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Alerts in Oracle Application
DECEMBER 19, 2010 4 COMMENTS

10 Votes

Alerts in Oracle Application


Oracle Alert facilitates the flow of information within your organization by letting you create entities called alerts to
monitor your business information and to notify you of the information you want. You can define one of two types of
alerts: an event alert or a periodic alert.
Event Alert:
An event alert immediately notifies you of activity in your database as it occurs. When you create an event alert, you
specify the following:
• A database event that you want to monitor, that is, an insert and/or an update to a specific database table.
• A SQL Select statement that retrieves specific database information as a result of the database event.
• Actions that you want Oracle Alert to perform as a result of the database event. An action can entail sending
someone an electronic mail message, running a concurrent program, running an operating script, or running a SQL
statement script. You include all the actions you want Oracle Alert to perform, in an action set.
Periodic Alert:
A periodic alert, on the other hand, checks the database for information according to a schedule you define. In a
periodic alert specify the following:
• A SQL Select statement that retrieves specific database information.
• The frequency that you want the periodic alert to run the SQL statement.
• Actions that Oracle Alert to perform once it runs the SQL statement. An action can entail sending the retrieved
information to someone in an electronic mail message, running a concurrent program, running an operating script, or
running a SQL statement script. We include all the actions we want Oracle Alert to perform, in an action set.
Navigation in Oracle Apps to define an alert:
Go to “Alert Manager” Responsibility
Alert >> Define
Transfer Alert from one instance/database to other:
Go to “Alert Manager” Responsibility
Alert >> Define
Go to “Tools” Menu on top
Click on “Transfer Alert”
Enter source and destination fields and click Transfer.
How to define an periodic alert:
1. Go to Alert Manager > Alert > Define.
2. Select the ‘Periodic’ Tab.
3. Enter the name of the application that owns the alert in the Application field.
4. Name the alert (up to 50 characters), and give it a meaningful description (up to 240 characters).
5. Check Enabled to enable your periodic alert.
6. Set the frequency for the periodic alert to any of the following:
 On Demand
 On Day of the Month
 On Day of the Week
 Every N Calendar Days
 Every Day
 Every Other Day
 Every N Business Days
 Every Business Day
 Every Other Business Day
Enter a SQL Select statement that retrieves all the data your alert needs to perform the actions you plan to define.
Your periodic alert Select statement must include an INTO clause that contains one output for each column selected
by your Select statement.
Here is an example of a periodic alert Select statement that looks for users who have not changed their passwords
within the number of days specified by the value in :THRESHOLD_DAYS.:
SELECT user_name,
password_date,
:THRESHOLD_DAYS
INTO &USER,
&LASTDATE,
&NUMDAYS
FROM fnd_user
WHERE sysdate = NVL(password_date,
sysdate) + :THRESHOLD_DAYS
ORDER BY user_name
Although Oracle Alert does not support PL/SQL statements as the alert SQL statement definition, you can create a
PL/SQL packaged function that contains PL/SQL logic and enter a SQL Select statement that calls that packaged
function.
You can verify the accuracy and effectiveness of your Select statement. Choose Verify to parse your Select
statement and display the result in a Note window.
Choose Run to execute the Select statement in one of your application’s Oracle IDs, and display the number of rows
returned in a Note window.
Once you are satisfied with the SQL statement, save your work.
Specifying Alert Details:
Once you define an event or periodic alert in the Alerts window, you need to display to the Alert Details window to
complete the alert definition. The Alert Details window includes information such as which Application installations
you want the alert to run against, what default values you want your inputs variables to use, and what additional
characteristics you want your output variables to have.
Creating Alert Actions:
After you define your alert you need to create the actions you want your alert to perform. There are four types of
actions you can create:
• message actions
• concurrent program actions
• operating script actions
• SQL statement script actions
Choose Actions
Enter a name (up to 80 characters) and description (up to 240 characters) for your alert action.
Select a level for your action: Detail, Summary, or No Exception.
Choose Action Details to display the Action Details window.
Select the type of action you want to create in the Action Type field
Creating an Event Alert:
Specify the name of the application and the database table that you want Oracle Alert to monitor.
Note: You cannot use a view as the event table for your alert.
Check After Insert and/or After Update if you want to run your event alert when an application user inserts and/or
updates a row in the database table.
Specify a value in the Keep _ Days field to indicate the number of days of exceptions, actions, and response actions
history you want to keep for this alert.
Specify a value in the End Date field if you want to disable your alert by a certain date.
Important Alert Tables:
 ALR_ALERTS
 ALR_ACTIONS
 ALR_ACTION_SETS
 ALR_ACTION_SET_INPUTS
 ALR_ACTION_SET_OUTPUTS
 ALR_ACTION_SET_MEMBERS
 ALR_ALERT_CHECKS
 ALR_ALERT_INPUTS
 ALR_ALERT_OUTPUTS
 ALR_ACTION_SET_CHECKS
 ALR_RESPONSE_SETS
 ALR_RESPONSE_ACTIONS
 ALR_VALID_RESONSES
Oracle Alert uses the following internal views:
 ALR_ALERT_ACTIONS_VIEW
 ALR_ALERT_HISTORY_VIEW
 ALR_CHECK_ACTION_HISTORY_VIEW
 ALR_INSTALLATIONS_VIEW
 ALR_PERIODIC_ALERTS_VIEW
 ALR_RESPONSE_ACTIONS_VIEW
 ALR_SCHEDULED_PROGRAMS
 ALR_VARIABLES_AND_OUTPUTS
For complete details you can refer Oracle Alert User’s Guide
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Oracle Alerts- Few FAQsIn "AOL"


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FILED UNDER AOL TAGGED WITH ALERT MANAGER, ALERTS, EVENT ALERT, ORACLE AOL, ORACLE APPS,
PERIODIC ALERT
4 Responses to Alerts in Oracle Application

1. Sunil Sharma says:

January 22, 2011 at 9:38 am

Gud one

2
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Reply

2. rahina says:

September 14, 2011 at 7:40 am

Thank about your info. Im a newbie in oracle ebs

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Reply

3. KRISHNA SUBRAMANYAM says:

February 10, 2012 at 9:48 am

hi,

very use full. thank you :) :)

0
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4. Dibyajyoti Koch says:

February 20, 2012 at 11:05 am

Hey Guys…Thanks for the comments…

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Reply

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