Sei sulla pagina 1di 15

IEEE P1627/D1.

Date: October 13, 2005

Draft Standard for DC Electrification


Overhead Contact Systems, Including
Application of Lightning Arresters for
Transit Systems

Prepared by Working Group 17 of the Overhead Contact System Subcommittee


Sponsored by the Rail Vehicle Transit Interface Standards Committee
of the
IEEE Vehicular Technology Society

Copyright © 2005 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.
Three Park Avenue
New York, New York 10016­5997, USA
All rights reserved.

All rights reserved. This document is an unapproved draft of a proposed IEEE Standard.   As such, this
document is subject to change. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK! Because this is an unapproved draft, this
document must not be utilized for any conformance/compliance purposes. Permission is hereby granted
for   IEEE   Standards   Committee   participants   to   reproduce   this   document   for   purposes   of   IEEE
standardization   activities   only.   Prior   to   submitting   this   document   to   another   standards   development
organization for standardization activities, permission must first be obtained from the Manager, Standards
Licensing  and   Contracts,   IEEE   Standards   Activities   Department.   Other   entities   seeking  permission  to
reproduce   this   document,   in   whole   or   in   part,   must   obtain   permission   from   the   Manager,   Standards
Licensing and Contracts, IEEE Standards Activities Department.

IEEE Standards Activities Department
Standards Licensing and Contracts
445 Hoes Lane, P.O. Box 1331
Piscataway, NJ 08855­1331, USA
October 13, 2005 IEEE P1927/D1.1
Introduction

(This   introduction   is   not   part   of   IEEE   P1627/D1.1,   Draft   Standard   for   DC   Electrification   Overhead
Contact Systems, Including Application of Lightning Arresters for Transit Systems.)

The majority of the present operating dc electrified rail systems use OCS or third rail to supply power to
the vehicles.  OCS is potential candidates of lightning strikes.

Basic lightning protection could be grouped into the following subsystems:

 Direct stroke diverters such as lightning rods and ground wires.  The purpose of these subsystems
is to intercept lightning strokes and discharge them to ground.

 Low grounding resistance (lightning rods, pole footings and lightning arrester ground) to hold
structure potential bellow insulation flashover and breakdown level.

 Lightning arrester application to reduce power circuit surge voltage below insulation flashover
and breakdown of the equipment.

 Set insulation levels to minimize outages due to lightning.

The working group’s approach for developing the OCS lightning protection standard will focus on the first
three of the above mentioned subsystem.  Setting basic insulation levels for the OCS is part of the scope of
work of another subcommittee. The electric utility industry universally recognizes that long transmission
lines must insulate against lightning rather than merely for the operating voltage if they are to provide
acceptable  service  from  the  standpoint  of minimizing  the  lightning  outages.    Although,  the setting  of
insulation levels for OCS is not part of the scope of this standard, we would like to recommend that similar
to the utility transmission line OCS insulation standards subcommittee should consider other factors such
as lightning outages and contamination prior to selecting insulation levels.

The other feature that makes OCS designers and engineers contemplate is the question as to whether to
shield nor not to shield the OCS system with overhead ground wire(s).  A lightning stroke terminating on
an unshielded OCS will encounter surge impedance much higher than that of a ground wire shielded OCS.
As a result of the higher surge impedance, the induced voltage will be higher and consequently the number
of flashovers across the OCS  insulators will be higher.   While the above discussion brings out much
inferior performance per circuit mile for unshielded rather than shielded OCS, the unshielded OCS can be
acceptable in regions of very low isokeraunic levels and urban areas where shielding may be provided by
trees   and  nearly  building.     Also,   it   should   be  mentioned  that   strokes  to   unshielded   OCS  will  set  up
traveling waves on OCS conductors that will travel to the substation.  Thus the substation is the recipient
of large and more numerous lightning surges from unshielded OCS than from shielded OCS.  Please also
keep in mind that the crest value of the surge will be determined by the insulation level of the OCS.

While we are evaluating the risk to the OCS  from  direct  strokes, we must  not overlook the effect  of


induced lightning strokes, especially OCS located near transmission lines and other shielding structures.

Shielded OCS with ground wires in addition to having much smaller surge impedance and consequently
reduced crest voltages, lightning strokes progressively drain into the ground as the waves successfully
reach adjacent towers and in a few spans from the struck pole the waves disappear.  This establishes the

Copyright © 2005 IEEE. All rights reserved.
This is an unapproved IEEE Standards Draft, subject to change. ii
October 13, 2005 IEEE P1927/D1.1
other advantage of the shielded OCS that the equipment in the substation are not subjected to surges for
lightning strokes on the OCS a few spans away from the substation.

Fig. 1

2002 Edition

This edition of IEEE P1627, Standard for Grounding Practice for DC Electrification Overhead Contact
System,   Including   Application   of   Lightning   Arresters   for   Transit   Systems   was   prepared   by   the
VEHICULAR   TECHNOLOGY   SOCIETY,   Rail   Transit   Vehicle   Interface   Standards   Committee,
Overhead Contact Systems Sub­Committee for Rail Transit, power supply working group.

Origin and Development of IEEE P1627

The Overhead Contact Systems Sub­Committee for Rail Transit Systems was formed in 2001 with the
purpose   of   developing   standards   governing   the   design   and   construction   of   overhead   contact   systems
(OCS) for rail transit.  The primary concern of the committee regarding OCS for light rail systems was the
lack of uniform practices for grounding OCS and application of lightning arresters and their effect on
safety to passengers, personnel and equipment, and reliability and cost effectiveness of such systems.

Prior  and   during  the  development   of  this   standard   there   were   reports  of   lightning   arrester   failures   in
several  systems resulting in service  interruption and equipment  failures.   Questions were being raised
regarding the grounding of OCS support poles and the pros and cons of using lightning arresters in the
OCS.  Most importantly, there was no understanding of the lightning arrester failures and recommended
application guidelines.  The good news so far has been that there have been no reports regarding personnel
injuries.

At the time this standard was completed, the working group had the following membership:

Nikitas D. Rassias, Chair
Ramesh Dhingra, Co­Chair

Alan Blatcxhford Ian Hayes Michael Long


Butch Campbell Albert Hoe Steve Mitan
Ron Clark Jay Sender
Copyright © 2005 IEEE. All rights reserved.
This is an unapproved IEEE Standards Draft, subject to change. iii
October 13, 2005 IEEE P1927/D1.1
Jeffrey N. Sisson Benjamin Stell Paul White
Gary Touryan Tom Yong
Carl Wessel

Copyright © 2005 IEEE. All rights reserved.
This is an unapproved IEEE Standards Draft, subject to change. iv
The following members of the balloting committee voted on this standard. Balloters may have voted for
approval, disapproval, or abstention. (To be provided by IEEE editor at time of publication.)
_______________________________________________________________________________________
Contents

Introduction......................................................................................................................................................ii

1. Overview......................................................................................................................................................5

1.1 Scope......................................................................................................................................................5

1.2 Purpose...................................................................................................................................................5

2. References....................................................................................................................................................6

3. Definitions, abbreviations, and acronyms....................................................................................................7

3.1 Definitions..............................................................................................................................................7

3.2 Abbreviations and Acronyms.................................................................................................................8

4. Grounding.....................................................................................................................................................9

4.1 Ground Wire...........................................................................................................................................9

4.2 OCS support grounding..........................................................................................................................9

5. Lightning Arresters.......................................................................................................................................9

5.1 Application.............................................................................................................................................9

5.2 Lightning Arrester Rating....................................................................................................................10

6. Service Requirements.................................................................................................................................11

7. Testing........................................................................................................................................................11

7.1 Design Test...........................................................................................................................................11

7.2 In Service Test......................................................................................................................................12

Bibliography...............................................................................................................................................13
Draft Standard for DC Electrification
Overhead Contact Systems, Including
Application of Lightning Arresters for
Transit Systems

1. Overview

1.1 Scope

The scope of this standard covers practices for grounding OCS used in dc traction electrification for rail,
light rail, and trolley bus, including the proper application and testing of lightning arresters.This style sheet
is intended to provide IEEE standards working groups with guidelines for the formatting of draft standards
that   are   to   be   submitted   to   the   IEEE   Standards   for   publication   and   inclusion   in   the   IEEE   Standards
document database. 

1.2 Purpose

The purpose of this standard is to establish minimum requirements for grounding of OCS and application
of lightning arresters that will provide a reasonable degree of safety to personnel and equipment from
lightning and its related hazards.  At present time there are no uniform practices for grounding OCS used
in   dc   traction   electrification   or   for   application   of   lightning   arresters.     Such   a   standard   will   provide
increased protection to passengers, personnel and equipment, reduce maintenance  and initial costs and
improve systems performance.
2. References

This standard shall be used in conjunction with the following publications.  If the following standards are
superceded   by   an   approved  version,  the   latest   revision   shall  apply.     In   case   of   conflict   between   this
standard   and   the   referenced   document,   this   standard   shall   take   precedence.     Those   provisions   of   the
referenced standard that are not in conflict with this standard shall apply as referenced.

National Electrical Safety Code

National Electrical Code

Canadian Electrical Code

Canadian Standards Association

British Standard BSN EN 50124­1:2001 Railway Applications – Insulation coordination
3. Definitions, abbreviations, and acronyms

3.1 Definitions

Clearance: Shortest distance in air between two conductive materials

Creepage Distance: Shortest distance along the surface of the insulating material between two conductive
materials

Electrical Section: Part of an electrical circuit having its own voltage rating for insulation coordination

Grounded: electrical section connected to earth that cannot be interrupted

Ground Wire:   The conductor installed for the purpose of   providing electrical continuity between the


supporting structure of the overhead contact system and the common return or grounding system.

Insulated: All components isolated from the energized OCS conductors by at least one level of insulation.
An insulated section may be under the influence of adjacent energized circuits.  An insulated section may
be considered as an electrical section.

Lightning Arrester:   A device typically mounted on OCS poles and connected to the OCS, designed to
protect insulated feeder cables against lightning, by providing a path to ground through a spark­gap, with
or without variable resistance elements.

Nominal voltage: Value assigned to a circuit or system approximately equilivent to the working voltage
for designating the voltage class.

Overvoltage:  Voltage   having   a   peak   value   exceeding   the   maximum   steady   state   voltage   at   normal
operating conditions.

Rated Voltage: Value of voltage assigned to a component, device or equipment

Rated Impulse Voltage: Value of voltage assigned to the equipment referring to the specified withstand
capability of the insulation against transient overvoltages.

Rated Insulation Voltage:  RMS withstand voltage assigned to the equipment referring to the specified
permanent (over five minutes) withstand capability of the insulation between energized components and
earth.

Surge Arrester:  See Lightning Arrester

Working Voltage: Highest RMS value of the ac or dc voltage, which can occur between two points across
any insulation when each electrical circuit is at maximum voltage.
Working Peak Voltage:  Highest value of the voltage which can occur in service across any particular
insulation.

3.2 Abbreviations and Acronyms

ANSI American National Standards Institute
AREMA American Railway Engineering Association
ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials
AWG American Wire Gauge
DC Direct Current
FRA Federal Railroad Administration
IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
ISO International Organization for Standards
LRV Light Rail Vehicle
NEC National Electrical Code (NFPA­70)
NEMA National Electrical Manufacturers Association
NESC National Electrical Safety Code
NETA National Electrical Testing Association
NFPA National Fire Protection Association
OCS Overhead Contact System
OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration Act
RMS Root Mean Square
ROW Right­of­way
TES Traction Electrification System
UBC Uniform Building Code
UL Underwriters Laboratories, Inc.
USASI United States of America Standards Institute
USDOT United States Department of Transportation
4. Grounding

4.1 Ground Wire.

4.1.1 OCS, when installed in regions where the isokeraunic level is higher than 10, shall be protected from
lightning surges with an overhead ground wire or wires as required to maintain a maximum shielding
angle of no more than 45 degrees Fig. 1.

4.1.2   Ground   wire   shall   be   9/16   diameter   Copperweld   having   19   number   9   conductors,   and   40%
conductivity.  Hard drawn copper wire 4/0 Awg stranded could also be used if  theft is not a concern.

4.1.3 Ground wire shall be bonded at each OCS support with a 9/16 Copperweld, 40% conductivity wire.

4.1.4 Ground wires shall be terminated into the traction power substations and shall be connected to the
substation ground grid.

4.2 OCS support grounding

4.2.1 OCS support poles with lightening arresters attached to them shall have 5 ohms footing resistance
maximum.  OCS poles without lightning arresters attached to them hall have 25 ohms footing resistance
maximum.   The grounding of the pole could be accomplished by connecting the pole foundation steel
caisson to the pole, by providing ground rods or counterpoise wires.  Earth resistivity shall be measured
and the measurements shall be used to calculate the pole footing resistance.  Following the installation of
the pole, the footing resistance shall be measured and recorded for future reference.

4.2.2  Overhead  ground  wire  shall  also  be  sized  to carry   load  and  fault   current  for  electrical  services
attached to the pole including traction power.

4.2.3 Where multiple ground rods are being used, they shall be spaced apart further than the length or their
immersion.   Two 10­foot rods should be spaced 20 feet apart.   Connect ground rods to grounding wire
with   4/0   Awg   copper   wire   located   18   inches   below   ground.     Provide   two   bonds   from   the   4/0   Awg
grounding wire to the pole.  Use ­corrosive connections to connect the grounding conductor to the ground
rods and to the pole.

5. Lightning Arresters

5.1 Application

5.1.1  Lightning   arresters  shall  be  provided  and   shall  be  connected  to  the  OCS   at   mid  point  between
substations and at places where electrical equipment are connected to the OCS, such as insulated cables,
transformers, and circuit breakers.  For OCS systems that require multiple taps from parallel underground
feeders, lightning arresters shall  be and shall be connected to the OCS system at 1000 feet maximum
spacing.       Also,   lightning   arresters   shall   be   connected   to   the   catenary   system   at   places   where   tight
electrical clearances exist between the OCS and overpasses such as bridges, convention centers or tunnels.
5.1.2 Use a 9/16 Copperweld 600 insulated with jacket wire 40% conductivity to connect the lightning
arrester to the OCS support footing ground grid using an exothermic weld.  If theft is not a concern than
copper wire of equivalent size can be substituted for the copperweld ground wire.   Maintain lightning
arrester ground leads to a minimum.   If is not practical to connect the lightning arrester to the catenary
pole (round pole) then extend the ground wire down the OCS support and connect it to the OCS support’s
ground grid (use insulated grounding conductor to avoid arcing).

5.1.3  Locate  lightning  arresters  directly  (as  close  as  possible)  at  the  terminals  of  the  apparatus  being
protected.   At this location, and with the arrester ground leads connected directly to the tank, frame, or
other metallic structure which supports the insulated parts, the voltage applied to the insulation will be
limited to the sparkover voltage and the discharge of the arrester.

 Name Plate Information

 The following information shall be provided:

 Suitable for application on DC traction systems

 Rated voltage

 Nominal discharge current

 Pressure relief capability in KA

 Manufacturers name

 Year of manufacture

 Serial number

5.2 Lightning Arrester Rating

5.2.1  Lightning  arresters discharge  voltage is no more  than 80%  of the BIL of the equipment  that  is


protecting.

5.2.2 Voltage rating of lightning arresters shall be 125% of maximum continuous system operating voltage
measured from phase OCS to rail or the voltage rating of the  lightning arrester shall be at least 5% above
the momentary  maximum  possible  system  operating voltage under  any  normal  or expected  peak  fault
condition (allowing 5% for utility overvoltage and a percent for regeneration based no system parameters).
OCS  to rail  voltage  shall  not  exceed  the  rating  of the  lightning  arrester  under  all  traction  and  utility
systems operating conditions.

Table 1 Traction Power Voltage Levels

System Nominal Voltage System Maximum System Maximum Momentary


(Volts) Continuous Voltage (Volts) Voltage (Volts)
Up to 850 1020 1,150

1,500 1,800 2,000

3,000 3,600 4,000

5.2.3 Lighting arrester rating shall be as listed on table 1.

Table 1­ Arrester Ratings

Lightning Arresters

System Maximum Minimum Rated Nominal Maximum residual Voltage


Temporary Voltage Volts Discharge Pressure Relief at 20 KA Discharge
Voltage Volts DC DC Current KA Capacity KA current in KV

1,150 1,300 100 20 5

2,000 2,100 100 20 9

4,000 4,200 100 20 16

Lightning Arresters

BIL KV DC Withstand Minimum
Minimum Rated Minimum
Voltage Volts DC Dry KV Wet KV Energy KJ 

1,300 65 45 25 3.22

2,100 65 45 25 4.83

4,200 65 45 25 11.27

6. Service Requirements

Operating ambient temperature shall be between ­40 degrees C and + 40 degrees C.   Altitude shall not
exceed 1800 feet.  System OCS to ground voltage shall be within the rating of the arrester under all system
operating conditions.
7. Testing

7.1 Design Test

 Lighting arrester shall be subjected to the following design test:

 Insulation withstand test

 DC Dry and Wet spark over test

 Discharge voltage test

 Impulse protective level voltage time characteristics

 Accelerated aging procedure

 Pressure relief test

New and clean arresters shall be used for each design test.

The arrester shall be mounted in the position(s) in which it is designed to be used.

Ambient temperature for test shall be  ­10 degrees centigrade to +20 degrees centigrade  and shall not very
more then + or – 3 degrees centigrade.

7.2 In Service Test

Lightning arresters shall be tested within a period of five (5) years.  The yearly sampling for testing shall
be a group of twenty percent of all of the arrestors for a given line.

A   representative   sample   on   the   in­service   arrestors   and   on­hand   spares   shall   be   tested   for   possible
degradation and failure.   Based on the testing results found either further samples maybe required for
testing period, or no further testing will be required until the next year, or identified testing period.  The
time interval between testing the entire inventory shall be a maximum of five years, from the in­service
date of the alignment or line.
Bibliography

Lightning Strikes 

British Standard BSN EN 50124­1:2001 Railway Applications – Insulation coordination