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After Reading Routine

Found Poems
By Tiernan O’Rourke
Think, Pair, Share

What is the meaning of life?

(Don’t say 42)


Is life worth living if these things were taken away?
Victor Frankl
Man's Search For Meaning
Annotations

● Circle words you think are very powerful (nouns, verbs, adjectives)

● Underline any phrases that stand out to you

● Write any feelings you might have next to the passage your reading

● Star your favorite paragraph(s)


Found Poems

● Start the poem with a strong word or phrase

● Use line breaks

● Try to respect the original order of words

● Make sure verb tenses match

● Give your poem a title

● Don’t forget punctuation (Add your own for dramatic effect)


Bibliography
Fisher, D. (2015). 50 instructional routines to develop content literacy. Boston: Pearson.

Found Poems/Parallel Poems - ReadWriteThink. (n.d.). Retrieved March 22, 2018, from http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-
resources/lesson-plans/found-poems-parallel-poems-33.html?tab=4#tabs

Frankl, V. E. (1963). Mans search for meaning: An introduction to logetheraphy. Boston: Beacon Pr

Simon, M. (2018, February 07). Why I Have My Students Write Found Poetry Instead of Essays. Retrieved March 22, 2018, from
https://www.weareteachers.com/found-poetry/.
I chose the How to Use Found Poetry website as a source because it explains how found
poems are especially useful for narrative nonfiction which is what my piece of reading
was. It also gives examples on how to structure the poem which I used in the class.

I chose the article from readwritethink.org because it explains how found poetry is also
useful for teaching about poems themselves and not just the text they are using. It also
gives a detailed explanation on how to go about using found poems.