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Annual report 2009 Annual report and nancial statements 2009 1

Annual report

2009

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

1

vision

A caring world where the basic requirements of people in need are fulfilled.

mission

Inspired by Islamic humanitarian values, Islamic Relief Worldwide aims to help meet the needs of vulnerable people and empower them to become self-reliant so that they can live with dignity and confidence. We help individuals, groups and institutions to develop safe and caring communities and make it possible for those who wish to support others to reach people in need of their help.

work

We provide help where it is needed most and wherever we are best placed to assist. We do this regardless of race, colour, political affiliation, gender or belief and without expecting anything in return. We work to mitigate the effects of disasters, preparing for their occurrence where possible and responding with emergency relief and rehabilitation. We promote sustainable development through our work in the sectors of education, health and nutrition, water and sanitation, and livelihoods. We also advocate on behalf of the poor. We hope to contribute to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) through raising awareness of the issues that affect poor communities and through our work on the ground.

Cover: Ismeta Hutinovic tending her crop of fruit trees in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Ismeta and her husband took out an interest-free loan from Islamic Relief to start up a fruit-growing business. Photo Islamic Relief/Stefano Massimo

2 Responding to emergencies

4

Message from the chair of the Board of Trustees

5

Message from the CEO

6

Report of directors/trustees

7

Meeting our organisational aims

8

Aim 1

Responding to emergencies

12

Aim 2

Caring for orphans and children in need

16

Aim 3

Supporting education

20

Aim 4

Providing access to healthcare and water

24

Aim 5

Promoting sustainable livelihoods

28

Aim 6

Campaigning and advocacy on humanitarian issues

31

New strategic directions

32

Fundraising and local activities

33 Events in the United Kingdom

34 Middle East and emerging markets fundraising

36

Governance and management

38

Organisational structure

43

Financial and business review

48

Investment policy and performance

50

Independent auditor’s report

51

Financial statements 2009

54 Notes to the accounts

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

3

Message from the chair of the Board of Trustees

Assalamu alaykum Peace be upon you all.

During a period of considerable change, 2009 saw Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW) come to the end of a successful three- year strategy, and, building on the aspirations and ideas of the whole organisation, look ahead to a new set of objectives for the next ve years.

In 2009, we marked our 25th year of working with vulnerable communities around the world. Islamic Relief has come a long way since we opened our rst o ce in the United Kingdom in 1984 and received our rst donation of 20p. Today, we raise £58 million a year, supporting 360 development projects. With our international partners, we have o ces in 38 countries with over 300 employees, and we are grateful to all our supporters and sta who have shown incredible generosity and commitment in making our work possible.

generosity and commitment in making our work possible. During Saleh Saeed’s rst full year as chief

During Saleh Saeed’s rst full year as chief executive, we have seen continuing nancial and environmental insecurity around the globe, with the most vulnerable communities su ering the most. As part of our new strategy for 2010-2015, we are focusing on enabling communities to adapt to, and meet the challenge of, living in environments at risk from climate change, natural disasters, con ict and global market changes. This will include a greater emphasis on promoting self-su ciency so that individuals and communities are empowered to support themselves — for example, by receiving skills-training, interest free loans or advice on setting up a small business.

Alongside a shift towards encouraging sustainability, there has been a growing realisation that the sector-led approach adopted in the last strategy has not always encouraged integrated approaches, which see communities’ needs in a holistic way. Islamic Relief will therefore be moving towards a far more collaborative model of working using integrated approaches that focus on making livelihoods sustainable. These will enable us to address the underlying causes of poverty and su ering coherently and e ectively with support from all our partners around the world.

Our organisation continues to go from strength to strength in supporting and empowering individuals and communities in need, as this report re ects. I would like to thank Dr Essam El-Haddad and Ibrahim El-Zayat who have shared the role of chair of the board until my appointment, and I look forward to another 12 months of IRW’s activities and achievements.

Dr Mohammed El-Alfy Chair of the Board of Trustees Islamic Relief Worldwide September 2010

4 Message from the chair of the Board of Trustees and the CEO

Message from the CEO

Assalamu alaykum Peace be upon you all.

My rst full year in o ce in 2009 was a time of review, adaptation and expansion. We successfully implemented our internal change process, which will help to make the organisation more e cient, both in the way we operate and in how best we can achieve our wider humanitarian goals. In this climate of continued economic uncertainty and food shortages around the world, we are working to meet the needs of our bene ciaries, partners, donors and supporters more e ectively, ensuring they have the quality of service they deserve.

ensuring they have the quality of service they deserve. Emergency relief continues to be a key

Emergency relief continues to be a key area of our work and, in 2009, we supported communities a ected by disasters around the world: for example, Cyclone Aila in Bangladesh, the Sumatra earthquake, the Gaza con ict, and ghting in north-west Pakistan and in northern Yemen.

Last year, Islamic Relief celebrated its 25th anniversary, which gave us an opportunity to mark our successes in serving humanity — since 1984, we have supported more than two million people in 25 countries. Our theme for 2009 and for our anniversary centred on empowerment. We strive to empower our bene ciaries to lead sustainable livelihoods while becoming less reliant on aid, and we look forward to another 25 years of working to support vulnerable communities around the world to become stronger and more self-su cient.

Our drive towards empowerment and improvement has been supported by our internal change process, which we initiated in 2008 and rolled out in 2009. This process has focused on ensuring that we have a more e cient and responsive organisational structure — we have improved our role as an employer, and are concentrating on developing every member of sta , through training and ongoing reviews.

This report presents the achievements and nances of the organisation, which show the continued generosity of our donors. Without this and the hard work of our sta and volunteers, none of our relief or development work would be possible, so I would like to thank everyone who has been involved in making a positive di erence to so many people around the world. May such good work help us to reach even more individuals and communities in the future.

Saleh Saeed CEO of Islamic Relief Worldwide September 2010

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

5

Report of directors/trustees

Organisational aims in 2009

Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW) works to relieve the su ering of the world’s poorest people by providing emergency relief and supporting sustainable development. During 2009 we continued to meet these aims by providing humanitarian aid to those a ected by con ict in The Gaza Strip, in northwest Pakistan and in northern Yemen. We also responded with emergency relief to those a ected by Cyclone Aila in Bangladesh and the earthquake in Sumatra, and we continued our emergency response work with Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh and those a ected by Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar.

The plight of the world’s poorest people remained critical this year as communities continued to feel the impact of the global food crisis across the developing world. Basic food commodities were still una ordable and drought left many unable to grow their own crops or rear their livestock. Millions of people remained vulnerable to malnutrition and were pushed back into poverty.

In 2009, our work towards the aims of the Millennium Development Goals continued as we helped reduce poverty and increase access to basic services in some of the world’s poorest countries. Our projects in 25 countries are helping to provide people with food, clean water, quality healthcare, education and the means to make a living. Wherever we can, we aim to empower people to help themselves so that they are no longer rely on aid.

Responding to emergencies

The impact of emergencies is often most devastating in the world’s poorest countries where people may lack the resources to rebuild their lives. We aim to increase our capacity to respond e ectively to natural and man-made disasters. We also work towards reducing vulnerability through disaster preparedness programmes that empower communities to deal proactively with emergency situations. We continue to help communities rebuild their lives after the initial emergency period.

Caring for orphans and children in need

Children who have lost their parents or who face extraordinary challenges such as con ict, displacement or HIV, may struggle to meet their basic needs. We provide support to orphans and other

6 Report of directors/trustees

vulnerable children to help them realise their full potential. We do this by o ering a comprehensive orphan support and child welfare programme that takes care of their education, health, social welfare and domestic needs.

Supporting education

Education is key to ensuring long-term development for poor communities. We aim to support access to educational opportunities by promoting formal and vocational education, particularly among disadvantaged communities.

Providing access to healthcare and water

Poverty and ill-health often go hand in hand due to a lack of access to clean water and healthcare services. We strive to improve the health of the communities we work with by providing access to clean and sustainable water and sanitation facilities, as well as increasing knowledge of hygiene practices. We also provide healthcare services and awareness training, with a focus on caring for mothers and children.

Promoting sustainable livelihoods

Supporting people to earn a living is key to reducing dependency on aid and helping them move out of poverty. We are working to increase the economic, social and physical capacity of communities to sustain their livelihoods. We will continue to o er support through providing training, tools and interest-free micro nance loans.

Campaigning and advocacy on humanitarian issues

We believe e ective partnerships are key to alleviating global poverty. We have increased our work with other international NGOs, speaking out against poverty and raising awareness about the issues facing those with whom we work. We do this by developing policies, awareness-raising, researching, lobbying and campaigning. We will continue to increase awareness of our Islamic humanitarian values and our inclusive approach.

Meeting our organisational aims

In 2009, Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW) came to the end of its three-year strategy that de ned its six major areas of work. This section highlights some of our activities over 2009 that helped us to meet our organisational aims. We have also provided a table at the end of each aim, listing individual projects relating to that aim, including target bene ciaries and expenditure.

A woman carrying Ramadan supplies in Egypt
A woman carrying Ramadan supplies in Egypt

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

7

Aim 1

Responding to emergencies

Aims:

To develop our organisational capacity to respond

e

ectively to emergencies.

To reduce vulnerability via food supply programmes — for example, our Ramadan and Qurbani interventions.

Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW) is committed to increasing its capacity to respond to emergencies as quickly as possible in order to meet the urgent needs of those a ected. Our strategy for 2009, included increasing the number of emergency response personnel ready to respond to disasters at short notice. It also focused on increasing our disaster-preparedness work to mitigate the e ect of disasters on poor communities.

In 2009, Islamic Relief responded to a number of emergencies including Cyclone Aila in Bangladesh, the Gaza con ict, the Sumatra earthquake, and ghting in northwest Pakistan and in northern Yemen. We also continued our emergency response work with

8 Responding to emergencies

A man rests on the rubble of destroyed buildings in Gaza
A man rests on the rubble of destroyed buildings in Gaza

Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh and those a ected by Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar. Throughout 2009, we worked to increase our capacity to respond quickly to disasters, and in the Gaza Strip we began distributing aid within hours of the outbreak of con ict. In Bangladesh, we ensured our disaster-response work included building the resilience of communities to deal with future emergencies.

We have also implemented Ramadan and Qurbani programmes, where food or meat is distributed to more than three million people in 27 countries.

Cyclone Aila response and recovery

Bangladesh

On 25th May 2009, Cyclone Aila struck southwest Bangladesh, causing tidal waves that a ected more than three million people. Over 42,000 homes were destroyed and a further 1.9 million were damaged.

Islamic Relief worked in the Shathkhira and Khulna districts to provide food for over 27,000 people, water and sanitation facilities for around 22,000, emergency and transitional shelter for 13,500, and cash-for-work opportunities for more than 7,500 people.

Islamic Relief responded to the disaster though the Cyclone Aila Response and Early Recovery programme, funded by the European Community Humanitarian Aid Department (ECHO), which bene ted more than 70,000 people. The project aimed to provide support to help the cyclone-a ected communities of southwest Bangladesh recover from the disaster. We achieved this by providing shelter for those made homeless, providing cash-for-work opportunities to those who lost their livelihoods, and ensuring access to clean water and sanitation to help prevent the spread of waterborne diseases.

With Islamic Relief’s support, those given new shelters or who were helped to repair their damaged accommodation could move from the makeshift roadside camps to homes that were safer and more comfortable. People employed through the cash-for- work scheme could earn a living by repairing their local area while also building their capacity to work together on community projects. Access to clean water and better sanitation facilities has helped improve the health of communities, as has our e orts to raise awareness of good hygiene practices.

To help communities living in disaster-prone areas in the long term, IRW and ECHO also began implementing a programme to help communities prepare for and

implementing a programme to help communities prepare for and A hygiene promotion session for local people

A hygiene promotion session for local people in Natrakona

cope with future disasters. The Building Disaster Resilience and Safer Communities project in Natrakona and Sylhet began in July 2009, with the aim of helping to enhance the capacity of local communities and institutions to mitigate and respond to natural disasters.

Post-con ict recovery in Gaza

Palestinian Territories

Post-con ict recovery in Gaza Palestinian Territories A woman carrying supplies donated by Islamic Relief as

A woman carrying supplies donated by Islamic Relief as part of

the emergency relief operation in Gaza

The con ict in the Gaza Strip that began on 27th December 2008 devastated Gaza’s fragile infrastructure. Around 1,300 people were killed, more than 5,000 were injured and 40,000 people were displaced from their homes.

Islamic Relief’s emergency response began just hours after the con ict started, with truckloads of emergency food, medical aid and survival kits delivered to displaced and injured people. Once the 22-day war ended, we began a post-con ict recovery programme to help restore basic services to the worst-a ected families. The programme included repairing 200 homes and 20 schools, providing psychosocial care for 1,000 children and giving 500 families essential survival items such as hygiene kits and blankets.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

9

Throughout 2009, Islamic Relief has been implementing various rehabilitation programmes in Gaza funded by partners including Reach Out to Asia, the Catholic Agency for Overseas Development (CAFOD) and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID).

Through our post-con ict programmes, 80,000 families have received food aid and 25,000 children

at risk of malnutrition have received forti ed milk and high-energy biscuits on a daily basis. A further 22 schools have been repaired and equipped, bene ting thousands of students. Also, in 2009, 36,000 children

su ering from trauma were helped through specialist

care sessions, and a new psychosocial centre was opened to support children and parents.

centre was opened to support children and parents. Orphans in Gaza who received fortified milk from

Orphans in Gaza who received fortified milk from IRW as part of the emergency relief operation

To help restore the health sector, Islamic Relief has renovated eight primary health centres and has repaired and equipped a further 32. An intensive care unit has been established at Al Shifa Hospital and we have set up a new blood bank to serve three other local hospitals. Islamic Relief is also providing Gaza’s only

arti cial limbs centre with prosthetic limbs that allow adults and children who are injured and disabled to live

a more active life.

To help those who lost their livelihoods, IRW ran a three-month cash-for-work scheme that provided 1,500 unemployed people with temporary work. We also built 12 agricultural wells that have helped farmers who were struggling to make a living after irrigation systems were destroyed.

10 Responding to emergencies

Emergency relief for displaced families

Pakistan

emergencies Emergency relief for displaced families Pakistan Children fetching water from a pump supplied by Islamic

Children fetching water from a pump supplied by Islamic Relief at Char Gulli School

In April 2009, a con ict broke out in Pakistan’s North—West Frontier Province (NWFP), forcing around three million people to ee their homes. Most of the displaced ed from Swat, Buner and Dir to the districts of Mardan and Swabi, where they sought refuge with host families, in rented accommodation or in camps.

Islamic Relief began an emergency response programme in Mardan to help support displaced people and host communities. We provided more than 3,500 families with emergency relief items, and we set up water and sanitation facilities in 26 villages. Mercy Centres were also established, which provided over 4,500 children with access to healthcare, counselling, education and other activities. More than 11,000 patients were also treated through Islamic Relief health clinics.

As the security situation in Buner improved, Islamic Relief began to support the rehabilitation of houses for over 35,000 people returning to their homes.

To help improve the health of children, Islamic Relief provided food packs for 9,000 school children and healthcare services for 3,000. We also trained 250 teachers to monitor children’s health, and more than 200 health education sessions were carried out to promote good health practices. School health days were also held in ten primary schools.

CASE STUDY Abdul Khaliq — Pakistan Thirty-year-old Abdul Khaliq ed his home in Swat in
CASE STUDY
Abdul Khaliq — Pakistan
Thirty-year-old Abdul Khaliq ed his home in Swat in
June 2009 when his village was attacked. He and 16
members of his family sought refuge with a family
in Char Gulli, Mardan, where they lived in one room.
Abdul Khaliq and his son, Yaar Zameen, received free
medical care at Islamic Relief’s Basic Health Unit in
Char Gulli.
“My three-year-old son Yaar Zameen was sick and
I wasn’t well either but I didn’t know how I could
a ord any medical care, as I have no money,” said
Abdul Khaliq. “Then someone told me about the free
medical care that Islamic Relief gives so I went to
their health centre with my son.
Abdul Khaliq with his son, receiving medical care from
Islamic Relief.
“We both got proper medical treatment and we were
given everything for free. The Islamic Relief team
was so friendly, and the free medical service has
helped a lot to improve our situation. At least I won’t
have to worry about our medical needs while we’re
living here"
Islamic Relief’s medical teams provided antenatal
and postnatal healthcare, out-patient services,
vaccinations for children, and mental health support,
as well as a 24-hour ambulance service taking
people to hospital.

Projects relating to responding to emergencies in 2009

Country Project Links to other organisationalaims* Target bene ciaries Expenditure (£) Bangladesh Food
Country
Project
Links to other
organisationalaims*
Target
bene ciaries
Expenditure (£)
Bangladesh
Food assistance for unregistered Rohinga refugees
9,600
476,741
Ethiopia
Health and nutrition improvement programme
Aim 4
5,400
26,601
Kenya
Integrated nutrition project in Northeast Province
49,100
499,534
Niger
Food security and livelihood rehabilitation
Aim 5
97,111
Occupied
Family sponsorship project – Phase III
Aims 3 and 4
15,000
238,104
Palestinian
Territories (OPT)
Gaza Strip emergency and relief
174,566
Cash-for-work for unemployed graduates and Feed the Needy
project in Gaza
Aim 5
700
737,405
Pakistan
Supporting community resilience in Mardan in North-West
Frontier Province (NWFP)
101,600
30,163
Pakistan emergency in NWFP
98,000
616,149
Somalia
Emergency support to internally displaced people in Lower
Shaballe
Aim 4
27,900
900,399

Note: For most projects and countries it is possible to obtain beneficiary numbers (which have been rounded up or down to the nearest 10 or 100). However, in some cases, it is difficult to access this data. For example, some societies may not want details about their family members to be added to non-governmental organisation (NGO) statistics.

*For a full list of aims, refer to page 3.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

11

Aim 2

Nine-year-old Chifaa Abu Niaj from Lebanon has been sponsored by Islamic Relief since 2006
Nine-year-old Chifaa Abu Niaj from Lebanon has been sponsored by Islamic Relief since 2006

Caring for orphans and children in need

Aim:

To contribute to alleviating child poverty by

o ering a comprehensive orphan support and

child welfare programme, covering education, health, social welfare, sponsorship and shelter.

Losing one or both parents is traumatic for any child. In countries where war, famine and HIV/AIDS are a part of everyday life, millions of children are orphaned or left to struggle for survival. In the short term, our orphan— oriented projects provide food, clothing, healthcare and shelter for orphaned children and their families around the world. We also o er longer-term support by helping orphans to access education that will give them a better chance in life. Our strategy for 2009 aimed to ensure that all sponsored children of school age were attending school, and that they had a basic school kit of stationery, books and, where needed, a uniform — and we achieved this in 99 per cent of cases.

12 Caring for orphans and children in need

Families of orphans are vulnerable too, particularly widows and women who have to care for their families and be the main breadwinners. So we also o er them nancial and practical support — for example, microcredit schemes, which include training to help them set up small businesses. We have programmes in Bangladesh, Bosnia, Kosova and Sudan.

In 2009, Islamic Relief‘s comprehensive One-to-one Sponsorship programme reached nearly 27,000 orphans in 22 countries around the world, making sure they have decent housing, adequate healthcare and that they can attend school. All of the orphans are supported by sta who have undergone an extensive training programme.

Sponsoring vulnerable children and their families

Chechnya

Sponsoring vulnerable children and their families Chechnya Khaka Bokova, aged 9, has been sponsored by IRW

Khaka Bokova, aged 9, has been sponsored by IRW since 2007. Sponsorship means she can receive vaccinations and regular medical check-ups. She enjoys reading, cycling and craftwork and would like to train to be a doctor

In the aftermath of two military campaigns, many

children in Chechnya in the Russian Federation were

orphaned: more than 1,230 children lost both parents,

and over 25,000 children lost their father or mother.

Our One-to-one Sponsorship programme supports such

vulnerable children and their families, by distributing

quarterly packages of food, seasonal clothing, soap,

detergent and school stationery. A key focus is on

improving the children’s diet and health, by making sure

they have nutritional food and hygiene items. By 2009,

we had sponsored more than 1,750 children in the region

and we also expanded the programme to cover more

remote mountainous villages.

All school-aged children who we sponsored had the opportunity to go to school and 130 of the poorest children received a school bag and stationery at the beginning of the school year.

Unemployment in Chechnya is rife, and children

often leave school early to try to nd work to support

their families. To ensure that children have better

job opportunities, we supplied carpentry and sewing

equipment for two classes at the Vocational Training

Centre for Grozny Boarding School, which was set up by

Islamic Relief in 2008.

One-to-One

Sponsorship

programme

Lebanon

Relief in 2008. One-to-One Sponsorship programme Lebanon Anis Khder, aged 5, is from Tyre. His family

Anis Khder, aged 5, is from Tyre. His family relies on sponsorship money to secure their basic needs for food, accommodation and healthcare

After the war in Lebanon in 2006, many children were

left homeless and orphaned. Children who have lost

one or both of their parents often experience higher

levels of emotional neglect, anxiety, depression and

psychological distress than other children. In 2009,

through its One-to-one Sponsorship programme,

Islamic Relief supported almost 900 Palestinian

orphans living in refugee camps in Lebanon by giving

regular sponsorship payments to their families, which

helped to ensure that their basic needs for food,

medical care and adequate housing were met.

In 2009, we sponsored 695 orphans in five different refugee camps in Sidon and Tyre. During Ramadan, we gave out food parcels, and we also provided clothes for the children at Eid.

Orphaned children often miss out on school or perform poorly, as their education is interrupted because of domestic and economic pressures. Many of these children have to leave school to work, as they have become the sole breadwinners for their family. To help secure a good education and future for these orphans, we donated money towards school fees, and o ered educational support to children who were having di culty learning at school.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

13

Dental healthcare for orphans and poor families

Kosova

Dental healthcare for orphans and poor families Kosova Brahmin Morina, aged 11, before having one of

Brahmin Morina, aged 11, before having one of his teeth removed

For vulnerable families facing poverty in Kosova,

dental hygiene is low on their list of priorities. With no

water supply inside the house, inadequate roads, and

the nearest health clinic a long way away, people often

wait till they have serious problems with their teeth

before seeking emergency help. Even then, treatment

is often poor, using unsterile and inadequate

equipment.

In nine months, almost 6,000 people had treatments to fix problems with their teeth.

But Islamic Relief has helped to change that by

setting up a dental health project that has given free

treatment to orphans and poor families in Drenas,

central Kosova, since March 2009. We set up two

dental centres where quali ed dentists and their

assistants carried out general check-ups and treated

existing problems, for example, by removing teeth,

treating infections or tting llings. The project has

also promoted longer-term dental health by teaching

people about good oral hygiene.

14 Caring for orphans and children in need

CASE STUDY Edona — Kosova Edona receiving dental treatment Eight-year-old Edona Gashi from Drenas is
CASE STUDY
Edona — Kosova
Edona receiving dental treatment
Eight-year-old Edona Gashi from Drenas is proud of
her new smile. She’s one of many children from poor
families who have bene ted from the free dental
treatment on o er as part of Islamic Relief’s dental
health project in Kosova.
“Before, we were begging on the road. Islamic Relief
gave us clothes and food packages. Thank you for
the opportunity to have our teeth looked after at the
dental wellness centre — before, most of us didn’t even
have toothpaste or had never been to a dentist. Now
we have great treatment here. I have had two teeth
taken out and now all the dental decay has gone.”
Unlike her 50-year-old father, who doesn’t have a
single tooth left, Edona — and many other children like
her — now have a healthier start and, with a better
understanding of oral hygiene, they have a much
smaller risk of losing teeth in later life.
As Edona beams, “Thank you for giving me my
smile back.”

Projects relating to caring for orphans and children in need in 2009

Country

Project

Links to other organisationalaims*

Target bene ciaries

Expenditure (£)

Albania

Orphans’ summer school

 

200

20,771

Bangladesh

Alternative education for children a ected by Cylone Sidr

Aim 3

600

37,651

 

Orphans’ water facility

Aim 4

500

4,250

 

Livelihood promotion and handicraft production for widows and children

Aim 5

80

6,874

 

Providing water and sanitation for orphans

Aim 4

500

8,840

Bosnia-

Orphans’ educational centre

 

600

25,550

Herzegovina

Chechnya

School bags for orphans

Aim 3

100

5,099

 

Vocational training centre for orphans in boarding schools

 

60

9,533

 

Improving facilities at child rehabilitation centre in Argun

 

200

117,182

 

Livelihood support for orphans households

 

600

51,964

Egypt

Early rehabilitation intervention centre (ERIC) for mentally challenged children

Aim 4

2,400

130,460

 

Building land and building for ERIC new home

Aim 4

 

45,862

Ethiopia

Increasing income generation for widows and orphans

Aim 5

400

81,662

Kenya

Orphans micro enterprise project

Aim 5

600

59,559

Kosova

Dental care for orphans and poor families

 

5,600

79,753

Mali

Centre of Hope orphans (waqf funding)

 

11,700

26,756

 

15 child-friendly villages in southern Mali

 

55,300

37,836

 

Child-friendly village

 

100

25,284

 

Strengthening partnership with Mali vulnerable children

 

5,000

47,969

Occupied

Emergency intervention in the Gaza Strip

 

131,200

472,616

Palestinian

Territories

 

Psychosocial counselling centre in northern Gaza

 

30

85,935

 

Milk for pre-school children

 

3,500

120,553

 

Family sponsorship

 

3,400

140,397

 

School feeding for students in the poorest and marginalised areas

 

10,000

72,024

 

Eid clothes project for children and orphans

 

2,500

91,445

Pakistan

Supporting community resilience in emergency area of Mardan in North-West Frontier Province (NWFP)

Aims 3 and 4

3,600

13,938

Sudan

Education enhancement for orphans

 

4,800

39,171

 

Providing educational support to internally displaced students in Darfur

Aim 3

11,600

63,421

 

Community-based reintegration of children a ected by war in Upper Nile State

 

3,600

8,971

Note: For most projects and countries it is possible to obtain beneficiary numbers (which have been rounded up or down to the nearest 10 or 100). However, in some cases, it is difficult to access this data. For example, some societies may not want details about their family members to be added to non-governmental organisation (NGO) statistics.

*For a full list of aims, refer to page 3.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

15

Aim 3

Girls studying at the Kabul family integrated development centre, Afghanistan. The centre provides literacy and
Girls studying at the Kabul family integrated development centre, Afghanistan. The centre
provides literacy and language classes and computer training to widows and orphans.

Supporting education

Aim:

To broaden opportunities for children and communities through improved education.

Education provides the key to a better future, helping people to increase their skills, ful l their potential and pursue their goals. But this basic human right is denied to millions of children and adults in poor communities throughout the developing world. Poverty, a lack of infrastructure and poor access to schools are some of the obstacles that stand in the way of a child’s education. The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) estimates that around 100 million children of primary school age are currently not in school, and many have to stay at home to support their families.

16 Supporting education

Our strategy for 2009 focused on getting more children into school by building new schools and rehabilitating existing ones, making regular attendance a realistic option for them, training teachers and providing educational materials. We prioritise the needs of the most vulnerable people, including children, and those living in con ict areas and rural regions.

We also focus on adult education and vocational training. By working directly with local communities, we ensure that our educational projects are relevant to their needs, o ering them new skills and realistic work opportunities as a way out of poverty.

Meeting the educational needs of internally displaced people

Somalia

the educational needs of internally displaced people Somalia Children in class at a camp for displaced

Children in class at a camp for displaced people camp in Mogadishu

Islamic Relief has been working in Somalia since 2006 to support families living in the numerous refugee camps in the Mogadishu-Afgoi Corridor, set up for those eeing the ghting in the capital.

Basic needs for food, water and shelter take priority over secondary needs such as education. However, providing education in such unstable environments as internally displaced people (IDP) camps is vital: school gives children an escape from the violent realities they have experienced, o ering a routine, psychosocial support and learning. Education helps children to believe that they have the potential to achieve stable, constructive lives and that their studies will help them to get good jobs.

In 2009, Islamic Relief funded 25 teachers to support more than 1,200 children in IDP camps in Mogadishu. The project helped to ensure that schools remained open in the camps, which meant that enrolment remained high and students had a consistent and continuous education.

School extensions in Tarmiya

Iraq

and continuous education. School extensions in Tarmiya Iraq Children at a newly renovated school in Tarmiya

Children at a newly renovated school in Tarmiya

The education system in Iraq is facing complex challenges and demands: thousands of schools throughout the country have su ered tremendous neglect and underfunding as a result of economic sanctions, continued warfare and civil con ict. Many schools need major building work, but funding is limited.

To raise health and hygiene awareness among the school children, we conducted two participatory seminars at each school on best health and hygiene practices, and distributed 1,500 hygiene kits to the children.

In Tarmiya, north of Baghdad, Islamic Relief has improved the condition of three primary schools by extending and rehabilitating the buildings, and updating the water and sanitation facilities. Working with local labourers, we have reconstructed 15 classrooms and supplied them with desks, blackboards and teaching materials. Around 1,500 children have bene ted from the project.

As a result of the improved school environments, the enrolment rate of school children in the Tarmiya District – especially girls – has increased.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

17

Rebuilding schools in the Gaza Strip

Occupied Palestinian Territories

schools in the Gaza Strip Occupied Palestinian Territories Renovation of a damaged school in Gaza More

Renovation of a damaged school in Gaza

More than 160 schools were damaged in the recent

con ict in the Gaza Strip, leaving many children unable

to access a decent education. Six months later, some

schools were still operating a double-shift system –

where some students were taught in the morning,

and others in the afternoon – which compromised the

quality of education. Gaza desperately needs to have

its schools rebuilt, repaired and equipped with learning

materials. Education for children who are traumatised

is particularly important as it o ers them stability and a

sense of normality.

Around 20,000 students, 1,000 teachers and 300 labourers have benefited from the rebuilding schools project, which is set to expand to more schools within Gaza.

In a joint partnership with Reach Out To Asia (ROTA),

Islamic Relief aims to provide a safe and healthy

learning environment for Palestinian students in Gaza.

In 2009, we reconstructed and rehabilitated 22 schools

that were severely or moderately damaged.

As part of this ongoing project, we have developed

libraries, science laboratories, health rooms,

educational technology and computer training labs in

the schools, as well as psychosocial and educational

counselling rooms. We have also set up a training

programme for 300 teachers, focusing on increasing

knowledge and improving teaching skills in the latest

curriculum subjects, especially technology.

18 Supporting education

CASE STUDY Mahmoud — Gaza Mahmoud in his classroom Mahmoud Aldous is 12 years old
CASE STUDY
Mahmoud — Gaza
Mahmoud in his classroom
Mahmoud Aldous is 12 years old and attends the
Al-Zohoor school in the west of Gaza. His school was
seriously damaged during the ghting and is now being
repaired by Islamic Relief.
“When I went back to school after the war I found the
windows were broken and the walls were damaged,”
said Mahmoud. “Then I went to nd my friend who
I used to sit next to, but he wasn’t there anymore
because he had been killed. The days of war were very
frightening and I really wish I could live in a safe place.”
The con ict has seriously a ected all the children in
Mahmoud’s school, many of whom had their homes
destroyed. The teachers say many are su ering from
trauma and nd it di cult to concentrate or have
behavioural problems, such as being violent towards
each other.
After the war, Islamic Relief provided psychosocial
support to thousands of school children in Gaza to
help them deal with the trauma they had experienced.
We also mended the windows, repaired the walls
and painted the bathrooms of the schools we work
in. Having a pleasant place in which to study is even
more important for children living in such an unstable
environment. As Mahmoud said: “We had to take our
exams but we couldn’t study surrounded by such
destruction. But the new school environment makes
us feel motivated and we all want to study now. My
favourite subject is English and when I’m older I want to
study abroad.”

Projects relating to supporting education in 2009

Country Project Links to other organisationalaims* Target bene ciaries Expenditure (£) China Girl students’
Country
Project
Links to other
organisationalaims*
Target
bene ciaries
Expenditure (£)
China
Girl students’ home project in Haiyuan County
100
6,694
Ethiopia
Afar local area development programme: education support
92,017
India
Improving access to education for underprivileged girls
1,500
36,788
Improving education for underprivileged people
13,200
59,854
Iraq
School extensions project in Tarmiya, North Baghdad
1,500
136,703
Kenya
Sponsorship of female sta
2,978
Occupied
Construction of school at the new Askar refugee camp
500
354,344
Palestinian
Territories
Supply safe water for coastal schools in the Gaza Strip
Aim 4
10,200
28,041
Primary school renovation programme
11,300
55,616
Improving health environment in girls' schools
4,800
174,783
Emergency intervention in Gaza
131,200
472,617
Post-con ict recovery in Gaza
14,100
770,481
Supplying food at school for students in the poorest and
marginalised areas
13,100
37,920
Kindergartens’ environment enhancement programme
16,500
65,106
Supporting school health programme
16,200
35,174
Improving educational access and quality in Gaza
147,400
694,882
Pakistan
Kashmir Emergency Relief and Rehabilitation education project
900
734,179
Balochistan education support project
2,500
179,535
Small-scale enterprise development project
Aim 5
2,200
63,092
Community health and education support project
Aim 4
3,100
25,074
Somalia
Teachers for internally displaced people (IDP) camps
40
5,937
Sudan
Education support projects
6,100
125,888
IDP basic needs project in West Darfur – Phase II
Aim 4
14,000
130,311
Reconstructing education facilities in Blue Nile State
5,100
33,309

Note: For most projects and countries it is possible to obtain beneficiary numbers (which have been rounded up or down to the nearest 10 or 100). However, in some cases, it is difficult to access this data. For example, some societies may not want details about their family members to be added to non-governmental organisation (NGO) statistics.

*For a full list of aims, refer to page 3.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

19

Aim 4

Tahir Saeed, who was trained by Islamic Relief, treating a young patient at his pharmacy
Tahir Saeed, who was trained by Islamic Relief, treating a young patient at his pharmacy in Pakistan

Providing access to healthcare and water

Aims:

To increase access to appropriate, clean and sustainable water and sanitation facilities, with a focus on increased knowledge of hygiene practices.

By providing communities with cash, material and medical equipment, we can support the regeneration and building of health facilities. We are also helping these communities to improve preventive and curative health series, such as child immunisation, antenatal

To improve the health of communities.

According to the United Nations Educational, Scienti c and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), one billion people lack access to safe drinking water and nearly half of the developing world’s population — 2.4 billion people — still do not have adequate sanitation. Without decent healthcare facilities, and with poor access to medical supplies, clean drinking water and health education, people fall ill and die from preventable diseases and health concerns.

To tackle this problem, Islamic Relief’s strategy aims to increase access to safe, clean drinking water and sanitation facilities. By working closely with local communities, we have established sustainable water sources, for example, by digging wells and setting up traditional water collection systems. Through training, communities are then empowered to manage these services.

and postnatal care, and therapeutic care. Training and awareness-raising programmes for local health workers and community health committees help to increase knowledge of hygiene practices.

Women and children are often the most susceptible to illness and disease — according to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), more than half a million women die during pregnancy or childbirth, and around nine million children under ve die every year, largely from treatable or preventable diseases. By providing access to suitable health clinics, medicine, skilled health professionals and nutritional support, we are working to reduce maternal and child mortality in communities and to o er mothers and children the medical care they need.

20 Providing access to healthcare and water

Improving water and sanitation in Warrap State

Sudan

Improving water and sanitation in Warrap State Sudan Local people using a hand pump in Warrap

Local people using a hand pump in Warrap State

Years of inter-ethnic ghting, poverty and under- development mean that many people in South Sudan face a challenging future, with basic services in many regions seriously lacking.

To support the most basic of human needs — water — Islamic Relief set up a project to provide clean water and improved sanitation facilities in Tonj North County in Warrap State. Ten boreholes were drilled, which were tted with new hand pumps in ten villages, and 34 broken hand pumps were repaired. Hygiene promotion sessions were carried out with the whole community. Topics included how and when to wash your hands, the importance of covering water containers to prevent contamination, and how to use latrines.

As a result of the project, almost 40,000 people in 44 villages now have access to safe, clean drinking water.

The project was keen to empower local people to keep existing hand pumps in good working order so, in partnership with the South Sudan Relief and Rehabilitation Commission (SSRRC), 48 people from several villages were trained in hand-pump maintenance and repair. UNICEF donated specialised tools to support them.

In addition, 700 cement slabs were cast for household latrines, built by labourers from the villages using local materials. A school latrine was also built, ensuring that more than 1,000 people had safe, clean toilet facilities.

Reconstruction of Sayasan Hospital

Chechnya

facilities. Reconstruction of Sayasan Hospital Chechnya Groups of local female labourers worked to plaster walls,

Groups of local female labourers worked to plaster walls, fix windows and paint doors in the new hospital. This gave them a valuable source of income and also a sense of ownership towards the new hospital.

The Sayasan Hospital in the Nozhay-Yurt region is one of the largest hospitals in this mountainous part of Chechnya. However, most of it was destroyed in the recent war, which left around 45,000 people from 13 villages with no access to medical care and prevented many of those displaced by the ghting from returning home.

The renovated hospital has 12 new wards including surgery, maternal healthcare, and specialist wards for tuberculosis and infectious diseases. It supports more than 65,000 people from Sayasan and surrounding villages, including over 11,000 returnees who had fled the fighting in the region.

The local community of Sayasan had already made

e orts to rebuild a small ward on the site of the

Sayasan Hospital, but this could only o er rst-aid services. Working with the local community, Islamic Relief got involved in the reconstruction, and the new hospital was completed in July 2009.

There are currently six doctors and 30 medical sta working at the new hospital, and they are enthusiastic about their brand new premises. The high-quality healthcare they can o er means that people don’t have to travel long distances to get treatment, and some displaced families have even been encouraged to return to their pre-war homes.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

21

‘Water for life’ in the Mandera district

Kenya

‘Water for life’ in the Mandera district Kenya Livestock is a vital resource for communities in

Livestock is a vital resource for communities in the Mandera district, so it is important to ensure they have enough clean water to drink

Due to successive and cyclic droughts in the Mandera

district in northeast Kenya for the last three years,

water has been in critically short supply. Many families

have to survive on less than four litres of water per

person per day. Islamic Relief has set up the Water for

Life project, to ensure that around 75,000 people and

more than 250,000 livestock have access to safe, clean

drinking water.

We have installed vital water harvesting and storage systems in five locations, including five masonry tanks, five power houses, 20 water kiosks and 20 reticulation systems.

Now, communities can easily access and store water.

The distance to the nearest supply has been greatly

reduced. As a result, women, who usually collect the

water, have more time to look after their children and

give them healthier food. Waterborne illnesses have

decreased since IRW sta increased the monitoring of

water quality.

Members of the ve villages bene ting from the

scheme earn a living by selling water to those outside

of their immediate communities. We have carried

out training sessions on community water resource

management, how to use water productively, and

how to set up kitchen gardens — this ensures that the

facilities are productive and sustainable.

22 Providing access to healthcare and water

CASE STUDY Fatuma — Kenya Fatuma collecting water Fatuma Dakane Muhumed, 42, comes from Libehiya
CASE STUDY
Fatuma — Kenya
Fatuma collecting water
Fatuma Dakane Muhumed, 42, comes from Libehiya in
the Mandera district, which has been seriously a ected
by the recurring droughts. A mother of seven, she lives
in cramped conditions in a single thatched hut with her
with her children, her parents-in-law and her husband
(the sole breadwinner) who works as a local labourer,
Access to food and water has been limited because
of the droughts, and the family now has to survive
without the milk and meat they used to enjoy. But the
Water for Life project means Fatuma can now collect
water easily to feed her family and livestock.
“Before we used to fetch water from shallow wells a
long distance away, which were contaminated and
dirty. Now we don’t have to walk far to get water, as
the kiosk is just 20 metres away from our house. This
means I’ve got time to take my children to school.”
Fatuma also doesn’t have far to take her goats to
get water, as they can also drink at the shallow wells
nearby, before going to graze in the valley.
As part of the project, Fatuma joined a focus group
discussion on good hygiene, which has helped her to
ensure her family can stay healthy.
Although life is still tough, Fatuma and her family are
more optimistic about what lies ahead. “At least now,
with help from Islamic Relief, we have more hope and
con dence for the future.”

Projects relating to providing access to healthcare and water in 2009

Country

Project

Target bene ciaries

Expenditure (£)

Afghanistan

200 shallow wells in Shortepa and Kaldar

35,000

118,334

 

Eyesight rehabilitation

300

28,746

Bangladesh

Safer water supply and sanitation project

6,100

16,512

 

Humanitarian assistance for unregistered Rohingya refugees

12,900

476,741

 

Cyclone Alia response and early recovery programme

52,300

426,640

Chad

Chad emergency assistance water and sanitation project

25,900

306,234

Chechnya

Reconstruction of a water pipeline and water tower in Shalazhi village

6,000

76,933

 

Reconstruction of Sayasan Hospital in Nozhay

68,400

198,606

 

Provision of material to Grozny Prosthetic Orthopaedic Clinic

4,800

174,783

China

Rainwater catchment and harvesting in Gungh County and Haunxian

2,700

33,264

Ethiopia

Food security

146,300

168,636

 

Water and sanitation improvement

400

95,383

 

Local area development programme in Afar – health component – Part II

51,100

25,807

Iraq

Rehabilitation of two water treatment plants in Tarmiya

8,000

85,635

 

Equipping maternity hospital in Tarmiya

 

46,254

Mali

Water and sanitation projectsin South Mali

4,200

106,444

 

Regional programme for blindness prevention

70,200

435,699

 

Contribution to the eradication of malaria

5,000

39,234

Niger

Primary healthcare

 

55,191

OPT

Digging and rehabilitating water wells

11,000

123,887

 

Construction of water network at Al Barazil

19,000

70,243

 

Improving water availability in Al-Zbiebdat village

800

71,908

 

Emergency intervention in the Gaza Strip

 

232,914

 

Provision of arti cial limbs for disabled people in Gaza

1,000

123,083

Pakistan

Water and sanitation project in Balochistan

1,300

183,228

 

Prevention of blindness

11,000

15,296

 

Qatar Red Crescent Field Hospital

 

72,645

 

Chagai health intervention project

43,400

39,125

 

Operational cost for basic health unit in Dhulli district in Bagh, AJK

15,000

37,990

 

Kashmir Emergency Relief and Rehabilitation health project

12,000

241,697

Sudan

Water and sanitation improvement in South Kordofan

1,500

23,090

 

Water and sanitation improvement in Warrap

18,800

123,651

 

Water, sanitation and public health improvement projects

80,600

370,254

 

Shelter improvement in Kerinding II internally displaced people (IDP) camp in West Darfur

2,300

82,366

 

Provision of improved health services to people a ected by con ict

14,800

51,165

 

Improvement of primary health services for IDP and host communities

20,000

14,606

 

Responding to displacement in Terekeka

14,300

16,067

Yemen

Al-Selo water and health project

 

48,879

Note: For most projects and countries it is possible to obtain beneficiary numbers (which have been rounded up or down to the nearest

10 or 100). However, in some cases, it is difficult to access this data. For example, some societies may not want details about their family

members to be added to non-governmental organisation (NGO) statistics.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

23

Aim 5

Local people employed to pave roads as part of a cash-for-work project in Gaza
Local people employed to pave roads as part of a cash-for-work project in Gaza

Promoting sustainable livelihoods

Aim:

To alleviate poverty by increasing the economic, social and physical capacity of communities to sustain their livelihoods.

Everyone has the right to make a decent living but for those living in poverty, without skills and support, it’s hard to get started. Employment means people can access basic services such as healthcare and education, and can secure a more promising future for themselves and their families.

As part of Islamic Relief’s strategy to increase the ability of communities to maintain their livelihoods, we provide people with the tools, training and support they need to earn an income, whether it is running a business, growing fruit and vegetables or setting up a shop.

24 Promoting sustainable livelihoods

One of our most successful types of project involves Islamic micro nance. In 2009, we provided community organisations and individuals in more than 15 countries with interest-free loans, which they used to set up or expand a business. We also o er training and support to ensure people have the skills they need to make sure their enterprise is successful. Qard hasan (goodwill loans) are also provided to poor families to meet their immediate social needs — for example, school fees, costs for healthcare and housing repair, and other basic household costs.

Food-for-work and cash-for-work projects are key areas within our programme that we continue to support, mainly during emergency situations or as part of infrastructure or agriculture development projects. For example, we might pay local people with essential food items, such as oil, tea or sugar — or in cash — to rebuild roads and buildings after an emergency, or to build water supplies in areas of drought.

Youth skills training

Afghanistan

Youth skills training Afghanistan Barisa Mohammed, 19, in the beauty parlour she set up in her

Barisa Mohammed, 19, in the beauty parlour she set up in her home in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. Photo: Islamic Relief/ Shaista Chishty

Afghanistan has long su ered the e ects of war and instability in which many skilled workers have been killed or have ed the country. As a result, many families have been left without a breadwinner. The devastation of the country’s infrastructure has also made it di cult for young people to gain vocational skills and nd employment.

Working in the Balkh province of Afghanistan, Islamic Relief’s youth skills training project had initially aimed to train just 30 youths, but demand was very high, so we managed to extend the number of places available, and trained 30 men and 30 women.

The training programme targeted young people who previously needed to be cared for, and helped them to become breadwinners in the industry of their choice, ranging from beauty therapy to calligraphy. Some of the participants were orphaned at a young age and had resorted to begging or drug smuggling. Through class participation, group discussion and quizzes, the students learned to think critically and dynamically, as well as developing their personalities and their plans for the future.

Working closely with the Afghan Ministry of Labor and Social A airs, and the Afghan Ministry of Women’s A airs, the three-month programme not only equipped participants with vocational skills but also provided workshops on health, hygiene and the environment, to help combat unhygienic practices and improve their quality of life.

Livelihood support in Aceh

Indonesia

their quality of life. Livelihood support in Aceh Indonesia Farmers in Aceh Jaya were given more

Farmers in Aceh Jaya were given more than 140,000 cocoa seeds and taught how to tend them.

Following 30 years of con ict, and after the devastating e ects of the 2004 tsunami, the people of the Aceh Jaya district in Aceh Province, Indonesia, face a great deal of insecurity. With the region’s infrastructure destroyed, state services such as health and education are non-existent or limited, leaving communities vulnerable. Many people live in the mountainous areas and, with limited sources of income, some of them illegally collect rewood and cut down trees.

In 2009, Islamic Relief set up a project to support farming and livestock families in ve villages in the Aceh Jaya district and to discourage illegal logging. Through training in areas such as modern farming methods, and the care of poultry and livestock, we are helping more than 325 poor families and female- headed households to increase their income and have greater food security as a result of sustainable farming.

As part of the project, we will also be o ering vocational training to 50 villagers in areas such as carpentry and sewing, which will help to generate income.

To encourage the long-term sustainability of the project, we are also working with local NGOs and communities to set up committees and groups to manage the programme activities. Training is provided in areas such as con ict management, fundraising and participatory approaches.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

25

Small-scale enterprise development (Islamic microcredit) in Rawalpindi

Pakistan

In a country where, according to the World Bank, 33 per

cent of the population live below the poverty line, it’s

tough for those who want to earn a living by working

for themselves to set up in business. To get a loan from

a bank is a lengthy process and isn’t always available to

poor people because of lack of collateral, and interest

rates are prohibitively high.

But Islamic Relief’s microcredit scheme, which has been

running in Rawalpindi since 2002, enables people to

access the initial capital they need to get started: the

loans are interest free and the repayments are spread

out in manageable amounts.

In 2009, we granted loans to more than 400 families,

which bene ted over 2,000 people — almost half of

them female. Individuals and families set up a range

of businesses, from tailoring and making clothes, to

repairing computers and selling groceries. As well

as helping those who have taken out the loans — by

generating extra income to access better health

services — the scheme also has a positive impact on

the local communities, as the new businesses provide

employment for local people.

The scheme also funds housing regeneration for

poor families: 115 loans were distributed for home

improvements, allowing families to repair their roofs,

walls and sewerage systems, and build water tanks.

26 Promoting sustainable livelihoods

CASE STUDY Wazir Abbas — Pakistan Wazir Abbas welding a pipe Wazir Abbas, 32, lives
CASE STUDY
Wazir Abbas — Pakistan
Wazir Abbas welding a pipe
Wazir Abbas, 32, lives in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, with his
wife and one-year-old daughter. He received an initial
loan of 30,000 rupees from Islamic Relief in 2006,
which he used to set up his own business buying old
pipes that he welds and reshapes, before selling them
on for household plumbing.
After paying back the initial loan, Wazir applied for
and was granted a second loan in 2007, to expand his
business even further.
“The sta at Islamic Relief have been very supportive
and my business is doing well: I have three employees
and I can support my family, which is good. Before I got
the rst loan from Islamic Relief I was in dire need of
nancial support. The loans have brought great change
to my business and have helped me to keep going in
di cult circumstances.”
Wazir hopes that his business will go from strength to
strength. Eventually, instead of buying in pipes from
outside, he would like to be able to manufacture the
pipes himself, and further funding from Islamic Relief
could make this possible. As Wazir comments, “If there
was someone who quali ed for an Islamic Relief loan I
would de nitely recommend that they got one”

Projects relating to promoting sustainable livelihoods in 2009

Country

Project

Links to other organisationalaims*

Target bene ciaries

Expenditure (£)

Afghanistan

Afghan youth skills enhancement

 

40

45,423

Bangladesh

Vocational training and employment support services

 

200

4,788

 

Health education and livelihood support (HELP Ultra Poor)

Aim 4

184,000

734,887

 

Vocational training and employment support services

 

1,200

99,008

Chad

Microcredit programme

 

7,000

212,514

 

Rehabilitation assistance project in Djourf and Salamat

 

58,600

243,147

China

Beilin irrigation development project

Aim 4

400

21,084

 

Tongjiang education, health and water supply

Aim 4

1,300

45,367

 

Haiyuan ecological management demonstration

Aim 4

1,500

36,185

 

Fuyun integrated development

Aim 4

800

29,024

 

Integrated rural development in Tongxin, Ningxha

Aim 4

10,700

7,598

Egypt

Microcredit programme for poorest

 

1,800

65,287

Ethiopia

Local area development programme in Afar

   

67,589

India

Livelihood and income for widows and orphans

 

100

22,338

Indonesia

Livelihoods support

 

3,200

653,694

Iraq

Promoting self-help among vulnerable Iraqi women

 

200

16,980

Kenya

Microcredit programme

 

300

140,759

Malawi

Promoting enterprise through micro nance

 

500

44,761

Mali

Community-based initiative

   

33,633

Occupied

Job creation for unemployed workers in the Gaza Strip

 

700

4,221

Palestinian

Territories

 

Microcredit programme

 

80

72,433

 

Small enterprises for rural women in the West Bank

 

700

90,263

 

Post-con ict recovery in Gaza

 

14,100

770,481

 

Debris and rubble removal project

Aim 4

5,700

82,110

 

Job creation for people a ected by crisis in Gaza

 

1,800

308,432

 

Supporting small and microcredit enterprises

 

300

244,022

 

Disasters Emergency Committee Gaza emergency appeal (emergency response personnel)

 

2,100

83,057

 

Women’s empowerment programme

 

500

26,624

Pakistan

Sustainable livelihood opportunities project in Balochistan

Aim 4

10,500

82,162

 

Community livelihood improvement project

Aim 4

121,500

54,599

Sudan

United Nations Development Programme consortium in Blue Nile State

 

60,000

1,230,839

Note: For most projects and countries it is possible to obtain beneficiary numbers (which have been rounded up or down to the nearest 10 or 100). However, in some cases, it is difficult to access this data. For example, some societies may not want details about their family members to be added to non-governmental organisation (NGO) statistics.

*For a full list of aims, refer to page 3.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

27

Aim 6

Women from Linxia Hui in China carrying Ramadan supplies provided by Islamic Relief
Women from Linxia Hui in China carrying Ramadan supplies provided by Islamic Relief

Campaigning and advocacy on humanitarian issues

Aims:

To work for poor and vulnerable people

to ensure that their basic needs are met by conducting a range of activities, including policy development, awareness-raising, research, lobbying and campaigning. To increase awareness of Islamic values that

encourage us to spend less on ourselves and more on people in need. To ensure that IRW’s Islamic humanitarian

values are embedded in our work and are promoted to donors and the public. To increase awareness of our inclusive approach.

To fully support our development work on the ground,

it is crucial that we speak out against poverty, and raise awareness about the issues facing those we

work with. As part of our strategy for 2009, we aimed to increase our partnership work with other non- governmental organisations (NGOs), in order to have

a stronger collective voice on behalf of vulnerable

28 Campaigning and advocacy on humanitarian issues

people. We carried out research and lobbied on issues such as the cancellation of debt, stopping climate change and encouraging fair trade, while continuing to run campaigns to support those a ected by emergencies around the world.

We strongly believe in humanitarian aid issues (as expressed, for example, in the Red Cross/Crescent Code of Conduct for NGOs) and these are allied with the Islamic values of charity, justice and integrity. In 2009, we continued to capitalise on our distinct approach in using Islamic values as a basis for our work: for example, by promoting waqf as an important approach to addressing poverty in a sustainable and e ective way. Waqf is a form of sadaqah jariya (ongoing charity) in which a gift is donated to bring a charitable return. The gift is invested to make a pro t, but cannot be sold. So if a eld is given as a waqf, the crops can be used and sold by the bene ciary, but the eld remains intact as the original investment. In 2009, we had seven waqf projects around the world, supporting more than 9,000 people.

Jubilee Debt Campaign and the Muslim Charities Forum

Jubilee Debt Campaign and the Muslim Charities Forum Members of the Muslim Charities Forum exchange ideas

Members of the Muslim Charities Forum exchange ideas and experience

In 2009, Islamic Relief worked alongside partners in the Jubilee Debt Campaign to bring ‘vulture funds’ to an end. These funds are private companies that buy up the debts of heavily indebted countries at a cheap price, then try to recover the full amount, often by suing through the courts. Such funds are unjust because they make poor people even poorer, so we lobbied and supported a law to ban such pro teering. Our joint campaigning work bore fruit in 2010, when the Debt Relief (Developing Countries) Act, which severely restricts the actions of vulture funds in the United Kingdom, was passed into law.

In 2009, the Muslim Charities Forum (MCF), of which Islamic Relief was a founding member, expanded its secretariat at IRW to include a board of trustees. MCF was set up in 2007 by four British Muslim-led international NGOs. The forum aims to improve British Muslim charities’ contribution to international development by promoting the exchange of experience, ideas and information among its members, between networks of NGOs in the United Kingdom and internationally, and with governments. In 2009, we initiated a project among MCF members to improve nancial management and transparency.

Working in partnership to combat deserti cation

Sudan

Working in partnership to combat deserti cation Sudan Distribution of tree seedlings donated by Islamic Relief

Distribution of tree seedlings donated by Islamic Relief in North Kordofan State

Many states in Sudan currently face food insecurity as a result of recurrent droughts and oods. Extreme poverty and the lack of sustainable livelihoods have led to trees being cut down for rewood or charcoal production.

To contribute to soil and water conservation, Islamic Relief set up a pilot project in North Kordofan State, in partnership with the Ministry of Agriculture and the forestry department. The Planting for Tomorrow project also involved community-based organisations, schools and farmers who were trained in the production and care of tree seedlings while also learning about measures to reduce the spread of deserti cation.

As a result of the pilot project’s success, it was extended to two more states in south Sudan in 2009. In Blue Nile State, the project targeted 15 schools, where children were educated on the importance of environmental conservation. Tree seedling nurseries were set up and managed by 15 widows who received training in horticulture and nursery management.

In Central Equatoria, around 3,300 fruit and tree seedlings were distributed to families in three villages, which will increase the families’ income when the fruit trees become productive. More than 800 community members attended awareness-raising sessions on tree planting and environmental conservation.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

29

Supporting widows and orphans by drawing on Islamic values

India

Around 60 million Indian children under the age of 14

do not attend school and millions more are forced into

labour. Childhood in India is often a struggle among

the poorest communities, but life can be even harder

without a breadwinner in the family.

The One-to-one Sponsorship programme aims to improve the quality of life for orphaned children. The additional nancial support from the waqf fund also helps orphans and their families directly – from the produce and money that the goats generate — and indirectly, by empowering women to be able to earn a regular and sustainable income. The project will have long-term bene ts for the orphans who will gain enough experience to develop a sustainable income of their own in the future. In addition, the programme generates growth because the rst year’s o spring from the initial 20 goats is given to other families in similar circumstances.

After the rst year, the ten families can keep any other young that their goats produce. As the project develops, it will relocate to the areas in most need, with plans to continue it in Karnataka and to expand to Tamil Nadu.

CASE STUDY Asmabi — India Asmabi tending her goats Forty-year-old Asmabi lives in a house
CASE STUDY
Asmabi — India
Asmabi tending her goats
Forty-year-old Asmabi lives in a house with her
mother and two sons: Mohammed Firdous and Arshad.
Mohammed Firdous is sponsored through Islamic
Relief’s One-to-One Sponsorship programme, which
ensures all his food, healthcare and educational needs
are met.
Asmabi’s family was given two goats to rear through
Islamic Relief’s waqf fund. Asmabi’s main source of
income is from the sponsorship programme, but she
now also sells goat’s milk, which provides her with a
regular income.
Asmabi faces many daily obstacles: travel is di cult
because there are no proper roads or frequent
transport and, to get water, she has to go to another
house in the village. However, with the help of the
sponsorship scheme and the waqf fund, life has
become easier. As she explains, “Now I have cleared my
debts, and we’re using the money we receive for my
son’s sponsorship to provide him with food, clothing,
better hygiene and schooling. “We survive only on the
generosity of Islamic Relief and its donors.”
Projects relating to campaigning and advocacy on humanitarian issues in 2009 Country Project Links to
Projects relating to campaigning and advocacy on humanitarian
issues in 2009
Country
Project
Links to other
organisationalaims*
Target
bene ciaries
Expenditure (£)
Pakistan
Afghan youth skills enhancement
40
45,423
Integrated development for AJK and Balochistan
Aims 3, 4 and 5
147,800
147,800
Sudan
Planting for Tomorrow – combating deserti cation in
Sudan
2,000
2,000
Partnership Programme Agreement (PPA) baseline
survey in African countries
Aim 5
54,224

Note: For most projects and countries it is possible to obtain beneficiary numbers (which have been rounded up or down to the nearest 10 or 100). However, in some cases, it is difficult to access this data. For example, some societies may not want details about their family members to be added to non-governmental organisation (NGO) statistics. *

30 Campaigning and advocacy on humanitarian issues

New strategic directions As Islamic Relief’s strategy for 2007—09 came to an end, this gave

New strategic directions

As Islamic Relief’s strategy for 2007—09 came to an end, this gave the organisation an opportunity to re- evaluate the e ectiveness of its mission, approach and conceptual framework, and to consider new strategic directions. In developing a strategy for the next ve years, we considered it crucial to consult with the whole organisation and build on everyone’s aspirations and ideas. This provided a unique opportunity to engage all our stakeholders in addressing the huge external challenges that face the communities we work with, and the internal development needs of an organisation that has grown enormously in the last decade.

The formulation stage of the new strategy project has

resulted in the following strategic priorities:

In response to the rapidly changing environmental

context and the increased vulnerability of many

of the communities we work with, we have

realised that a major shift in emphasis is needed:

from responding to emergencies, to enabling

communities to adapt to — and meet the challenge

of — living in environments at risk from climate

change, natural disasters, con ict and global

market changes.

There is a growing realisation that the sector-led

approach adopted in the last strategy has not

always encouraged integrated approaches that

consider communities’ needs in a holistic way.

As part of the new strategy, we will therefore be

moving towards a far more collaborative model of

working. This will use integrated approaches that

focus on making livelihoods sustainable – such

methods will enable us to address the underlying

causes of poverty and su ering coherently and

e

ectively, with support from all our partners

around the world.

In tandem with this integrated development

approach, Islamic Relief will place a greater

emphasis on enabling communities to advocate

and express the need to tackle the causes

of poverty and su ering both at a local and

international level. We will also provide more

leadership on clarifying and promoting human

rights, and on drawing on faith teachings and

values to tackle poverty.

By developing programmes that communities

and individuals in the developed world can

easily engage with and be partners in, Islamic

Relief hopes for a future where its core donors

and supporters can more actively participate

in and contribute to fundamental changes that

are needed to fully support and empower our

bene ciaries around the world.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

31

Supporters raised funds for Islamic Relief through a sponsored trek to the summit of Mount
Supporters raised funds for Islamic Relief through a sponsored trek to the summit of Mount Everest.

Fundraising and local activities

32 Fundraising and local activities

To raise funds for development and emergency projects around the world, IRW partners launched a variety of local campaigns in 2009. By running marathons, climbing mountains, crossing deserts and undertaking parachute jumps, daredevil volunteers around the world raised almost £200,000 in sponsorship donations. Fundraising dinners, school activities and educational tours also contributed to raising money and increasing awareness about the issues a ecting the communities we support.

Events in the United Kingdom

Events in the United Kingdom Celebrating 25 years of IRW at the gala dinner Throughout the

Celebrating 25 years of IRW at the gala dinner

Throughout the year, Islamic Relief United Kingdom ran numerous campaigns, using a variety of media – including television, online appeals and e-marketing – to fundraise for our international projects. A key focus was our 25th anniversary, which involved celebrating our achievements over the last quarter century, thanking all our supporters and paying tribute to the strength and spirit of the individuals and communities we have reached through our work. In December 2009, we held a prestigious gala dinner in London, attended by Islamic Relief supporters from around the world, and by HRH The Prince of Wales, who praised us for our “outstanding work in providing humanitarian aid”.

To celebrate the anniversary and Islamic Relief’s work in empowering communities, we commissioned a photo exhibition called ‘Hope and Empowerment’. Renowned photographers Stefano Massimo and Shaista Chishty travelled to Afghanistan, Yemen, Bangladesh, Kenya and Bosnia-Herzegovina to capture the lives and stories of communities living in poverty and their e orts to improve their circumstances. The images were displayed at various IRW events and activities throughout the year, including at the gala dinner.

throughout the year, including at the gala dinner. Volunteers shake their tins on the streets of

Volunteers shake their tins on the streets of Wales for the Gaza appeal.

From bazaars, dinners and street collections, to school activities, sponsored events and live TV appeals, volunteers and donors came together to raise more than £5 million in 2009 to support those a ected by the crisis in Gaza. Such generosity ensured we could instigate an e cient emergency response, as well as setting up a post-war recovery plan.

Younis Khan and Shahid Afridi, stars of the Pakistani cricket team joined Islamic Relief as ambassadors for a week-long fundraising dinner tour in ve cities around the United Kingdom to raise money and awareness for our work with people a ected by the con ict in northwest Pakistan. The sold-out tour, supported by more than 2,500 people, raised over £500,000 to allow IRW to provide healthcare, education, clean water and trauma care to those rebuilding their lives in the volatile Swat region.

to those rebuilding their lives in the volatile Swat region. Funds from our campaign helped to

Funds from our campaign helped to irrigate parts of the desert in Mali

As part of the Kenyan Water for Life campaign, retired Texan chaplain Shaykh Yusuf and Islamic Relief volunteers toured mosques and community centres around the United Kingdom to share their experiences of their visit to vulnerable communities in Kenya. Their tour raised more than £500,000 for the project, which helped to ensure that around 75,000 people have access to safe, clean drinking water.

Our Turning the Desert Green campaign, which focused on raising funds for water projects in Mali, exceeded its target and raised more than £200,000. Iman Zaid, the Americanimam and speaker, headlined four events in England where he shared his own experiences of his visit to Mali and inspired people to donate.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

33

Middle East and emerging markets fundraising

Middle East and emerging markets fundraising The artificial limbs centre in Gaza The Middle East and

The artificial limbs centre in Gaza

The Middle East and emerging markets department, based in Birmingham, trebled its fundraising target for 2009, raising an impressive £8 million for the Middle East region.

As part of our objective to build relationships with new donors, we welcomed a partnership with the Royal Charity Organisation in Bahrain, which donated more than £350,000 to sponsor an arti cial limbs centre in Gaza. A £3.8 million contract was also agreed with Reach Out To Asia (ROTA) in Qatar to reconstruct and rehabilitate 22 schools in Gaza that were a ected by bomb strikes. In 2009, we increased the number of in-kind donations that support people in need — Middle East partners have donated 48 tons of milk for Gaza children, ten ambulances, ve vans of food and non- food items, and medicines and medical equipment — all worth approximately £650,000.

Following a drought that hit Niger, Ethiopia and Mali, we launched the Campaign for Water and Health. The appeal, which included fundraising events and visits to institutions and organisations in the Middle East, raised £200,000, which enabled IRW to launch a speedy and e ective emergency response. In 2009, the department secured 30,000 frozen meat carcasses (worth over £2.3m) from the Islamic Development Bank and these were canned and distributed in Mali, Niger, the Palestinian Territories, Iraq, and Palestinian camps in Lebanon.

34 Fundraising and local activities

camps in Lebanon. 3 4 Fundraising and local activities Distribution of canned meat in Niger One

Distribution of canned meat in Niger

One of the aims of the department is to empower Middle Eastern NGOs and local charities. We conducted a workshop in Qatar in February hosted by EID Charity, which focused on project management of humanitarian programmes. We also participated in the Dubai International Humanitarian Aid and Development Exhibition and Conference — an annual meeting between more than 300 humanitarian and charity associations to discuss the challenges and the opportunities in this eld. This year, the theme was Empowering Communities: from Disasters to Development.

Where the money came from

Voluntary income from the UK Islamic Relief USA Middle East and other geographical regions Institutions
Voluntary income from the UK
Islamic Relief USA
Middle East and other geographical regions
Institutions
Islamic Relief Deutschland
Secours Islamique France
Islamic Relief Holland
Islamic Relief Association Switzerland
Clothes recycling
Islamic Relief Sweden
Islamic Relief Belgium
Islamic Relief Canada
Islamic Relief Italy
Income from field offices
Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC)
Islamic Relief shops and merchandising
Waqf investment income
Islamic Relief Malaysia
Islamic Relief Mauritius
Islamic Relief South Africa

Where the money was spent

Emergency relief Orphan welfare Allocated to future humanitarian projects Raising funds and publicity Health and
Emergency relief
Orphan welfare
Allocated to future humanitarian projects
Raising funds and publicity
Health and nutrition
Qurbani
Education and vocational training
Sustainable livelihoods
Water and sanitation
Feed the Needy
Trading subsidiary – TIC International
Awareness-raising
Advocacy projects
Legal and statutory compliance (governance)
Investment costs – waqf

Annual report and financial statements 2009

35

Governance and management

Charity registration number: 328158 Company registration number: 2365572

Communications Director (interim): Mr S Butt

Address of principal o ce

Independent auditors

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

19 Rea Street South Digbeth

Chartered Accountants and Statutory Auditors Cornwall Court

Birmingham

19

Cornwall Street

B5 6LB

Birmingham

 

B3 2DT

Name of trustees/directors who served during the year and up to the date of signing the nancial statements

Bankers

Dr Mohamed El-Alfy (chair)

Barclays Bank Plc

Dr Essam El-Haddad

15

Colmore Row

Mr Nader Al-Nouri

Birmingham

Mr Ibrahim El-Zayat

B3 2BT

Mr Iftikhar Awan Mr Tahir Salie

Natwest Plc

Dr Abdelwahab Noorwali

Colmore Row

Dr Mohamed Attawia

Birmingham

B3 2AS

Company secretaries

Solicitors

Mr A R Varachhia as of 17th October 2009 Dr Essam El-Haddad up until 17th October 2009

Mills & Reeve 78–84 Colmore Row

Senior personnel

Birmingham B3 2AB

Chief Executive O cer: Mr S Saeed

Stratford Solicitors

Stratford House

Finance and Services Director:

Stratford Place

Mr H Atallah FCA, FRSA

Birmingham

B12 0HT

International Programmes Director:

Dr H Said MBChB, MBA

Carters

211 Broadway

Middle East and Emerging Markets Director:

Orangeville

Mr H Khalifa

Canada

L9W 1K4

United Kingdom Director: Mr J Malik

Human Resources and Organisational Development Director (interim): Mr S Butt

36 Governance and management

Constitution

Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW) is constituted as a company limited by guarantee (number 2365572) and registered charity (number 328158). It was formed on 13 February 1984 as a charitable organisation, incorporated under the Companies Act 1985 on 28 March 1989 and registered with the Charity Commission on 6 April 1989. It is an organisation that is governed by its Memorandum and Articles of Association. In the event of winding up, members are required to contribute £1.

Board of Trustees

The governance of IRW is the responsibility of the Board of Trustees, which is currently made up of eight trustees. The directors of the company are also the charity trustees for the purpose of charity law. The Board of Trustees’ contractual obligation is to direct and control the organisation through the process of governance. It plans future aims and priorities, monitors current performance and measures progress.

The Board of Trustees’ focus is primarily on strategic planning and governance, which includes measuring strategic results achieved by management, satisfying the regulatory requirements of the charity, and ful lling the Board of Trustees’ responsibilities to all stakeholders.

Recruitment and appointment of trustees

Members of the Board of Trustees devote their time voluntarily. When appointing trustees, emphasis is placed on the diversity of skills and knowledge that is required for a board to be e ective. The selection process involves determining the necessary skills, knowledge and experience (given the operational climate and needs), identifying potential trustees, and promoting and explaining the activities of the board to potential trustees. Nominations for potential board members come from the various stakeholders and partners of Islamic Relief. The process may include personal approaches to potential candidates. Once candidates have been shortlisted, the chair of the Appointments Committee contacts all nominees in writing and the selection process is then carried out.

Induction and training of trustees

The induction process for new trustees includes an explanation regarding the function of the Board of Trustees and could include appointing a mentor for the

new board member. A full overview of the organisation and its activities is provided, and the contributions the new member will be able to make are explored. Trustees are given a welcome pack, which includes a copy of the Memorandum and Articles of Association, the nancial statements, board minutes and the Charity Commission guidance,The Essential Trustee, as well as recent publications.

Islamic Relief encourages ongoing training to ful l the development needs of the trustees. This is achieved by encouraging trustees to identify personal training needs, and by providing training in new or emerging areas of responsibility. The CEO keeps the trustees informed of changes in regulatory standards and training possibilities. Training is treated as an essential and regular board activity, ensuring it is professional, appropriate and evaluated.

Management restructuring

IRW has started the restructuring of its management system. The Board of Trustees is directly involved in assessing the progress of this process and implementing the approved strategy. The trustees are currently consulting with partners to ensure that future governance structures are t for the purpose of the organisation.

The Board of Trustees receives regular reports on the performance of the organisation and the annual nancial reports, along with plans and budgets. The Board also approves any news policies and procedures.

Key personnel

The CEO, along with other senior sta , is responsible for the day-to-day management of the organisation. The CEO is accountable to the Board of Trustees. The CEO chairs the Board of Directors, which is made up of the division directors and which supervises the daily activities of Islamic Relief Worldwide.

Division directors oversee the implementation of the policies laid down by the Board of Trustees and support the work of other sta and volunteers. All major humanitarian campaigns are coordinated from IRW’s headquarters.

TIC International Limited is a trading subsidiary and supports the fundraising activities of Islamic Relief by recycling clothes. The assets, liabilities and trading results of this company are incorporated in these consolidated nancial statements.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

37

Organisational structure

Organisational structure The Islamic Relief global family Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW) is the global implementing and

The Islamic Relief global family

Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW) is the global implementing and coordinating member of the Islamic Relief family, based in Birmingham in the United Kingdom. It operates through a global network of a liated implementing partners and locally registered Islamic Relief partners.

A liated implementing partners include, for example, Islamic Relief Pakistan, Islamic Relief Niger and Islamic Relief Bangladesh. They liaise closely with IRW within a formal reporting and monitoring framework that ensures all a liates work towards the same core strategic objectives. Islamic Relief’s working relationship with these partners ensures the appropriate use of funds provided for humanitarian programmes.

Islamic Relief carries out most humanitarian projects through a liated implementing partners in the following countries:

38 Organisational structure

Where we workin the following countries: 3 8 Organisational structure Islamic Relief partners Where we work and an

Islamic Relief partnerscountries: 3 8 Organisational structure Where we work Where we work and an Islamic Relief partner

Where we work and an Islamic Relief partnerstructure Where we work Islamic Relief partners Afghanistan Albania Bangladesh Bosnia-Herzegovina

Afghanistan

Albania

Bangladesh

Bosnia-Herzegovina Chad China Egypt Ethiopia India Indonesia Jordan Kenya Kosova Malawi Mali Niger Occupied Palestinian Territories Pakistan Russian Federation (Chechnya/Ingushetia) Somalia South Africa Sri Lanka Sudan Yemen.

Organisational structure (continued)

Islamic Relief partners, listed below, are established as separate independent legal entities with their own jurisdiction. For this reason, their results are not included within these accounts, as IRW only includes funds processed through the United Kingdom.

coordinates emergency relief campaigns in the United Kingdom.

Risk management

Belgium

Islamic Relief is dedicated to alleviating the poverty and su ering of the world’s poorest people, which

Canada

often means operating in ‘high-risk’ countries. To

France

ful l our vision and mission e ectively, to e ectively

Germany

safeguard our sta and bene ciaries, and to meet the

Italy

obligations to our donors, risks are managed through

Malaysia

the following mechanisms.

Mauritius

Netherlands

The Board of Trustees constantly reviews the risks the

South Africa

organisation faces and plays an active role in both risk

Sweden

assessment and mitigation. The board also implements

Switzerland

a risk management policy relating to risks that IRW

United Kingdom

faces regarding the provision of humanitarian aid.

USA.

Islamic Relief continues to work towards enhancing its management processes and the e ectiveness of its international humanitarian work by, for example, regularly reviewing structural and policy issues. Consequently, it has also undertaken a consultative and comprehensive process of formulating standards and policies covering all aspects of IRW’s work.

TIC International Limited

The process of identifying risks and developing an ongoing programme to monitor and mitigate against them is undertaken and reviewed by the Board of Directors and the Board of Trustees. This ongoing programme incorporates all aspects of risk faced by

the organisation relating to governance, operations,

nances and external obligations. Although

responsibility for risk assessment lies with IRW management, the Evaluation and Audit Unit facilitates the assessment process.

The current key strategic risks are considered to be:

TIC International is a trading subsidiary of IRW whose principal activity is clothes recycling. TIC International generates income from this. All pro ts received from this operation are returned to Islamic Relief. TIC International also provides logistical support in sorting and shipping emergency aid such as tents, food and blankets to areas a ected by disaster.

damage to reputation and public con dence the inability to access bene ciaries due to security concerns the inability to move funds in a timely fashion to complete projects as planned the lack of sustainability of various income streams in order to deliver our strategic objectives.

projects as planned the lack of sustainability of various income streams in order to deliver our
projects as planned the lack of sustainability of various income streams in order to deliver our
projects as planned the lack of sustainability of various income streams in order to deliver our

Working with other organisations

Islamic Relief works with other organisations to achieve common goals. Such organisations include:

The CEO and the directors are responsible for following up the recommendations of the Evaluation and Audit Unit. The Audit Committee, chaired by Dr Mohamed El-Alfy of the Board of Trustees, monitors the implementation of these recommendations.

Catholic Agency for Overseas Development (CAFOD) Department for International Development (DFID) European Commission (EC) European Commission Humanitarian Aid O ce (ECHO) World Food Programme (WFP).

 

Corporate governance

Internal controls over all forms of commitment and expenditure continue to be re ned in order to improve e ciency. Processes are in place to ensure that performance is monitored and that appropriate management information is reviewed. In 2009, this was carried out by a change management programme

IRW is also a member of the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC), a body of 13 agencies that

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

39

Organisational structure (continued)

and process improvement groups, including the Evaluation and Audit Unit.

The systems of internal control are designed to provide reasonable but not absolute assurance against material mismanagement or loss. They include:

a strategic plan – which includes an annual

operating plan and annual budget approved by the Board of Trustees regular analysis by the Board of Trustees and

Board of Directors of the results and variances from budgets delegation of day-to-day management authority,

including segregation of duties the identi cation and management of risks.

The Evaluation and Audit Unit is integral to the internal control processes.

The Evaluation and Audit Unit

The Evaluation and Audit Unit’s objective is to carry out a programme of regular, risk-based cyclical audits

across Islamic Relief’s operations, with all reports directly addressed to the CEO. The Internal Audit Committee, which

is a part of the Board of Trustees, reviews these reports. The

audit programme includes risk-based audits of overseas projects and United Kingdom-based functions.

The Evaluation and Audit Unit’s function is:

to maintain and promote quality standards within

the organisation to review and improve operating systems

to evaluate and analyse Islamic Relief’s humanitarian programmes.

IRW aims to ensure quality assurance by following

a systematic approach to identify and respond to

the needs of those who use Islamic Relief’s services,

whether bene ciaries or donors.

During 2009, the Evaluation and Audit Unit undertook appraisals of humanitarian programmes to ensure that quality assurance systems were being used e ectively. The unit has also carried out evaluations of partners and a liates against quality standards and has assisted in the production of relevant action plans.

Grant-making policies

Islamic Relief provides grants to organisations and

40 Organisational structure

individuals if the request meets the charitable objectives and criteria set by IRW. After initial approval,

applications are reviewed by a committee of senior personnel. Islamic Relief aims to ensure that all grant applications are treated equally and fairly. It remains at the discretion of IRW to make the nal decision as to who is eligible to receive a grant.

Public bene t

Islamic Relief’s strategic plans are developed to ensure that we provide maximum public bene t and achieve our objectives as set out in the Islamic Relief Strategy (available at www.islamic-relief.com/Whoweare/ PartnershipNewslettersMain.aspx?depID=2). These objectives fall under purposes de ned by the Charities Act 2006.

Employees

IRW supports and develops the skills of its employees. All employees are encouraged to engage with the strategy and objectives, and to give their suggestions and views on performance and strategy. Islamic Relief is committed to the People in Aid (PIA) Code of Good Practice.

We are an equal opportunities employer and have a policy of recruitment and promotion based on aptitude and ability without discrimination in any way or form. The policies at IRW are set to focus on training and career development for the majority of employees. For this reason, employees are assessed with supervision and an annual appraisal.

Volunteers’ help and gifts in-kind

Islamic Relief considers volunteers as the heart and soul of its operations and relies on them to be able to deliver its services. IRW undertakes the management of all its volunteers.

During 2009, between 400 and 450 volunteers in the United Kingdom alone contributed around 35,000 hours of work to IRW operations by donating their time in the shops, through administration and by being involved in fundraising activities. (Because of the many varied aspects of work that volunteers do across several regions, it is di cult to estimate a precise number of volunteers and hours.)

The trustees extend their gratitude to all volunteers who helped Islamic Relief in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in achieving its goals and objectives. Furthermore, the trustees extend their gratitude to the public who have been

Organisational structure (continued)

generous in providing clothing for resale

in the shops or through the textile recycling services provided by TIC International Limited.

Directors and trustees

The directors and trustees, who constitute the executives, are elected by the Annual General Meeting of members. The executives have the authority to appoint additional directors to ll a casual vacancy. Directors appointed in this manner are eligible for re- election at the Annual General Meeting. The conduct of such formalities is governed in general by the Companies Act 1985. The following directors/trustees have held o ce since 1 January 2009:

Dr Mohamed El-Alfy (chair) Dr Essam El-Haddad Mr Nader Al-Nouri Mr Ibrahim El-Zayat Mr Iftikhar Awan Mr Tahir Salie Dr Abdelwahab Nourwali Dr Mohamed Attawia

Speci c restrictions

The Memorandum of Association makes speci c restrictions on the conditions of operations. These comprise the following:

Property held as a trust will be subject to

legislation relating to trusts on matters of investment. The object of the company shall not extend

to regulating relations between workers and employers or organisations of workers/employers. Property held under the jurisdiction of the Charity

Commission or any such property that comes into the hands of the directors/trustees is subject to the control of the Charity Commissioners. Article 5 disallows the distribution of any dividends or pro ts to members of the company and requires the income and property of the company to be applied solely towards the promotion of its objectives.

Directors’ and trustees’ responsibilities

The directors are responsible for preparing the annual report and the nancial statements in accordance with applicable law and regulations.

Company law requires the directors to prepare nancial statements for each nancial year. Under that law, the

directors have elected to prepare the group and parent company nancial statements in accordance with United Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting Practice (United Kingdom accounting standards and applicable law). Under company law the directors must not approve the

nancial statements unless they are satis ed that they give

a true and fair view of the state of a airs of the group and company, and of the pro t or loss of the group for that period.

In preparing those nancial statements, the directors are required to:

select suitable accounting policies and then apply

them consistently make judgements and accounting estimates that are

reasonable and prudent state whether applicable United Kingdom accounting

standards have been followed, subject to any material departures disclosed and explained in the nancial statements prepare the nancial statements on the going-concern basis unless it is inappropriate to presume that the company will continue in business.

The directors are responsible for keeping adequate accounting records that are su cient to show and explain the company's transactions and disclose with reasonable accuracy at any time the nancial position of the company and the group, and enable them to ensure that the nancial statements comply with the Companies Act 2006 and the Charity Commission Statement of Recommended Practice (SORP) 2005. They are also responsible for safeguarding the assets of the company and the group and hence for taking reasonable steps for the prevention and detection of fraud and other irregularities.

The directors are responsible for the maintenance and integrity of the company’s website. Legislation in the United Kingdom governing the preparation and dissemination of nancial statements may di er from legislation in other jurisdictions.

Statement on disclosure of information to the auditors

In accordance with Section 418, directors’ reports shall include a statement, in the case of each director in o ce at the date the directors’ report is approved, that:

So far as the director/trustee is aware, there is no relevant audit information of which the company’s auditors are unaware, and

He has taken all the steps that he ought to have taken as a director in order to make himself aware of any relevant audit information and to establish that the company’s auditors are aware of that information.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

41

Organisational structure (continued)

Trustee responsibilities in relation to the nancial statements

Company and charity law require the trustees to prepare nancial statements for each nancial year that give a true and fair view of the state of a airs of the charity and the group, and of the surplus or de cit of the group for that period. In preparing those nancial statements, the trustees con rm that they have:

selected suitable accounting policies and applied

them consistently made judgements and estimates that are

reasonable and prudent stated whether applicable accounting standards

have been followed disclosed and explained any material departures in

the nancial statements prepared the nancial statements on a going- concern basis.

The trustees are responsible for ensuring that proper accounting records are kept, which disclose with reasonable accuracy at any time the nancial position of the charity and the group, and enable the trustees to ensure that the nancial statements comply with the Companies Act 2006 and the Charity Commission SORP 2005. They are also responsible for safeguarding the charity’s and the group’s assets and therefore for taking reasonable steps to prevent and detect fraud and breaches of law and regulations.

42 Organisational structure

Financial and business review

Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW) is a non-governmental, non-political humanitarian aid organisation with operations in 25 countries. We are dedicated to helping people in need and are accountable to our donors, supporters, bene ciaries, partners and all our stakeholders. Our activities in 2009 consisted of responding to humanitarian emergencies, addressing the long-term requirements of people in need, attempting to address the underlying causes of poverty, and promoting sustainable development.

Environment

We are among the Top 100 charities in the United Kingdom. IRW does not view itself as having competitors in the corporate sense but rather fellow organisations operating in the same sector, working towards the common goal of providing humanitarian relief and alleviating su ering. This is illustrated, for example, by the joint working partnership of leading charities through the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC).

We are committed to ensuring that IRW meets all regulations and laws governing charities and has the appropriate technology and systems in place to meet the requirements of the donor, bene ciary and regulatory bodies.

With the downturn in the global economy, we are taking measures to manage our cash- ow carefully, strengthen our reserves and provide a greater service to our individual donors through whom IRW receives the majority of its funding.

Ethos

We combine honesty and transparency with Islamic values. Accountability before the Creator and our stakeholders is at the core of our ethos.

Income and funding

Our voluntary income continues to grow. The ve-year trend (see the table below) shows a uctuation in 2005 and 2006 that was the result of two major disasters and

appeals during that time for the 2004 tsunami and the Asian earthquake. The ve-year trend shows an increase from £35.4 million in 2005 to £41.2 million in 2009.

We initially aimed for our income to be in line with the previous year’s income at £45 million (excluding income from trading subsidiaries) in light of the prevailing economic downturn experienced in 2009.

2009 was a successful year due to the generosity of our donors, and this saw our income reach £58 million. This enabled Islamic Relief to continue and expand its charitable activities in both disaster-response and sustainable development programmes.

 

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

Voluntary

41.2m

33.7m

28.9m

26.4m

35.4m

income (£)

%

increase

22

17

9

-25

92

Funding from institutional donors

We continued to work in partnership with numerous humanitarian organisations to facilitate cooperation, coordination and communication in delivering e ective programmes. We are committed to the Millennium Development Goals through the Partnership Programme Agreement with the Department for International Development (DFID) in the United Kingdom, and the aims of our strategy re ect our contribution to achieving these essential global targets.

 

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

Income

14.4m

11.4m

8.7m

7.7m

5.5m

from

Charitable

activities

(£)

%

increase

11

24

22

21

13

Note 5 to the nancial statements lists the names of organisations that have made charitable donations, and further details of donations to individual projects are shown in Notes 35 and 36.

Annual report and nancial statements 2009

43