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UDL LESSON PLAN ASSIGNMENT

Lesson Plan

Title: States of Matter

Subject: Science

Grade Level: 2nd

NYS Standards:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1
Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and
texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.2
Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented
orally or through other media.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject
area.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.8
Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to
answer a question.

Lesson Objective(s): Students will be able to define what matter is and identify the three states
of matter. Students will be able to describe the properties of each state of matter. Students will
be able to classify matter as a solid, liquid, or gas and provide examples.

Lesson Assessment: The assessment will be through class discussions, the small group activity,
and the odd one out worksheet.

Lesson Description of the Day: Students will discover what matter is and the properties of
three states of matter. Groups will then act out and demonstrate their assigned state of matter,
providing examples and explaining their demonstration. Students will individually demonstrate
their knowledge through a worksheet.

Differentiated Goals for Diverse learners (tied to lesson objective):

Broad Goals for all Students: All students will identify the three states of matter and will
select/classify the odd one out in examples of states of matter.

Goal Extensions for Advanced Learning (MODIFIED): A few students for greater
challenge will construct their own odd one out lists for the different states of matter.

Adapted Goals for Students needing more challenge: Some students for more challenge
will complete the TedEd provided for the states of matter and experiment what occurs when
adding/removing heat to the states of matter through an online simulation.

Adapted Goals for students needing more support: Some students for more support will
identify the odd one out for the states of matter by looking at pictures instead of a list.
MODIFIED GOALS for students needing greater support: A few students with a
learning disability for greater support will practice by sorting one picture at a time and placing it
in the correct category: solid, liquid, or gas. This is until they are ready to select the odd one out
in a group.

Procedure/Methods : (Time frame; UDL Connections/ Multiple Means of representation,


engagement, and expression must be included and identified for each step)

Anticipatory Set:

The lesson will begin by with the students utilizing their prior knowledge on three things they are
familiar with in order to make predictions about a new topic. This will lead us into the topic for
the day, states of matter. After reading aloud and discussing the new vocabulary and main ideas,
the students will have a structured group activity to model the atoms in matter, and then will
demonstrate their knowledge through independent practice.

Introduction (Introduce and Model New Knowledge):

“Good afternoon, scientists!! Today we are going to jump into a new topic, something different.
I want you to look at these three pictures (projected on the board) through your scientist lenses
and talk to your partner about what you see. What do you know about these three things from
your everyday life? How are they alike? How are they different?”

“Now I am going to place three more images on the board along with these. Each image will
have a match. My question for you and your partner to explore is this: Predict which pictures
belong together and explain your reasoning. Make observations about each picture and tell why
you believe they would be a match. Record your observations and your predictions in your
notebook and be ready to
share.”

*UDL connections/Multiple Means of representation and engagement occur at the beginning


of this lesson. The students are being asked to draw upon their prior knowledge looking at
images that are familiar to them, and then they are asked to think critically and make connections
between what they know and what they are about to learn. They are also collaborating and
sharing ideas with their partner, which allows for deeper thoughts.

I am going to read aloud an informational text to the students about matter. The students will
have the text in front of them and it will be projected on the board. The text comes from:
http://www.coolkidfacts.com/states-of-matter-for-kids/. I would read aloud:
Matter is everything that we come across in our lives, like the air you breathe, the clothes
you wear, cool drinks – literally everything! In fact, did you know that you are made of
matter too? When we talk about the states of matter, we mostly talk about solids, liquids
and gases. There are also ones that are less common and they’re called plasma and beam.

I would ask, “From this paragraph, tell me what one of the most common states of matter is.”
After, I would ask what another is and what the third is. “Let’s continue on with reading”

When we talk about states of matter, it’s important for you to understand what some of the
words mean that are used quite a lot. One of these words is a molecule. Molecules are
made up of two or more atoms. Atoms are tiny, tiny particles or building blocks which make
up substance. Everything you see or imagine is made up of something. So atoms when
put together form molecules, which form cells, which form our organs and our populations
and our planets and the galaxies and so on.

“Now can someone tell me what a molecule is?” I would call on a student with their hand raised.
After their response I would see if anything needed to be added or explained. Then I would ask,
“What is an atom? Can someone tell me?” Again, I would be checking for understanding and
seeing if I need to elaborate anymore.

Solids are objects that keep their own shape and do not flow in a given temperature. Ice is
a solid but when it melts it becomes a liquid. Other examples of solids are cars, books and
clothes. Solids can be different colors and textures, and they can be turned into different
shapes, for example clay. Solids are made up of molecules which group together and don’t
move around.

“This paragraph gave us a few examples of what solids can be; can some of you think of
examples of solids that haven’t already been listed?” I would call on 5 different students to have
different examples.

Liquids do not have their own shape but can take the shape of the container they are in and
they can flow at a given temperature. Examples of liquids are tea, water and blood. They
can be different colors and thickness; for example, custard is a thicker liquid than tea and
doesn’t flow as quickly as tea. You can measure a liquid in a cup or a spoon. Liquids are
made up of molecules which are further apart than in solids and can move around easily.

“Again we were given a few examples, I would like some more though. Can you name an
example of a liquid?” I would call on 5 students to give examples of a liquid.

Gases are air-like substances that can move around freely or flow to fit a container and they
don’t have their own shape. You can put your hand through gases and you won’t feel
them. If they get out their container they can spread easily. We are surrounded by different
gases in the air we breathe. We can’t put gas into a measuring cup to measure its volume; it
has to be worked out using a mathematical formula. Their molecules are spaced apart and
jiggle around.

“Now in this paragraph we don’t see many examples of gases. These might be harder to think of
but does anyone have any examples in their head?” I would see if anyone raises their hand. If
not I would say, “Well let’s think about this together. We know the air around us is a gas. Let’s
think of a balloon. Balloons float in the air and are filled with something, does anyone know
what it is filled with? It is called helium. Helium is a gas. Now let’s think about a car or a train.
Has anyone ever seen a black cloud come out of these? Those are fumes and those are a gas.
Another example would be steam from a pot on the stove.”
*UDL Connections/Multiple Means of representation occurs here because the information is
given to the students auditorily, through the teacher reading the text aloud, and visually, having
the students follow along in the text. Throughout the text, main ideas are being highlighted and
vocabulary is being clarified for comprehension.

Provide Guided Practice:

“Now that we have read the article and have some good background knowledge on matter, you
are going to do an activity with those at your table. Each table (5) will get a piece of paper from
me stating if you are a solid, liquid, or gas. As a table you will have to come up with an example
of your state of matter that wasn’t already mentioned in class. Then you will have to come to the
front of class and act like the atoms in your state of matter. Can someone remind what an atom
is?” A student would answer and if they are correct I would move on; if clarification is needed, I
would give it. “You will have five minutes to discuss what your group will do.” Each group
will come to the front. They will act out their atoms, in a solid the children (atoms) should be
tightly packed because this is why a solid is hard and keeps its shape, in a liquid the children
(atoms) should be farther apart and moving a little bit, which allows us to pour liquids and allows
them to take the shape of their container, and in a gas the children (atoms) should be far apart
and moving rapidly. After each group acts out their atoms for their state of matter, I will ask the
remaining class members to state what state of matter they believe the group they just observed
is. I will ask a student to give me their answer, and then I would ask the rest of the class for a
thumbs up or thumbs down for whether they agree or disagree. From there I would ask someone
to explain how they know this. We would continue until each group has gone.

*UDL Connections/Multiple Means of representation, engagement, and expression occur at


this point in this lesson. The students are demonstrating the information to one another in a
visual and tactile way. The students are collaborating and working together to model what they
have just learned and are expressing their responses through dramatizing like they are the atoms
in a state of matter.

Provide Independent Practice:

After this activity, there will be a worksheet handed out for the students to complete
independently. Based upon the needs of level of each student, there will be different activities
based upon the goals. At the top of the worksheet the students will have to define what matter is
and identify the three states of matter. The rest of the worksheet is odd one out. There will be
lists of items and the students will have to choose which item the odd one is out and explain why.
The lists would be based off of the states of matter. An example list would be: Ice, Cup, Bag,
Soup, and Sock. They would choose the odd one out and tell me why it is the odd one out. I
would be circulating around the room while they are working on the worksheets. The students
needing more challenge would be creating their own lists and some needing greater challenge
would work on the computers completing the TedEd. Those who need more support would be
provided with the appropriate materials.

*UDL connections/Multiple Means of representation and expression occur at this point in the
lesson because based upon the learners’ needs the information and the responses needed are
varied for each student.

Wrap up/closure:

To end the lesson, I would tell the class we are going to review. I would project the Glogster up
on the board for the students to see. We would explore and discuss the different parts of the
Glogster, reviewing the information and the images. Lastly, I would play the video of 1st and 2nd
grade students singing a rap about the different states of matter.

*UDL connections/Multiple Means of representation, expression, and engagement occur


during the closing discussion. The students are reinforcing what matter is, what the three states
of matter are, and examples of them. The discussion allows for students to verbalize their final
thoughts and the Glogster and video gives the students different visual and auditory means of
representing the information.

Instructional Strategies:

- One instructional strategy used in the lesson was activating the prior knowledge of the
students. Even though this is a brand new unit for them, and this is most likely the first
time they are being introduced to matter, I being the lesson by having the students discuss
three images (ice, water, steam) that they are familiar with and can make observations
about. I ask them to try to make connections from images they are familiar with to the
images that are new to them. This will allow them to expand and build on their prior
knowledge. According to the text book, “to improve the acquisition of new knowledge,
prior learning needs to be either primed or bypassed” (p. 255).
- Another instructional strategy used in this lesson is the think-pair-share. The activity in
the beginning while looking at three familiar images and then trying to predict which
unfamiliar image matches with the familiar is done with partners. I ask prompting
questions to the class, they are to think and then discuss with their partners. Discussing
with their partners allows for more meaningful responses and allows for more ideas to be
created. They are to record their predictions and discussions with their partner in their
science notebook. According to the text book, “communicating about a response with a
partner before actually responding using the think-pair-share technique allows for the
critical processing time” (p. 273).
- Another instructional strategy that can be seen in the lesson is cooperative learning. The
students are in groups and have to work together to decide how they will model the atoms
in their assigned state of matter. Working together they must decide what the atoms do
and how they will model it to their classmates. According to the text book, “students can
learn from each other as they share and combine their best efforts to solve a problem or
create a project/performance” (p. 277).
- Another instructional strategy involved in this lesson is role play. Even though this isn’t
your typical role play with characters from a story, the students are working together to
role play atoms. They must make themselves the atoms and act as if they were the atoms
in their assigned state of matter. “Role play serves to improve peer interaction and
provide opportunities for students to problem solve while gaining oral language skills”
(Teacher ToolBox p. 50).
- Another instructional strategy that is geared towards behavior that will be used
throughout this lesson is social reinforcement. When students answer correctly, I will
make sure to give verbal praise and recognition. When I observe the students working
well together in their groups, I will recognize their hard work and give verbal praise.
Noticing when the students are performing as they are expected in the classroom and
giving verbal praise will allow for other students to want to be on task. “For most
students, positive attention from the teacher is a powerful type of social reinforcement.
Verbal praise is most effective when it is immediate and specific to a target behavior” (p.
297).
- Another instructional strategy that is being used in this lesson is self-monitoring. The
students are being placed in groups to work together towards a common goal. The
students only have a certain amount of time for this group work, therefore, the students
are expected to self-monitor their behavior as they have already been taught. This means
that the students are, “tracking one’s own behavior and making choices to discontinue
inappropriate actions” (p. 303).

Assessment (benchmark for the different goals)

Goal Instructional Activity Assessment: Minimum


Requirement

Broad Goals for all Students will identify the Students must have identified
Students: All students will three states of matter and the three states of matter and
identify the three states of select/classify the odd one out selected/classified the correct
matter and will select/classify in a group of examples of the odd one out in the group of
the odd one out in examples states of matter. examples.
of states of matter.

Goal Extensions for Students will identify the Students must have
Advanced Learning three states of matter and constructed at least 6 accurate
(MODIFIED): A few select/classify the odd one out odd one out lists of their own,
students for greater in a group of examples of the 2 lists for each state of matter.
challenge will construct their states of matter. Then, the
own odd one out lists for the student will construct their
different states of matter. own odd one out lists for the
states of matter.

Adapted Goals for Students Students will identify the Students must have watched
needing more challenge: three states of matter and the videos and experimented
Some students for more select/classify the odd one out with the simulation of
challenge will complete the in a group of examples of the adding/removing heat.
TedEd provided for the states states of matter. Students Students must have
of matter and experiment will then have to use the participated in the discussion
what occurs when computer to complete the on the TedEd following the
adding/removing heat to the TedEd to experiment and online simulation they
states of matter through an discuss what occurs when completed.
online simulation. adding/removing heat to the
different states of matter.

Adapted Goals for students Students identify the three Students must have identified
needing more support: states of matter. They will be the three states of matter and
Some students for more given a worksheet with selected/classified the correct
support will identify the odd groups of pictures and will odd one out in the group of
one out for the states of have to select/classify which pictures.
matter by looking at pictures picture is the odd one out.
instead of a list.

MODIFIED GOALS for Students will be given a 3- Students must have labeled
students needing greater column chart and will have to the three columns, solid,
support: A few students with label each column with a state liquid, and gas. The student
a learning disability for of matter. The student will be must identify the correct
greater support will practice presented with a picture one column for each picture. If
by sorting one picture at a at a time and will have to the student identifies the
time and placing it in the identify the correct column to wrong column for a picture,
correct category: solid, liquid, place the picture. the picture will be recycled at
or gas. This is until they are the end and the student will
ready to select the odd one try again.
out in a group.

Materials/Resources :

- Computer
- Projector
- SmartBoard
- Images (Ice cube, water, steam) (Atoms of solid, liquid, gas)
o https://danielmiessler.com/images/ice-water-steam.jpg
o http://www.mstworkbooks.co.za/natural-sciences/gr8/images/gr8mm02-gd-
0001.jpg
- States of Matter Article
o https://www.coolkidfacts.com/states-of-matter-for-kids/
- Odd One Out Worksheet

Name: ______________________________ Date: ____________________________

Define Matter and Identify the three states of matter. (You may use drawings along with
words to show your understanding of what matter is.)

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Odd One Out


Directions: Looking at the lists of words, you must choose the word that does not belong in the
group by circling the word. Write why it does not belong.
1. Soup 2. Lemonade
Sock Coffee
Book Water
Ice Bagel
3. Oxygen 4. Table
Steam Blanket
Bag Cup
Helium Orange Juice

5. Kool-Aid 6. Grape Juice


Coffee beans Grapes
Iced Tea Cranberry Juice
Hot Chocolate Root Beer

7. Spaghetti 8. Steam
Ice Cream Smoke
Milk Helium
Meatball Rain

- Adapted Odd One Out Worksheet

Name: ______________________________ Date: ____________________________

Define Matter and Identify the three states of matter. (You may use drawings along with
words to show your understanding of what matter is.)

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Odd One Out


Directions: Looking at the groups of pictures, you must choose the picture that does not belong
in the group by circling the picture.
1.
2.

3. 4.

5. 6.

- Three Column Chart


- Pictures of Matter (Using the same pictures from the adapted odd one out worksheet, they
will just be larger and cut out)
- TedEd
o http://ed.ted.com/on/o4lnbZtY
- Glogster
- Science Notebook
- Pencil

Technology:

- SmartBoard
- Projector
- Images on the board for the discussion and inquiry at the beginning of the lesson
- Coolkidfacts article projected on the board (http://www.coolkidfacts.com/states-of-matter-
for-kids/)
- TedEd (http://ed.ted.com/on/o4lnbZtY)
- Glogster