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CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR IN RELATION TO HEALTHCARE PRODUCT

INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY:

Consumer behavior is viewed as an orderly process whereby the individual interacts


with his or her environment for the purpose of making marketplace decision on
products and services. There are many factors that influence consumer behavior.
Potential customers are subject to various stimuli. The service firm must understand
how the consumer would respond to different service features, price, appeals, etc.,
along with the major forces in the marketing environment such as economic, social,
cultural factor. All the above mentioned stimuli influence the buyer’s the decision-
making process evoke positive or negative response towards the product or service.

All of us buy different types of services for a varied reasons. One person may go to
a restaurant for good food while the other may opt for a five-star hotel for status.
One person may prefer to read the Indian Express in the morning, while the other
may prefer to read the same newspaper after coming back from office. There are
women who visit beauty parlour regularly while there are some who don’t go to
beauty salon at all. Similarly, there are many such examples telling us that people
show different behavior in buying and using different products and services.

The disciple of marketing which helps in developing a deeper insight in these


behavioural differences is called buyer behavior. The meaning of market orientation
is that a firm should aim all its efforts at satisfying its customers. In order to know
customer’s satisfaction it becomes essential to have a deeper knowledge regarding
the behavior of the buyer.

Once the consumer has recognised a problem, they search for information on
products and services that can solve that problem. Belch and Belch (2007) explain
that consumers undertake both an internal (memory) and an external search. Sources
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of information include personal sources and experience, and commercial and public
sources.

The relevant internal psychological process associated with information search


is perception, which can be defined as "the process by which an individual receives,
selects, organises, and interprets information to create a meaningful picture of the
world". Consumers' tendency to search for information on goods and services makes
it possible for researchers to forecast the purchasing plans of consumers using brief
descriptions of the products of interest.

Involvement with the product makes consumers process product-related information


more readily. This information is processed thoroughly, hence, it is retained for a
longtime. Because of this the consumers become emotionally high and tend to
engage in extended problem solving and word- of-mouth communications. These
result into three categories: search for information, processing information, and
information transmission. Customers who are highly involved tend to search for
information and shop around more when compared with low involvement
customers. For example, the customer who is highly involved with cars and thinks
about buying it is likely to gather information. He sees for alternative models to
figure the advantages and disadvantages of each. The more they are involved, the
more they learn about the alternatives with in that category. To gather the
information they use various sources. One such behaviour is to shop around, where
they visit various outlets and talk to sales people. The customers of this kind should
be encouraged buy retailers to visit the outlets to know, and compare various models
to meet information needs.

At this time the consumer compares the brands and products that are in their evoked
set. The evoked set refers to the number of alternatives that are considered by
consumers during the problem-solving process. Sometimes also known as

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consideration, this set tends to be small relative to the total number of options
available. How can the marketing organisation increase the likelihood that their
brand is part of the consumer's evoked set? Consumers evaluate alternatives in terms
of the functional and psychological benefits that they offer. The marketing
organisation needs to understand what benefits consumers are seeking and therefore
which attributes are most important in terms of making a decision. It also needs to
check other brands of the customer’s consideration set to prepare the right plan for
its own brand.

Once the alternatives have been evaluated, the consumer is ready to make a purchase
decision. Sometimes purchase intention does not result in an actual purchase. The
marketing organisation must facilitate the consumer to act on their purchase
intention. The organisation can use a variety of techniques to achieve this. The
provision of credit or payment terms may encourage purchase, or a sales promotion
such as the opportunity to receive a premium or enter a competition may provide an
incentive to buy now. The relevant internal psychological process that is associated
with purchase decision is integration. Once the integration is achieved, the
organisation can influence the purchase decisions much more easily.

There are 5 stages of a consumer buying process: The problem recognition stage,
meaning the identification of something a consumer needs. The search for
information, which means you search your knowledge bases or external knowledge
sources for information on the product. The possibility of alternative options,
meaning whether there is another better or cheaper product available. The choice to
purchase the product and then finally the actual purchase of the product. This shows
the complete process that a consumer will most likely, whether recognisably or not,
go through when they go to buy a product.

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Buying decisions of consumers also depend on the following factors:

 Messages, advertisements, promotional materials, a consumer goes through


also called selective exposure.
 Not all promotional materials and advertisements excite a consumer. A
consumer does not pay attention to everything he sees. He is interested in only
what he wants to see. Such behaviour is called selective attention.
 Consumer interpretation refers to how an individual perceives a particular
message.
 A consumer would certainly buy something which appeals him the most. He
would remember the most relevant and meaningful message also called
as selective retention. He would obviously not remember something which
has nothing to do with his need.

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LIMITATIONS:

Inconsistency

 One of the biggest drawbacks of relying too heavily on consumer buying behavior
is that consumers rarely apply the same steps in the same way for every product and
service purchase. This makes it more difficult for marketers trying to stimulate a
need or to offer messages that enhance the likelihood of a purchase for their brand.
Thus, most companies have to perform more research into their particular market
segments and how they approach their brand.

Limited Buyer Interest

 Another primary limitation for marketers using the consumer buying behavior model
is that consumers sometimes are much less involved in a purchase decision. For
instance, someone buying laundry detergent is generally less involved in the
purchase than someone buying a car or washer and dryer. Thus, the ability of
marketers to affect consumers by analyzing buyer behavior is limited. Consumers
that are less involved spend less time seeking or viewing information about the
purchase.

Social and Cultural Influences

 Marketers spend significant time trying to interpret consumer buying behavior


related to their products, but they must also understand how each given customer is
influenced externally by social relationships and culture. Selling barbecue to
Americans for the Fourth of July is fairly predictable. However, knowing how a

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given customer is influenced by family, friends and their community for purchases
of appliances, food and household items is significantly more complex.

Applying Stimuli

 In its "Buyer Behavior" overview, MMC Learning points out that marketing tries to
respond to consumer buying behavior by communicating with stimuli expected to
elicit the desired consumer response. For instance, a fast food restaurant may
promote its late night drive through window to inspire a desire from the market for
a late night meal. Unfortunately, MMC Learning notes that buying behavior involves
a number of complicated psychological variables related to consumer perception,
motivation, learning, memory, attitude and personality. Accurately predicting
response to a given message often demands significant marketing research and focus
group studies.

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Health Care

Health care or healthcare is the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention


of disease, illness, injury, and other physical and mental impairments in human
beings. Health care is delivered by practitioners in allied
health, dentistry, midwifery(obstetrics), medicine, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, p
sychology and other health professions. It refers to the work done in
providing primary care, secondary care, and tertiary care, as well as in public health.

Access to health care varies across countries, groups, and individuals, largely
influenced by social and economic conditions as well as the health policies in place.
Countries and jurisdictions have different policies and plans in relation to the
personal and population-based health care goals within their societies. Health care
systems are organizations established to meet the health needs of target populations.
Their exact configuration varies between national and subnational entities. In some
countries and jurisdictions, health care planning is distributed among market
participants, whereas in others, planning occurs more centrally among governments
or other coordinating bodies. In all cases, according to the World Health
Organization (WHO), a well-functioning health care system requires a robust
financing mechanism; a well-trained and adequately-paid workforce; reliable
information on which to base decisions and policies; and well maintained health
facilities and logistics to deliver quality medicines and technologies.[1]

Health care is conventionally regarded as an important determinant in promoting the


general physical and mental health and well-being of people around the world. An
example of this was the worldwide eradication of smallpox in 1980, declared by the

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WHO as the first disease in human history to be completely eliminated by deliberate


health care interventions.

Primary care refers to the work of health professionals who act as a first point of
consultation for all patients within the health care system. Such a professional would
usually be a primary care physician, such as a practitioner or family physician, a
licensed independent practitioner such as a physiotherapist, or a non-physician
primary care provider (mid-level provider) such as a physician assistant or nurse
practitioner. Depending on the locality, health system organization, and sometimes
at the patient's discretion, they may see another health care professional first, such
as a pharmacist, a nurse (such as in the United Kingdom), a clinical officer (such as
in parts of Africa), or an Ayurvedic or other traditional medicine professional (such
as in parts of Asia). Depending on the nature of the health condition, patients may
then be referred for secondary or tertiary care.

Primary care is often used as the term for the health care services which play a role
in the local community. It can be provided in different settings, such as Urgent
care centres which provide services to patients same day with appointment or walk-
in bases.

Primary care involves the widest scope of health care, including all ages of patients,
patients of all socioeconomic and geographic origins, patients seeking to maintain
optimal health, and patients with all manner of acute and chronic
physical, mental and social health issues, including multiple chronic diseases.
Consequently, a primary care practitioner must possess a wide breadth of knowledge
in many areas. Continuity is a key characteristic of primary care, as patients usually
prefer to consult the same practitioner for routine check-ups and preventive
care, health education, and every time they require an initial consultation about a
new health problem. The International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC) is a

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standardized tool for understanding and analyzing information on interventions in


primary care by the reason for the patient visit.

Secondary care is the health care services provided by medical specialists and other
health professionals who generally do not have first contact with patients, for
example, cardiologists, urologists and dermatologists.

It includes acute care: necessary treatment for a short period of time for a brief but
serious illness, injury or other health condition, such as in a hospital emergency
department. It also includes skilled attendance during childbirth, intensive care,
and medical imaging services.

The "secondary care" is sometimes used synonymously with "hospital care".


However many secondary care providers do not necessarily work in hospitals, such
as psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, occupational
therapists or physiotherapists (physiotherapists are also primary care providers and
a referral is not required to see a physiotherapist), and some primary care services
are delivered within hospitals. Depending on the organization and policies of the
national health system, patients may be required to see a primary care provider for
a referral before they can access secondary care.

For example, in the United States, which operates under a mixed market health care
system, some physicians might voluntarily limit their practice to secondary care by
requiring patients to see a primary care provider first, or this restriction may be
imposed under the terms of the payment agreements in private or group health plans.
In other cases medical specialists may see patients without a referral, and patients
may decide whether self-referral is preferred.

In the United Kingdom and Canada, patient self-referral to a medical specialist for
secondary care is rare as prior referral from another physician (either a primary care

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physician or another specialist) is considered necessary, regardless of whether the


funding is from private insurance schemes or national health insurance.

Allied health professionals, such as physical therapists, respiratory


therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, and dietitians, also generally
work in secondary care, accessed through either patient self-referral or through
physician referral.

The health care industry incorporates several sectors that are dedicated to providing
health care services and products. As a basic framework for defining the sector, the
United Nations' International Standard Industrial Classification categorizes health
care as generally consisting of hospital activities, medical and dental practice
activities, and "other human health activities". The last class involves activities of,
or under the supervision of, nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, scientific or
diagnostic laboratories, pathology clinics, residential health facilities, or other allied
health professions, e.g. in the field of optometry, hydrotherapy, medical massage,
yoga therapy, music therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, chiropody,
homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, etc.[18]

In addition, according to industry and market classifications, such as the Global


Industry Classification Standard and the Industry, health care includes many
categories of medical equipment, instruments and services as well as biotechnology,
diagnostic laboratories and substances, and drug manufacturing and delivery.

For example, pharmaceuticals and other medical devices are the leading high
technology exports of Europe and the United States. The United States dominates
the biopharmaceutical field, accounting for three-quarters of the world's
biotechnology revenues.

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The public health system in India comprises a set of state-owned health


care facilities funded and controlled by the government of India. Some of these are
controlled by agencies of the central government while some are controlled by the
governments of the states of India. The governmental ministry which controls the
central government interests in these institutions is the Ministry of Health & Family
Welfare. Governmental spending on health care in India is exclusively this system,
hence most of the treatments in these institutions are either fully or partially
subsidized.

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Health Care Product

Because of the current competitive environment, health care providers (hospitals,


HMOs, physicians, and others) are constantly searching for better products and
better means for delivering them. The health care product is often loosely defined as
a service. The authors develop a more precise definition of the health care product,
product line, and product mix. A bundle-of-elements concept is presented for the
health care product. These conceptualizations help to address how health care
providers can segment their market and position, promote, and price their products.
Though the authors focus on hospitals, the concepts and procedures developed are
applicable to other health care organizations.

Here are some companies which sell health care product:

Every day, millions of people around the world enjoy the benefits of products from
the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies. Very likely, someone in your
family is one of them.

Your family’s health and well-being is our passion. That’s why our companies offer
the world’s broadest range of health care products. Whether you have a skin blemish
or sniffles or a serious medical condition, you and the health professionals you trust
can turn to our companies’ products for comfort and care.

In your home, products from our consumer health companies brighten your smile,
add luster to your hair and ease that nagging headache. You can rely on us to help
keep baby fresh, sooth an irritating itch, or relieve an aching muscle.

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In operating rooms and laboratories, doctors and nurses, too, rely on products from
our medical technology companies. They use these products to perform hip
replacements, implant coronary stents, and run tests for metastatic breast cancer that
give people hope for a longer, more active life. These products help those help
people conquer life-threatening obesity, ward off colon cancer, and control their
diabetes. The list goes on.

And products from our pharmaceutical companies have likely helped someone you
know. These prescription medicines treat a wide array of conditions, ranging from
migraines and rheumatoid arthritis to cancer and serious infections.

Whatever your family’s health care needs, the Johnson & Johnson Family of
Companies is at your side.

The Himalaya Drug Company is a company established by M. Manal in 1930 and


based in Bangalore, India. It produces health care products under the
name Himalaya Herbal Healthcare whose products include ayurvedic ingredients.
It is spread across locations in India, the United States, the Middle East, Asia and
Europe. While its products are sold in 90 countries across the world. The products
are dispensed globally and thoroughly researched in the Bangalore facility and other
prestigious universities globally.

The company has more than 70 researchers that utilize ayurvedic herbs and minerals.
A Hepatic drug, named Liv.52, is its flagship product, first introduced in 1955.
Liv.52 to date has now over 200 human clinical trials. Himalaya Global Holdings
Ltd. (HGH) is the parent of The Himalaya Drug Company worldwide. It is also the
global headquarters of all Himalaya subsidiaries.

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Dabur is today India’s most trusted name and the world’s


largest Ayurvedic medicine & related products manufacturer and Natural Health
Care Company. Today, Dabur has a portfolio of over 381 trusted products spread
across 21 categories and over 1,000 SKUs. Dabur was founded in 1884 by Dr. S. K.
Burman, a physician in West Bengal, to produce and dispense Ayurvedic medicines.
Dr. Burman designed Ayurvedic medication for diseases such as cholera and
malaria. Soon the news of his medicines traveled, and he came to be known as the
trusted 'Daktar' or Doctor who came up with effective cures. Dabur India's FMCG

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portfolio today includes five flagship brands with distinct brand identities: Dabur as
the master brand for natural healthcare products, Vatika for premium personal
care, Hajmola for digestives, Real for fruit-based beverages and Fem for facial
bleaches and skin care.

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HISTORY OF HIMALAYA DRUG COMPANY:

Himalaya's story began way back in 1930. A curious young man riding through the
forests of Burma saw restless elephants being fed the root of a plant, Rauwolfia
serpentina, which helped pacify them. Fascinated by the plant's effect on elephants,
this young man, Mr. M. Manal, the founder of Himalaya, wanted to scientifically
test the herb's properties.
With no money and only a pocketful of dreams, he pawned his mother's jewelry to
buy a hand-operated tableting machine. The years that followed were a time of
endurance and a test of the young man's patience, strength and passion. He spent his
days learning about herbs from neighborhood healers and his nights working on the
machine to make a few hundred tablets. His vision was to 'bring the traditional Indian
science of Ayurveda to society in a contemporary form'.

In a time when herbal products were regarded with skepticism, our founder's belief
in the healing power of herbs was unwavering. He felt that if people were offered
safe and effective herbal medicines, they would come to accept them as part of their
healthcare routine. He believed that herbal medicines could and should be evaluated
on the same quality and efficacy parameters as conventional medicine. This was
possible through empirical research. Once scientific research proved that herbal
products worked, even doctors could be won over. This was a big dream with big
challenges. But he persevered on despite the obstacles.

After four years of researching the herb Rauwolfia serpentina, Serpina®, the world's
first natural antihypertensive drug was launched in 1934.

The discovery set the future course for Himalaya. It taught us the value of scientific
research. It also taught us the importance of patience, passion and perseverance. We

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have since focused on converting Ayurveda's herbal tradition into a range of


proprietary formulations dedicated to healthy living and longevity.

In 1955, Himalaya introduced Liv. 52, a liver formulation that ensures optimum liver
function. The product soon became our flagship brand and a top selling herbal
medicine. Other brands soon followed including Cystone, Bonnisan and
Rumalaya forte, products that went on to become household names.

In 1999, Himalaya entered the personal care segment under the brand name
'Ayurvedic Concepts’. This was unchartered territory which brought with it new
challenges and new opportunities for learning. People around the world were waking
up to the benefits of herbal and natural products for their personal care needs.
Himalaya had close to seven decades of research experience in herbal medicine and
this legacy had helped us understand the world of herbs. The prospect of entering
the personal care space was therefore exciting. We wanted to give customers herbal
personal care products that were mild, gentle, and hard-working and steeped in
science! Our guiding philosophy was to develop a range of personal care products

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rooted in Ayurveda and backed by research, a mainstay of the Himalaya brand. By


remaining true to our research ethic, we built credibility for our range of herbal
personal care products and gained the trust of our customers.

With our expanding range of products and growth in international markets,


Himalaya underwent a rebranding where the entire range was brought under a single
umbrella- Himalaya Herbal Healthcare. With the present portfolio of
pharmaceuticals, personal care, baby care, well-being and animal health products,
Himalaya has evolved into a 'head-to-heel' herbal wellness company.

After close to 80 years, we remain committed to enriching the lives of people who
use our products. Himalaya's therapeutic products have brought relief to people
suffering from ailments like liver disorders, diabetes to kidney stones and joint
disabilities. Our personal care range captures the best in nature and science, giving
our customers products that are gentle, effective and safe for long-term use. Our
vision is to offer wellness in every home and for the whole family through our herbal
healthcare.

Today, the Himalaya brand is synonymous with safe and efficacious herbal products.
Starting off operations in Dehradun way back in the 1930s, the company later spread
its wings to Mumbai and across the country. In 1975, the company set up an
advanced manufacturing facility in Makali, Bangalore, India. In 1991, the company
relocated its R&D facility to Bangalore.
We operate in over 90 countries, our products are prescribed by 400,000 doctors
worldwide, and millions of customers trust us for their health and personal care
needs. Himalaya Global Holdings Ltd. (HGH) is the parent of all Himalaya
subsidiaries.
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Our logo is a visual definition of our brand identity. The leaf that forms the crossbar
of the letter H represents the company's focus on herbal healthcare. The teal green
reflects our closeness to nature, while the orange is evocative of warmth, vibrancy
and our commitment to caring.

The Himalaya brand represents wellness, both internal and topical. Our range of
head-to-toe healthcare and personal care products spans the entire wellness
spectrum, offering gentle, safe and efficacious care.

Each and every product that carries our logo is backed by the high quality that is
Himalaya's hallmark. It promises good health, well-being and a prescription for good
living. Our logo symbolizes a promise delivered.

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With a history spanning eight decades in the area of herbal research, Himalaya
shares a close relationship with nature. We are in the business of not only
promoting good health but also safeguarding the health of our planet. Ever since
our inception, we have taken great care to protect biodiversity, collect herbs in a
sustainable way and promote good agricultural practices.

Every year, 300 million Himalaya products enter the homes of consumers around
the world. With a range of over 300 healthcare and personal care products including
brands like Liv.52, Cystone, and Bonnisan, we touch the lives of millions of
customers worldwide, giving them products that help them lead healthier, enriched
lives.

MISSION:

Himalaya's mission is to make herbal wellness a part of every home. We want to be


the most trusted company in scientific herbal healthcare and most admired for our
ethics, values and commitment to sustainability.

Our mission statement reads:

Establish Himalaya as a science-based, problem-solving, head-to-heel brand,


harnessed from nature's wealth and characterized by trust and healthy lives.

Develop markets worldwide with an in-depth and long-term approach, maintaining


at each step the highest ethical standards.

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Respect, collaborate with and utilize the talents of each member of the Himalaya
family and the local communities where Himalaya products are developed and/or
consumed, to drive our seed-to-shelf policy and to rigorously adopt ecofriendly
practices to support the environment we inhabit.

Ensure that each Himalaya employee strongly backs the Himalaya promise to exceed
the expectations of the consumer, each time and every time. Nothing less is
acceptable.
At the heart of the Himalaya mission is the belief that good health should be
accessible to everyone, and we strive to make this possible through our commitment
to science-driven herbal healthcare.

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MOTIVE:

Life at Himalaya is about being committed to integrity, accountability, fairness,


transparency and innovation.

Integrity: We value the trust our customers, business partners and other
stakeholders have placed in us. By being truthful, consistent and honest in everything
we do, we honor this trust.

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Accountability: We are accountable both internally to our team and externally to


our stakeholders. Systems and processes help us ensure accountability at every step.

Fairness: We remain firmly committed to our rules and are guided by our ethics.
This helps us make impartial decisions and treat all parties fairly.

Transparency: Being open in our dealings is integral to our work ethic. Whether it
is interacting with farmers who grow our herbs, vendors who supply us materials or
customers who buy our products, we believe that transparency helps us make
partners for life.
Innovation: Bringing ideas out of the lab and into the real world is the kind of
innovation we pursue. It inspires us to discover new medicines and develop new
products that go onto make life healthier and happier for people.

EMPLOYEES

Himalaya's founder firmly believed that the success of an organization depended on


the quality of its people. The best minds produce the best results. His belief was to
hire bright, passionate individuals who were ready to take on challenges and think
'out of the box'. By remaining true to this philosophy, we have grown as an
organization and continued to spearhead pioneering research in the herbal space.

Today, we are a family of over 5,000 employees worldwide, including a team of


over 200 passionate and energetic research scientists! Years before the 'equal
opportunity' mantra became popular in industry, we have practiced and promoted
non-discrimination. In fact, way back in 1950 our research department was headed
by a woman. Today, women make up 24% of our management staff. We continue
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to attract people who are talented, driven and inspired by our vision to bring health
and wellness to the lives of the people we touch.

People are Himalaya's most important asset and investing in them is vital to us. From
giving them the creative freedom to push the boundaries of research to fostering a
culture of open communication and diversity, we believe that our nurturing work
environment brings out the best in our team and allows us to develop the best
products.
Each and every Himalaya employee is unique and contributes to the success of the
organization. All of us are committed to making a difference.

We believe that the best results come about only when you wake up each morning
feeling excited about your work! In our area of business, where years of research
can sometimes produce no results, staying motivated comes from one's passion for
their work. It is the passion of our people that has given Himalaya a distinctive edge.

Our founder maintained that when you discover people with pure talent and passion,
you should 'create' a job for them. He believed that it is the people with vision and
passion who drive the success of an organization.

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PRODUCTS

PHARAMACUETICALS

Inspired by Ayurveda, Himalaya's pharmaceutical range, promoted exclusively


through doctors, addresses multiple health conditions. Our 60 strong product
portfolio includes therapeutics, wellness products, prescription dermaceuticals and
oral health products for men, women and children.
The information in this section is not intended to be a substitute for professional
medical advice. We urge you not to use the same to diagnose or treat your
problem.
Our phytopharmaceutials address lifestyle disorders, chronic illnesses like diabetes
and osteoporosis and life-threatening diseases like Hepatitis B. Our complete range
of preventative care products enhance immunity and assist in the management of
health. Derived from herbs, each product is backed by eight to ten years of research,
undergoing clinical trials, mutagen studies and toxicity tests to ensure safety and
efficacy.

Today, Himalaya is ranked thirty-one amongst 500 top pharmaceutical companies


in India. Our brands, Liv.52, Cystone, Bonnisan and Septilin are leaders in their
categories. In fact, Liv.52, a hepato-protective, is the only herbal medicine to be
ranked amongst the top ten bestselling medicines in the country.

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NURTRITION

Himalaya's nutrition health range combines the knowledge of Ayurveda with


modern science, to give children and adults a daily herbal nutritional health
supplement that provides the benefits of scientifically validated age-old herbs along
with essential vitamins and minerals.

ANIMAL HEALTH

Himalaya believes that natural health solutions work best for animals too. To this
end, we offer herbal remedies and daily care products for animals, specifically
livestock, poultry, aquaculture and pets. Our range comprises calcium supplement
for bone development in animals, herbal feed supplement for fish, livestock and
poultry and natural grooming products for your beloved pets.

BABY CARE

Himalaya's doctor-endorsed baby care range of products is produced using naturally


derived ingredients. They are developed and tested to be mild to support baby's
delicate skin, hair and eyes. Baby’s hygiene and comfort are kept as our topmost
priority. The products help address conditions like diaper rash and infantile dry skin.
Specially designed baby care products are divided into 'Pre-Bath', 'Bath' and 'Post-
Bath' categories.

PERSONAL CARE

Himalaya's personal care range was born out of the research strength of our
pharmaceutical products. By bringing the credibility of our pharmaceutical research

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to our personal care portfolio, we offer solution-based products that cater to your
daily personal care needs. The range offers the goodness of natural solutions for
everyday use, with no side effects. Made from herbs that are gentle and safe, our
range includes skincare, haircare, oral care and healthcare products.

RESEARCH

AYURVEDA-THE SCIENCE OF LIFE

Originating from the two Sanskrit words, ayus (life) and Veda (science), Ayurveda
is an ancient healing system originating in the Indian subcontinent that relies on
herbs for maintaining good health. Historical records suggest that the journey of
Ayurveda began in India more than 5,000 years ago, and this traditional system of
healing has influenced both Unani humor therapy conceptualized by Hippocrates
and ancient Chinese remedies.
The science and practice of Ayurveda are narrated in ancient texts, of which the
Charaka Samhita is the principal resource. The Charaka Samhita refers to a large
collection of Hindu sacred texts called the Vedas. Written in the Indus Valley area
around 1000 BC in Sanskrit, the Charaka Samhita is a treatise on general medicine.
This strongly suggests the probability that Ayurveda, though of pan Indo-European
origins, had begun to evolve into a distinct entity within the Indian subcontinent.
Vedic philosophy believes that human beings are all a part of nature. Just as animals
and plants are interdependent on each other to create balance within their beings,
there is a concurrent and inherent connection between the universe and human
beings. Unlike the animal kingdom, human beings live in a more complex, natural
world where they are perpetually exposed to environmental changes. Changes in
weather, society, economy, lifestyle, diet, work, financial status, emotions and

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relationships can easily tip the balance and negatively influence an individual's state.

According to Ayurvedic texts, the human body comprises three body states which
include Vata, Pitta and Kapha. Vata consists of the elements air and ether, which
give us movement and activity. Pitta includes the elements fire and water, which are
responsible for heat, appetite and digestion, and Kapha is characterized by the
elements earth and water, which are responsible for water and other bodily fluids.
When the three body states are in perfect harmony, the individual enjoys good health,
whereas an imbalance in the states causes disease. Ayurveda seeks to address this
state of imbalance through a process of holistic healing.

Herbs are at the heart of Ayurvedic medication. Whole flowers, roots, stems and
leaves are manually processed in various ways to discover their optimal potential.
Over 15,000 herbs are mentioned in the scriptures of which only around 850 are
commonly used in Ayurvedic medicine today. One of the most commonly used
herbs in Ayurveda is Neem. Described as sarva roga nivarini or that which keeps all
diseases at bay, Neem supports the body's natural defense system. Apart from Neem,
Ginger, Amla and Ashvagandha, among others, feature highly in the list of important
plants in this traditional medicinal system.

Historical records suggest that Ayurvedic medicine has paved the way for various
branches of medicine practiced today. Susruta Samhita, another revered Ayurvedic
text, mentions nine branches in Ayurveda-general medicine, surgery, ear, nose and
throat (ENT) and eye disease, toxicology, psychiatry, pediatrics, gynecology,
sexology and virility. Some texts also reveal that ancient natural healers delved into
plastic surgery.

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Drawing from this incredible history, Himalaya's mission is to contemporize


Ayurveda and develop safe and effective products to improve quality of life.

BY THE HEART:

At Himalaya, our scientists are driven by the knowledge that plants have immense
potential and can provide solutions to improve life. For instance, herbal medicines
are typically not explored for the treatment of life threatening diseases. The reasons
attributed are two-fold—the dearth of scientifically-validated herbal medicines and
the lack of awareness about alternative drugs.

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Yet, our scientists are busy researching herbal drugs for conditions like cancer,
depression and women's health, amongst others. Recently, we have launched a drug
for Hepatitis B, a condition that affects 40 million people in India, alone. The drug,
which has taken 14 years to develop, works at an efficacy rate comparable to
allopathic medicines, at a fraction of the price and with no side effects!
At Himalaya, research is not just about breakthrough formulations but also about
filling the gaps in conventional medicine. We believe that herbal remedies can
become the first treatment of choice for some conditions, and at other times,
contribute to a holistic regimen that improves the quality of life. For instance, our
cancer drug presently undergoing trials helps build immunity in patients on
chemotherapy.

Through research, Himalaya has introduced several innovative products. Cystone,


Himplasia and Septilin are some of our breakthrough drugs that are prescribed by
doctors across the world. Cystone, used in the treatment of urinary stones, is the only
herbal drug available for this condition. It is backed by over 90 clinical trials.
Himplasia is the first herbal formulation that controls benign prostate hyperplasia.
The efficacy of these drugs is comparable to allopathic medicines, without any side
effects! While herbs may not provide the answer to all unmet medical needs, they
can make a significant contribution to overall healthcare.

We have applied the research strength of our pharmaceutical products to consumer


care as well. A patent has been filed for our Under Eye Cream. Research is currently
underway to offer a wider range of products in the anti-aging and dermaceuticals
space.

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At Himalaya, we will continue to focus on research and build credibility for herbal
medicines and personal care products. Our customers understand that all our
products are a result of years of research. Today, over four million doctors and
customers in over 80 countries rely on us for their healthcare and personal care
needs.

FORMULATING THE DRUG

All herbal formulations at Himalaya find their roots in classical Ayurvedic texts. A
team of botanists and Ayurveda experts at our R&D center review these scholarly
texts and shortlist suitable herbs for further research. The availability and
sustainability of these herbs are first ensured before research is initiated.

Himalaya's photochemistry team studies the geographical and seasonal variations of


marker profile of these herbs. Active markers within these herbs, which are
responsible for its therapeutic property, may vary depending on whether they are
cultivated or sourced from the wild. Phytochemical profiling is established from
different seasons and geographical locations to ensure batch-to-batch consistency,
good quality and standardization. The quality of herbs is further maintained either
by cultivating herbs under supervision of agricultural scientists or by practicing
sustainable collection and harvesting practices under the supervision of trained
botanists (in case of herbs sourced from the wild). Herbs have to further pass through
stringent quality checks as per internal specifications laid out by our scientists.

With a focus on taking herbal research to new levels, Himalaya's scientists have
adopted bioassay guided fractionation and purification technology to identify the
active fractions. This ensures that the herbal preparation is standardized and
formulation has required levels of bioactive compounds to elicit the pharmacological

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response. This technology will continue to help in identifying photoactive principles


responsible for efficacy, synergy and bioavailability. Himalaya’s scientists are
leveraging this technology for innovative treatments of ailments including cancer,
diabetes and depression as well as for specialized products in skin, oral and hair care
categories.

Super Critical Fluid (SCF) extraction is one of the fast growing technologies for
extracting herbal materials without using chemical solvents. Himalaya’s scientists
are leveraging this technology during research and development for the extraction
of beneficial bioactive compounds. This ensures no solvent residues in herbal
preparation while delivering to the safety and efficacy of the products.

Extracts from single herb or a combination of herbs are initially tested on disease
models of cell lines to evaluate the efficacy of the drug. Once efficacy is confirmed,
these extracts undergo rigorous toxicity tests and mutagen studies to ensure that it is
safe to test on humans. The extracts are formulated into the desired dosage forms
(capsules, tablets, etc.) and then enter human clinical trials. All clinical trials follow
Indian and international norms on human subject testing.

Once safety of the drug has been established, it goes through three phases. The
numbers of patients increase in each phase before the drug is launched into the
Market. In Phase 1, the drug is administered to a small number of healthy human
subjects to assess safety of the formulation. Both Phase II and Phase III studies are
conducted to assess the true efficacy in patients suffering from the disease. These
studies are undertaken in leading hospitals and institutes across the world.

We have conducted clinical trials for our products in leading hospitals in India and
worldwide including the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (Delhi), Apollo

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Hospitals (Chennai), St. John's Hospital (Bangalore), IMS BHU (Varanasi), Mayo
Clinic (Rochester, New York), the Central Institute of Tuberculosis of The Medical
Academy of R.F., (Moscow, Russia), The Novosibirsk Research TB Institute
(Russia), and Charles University (Prague). Himalaya has over 1,200 published
clinical trials in leading international journals including Journal of the American
Medical Association (JAMA), Alternative Medicine, Indian Journal of
Pharmaceutical Sciences, The British Journal of Radiology and Journal of Ethno
pharmacology.
Phase IV studies are also conducted by Himalaya, which involve the safety
surveillance (pharmacovigilance) and ongoing technical support of a drug after it
receives permission to be sold.

INTEGRATED HEALTHCARE

Today, there is growing acceptance of integrative medicine, where traditional


systems of medicine like Ayurveda are dovetailing into conventional medicine to

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provide holistic treatment regimens. Integrated medicine does not accept traditional
medicine uncritically. Instead, it demands as much scientific validation from
alternative medicines as it does from conventional systems of medicine. By bringing
together the best of both systems, integrative medicine gives patients access to
healthcare based on good science, holistic therapies, and curative and preventative
treatments. Herbal medicines are now being used to treat disorders like diabetes,
hypertension and obesity. For diseases requiring long-term treatment, healthcare
professionals, including allopathic doctors, are turning to clinically validated herbal
medicines.

Herbs like Neem and Ginger are being researched for their therapeutic properties in
various research centers in India and all across the world. Scholars from the
Department of Microbiology at the Rajah Muthiah Medical College, Annamalai
University, India, studied the skin supportive effects of the seeds and leaves of the
Neem plant and found the results to be 'statistically significant' (Indian Journal of
Medical Microbiology 2003 Apr-Jun;21(2):98-101).Similarly, scientists at the
Department of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, John A. Burns School of
Medicine, University of Hawaii, noted Ginger's use in supporting the body's natural
response to nausea, calling it a herb that integrates East with West and old with new,
enjoying a reputation as a 'universal remedy' (Hawaii Medical Journal).

It has been our mission to deliver well-researched, clinically tried and tested herbal
drugs from our inception. We have supported the thinking that a traditional system
of medicine can be useful only when it is backed by modern scientific research.
Liv.52, a hepato-protective and Himalaya's flagship brand, is prescribed by
allopathic doctors. In many Russian hospitals, Liv.52 is prescribed as an adjuvant in
the treatment of tuberculosis to address the side effects of medication on the liver.
We believe that Liv.52 attained success due to the research and scientific validation

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backing it. Until today, 195 clinical papers and 81 experimental papers on Liv.52
have been published in medical and peer-reviewed journals worldwide. It is a
registered drug in over 30 countries and the only hepato-protective medicine with a
meta-analysis study in infective hepatitis. Studies show that Liv.52 reduces the
occurrence of hepatotoxic reactions and helps normalize the level of lipid
peroxidation when used as an adjuvant during the treatment of tuberculosis.

At Himalaya, we are committed to delivering well-researched, safe, effective herbal


medicine that is accessible to everyone. We believe that a synergistic approach to
medicine benefits patients by providing them with more effective treatment options,
helping them manage their health better and enhancing their overall quality of life.

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RESPONSIBILTY

CARE FOR HEALTH

Our farmers use organic farming techniques for cultivating herbs. Hundreds of acres
of farmland are protected from pests by natural, organic fertilizers like Neem oil.
Routine application of farmyard manures and vermicompost keeps the soil rich in
nutrients.

As part of the process to restore the Earth’s natural nutrients and control weeds, we
expose the soil to the sun, a process known as soil solarization. Soil that has been
solarized allows plants to draw on nutrients, especially nitrogen and calcium. Seeds
germinate more quickly, plants grow faster and mature earlier, giving higher yields
to our farmers.

CARE FOR GOOD HEALTH

Himalaya has partnered Aarohi, a non-profit organization, working in the remote,


rural areas of Uttarakhand in North India, to promote community health. The
partnership aims at improving maternal and child health in local villages. The
Aarohi- Himalaya Health Initiative, as it is known, seeks to address issues and
complications arising from poor maternal health by providing prenatal and post-natal
care and by improving access to quality clinical services for the rural population.
Additionally, the medical team is also engaged in health education and raising
awareness for nutrition in government schools, located in the interior Kumaon
region. The school intervention programme takes the form of ‘health camps’

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providing basic healthcare including general health checks, monitoring height and
weight, dental screening and deworming.

Supported by this partnership, Aarohi’s team of dedicated doctors conduct regular


health camps and perform different surgeries, free of cost, for the poor people
inhabiting this region. Patients are also referred to Aarohi’s Cottage Hospital (Aarohi
Arogya Kendra) for treatment and medications. Himalaya provides free medicines
to the hospital.We are hopeful this partnership will grow to see a healthy Kumaon a
few years down the line.

CARE FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

Himalaya has received the ISO 14001:2004 certification, the most recognized global
standard for excellence in environmental management.

By setting up a water treatment plant and sourcing water with low total dissolved
solid (TDS) levels, we have reduced water consumption by as much as 17,000 liters
a day.

The energy-efficient design of our warehouse allows for maximum natural light and
saves approximately 120,000 units of energy per year.

By switching to compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) and light emitting diode (LED)
lights at our facility in Bangalore, we now save over 91.69 kilowatts per hour of
energy each year.

These simple but crucial energy saving initiatives have helped us reduce our carbon
emissions by 128,366 kilograms thus far.

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A well-designed network of eight waterwells and 59 recharge pits ensures that


rainwater is collected effectively. The network of percolation pits and well operates
at 90 percent efficiency and has a combined storage capacity of 90,000 liters.
Presently, our entire water requirement is met by two waterwells with an average
generation capacity of 250,000 liters per day.

Rainwater harvesting has helped increase the water table of the surrounding area,
reduced the scarcity of water during the summer months and decreased the TDS
content in the groundwater. High TDS levels leave water unfit for human
consumption and damage crops. The TDS levels in the area surrounding our campus
in Bangalore have reduced from approximately 4,000 parts per million (ppm) in
2008 to 2,150 ppm in 2012.

CARE FOR THE COMMUNITY

Himalaya has engaged over 4,000 small and marginal farmers across India to grow
medicinal herbs. Majority of these farmers have small tracts of land, about three to
four acres, and need support to diversify their crops and generate additional income.
Through the program, they cultivate herbs like Alfalfa, Ashwagandha, Tulasi,
Ginger, Turmeric, Shatavari, Vetiver, Mucuna and Kalmegh.
Working mostly with women farmers who are socially the most disadvantaged,
Himalaya provides technical assistance and training in good agricultural practices,
sustainable herb collection and organic farming.

Farmers are trained through field trials and demonstrations by a team of expert
agricultural scientists. By providing seeds, packing materials and transportation, we
ease the farmers’ burden and reduce their cultivation costs.
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Most importantly, farmers who participate in this program do not have to depend on
intermediaries to sell their produce. Himalaya buys the herbs directly from them and
pays them a mutually agreed price, usually 10-15% higher than the market rate.

Himalaya is working with the local prison authorities in the states of Karnataka and
Andhra Pradesh in India, to rehabilitate inmates. The prisoners cultivate herbs for
Himalaya, earn an income and acquire essential skills. We also provide seeds,
technical assistance and training to the prisoners.

For Himalaya, this program is about giving prisoners a second chance to rebuild their
lives. Most of the inmates own small plots of farmland back in their villages. By
participating in this project, they can reconnect with farming. The aim of the project
is to ease the inmates’ reintegration into society by teaching them skills and helping
build their self-esteem.

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NEWS ROOM

HIMALAYA RECOGNIZED AS A POWER BRAND

Himalaya has formally joined the elite club of India's 100 Power Brands and has
been recognized as the No. 1 player in the herbal healthcare and personal care
segment.

Earlier this year, an independent survey was conducted by Indian Council for Market
Research (ICMR) to find out which brands are most preferred by Indians. Starting
with 20,000 brands, after several rounds of elimination, 1,000 brands were
shortlisted on availability, demand, reach and growth. Over 11,000 consumers across
22 cities in India were asked to rate these 1,000 brands on recall, legacy, goodwill
and impact. Finally, 100 of the most loved brands were awarded the Power Brands
title. Apart from Himalaya, well-known international brands like Apple, Blackberry,
Coca-Cola, Hewlett Packard, McDonald's and Vodafone also feature in this
prestigious list.

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ENTERS THE LIMCA BOOK OF RECORDS

Himalaya's flagship brand, Liv.52®, an herbal formulation for the management of


liver disorders, will feature in the Limca Book of Records 2013, as the highest selling
herbal drug in India, both in terms of units and rupee value.

Backed by 264 clinical studies including a meta-analysis study, Liv.52® has


received widespread acclaim over the years. Today, the drug is prescribed by over
400,000 doctors in India and overseas. In many Russian hospitals Liv.52® is
prescribed as an adjuvant in the treatment of tuberculosis to address the side effects
of anti-TB drugs on the liver. Apart from this, Liv.52® is included by the American
Botanical Council in the ABC clinical guide to herbs. The Interactional office of the
Control of Medicines in Switzerland approves Liv.52® as a pharmaceutical
specialty drug. Liv.52® is registered as a drug in over 65 countries. Marketed as

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Liver care in United States, Liv.52 was awarded the 'Best Supplement' award in 2008

By Better Nutrition Magazine, a leading independent health.

MAGAZINE

The Limca Book of Records, launched in 1990, emphasizes on unique achievements


of Indians and Indian companies within the country and abroad. Records are divided
into multiple categories, which include music, entertainment, human story, radio and
cinema.

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THE READER'S DIGEST TRUSTED BRAND

Himalaya is proud to receive the Reader's Digest Trusted Brand 2011 award in the
Vitamins/ Health Supplements category.

Every year, Reader's Digest conducts its Trusted Brands Survey to showcase brands
that have consistently delivered on quality and reliability. In short, brands that have
earned the consumers trust.

This year, consumers in China, Hong Kong, India, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore,
Taiwan and Thailand were asked to name their most trusted brands in 43 categories
of products and services.

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HIMALAYA HERBALS ENTERS GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD


RECORDS

The Himalaya Drug Company, India’s leading herbal health and personal care
Company, entered the Guinness World Record “for most people receiving a facial
simultaneously”. The record was accomplished by completing 286 facials in
Mumbai today and communicated a strong message on the importance of a healthy
skincare routine.

As part of the record setting activity, 286 students got a complete facial – starting
with a cleansing, toning and moisturizing routine which was followed by a Purifying
Neem facial, conducted by 286 professional beauty experts from Mumbai.
Himalaya’s Pure Skin Facial is an on-going initiative by the brand to engage with
teenagers across the country and create awareness on skin care. The record was
created using this interactive workshop as a platform where students from various
colleges in Mumbai participated in a pampering facial session. Beauty Expert, Veena
Desai moderated the activity and interacted with the audience explaining the step-
by-step facial routine. She also shared interesting tips on skin care and demonstrated
the process of cleansing, toning and moisturizing. The record of 286 facials was
certified at Shri Rang Mandir Grounds by Guinness Adjudicator, Ms. Fortuna Burke.

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THE HIMALAYA NEEM FACE WASH

INTRODUCTION

A soap-free, herbal formulation that gently removes impurities and prevents


pimples. Neem, well-known for its antibacterial properties, kills problem-causing
bacteria, and turmeric effectively controls acnes and pimple. Use regularly for clear,
soft and pimple-free skin. It doesn’t contain any harmful chemicals and is extracted
from the purest form of neem tree. It is only for external use and can be store in a
cool ad dry places. This product can be used by both men and women. It not only
prevents pimples but also cleans up the blacked spots and glows the face.

This is from the renowned Himalaya Herbals brand endorsed by over 250,000
doctors worldwide and used by customers in over 60 countries. Himalaya Herbals
products have been researched clinically and standardized to guarantee
bioequivalence. Bioequivalence refers to ensuring that the product on the market is
equivalent to the one on which clinical trials were successfully conducted. Himalaya
Herbal Healthcare uses chromatographic fingerprinting, one of the most
sophisticated standardization techniques, to ensure consistent quality and
performance.

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HIMALAYA NEEM FACE PACK KEY INGREDIENTS

Each ml contains:
Extracts
Neem (Azadirachta indica) (100 mg) Neem extracts possess properties that prevent
bacteria from growing. The tree stem, root and bark are said to possess astringent,
tonic and anti-periodic properties. In traditional Indian Ayurvedic theray the bark
is considered beneficial in cutaneous conditions. It is used for external applications
for the skin.

Fullers Earth (Multani Mitti) (40 mg) it has cooling and soothing properties.

Turmeric (Curcuma Longa) (20 mg). Is used in traditional Ayurvedic therapy for
its soothing, healing properties

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DIRECTIONS: Moisten face and neck; apply a small amount of purifying Neem
Face Wash and gently work up a lather using a circular motion. Wash off and pat
dry. Use twice daily. Use Himalaya Purifying Neem Pack once a week to rejuvenate
and revitalize your skin.

SIZE:

There are different sizes and price of neem face wash so that everyone can buy it
according to their use. The sizes and prices are as follows:

 15 ml – Rs.15
 50 ml – Rs.55
 100 ml – Rs.100
 150 ml – Rs.160
 200 ml – Rs.210

In year 2013 the company introduced the face wash in a form of foam as well. That
was something innovate and different from before which increased there sale. It was
available in only one size. That was:

 150 ml – Rs.180

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PROS OF HIMALAYA HERBALS PURIFYING NEEM FACE


WASH

 Does almost everything as claimed.


 Has a mild smell.
 Suits all skin types.
 Has neem extracts.
 Cleanses the face nicely.
 Does not cause break outs.
 Helps to slow down the rate of occurrence of pimples, to some extent.
 Herbal and natural

REVIEW

Purifying Neem Face Wash comes in a transparent plastic tube which has a dark
green colored flip-open cap. The packaging is very simple and neat.

The face wash is light green in color and has the appropriate consistency. The face
wash lathers well and a small quantity is enough to cover the face and neck.
Himalaya Neem was my first face wash and I used to like it a lot, initially. But later,
I replaced this face wash with Clean & Clear Foaming Face Wash. At present, I have
again used this neem face wash for 10 days to re-live my experience of this cleanser.
I do not know if Himalaya Neem actually has turmeric but I am certain that there are
neem extracts in this. The face wash cleanses the face properly and leaves a faint
neem smell for a while.

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It generously removes dirt, grease and oil from the face. It does not clog the facial
pores. It works to slow down the occurrence of pimples but it has near to no effect
on the existing pimples. However, the face wash cannot battle against oil. Right after
using the face wash, my face begins getting oily again within 20 minutes or so. This
thing bothers me a lot.

Still, considering its price, I cannot complaint much. Himalaya Purifying Neem is
budget friendly and an average face wash.

ADVERTISEMENTS

 Television Advertisement
 Radio Advertisement
 Online Advertisement
 In-store Advertising
 Celebrity Advertisement

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OBJECTIVES

The specific objectives of the study are as follows:

 To examine the quality of health services in India.


 To examine the status and problems of health services in India.
 To study the access of health services across the economic strata, gender and
space.
 Understand and use methodologies.

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QUESTIONNAIRES

Which skincare product do you use?

Forever
Face wash
Clean & clear face wash
Himalaya
Himalaya face wash
vicco
garnier
None
The Body Shop
Neem Facewash
Anisolar
No products.
Patanjali
Oriflame
Clean n Clear
Fair n lovely
Nivia
Himalaya
Shaving Cream
Garnier

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What do you look for in a skincare product?

Extracts from which the product is made. Price and quantity.


User friendly, no side effects, price, quality
Clenzing, refreshing and no side effects
Removes my tan and protects my skin from dirt and sun
Prevents my skin from getting pimples and removes scars
Nothing as such! It shouldn't harm my skin
Price
Hygienic, natural
Safety
Minimum chemical, yet effective
Facewash
It should be Refreshing
Oil removal
Naturally derived product
Skin nourishment and ayurvedic stuff which can make my skin healthy and keep it
glowing.
Mildness
No marks, no pimple & fairness
Chemicals
To protect my skin and keep it clean and nourished
Which makes my skin soft and glowy
More Natural ingredients

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If you are not a Himalaya customer, what are the reasons for you to prefer the
current face wash product you use?

I am a Himalaya user and I love the product


Price factor and better results
Better brand and refreshing
I haven't tried it yet so I can't give my views about it
Himalaya neem face wash is too main stream and cheap
I am one
It's better in quality and the packaging is better than most of the other face wash.
It only gives a flow to my skin for a week but not more. My skin looks dull after
using it for sometime

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As we can see that 88% of the people are comfortable with Herbal/Ayurvedic
products and only 12% of the people use allopathic.

So, as per the graph we can see that people buy face wash because of pimples and
the glow of the face.

And out of 26 people 6 only buy for moisturize and 3 goes for fairness.

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More than 95% of the people are satisfied with there current product and others
want to replace it with Himalaya products.

As you can see 96.2% of the people very well know about Himalaya face wash
product.

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As we can see that 53.8 of the people have used Himalaya neem face wash and had
a very good experience.

The above graph shows that TV/Newspaper has more influence than any other
advertisement that attracts and alerts the customer about the product.

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After using and see the growth and trust of the company 65.4% of the people would
like to recommend the face product over any other face wash to their family and
friends.

The graph shows that medical stores and general stores makes more sale over
supermarkets and online. It is convenient for the people to buy the product.

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Yeah, people do think that the packaging of the Himalaya neem face wash is
appealing. But still there are some suggestions from the people.

Suggest one modification to the packaging of the products?

No suggestion
No modifications required
-
None
It's Perfect
Gota Friendly
Aroma should be sweeter
Everything is perfect I feel
It should get more stylish and attractive which makes it an appealing product
It should get more attractive
Very bad product.
It should provide more quantity

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Even the pricing of the product is reasonable for 76.9% of the people.

Still there might be something which is missing in Himalaya neem face wash that is
not stopping the people from buying the face wash product over any other product.

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CONCLUSION:

 Almost everyone’s preference is for Herbal product and majority goes for
allopathy.
 The advertisement of the product is not that attractive which affects the sale.
 Most of the consumer buy other product because they only focus on glow and
Himalaya focuses on pimples more than glow.
 According to 80% of the people find the price of Himalaya face wash
reasonable.
 The packaging of the Himalaya neem face wash is attractive as well and shows
ecofriendly colour.
 The Himalaya face wash user would love to recommend the product to others.

SUGGESTIONS:

 The company can do research and development to improve their product.


 The company can expand its market with more advertisement and involving
celebrities in their ads.
 There should be more promotional activities.

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ANNEXURE

WEBILOGRAPHY

https://www.wikepedia.org

https://www.icmrindia.org

https://www.himalayawellness.com

http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com

`BIBLOGRAPHY

Service Sector Management- Vipul Publications

Principles Of Marketing- Vipul Publications

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