed the

undersquad,Tursihasenjoyedaspoilofrich-

erMikeTursisaid. In his first yearat thehelmofthe16-and-

glesinthepreviousgame—tripledhometwo runs, and cleanup hitter Jack Peterson dou- bled.

Peterson,outofSerra,isoneofthefewnon-

Capuchinoplayersontheroster.Hehasbatted inthecleanupspotallsummerlong. “Jackhasbeenmycatalystprettymuchall year,”Tursi said. “It’s always niceto havea kidthat can drive in runs. … He’s the team MVPatthispoint.” Peterson’s versatility has proven valuable

as well, as he has playedsecondbase, third baseandbothcorneroutfieldspots. Meyer has been the primary third base- man, though, and has shined on defense, according to Tursi. In last Thursday’s 2-1 victory over South City, Meyer made four key plays at the hot corner, including to backhandedgemsgoingtohisright,oneof whichwasadivingplay. Tursi said he’s been so impressed with Meyer’s play, it is reminiscent of recent Capuchino graduate Trey Zahursky, who earned a Division I scholarship to play at UniversityofNevada-Renonextseason. “He has baseball knowledge that you can’tteach,”Tursisaid.“I’vebeencoaching Treythelastthreeyears.Andheremindsme alotofTrey.” SanBrunoisinfirstplaceinthePeninsula Colt League, but is even in theloss column with thesecond-placeRedwoodCity Ravens (8-1), who areslatedto play six games over thefinalsixgamesoftheregularseason.The leaguetitlecouldcomedowntothefinalday of the season when the Orioles andRavens rematch.TheRavenshandedtheOriolestheir

onlylossoftheseason4-0onMay21.

onlylossoftheseason4-0onMay21. PALOMINO Continued from page 11

PALOMINO

Continued from page 11

Planeisagoodstepinthatdirection,hav-

ing joinedtheWhiteSox this season after

playing five previous summers with GamePrep Baseball Academy out of Atherton.WiththeWhiteSoxreturningjust

four players from last year’s squad, Souza had seek out plenty of additions. Those

additionsprovedpowerfulinSaturday’sdou-

bleheader. In addition to Plane’s two bombs, first- year Saratoga import Nathan Peng drilled two home runs in the second game of the doubleheader. Matthew Leong (Hillsdale) addedasolo homerin Game2, andcleanup hitter Austin Brown (Mills) homered in

Game1.

“Between [Plane] and Peng and Brown, theyhittheballhardtoday,”Souzasaid.“It wasflyingofhere(becauseofthewind).But theyhittheballhard.” Peng is one of four former high school league MVPs the White Sox fielded Saturday. PenCities this season also added Jaxon Skidmore (Hillsdale), who earned Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division Player of the Year honors in 2018, and Jordan Brandenburg (Carlmont)who earned

thesameawardin2017.BrownwasthePAL

LakeDivisionPlayeroftheYear. At SaratogaHigh School, Peng earnedEl Camino League Most Valuable Player hon-

orsafterhitting.524with12homerunsand

40 RBIs. His 12 homers rankedsecondin the state of California, according to MaxPreps.com. “WhenIsawwhohewas,Iwaslike,‘This is the guy who will put us over the top,’” Souzasaid.

is the guy who will put us over the top,’” Souzasaid. Peng was initially slated to

Peng was initially slated to play in the California Club Baseball league, but three weeks previous to the start of the summer schedule, theteamfolded. Theright-handed power hitter — boundfor UC Davis in the fall on a baseball scholarship — was referredtoSouzabyCCBcoachErickRaich. And Peng’s want to commute 40 minutes northtoplayPalominoballquicklygained momentum. PengattendedonepracticelastWednesday andimmediatelyfeltathome. “Power hitting,” Peng said. “Six home runstoday.Wednesdayatpractice,we…hit a bunch of home runs. Home runs are like thecoolestthing.So,whynot?” TheWhiteSoxflexedsomepitchingarms Saturday as well. Left-handerMattAndriola (Aragon) earnedthe five-inning victory in the mercy-rule win in Game 1. In Game 2, right-handerJulianBillot(Carlmont)fireda four-hit shutout in the five-inning, mercy-

rulewin. Also on staff for the White Sox is PAL

Bay Division Pitcher of the Year Angelo

Tonas(SacredHeartPrep)whofilledinnice-

lyasapositionplayerSaturdayastheWhite

Soxnavigatedaminimalroster.

WhilePlanewas busy stealing theshow, Tonas was 2 for 3 through both games, includingadouble, fourwalksandfourruns scored. The Georgetown-bound left-han- der’s highlight, however, came on defense asheturnedinarareunassisteddoubleplay fromrightfield. Theplaytookshapeinthesecondinning ofGame2 as SantaCruzhadrunners at the

cornerswithoneout.WhenDaxSmithlift-

edaflyballtorightfield,though,theSanta Cruz runners, not know how many outs there were, both took off running. Tonas gloved the fly ball then nonchalantly joggedin to tag first baseto completethe raredoubleplay.

took off running. Tonas gloved the fly ball then nonchalantly joggedin to tag first baseto completethe
took off running. Tonas gloved the fly ball then nonchalantly joggedin to tag first baseto completethe
took off running. Tonas gloved the fly ball then nonchalantly joggedin to tag first baseto completethe

015 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/8/18 2:24 PM Page 1

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LOCAL 15 THE DAILY JOURNAL Monday • June 11, 2018
LOCAL
15
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Monday • June 11, 2018

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16 Monday June 11, 2018

6/10/18 8:25 PM Page 1 1 6 Monday • June 11, 2018 S P O R

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TEN N IS

Continued from page 11

ThrowinthreetitlesattheU.S.Open,two atWimbledonandoneattheAustralianOpen,

andNadalisupto17majors,secondamong

menonlytoRogerFederer’s20.Thetwostars

havecombinedtowinthepastsixSlams.

Thevictoryalsoallowedthe32-year-old

NadaltoholdontotheNo.1ranking,ahead

ofFederer.

If there were any reason for a bit of intrigueenteringSunday,itwasthis:Thiem

beatNadalonredclayatRomeinMay2017

andagainatMadridlastmonth. ButthosearenotquitethesameastheFrench

claimedhis record-extending 11th French OpenchampionshipSundaybydisplaying

hisfoe-rattlingexcellenceina6-4,6-3,6-

2 victory over No. 7 seed Dominic Thiem.“Thereis areason why hewon 11

times here,” said Thiem, a 24-year-old Austrianappearinginhisfirstmajorfinal.

“It’sdefinitelyoneofthebestthingssome- Open,whereNadalis86-2forhiscareer.

bodyeverachievedinsport.” Thiemwasonthecouch,watchingonTV,

in2005,whenNadalearnedhisfirstGrand

SlamtrophyinParisatage19.Thatbegana

run of four consecutive French Open tri-

umphsthrough2008.Headdedfivestraight

from2010-14andnowhastwoinarow.

“Iamsureyouwillwinhereinthenextcou-

pleofyears,”NadaltoldThiemafterward. Againstmanyotheropponents—maybe ANY other — Thiem would have made thingsinteresting.Hepoundedhugeserves

thattopped135mph(220kph)—about25

mph(40kph)betterthanNadal’sfastest—

andtranslatedintosevenacesbutalsohad fivedouble-faults. Hetook thebiggest of bigcutsongroundstrokes,hisfeetleaving thegroundashethrewhiswholebodyinto them,asiftheveryoutcome—notofany individualpoint,butthewholeshebang— dependedonthestrengthofthatonewhip

ofhiswhiteracket.Thatledto34winners

(eightmorethanNadal)butalso42unforced

errors(18morethanNadal).

Halep knew she needed Grand Slam

PARIS—Itwastheendofalongandreward-

ingday, oneshe’lllikelyneverforget, and

newFrench Open champion Simona Halep harboredacoupleofoverridingconcerns. “I’mtired,”shesaid.“I’mhungry.Ididn’t

eatsince9a.m.”

Itwasgettingcloseto12hourssincethat

last meal, andHalep was speaking to two reporters in what she hopedwas her last

mediasessionSaturdaynightafterbeating

SloaneStephens3-6,6-4,6-1forherfirst

GrandSlamtitle.Halephadpinedforsucha championshiptogoalongwithherNo. 1 ranking,andshefinallyhadcomethrough

afterstartinghercareer0-3inmajorfinals.

“Ithinkitwasthemostimportantthing,

becausealwaysIsaidthatifyouareNo.1

withoutaGrandSlam,youarenotarealNo.

1,”Halepsaid.“NowthatIwasabletowin,

it makes it special, and makes it, like, everythingtogether.It’srealnow.” Sureis. “She showed a lot of maturity. She’s grown up a lot in the last 12 months. Sometimesthelossesdomakeyoumature really quickly. Youcan go one way with yourcareer,andgodownwards,oryoucan suckitup,workalittlebitharderandtryto do it again,” said Halep’s coach, Darren Cahill.“That’sthewayshewent.”

JUS TIF YHalep’s coach, Darren Cahill.“That’sthewayshewent.” Continued from page 11 wasupsetbyKeenIceintheTravers.

Continued from page 11

wasupsetbyKeenIceintheTravers. “Everybody thinks I’m so opposed to Saratoga,”hesaid.“I’mnot.I’vehadreally goodluckthere.”

The season-ending Breeders’ Cup world

championshipsareinLouisvilleonNov.2-3.

“It’sbeenthelongest,quickestjourney,”a hoarse-soundingBaffertsaidaslightrainfell outsideJustify’sbarn.“Wewereintheoffice watchingthereplayoverandover.He’sjust anunbelievablehorse.We’rejustsoproudof him.Wethoughthewasthatkindofhorsebut theyhavetoproveit.”

JustifywontheBelmontonSaturdayby1

3/4lengthsover24-1shotGronkowskiafter

winning the Kentucky Derby by 2 1/2 lengthsandthePreaknessbyahalf-length.

Justifybecamethefirstcoltin136yearsto

wintheDerbyafternotracingasa2-year-old.

“Heranalargenumberofracesinashort amount oftimewith no 2-year-oldfounda- tion,” said Chad Brown, who trains Gronkowski.“Thishorseovercamealot.He wasmanagedsowellbyBobandhisstaff. He’saremarkablehorsetoruninallthreelegs aswellashedid.” Wearing a white blanket advertising his

statusasthesport’s13thTripleCrownwin-

ner,Justifywalkedlapsinsidethebarnbefore comingoutsidetogreetaslewofcameras.He prickedhis ears at thesoundoftheshutter clicks andwhen Baffert ledhimcloser, he playfullybitatonecamera. “Pharoahmadesomanypeoplefeelgood,” Baffertsaid.“Thishorse,I’msuretherewas millions of people screaming at their TV wantingtoseeitdone.Peoplelovehistory beingmadeinsports.” Justify’svictorysilencedtheskepticswho believedthecoltwasdueforalossbecauseof his rushedschedule andclose result in the Preakness. “Opinions die,” Baffert said. “Facts live forever.”

“Opinions die,” Baffert said. “Facts live forever.” racesover111dayssincehisdebutonFeb.18.
“Opinions die,” Baffert said. “Facts live forever.” racesover111dayssincehisdebutonFeb.18.

racesover111dayssincehisdebutonFeb.18.

“Ourfocuswasoneachraceastheycame up,” Walden said after unveiling Justify’s Triple Crown banner inside Belmont Park. “Nowwecantakeadeepbreathandjustsee howthehorseis.” JustifyissettoreturntoChurchillDowns inLouisville,Kentucky,onMonday.

NextSaturday,Justify’sownersalongwith trainerBob Baffert andjockey MikeSmith willreceivetheirengravedKentuckyDerby trophies at Churchill. It’s possible Justify couldbeparadedat thetrack likeAmerican Pharoah afterhewon theTripleCrown for

Baffertin2015.

“Todayhelookedfantastic,”Baffertsaid. “After a week, it starts catching up with them.”

OnJune17,JustifywilltraveltoBaffert’s

baseinSouthernCaliforniatoawaithisnext move. Among the possibilities: the $1 million Haskell Invitational on July 29 at New Jersey’s Monmouth Park, the $1 million

PacificClassicatDelMaronAug.18andthe

$1.25millionTraversatSaratogaonAug.25.

Baffertcanexpecttohearfromofficialsat several tracks eagerto lureracing’s newest superstar, much like he didwith American Pharaoh. Chris Kay, president of the New York Racing Association, joked that he would

“holdBodehostageuntiltheymakethedeci-

sion,”referringtoBaffert’s13-year-oldson.

“Wehopethisentiregroupwillbeassembled againinlateAugustinSaratoga,”Kaysaid. BafferttookAmericanPharoahtoSaratoga

inAugust2015andtheTripleCrownwinner

againinlateAugustinSaratoga,”Kaysaid. BafferttookAmericanPharoahtoSaratoga inAugust2015andtheTripleCrownwinner
againinlateAugustinSaratoga,”Kaysaid. BafferttookAmericanPharoahtoSaratoga inAugust2015andtheTripleCrownwinner

017 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 7:34 PM Page 1

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DATEBOOK

Monday June 11, 2018

17

THE DAILY JOURNAL DATEBOOK Monday • June 11, 2018 17 ‘Ocean’s 8’— despite ho-hum reviews — found
THE DAILY JOURNAL DATEBOOK Monday • June 11, 2018 17 ‘Ocean’s 8’— despite ho-hum reviews — found

‘Ocean’s 8’— despite ho-hum reviews — found nothing like the stormy reception than the female-led‘Ghostbusters’reboot did on the same weekend two years ago.

‘Ocean’s 8’opens with franchise-best $41.5M

By Jake Coyle

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — “Ocean’s 8,” the female-fronted overhaul of the starry heist franchise, opened with an esti-

mated$41.5millionattheboxoffice,

takingtheweekend’stopspotfromthe

fast-falling“Solo:AStarWarsStory.”

Atalowerpricepointandinlessfan-

boy-guardedfranchise, “Ocean’s 8”—

despiteho-humreviews—foundnoth-

inglikethestormyreceptionthanthe female-led “Ghostbusters” reboot did onthesameweekendtwoyearsago.

Madeforapproximately$70million,

“Ocean’s 8” and its cast featuring Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett and AnneHathaway, set an opening-week-

endbestforthefranchise,notaccount-

ing for inflation. The three previous “Ocean’s” films — starring BradPitt, GeorgeClooney andMatt Damon, and based on the 1960 original “Ocean’s 11,”with Frank Sinatra—all debuted

withbetween$36-39millioninthelast

decade.

“Ocean’s 8,” also starring Mindy Kaling, Sarah Paulson, Awkwafina, Rihanna and Helena Bonham Carter,

drew a largely female audience — 69

percent—foraresultthatslightlysur-

passedexpectations.

“Wethoughtwe’dcomeininthe$35-

40(million)range,”saidWarnerBros.

distribution chief Jeff Goldstein.

Top 10 movies

1.“Ocean’s 8,” $41.5 million ($12.2 million international). 2. “Solo: A Star Wars Story,” $15.2 million. 3.“Deadpool 2,”$13.7 million ($18.5 million international). 4. “Hereditary,” $13 million ($3.5 million international).

5.“Avengers:InfinityWar,”$6.8million

($10.9 million international). 6.“Adrift,”$5.1 million. 7.“Book Club,”$4.2 million. 8.“Hotel Artemis,”$3.2 million. 9.“Upgrade,”$2.2 million. 10.“Life of the Party,”$2.1 million.

“Numberone, it’s fun. Numbertwo, it hits an underserved audience. Unfortunately, there is just a lack of storiesthatareaimedrightatwomen.” Yet the weekend’s three new wide releaseswereallfemalefronted.

Thehorrorthriller“Hereditary,”star-

ring Toni Collette, debuted with $13 million,settinganewcompanyrecord for A24, the indie distributor behind releases like “The Witch” and “Moonlight.” The feature-film direct- ingdebutofAriAster,“Hereditary”has receivedravereviewsandbeenhailedas theyear’sscariestmoviesinceitsdebut at the Sundance Film Festival. Either fromdisappointmentorsimplybecause

they werestunnedfromfear, audiences gave “Hereditary” — about a family cursedafterthedeathofitsmatriarch— aD-plusCinemaScore. Lesssuccessfulwas“HotelArtemis,” starringJodieFoster.TheGlobalRoad release, also starring Sterling K. Brown,DaveBautistaandCharlieDay,

floppedwith$3.2millionin2,407the-

aters. Setinanear-futureLosAngeles, “Hotel Artemis” is about a members- onlyhospitalforcriminals. Coming between more massive blockbustersliketherecent“Solo”and the upcoming “Incredibles 2” and

“Jurassic World,” the weekend was down about 20 percent fromlast year, accordingtocomScore, when“Wonder Woman” was setting box-office records.Butsomeofthestorywasstill thesame.

“There’salotofwomen-poweredrev-

enueattheboxofficeintheheatofthe

summer

Dergarabedian,seniormediaanalystfor comScore. “Films featuring female leadsarekillingitattheboxoffice,but

that’sbeengoingonforquiteawhile.”

One of the early summer’s more breakout hits has been the Supreme

CourtJusticeRuthBaderGinsburgdoc-

umentary“RBG,”whichhasmade$9.1

millioninsixweeksofreleasethrough

Sunday.

season,”

said

Paul

Sunday. season,” said Paul TYDTWDay B epreparedtolearnnewstuff!PetSitters
Sunday. season,” said Paul TYDTWDay B epreparedtolearnnewstuff!PetSitters

TYDTWDay

B epreparedtolearnnewstuff!PetSitters

Internationalis,Iassume,anorganizationyou

didnotknowexisted.Itisaneducationalassoci-

ationforprofessionalpetsittersheadquarteredinKing,

NorthCarolina,whichrepresentsnearly7,000folks

whomakealivingtakingcareofdogs,catsandother

companionanimalswhentheirhumansareatwork,trav-

elingorotherwiseunavail-

able.PSIprovidestraining

andresourcestoitsmem-

bersalongwithprofession-

alcertificationandliability

insurance.Asanentity

focusedonmakingsurethat

animalsgetwhattheyneed,

PSIabsolutelygetsmyvote

ofthanks!Secondnew

thingtolearntoday,PSIis

alsotheorganizationthat

foundedTakeYourDogTo

WorkDay(TYDTWDay),

celebratedtheFridayfol-

lowingFather’sDayeveryyearsince1999.

Perhapsnotyetaholidaywiththesamefollowingas PresidentsDayorBlackFriday, TYDTWDayhasindeed

grown.In1999,PSI’sfirstTakeYourDogToWorkDay

enjoyedtheparticipationofanestimated300companies

throughouttheUnitedStates,anumberwhichgrewto

5,000in2003andcontinuestogrowwiththetheme

“Becausewhoeverheardofworkinglikeacat?!”As

muchfunasthatsloganisIalsoverymuchappreciate PSI’ssecondthemefortheday,“Makeityourbusiness

tohelppetsinneed.”Friday,June22,marksthe20th

annualcelebrationwithactivitiesplannedthroughout

theUnitedStates,Canada,Australia,theUnited

Kingdom,NewZealandandIsrael.Andwishingtoavoid

anyaccusationsofspeciesismthenowweeklongcele-

brationbeginsaweekfromtodaywithMeowMonday.

Whilenoteveryworkenvironmentmightbeappropri-

ateorevensafeforpets,findingdogs(and,toalesser

degree,cats)alongwiththeirpeopleinofficesand

shopsisofcourseanever-increasingreality.But

whetheryourworkplaceisrightforFidoandFluffy,

pleaseconsidercreatingsomeopportunitynextweekto

atleastacknowledgeifnotactuallyhelpananimalin

need—or(admittedlygettingabitself-servinghere)

helpingananimalshelterlikePeninsulaHumane

Society&SPCA.

helpingananimalshelterlikePeninsulaHumane Society&SPCA. K e n S o c i e t y & S PC A

K e n

S o c i e t y & S PC A .

W h i t e i s t h e p re s i de n t o f t h e Pe n i n s ul a Hum an e

K e n S o c i e t y & S PC A . W
K e n S o c i e t y & S PC A . W
K e n S o c i e t y & S PC A . W
K e n S o c i e t y & S PC A . W
K e n S o c i e t y & S PC A . W
018 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 6:08 PM Page 1 Kaiser Permanente Redwood City staged

018 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 6:08 PM Page 1

018 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 6:08 PM Page 1 Kaiser Permanente Redwood City staged a

Kaiser Permanente Redwood City staged a ground-breaking for the new Medical Office being built at the corner of Marshall andMaplestreets.AmongthosewieldingshovelsattheeventareDr.WilliamFirtch,physician-in-chief;andSheilaGilson,senior vice president/area manager;of the Kaiser Permanente Redwood City Medical Center.Also in the crowd are Redwood City Mayor Ian Bain and councilwomen Shelly Masur and Janet Borgens.The four-story,143-provider building with three levels of underground parking is expected to open in 2021.

levels of underground parking is expected to open in 2021. Th o r and Eri c

Th o r and Eri c a Ke n da l l , ofSan Carlos, gavebirthtoababyboyat SequoiaHospitalinRedwoodCityon May14, 2018.

*** D a v i d J o y a and Li n a P e c h , of MenloPark, gavebirthtoababyboy atSequoiaHospitalinRedwoodCity onMay14, 2018. ***

To n y C h a n and Ta n i a Wo n g , of RedwoodCity, gavebirthtoababy boyatSequoiaHospitalinRedwood CityonMay18, 2018. *** J o s e p h Hy un and M e l a n i e Ode l e y e , ofBurlingame, gavebirth toababyboyatSequoiaHospitalin RedwoodCityonMay21, 2018.

toababyboyatSequoiaHospitalin RedwoodCityonMay21, 2018. A 2008 Apifoou College inTonga Island graduate and San

A

2008 Apifoou College inTonga Island graduate and San Mateo,California,native

is

currently serving with a U.S.Navy strike fighter squadron which flies one of the

world’smostadvancedwarplanes.SeamanMaliaMoalaisaculinaryspecialistwith theWarhawks ofVFA 97,which operates out of Naval Air Station Lemoore.A Navy culinary specialist is responsible for preparing meals for the squadrons.

18 Monday • June 11, 2018 THE DAILY JOURNAL
18 Monday • June 11, 2018
THE DAILY JOURNAL

People in the news

Vaughn DUI bust caught on officers’ body cameras

LOSANGELES—ActorVinceVaughnwasarrestedSunday on suspicion of drunken driving after being stopped at a sobriety checkpoint in a Southern California beach town, policesaid. Vaughn, 48, was busted early in the morning in Manhattan Beach afterfailing afieldsobriety test that was capturedwithofficers’bodycameras, Sgt. TimZinssaid.

morning in Manhattan Beach afterfailing afieldsobriety test that was capturedwithofficers’bodycameras, Sgt. TimZinssaid.
morning in Manhattan Beach afterfailing afieldsobriety test that was capturedwithofficers’bodycameras, Sgt. TimZinssaid.
morning in Manhattan Beach afterfailing afieldsobriety test that was capturedwithofficers’bodycameras, Sgt. TimZinssaid.
morning in Manhattan Beach afterfailing afieldsobriety test that was capturedwithofficers’bodycameras, Sgt. TimZinssaid.

019 0611 mon:0611 mon 251 6/10/18 5:49 PM Page 1

THE DAILY JOURNAL

mon 251 6/10/18 5:49 PM Page 1 THE DAILY JOURNAL DATEBOOK Monday • June 11, 2018 19 Calendar

DATEBOOK

Monday June 11, 2018

19

THE DAILY JOURNAL DATEBOOK Monday • June 11, 2018 19 Calendar MONDAY, JUNE 11 Celebrate Soul Food. 1

Calendar

MONDAY, JUNE 11 Celebrate Soul Food. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Place Fiesta Hall, 3146 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Showcasing ‘Southern Treats from Yvonne’s.’ For more information call 921-4191.

Kaiser Knit for a Cause. 2:30 p.m. Kaiser Cancer Treatment Center, 220 Oyster Point Blvd., South San Francisco. The Kaiser Permanente Knitting Group meets twice a month at Kaiser Permanente Cancer Treatment Center and is open to all knitters. For more information call

829-3860.

Reader Leader Orientation. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. South San Francisco Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave., South San Francisco. Free. For more infor- mation call 829-3860.

The ‘You Betta Work’ Comedy Fiesta. 7:30 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. Dragon Production Theatre Co., 2120 Broadway, Redwood City. Cost $5. For more information contact jesusubettawork@gmail.com.

TUESDAY, JUNE 12 Hawaiian Music Jam. 9 a.m.to 10:30 a.m. San Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. For more information call 522-7490.

Smartphone Training: iPhone. 10 a.m. to noon. San Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.For more information call

522-7490.

Sports Broadcasting Summer Camp. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Midpen Media Center,900 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto. For kids. Cost is $560. Students learn all the elements of live sports broadcasting in a unique hands-on training experience. For more information call 494-8686.

Senior Day at the County Fair. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. San Mateo County Event Center, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Free. For more informa- tion call 344-5200.

Celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Noon to 6 p.m. Place Fiesta Hall, 3146 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. For more information call 921-4191.

Kids Craft with Sophie’s World. 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. South San Francisco Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave., South San Francisco. Free. For more information call 829-3860.

The Tuskegee Airmen. 6:30 p.m. to

7:30 p.m. Menlo Park Main Library

800 Alma St., Menlo Park.

Presentation by David O. Cunningham, chapter president of the Bay Area’s Tuskegee Airmen, Inc., and son of one of the original African-American military aviators in the U.S. Armed Forces. For more information call 330-2501.

Learn to Play Bridge this Summer. 6:30 p.m. to 8: 30 p.m. San Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Early registration is encouraged. Registration is required. $125 for residents, $153 for non-residents. For more information call 522-7409.

Documentary Club. 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Watch the documentary of the month, ‘Paris is Burning.’ For more information con- tact belmont@smcl.org.

Drop-In Audio Recording and Vinyl Cutting. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Use audio recording devices to edit sound or vinyl cut unique art. For more infor- mation contact belmont@smcl.org.

TheatreWorks Silicon Valley Presents ‘Native Gardens.’ 7:30 p.m. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. Cost $40 to $100, savings available for educators, sen- iors and patrons 35 and under. For more information contact boxof- fice@theatreworks.org.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13 Free Pet ‘Fixes.’ 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Bell Street Park, 560 Bell St., East Palo Alto. Free spaying and neutering clinic hosted by the Peninsula Humane Society. Surgery performed by a licensed vet in an SPCA surgery vehicle. One pet per family. Cats and dogs only. For more information call

340-7022.

Drop-In Computer Help. 10 a.m. to

Noon. Redwood City Public Library,

1044 Middlefield Road, Redwood

City. Free. For more information call

780-7098.

Sports Broadcasting Summer Camp. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Midpen Media Center,900 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto. For kids. Cost is $560. Students learn all the elements of live sports broadcasting in a unique hands-on training experience. For more information call 494-8686.

Computer Coach. 10:30 a.m. to noon. ESL Club. 10:30 to noon. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de

las Pulgas, Belmont. Relaxed and welcoming tutoring session with one-on-one help. For more informa- tion contact belmont@smcl.org.

Toastmasters Public Speaking and Leadership Skills Development. Noon to 1 p.m. BKF Engineers, 255 Shoreline Drive, Suite 200, Redwood Shores. Join us in a friendly and sup- portive atmosphere while learning to improve your communication and leadership skills. For more infor- mation call (202) 390-7555.

Free Sunday Senior Luncheon. Noon to 1 p.m. The Magnolia of Millbrae, 201 Chadbourne Ave., Millbrae. Discuss the emotional and financial benefits of planning for senior years. For more information call 376-5006.

The Bible and Current Events. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Hope Evangelican Lutheran Church, 600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo. For more information contact helc@pacbell.net.

Makey Makey Piano and Scratch Programming. 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. South San Francisco Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave., South San Francisco.Free.For more information call 829-3860.

Better Choices, Better Health. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. San Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Learn about stress man- agement, dealing with pain and fatigue, weight management and decision making. Registration required. For more information con- tact ashong@cityofsanmateo.org.

Living in San Mateo County:

Community Discussion with Home for All. 6 p.m. South San Francisco Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave., South San Francisco. Representatives from the Home for All Initiative will lead an informative presentation on the current housing environment in San Mateo County, followed by a facilitated group dis- cussion. For more information call

829-3860.

DIY Hand Sanitizer. 6 p.m. Grand Avenue Library, 306 Walnut Ave., South San Francisco. Learn how to create your own natural hand sani- tizer. For more information contact ssfpladm@plsinfo.org.

Head Over High Heels: Drag at the Library. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Burlingame Library, 480 Primrose Road, Burlingame. For more informa-

tion call 558-7400.

TheatreWorks Silicon Valley Presents ‘Native Gardens.’ 7:30 p.m. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. Cost $40 to $100, savings available for educators, sen- iors and patrons 35 and under. For more information contact boxof- fice@theatreworks.org.

Sugar Ray at San Mateo County Fair. 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. San Mateo County Events Center, 2495 S. Delaware St., San Mateo. Iconic pop band Sugar Ray will come to the San Mateo County Fair. For more infor- mation call 574-3247.

THURSDAY, JUNE 14 Free Pet ‘Fixes.’ 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Fair Oaks Community Center, 2600 Middlefield Road, Redwood City. Free spaying and neutering clinic hosted by the Peninsula Humane Society. Surgery performed by a licensed vet in an SPCA surgery vehi- cle. One pet per family. Cats and dogs only. For more information call

340-7022.

Sports Broadcasting Summer Camp. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Midpen Media Center,900 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto. For kids. Cost is $560. Students learn all the elements of live sports broadcasting in a unique hands-on training experience. For more information call 494-8686.

San Mateo Asian Senior Club Special Event. 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. King Community Center, 725 Monte Diablo Ave., San Mateo. Guest Speaker Katie Quan discusses Rosie the Riveter. For more information call 522-7470.

ESL Club. 10:30 to noon. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Practice speaking and lis- tening in English. For more informa- tion contact belmont@smcl.org.

Hospice Care Presentation. 11 a.m. to Noon. Foster City Recreation Center, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster City. Foster City 55+ Club. Free. For more information call 286-2585.

Supervised Play. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. San Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Must have completed Play of the Hand course or have basic knowl- edge and experience with the game. Cost $115 to $140. Registration required. For more information call

522-7490.

F o r m o re e v e n t s v i s i t s m d a i l y j o u r n a l . c o m , c l i c k C a l e n d a r.

R EN T

Continued from page 1

also topping the rent list, some experts suggest a silver lining could beonthehorizon. San Mateo rents only ticked up .3 percent from last year, according to online housing database Apartmentlist, marking a significant reductionintheamountofrentgrowth showninyearsprior. Apartmentlist data analyst Chris Salviati suggestedthedownturn could be interpreted as a softening rental market. “We’redefinitelyseeingsomesigns of rental markets beginning to cool. Nationally, year-over-year growth is

currently1.5percent,whileitwas2.8

percentatthistimelastyear,”hesaid.

Butthoseencouragedbysuchaper-

spectiveshouldmeasuretheirenthusi-

asm, saidSalviati, noting San Mateo willlikelyremainanattractivelocale formany.

“San Mateo is a highly desirable

market,givenitsconvenientproximi-

tytobothSanFranciscoproperaswell as theSilicon Valley tech campuses,” hesaid. “Somerenters also preferthe quieter lifestyle that cities like San Mateo afford. For these reasons, San Mateo rents are some of the most

expensiveinthearea.” His perspective is supported by Apartmentlist rental figures, showing a median one-bedroom unit in San Mateo sits at $3,480 per month and

$4,370foratwo-bedroomunit.

Thosepricesmaycontinuetoclimb over the coming months too, as the summer tends to bring warm weather andanevenhotterrentalmarket. Somerentalexpertsareuncertainthe market is quite so expensive though, as the California Apartment Association believes more affordable optionsareavailable. Rhovy LynAntonio, vicepresident of public affairs for the association, saidtheaveragerent foran apartment in San Mateo is $2,930, whileacross the county is $2,694, according to rentaltrendtrackingresourceCoStar. She suggested the fluctuation in priceestimationscouldbeattributedto rental websites tending to gauge the newer, more expensive and upscale units while her association also con- siders the older and less expensive availablestock. Whilelocalpricesshowamarginof error, there is little daylight between the experts when discussing the root oftheaffordabilityissue. “Only when we have enough avail- ablehousing will wetruly havehous- ing that is affordable,” said Lyn Antonio in an email, pointing to the

starkdifferencebetweentheamountof establishedjobslocallyandnumberof newhousingunitsbuilt. Salviatiechoedasimilarsentiment. “The Bay Area still isn’t building enough new housing supply to meet demand,”hesaid. The outsize disparity in the avail- able units comparedto desire to live locally is likely a factor in pushing someresidentsoutoftheBayAreaand into cheaper parts of the country, he said. “We’restartingtoseesomeBayArea workers moving to othermoreafford- able tech hubs such as Austin and Denver,”hesaid. A recent Bay Area Council report

supportssuchaperspective,asthesur-

vey of 1,000 local voters shows youngpeopleexhaustedwiththecost of living are increasingly willing to relocate.

Nearly half the millennial voters polledagreedthey wouldlikely move elsewhereinthenextfewyears, seek- ingareaswithlessexpensivehousing and traffic congestion, according to thereportreleasedlastweek. Theexoduscouldbefuelingarental market softening, said Salviati, but questions linger over how long the potentialflatteningtrendmaylast. “It’s not entirely clearifthis cool- ing off were to continue, or for how long,”hesaid.

LIF TS

Continued from page 1

theirautoshopssince2012whenresi-

dents raised complaints about estab- lishments near Claremont Street and

RailroadAvenueparkingcarsandload-

ingvehiclesonneighborhoodstreets. In response to their concerns, city

officials issued letters to business

ownerswarningtheminstallingunper-

mittedlifts constitutedbuilding code violations, but later tabledthe effort to incorporate input from business owners affected by the changes, accordingtoastaffreport.

In response to a discussion at an October 2016 City Council meeting, the city’s planning and building departmentscreatedaprogramtoallow vehicle lifts to be permitted and remainwithoutpenalty,butfewerthan 10 of the more than 130 auto-related businesses in thecity havecomefor- wardto apply for the permits, which require a one-time payment of $195, said city Planner Richard Patenaude. He added some 95 establishments in the city — which are also clustered

aroundSouthAmphlett Boulevardand PalmAvenue — are believedto have liftsonsite. Central Neighborhood resident Laurie Watanuki advocatedfor tighter rules forbusinesses parking commer- cialvehiclesonresidentialstreetsand restrictions on outdoor auto repair shopoperationstomitigatethenoise affecting homeowners adjacent to them. Inreviewingastaffrecommendation tocontinuerequiringbusinessesusing vehicle lifts outdoors to apply for a special use permit, councilmembers agreed Planning Commission review

of the applications could offer busi-

nessownersandresidentsanopportu-

nitytoworkoutdetailscasebycase. Patric Jonsson, owner of Bo

Jonsson’s Foreign CarServiceat 111

E.20thAve.,urgedcouncilmembersto

considertheconstraintsthoseoperat-

ing auto repair shops face in turning

servicejobsaroundquickly,especially as parking has becomeless available acrossthecity. “Thelifts areessential forourbusi- nessesandifwecan’tusethem, we’re

not going to be able to survive,” he

said.“Theareaisbecomingoverlysat- themnext.

urated with the density homes… so

parkinghasbecomeabigissue.” CouncilmanJoeGoethalsjoinedhis fellowcouncilmembersinlookingfor creative ways to amend the parking requirement for auto service and gas stations,whichcurrentlystandsattwo stallsplusanadditionaltwostallsfor each service bay. Goethals suggested giving business owners an option to payparkingin-lieufeeswheremaking room for the required parking is not possible, noting the parking require- mentmaybewhathasdeterredowners fromseeking building permits allow- ingthemtooperatelifts. “Idon’t think they trust us to come in andget the permits andI want to make sure that we’re letting them all know that they can come in and be confidentthatwhenthey’reoperating asafebusinessthey’regoingtogetthe permit,”hesaid. Goethals notedparking expectedto become available in downtown garagesmaybeamongthefactorsthat couldmitigatetheneedintheseareas,

andcouncilmembersagreedtheywant-

edto reviewamendments to thepark-

ingrequirementsforauto-relatedbusi-

nesses when the issue comes before

edto reviewamendments to thepark- ingrequirementsforauto-relatedbusi- nesses when the issue comes before
edto reviewamendments to thepark- ingrequirementsforauto-relatedbusi- nesses when the issue comes before

edto reviewamendments to thepark- ingrequirementsforauto-relatedbusi- nesses when the issue comes before