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The Sweet Shop Syndrome Well so long and thanks for all the metal (resin, trees,
The Sweet Shop Syndrome
Well so long and thanks for all the metal (resin, trees, plastic,
glue, paint) and all the other things that have been so much of
my world as I punched out Wargames Journal over the last 6
years. From Issue 10 Rich Jones will take the helm (or should
it be steering wheel!?) of Wargames Journal. Rich has a huge
passion for this hobby of ours and I know for a fact that he is
not only planning on having lots of fun running WJ, but also
has a great number of cool ideas for content.
and sundry contact Rich to offer up articles, be it reviews or
scenarios, historical pieces, paint/modelling guides and so on.
He’s got helpers lined up but he can’t create it all on his own.
Plus, it is the views of other gamers that make it interesting
for others - not just what we think about wargaming. We’ve all
got a wargamers story to tell, so why don’t you tell us yours!
This last issue under my control is a mixture of new articles
and the old - as in lots of my favourite articles that I have
pulled out of the print versions of WJ for the enjoyment of
those who were not subscribers. That’s why this Issue is 170
pages in size. Our free advert offer for Issue 9, by way of
an introductory ‘Hi, we’re back’ message, has generated a
fantastic response, so thanks to those companies who took
the time to send is an advert or two. We’re hoping that from
Issue 10 many of these companies will remain with us as
advertisers.
On a personal note I’m doing a lot of naval gaming at the
moment, dabbling with space combat and killing lots of
Greeks and Persians. I even managed to extract a downed
chopper crew from Mogadishu the other day as well. That
said, I managed to wipe out a Platoon of my US Paratroopers
the other day during a particularly abortive scenario - what an
exciting life I lead!
We mentioned on the web site that with 2007 well and
truly behind us we’re all looking forward to a great year of
Wargaming, not that it seems there is much left. Time seems
to move on relentlessly and as you read this we are entering
into May already, which is amazing as it only seems like
yesterday that I got over the madness of Christmas. I’m still
going to be dabbling with WJ as it moves forward, writing
articles and helping out with the layout, but other projects and
more importantly family life have taken a priority with me.
Things I’m looking forward to in my wargames calendar
include more ancient gaming, Rich has me playing Impetus
and Field of Glory, and the new Seven Year War rules from
Barry Hilton have me primed to leap into this period. I’m
tempted to give the 28mm scale a miss here and go for a
smaller scale, but I just can’t make my mind up. I reckon this
is a common theme amongst wargamers, the Sweet Shop
Syndrome. Standing there looking at all the pretty things, your
money burning a hole in your pocket
all
we’re missing is a
parental voice saying ‘you don’t have to spend your money
now.’ Yeah, right! As if
Take care and happy gaming.
As for content inside WJ I would heartily request that all
Neil Fawcett,
WJ Production Monkey
Contact: neil@rebelpublishing.net

Rich Jones, Editor (aka Bossman) Mr Jones has been writing articles and hurling dice our way for years. He’s assumed a larger role which we hope sees his infectious passion Rich Jones, Editor (aka Bossman) for wargaming rub off on us all! for wargaming rub off on us all!

Neil Fawcett, Production Monkey Taking a semi-backseat roll on the magazine these days the man with too many toys now assumes the task of designing and layinbg WJ out on a regular basisNeil Fawcett, Production Monkey

Stephen Rhodes, Art Bloke The wargaming newbie who has caught the bug for white metal and dice. Currently gravitating towards all things AWI and ACW, Stephen is our Master Map MakerStephen Rhodes, Art Bloke

Adam Todd, Creative Chap Graphics and illustration supremo Adam will be called upon to help Stephen make every issue of WJ as Adam Todd, Creative Chap pretty as possible. Adam’s passion is for WWII gaming pretty as possible. Adam’s passion is for WWII gaming

Contacting Wargames Journal

Editorial enquiries and submission guidelines can

be obtained from:

Rich Jones (rich@rebelpublishing.net)

Neil Fawcett (neil@rebelpublishing.net)

Advertising enquiries go to Katie Bennett:

katie@rebelpublishing.net

Administration issues go to Katie Bennett:

katie@rebelpublishing.net

Main office number is +44 (0) 1458 835685

No part of this magazine may be reproduced (exceptforreviewpurposesorwherepermission is granted) without prior written consent of the publisher. Material published herein does not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rebel Publishing Ltd, its employees or editorial staff. Most product names are trademarks owned by the companies that publish those products. Use of the name of any product without mention of trademark status should not be considered as a challenge to such status.

12 IN THE SHADOW OF HISTORY This scenario is based around a little known incident

12 IN THE SHADOW OF HISTORY This scenario is based around a little known incident which in historical terms has been understandably eclipsed by the concurrent relief of the siege of Derry. In wargaming terms it lurks deep in the shadows beyond the Battles of The Boyne and Aughrim. It is particularly interesting because of its size and the nature of the encounter which could be described as a running battle. I have chosen to compile a brief historical background to place the scenario in context.

historical background to place the scenario in context. 148 UFO Terror - Part 2 In Issue

148 UFO Terror - Part 2

In Issue of our print magazine we covered the ground forces of S.H.A.D.O, the top secret agency that guards Earth against alien attack in Gerry Anderson’s classic TV series. Now John Treadaway of the South London Warlords lets rip in space as Interceptors and UFOs go head-to-head with this superb set of combat rules.

UFOs go head-to-head with this superb set of combat rules. 168 The Hard Option! latest thing

168 The Hard Option!

latest

thing to hit wargaming is hard plastic multi-part figures. No longer just for fantasy or sci-fi gamers, hard plastics are hitting the historical scene.

Plastics

that

is

The

are hitting the historical scene. Plastics that is The 130 The War in Burma This game

130 The War in Burma

This game won Best of Show at the Crisis wargames show. The owners of the game got all creative on some images and we thought you might like to see them.

R E G U L A R S

89 - Product Reviews

10 - Opinion Piece

116 THE BATTLE OF CHARTIERES

This is a fictitious 1815 Napoleonic scenario, using the Age of Eagles Napoleonic Fire and Fury Rules variant recently designed and published by Colonel Wilbur (Bill) Gray, and based around the original Fire & Fury rules designed by Richard Hasenauer.

We played the game using 15mm miniatures and this article is packed full of images taken during the testing of the scenario. Read on to see what our four intrepid commanders thought of their performances. It makes for interesting reading and painful for the French!

It makes for interesting reading and painful for the French! 36 Knights of the Sky Try
It makes for interesting reading and painful for the French! 36 Knights of the Sky Try

36 Knights of the Sky

Try out our complete WWI aerial combat game. We’ve given

you the rules, the aircraft, the templates and all you have to add is some dice and a few hours to shoot each other out

let’s shoot

of the sky. Tally Ho that fokker!

O T H E R

A RT I C L E S

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WWII Naval Rules

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Sir Jacob Astley

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Brush Strokes

134

Rearguard Action

112

A Portable Game

60

Warmaster Napoleonics

33

Make an A-Frame Hut

52

Peninsular in 40mm

160

Dyrrachium

164

Orcs on the Wall

in 40mm 160 Dyrrachium 164 Orcs on the Wall 54 The Merville Battery This is a

54 The Merville Battery

This is a great WWII scenario that has it all. The mission goes wrong, the officers know of its importance and still go ahead, the odds stacked against them! We present the scenario for the Rapid Fire 2 rule set.

them! We present the scenario for the Rapid Fire 2 rule set. 6 Wood! Lee Lowe

6 Wood!

Lee Lowe gets all frothy over painting wood and shares with us some of his tips for making spears look more like wood and less like shafts of brown paint that were added as an afterthought.

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shafts of brown paint that were added as an afterthought. 5 64 Operation Punch Out Wacht

64 Operation Punch Out

Wacht am Rhein was a formidable battle plan, audacious and crazy all at the same time. You can imagine the German commanders looking through fearful eyes at the Fuhrer as he detailed the plan for the first time on October 11th, 19.

detailed the plan for the first time on October 11th, 19. 136 Fancy Stuff Converting minis

136 Fancy Stuff

Converting minis is an easier task than you may at first think. Here Dave Lewis takes a 5mm scale figure and takes it from the realm of ‘simple’ and adds a cloak and fancy shield detail. Suddenly an ordinary figure stands out from the crowd!

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The simple piece of wood, why write an article on how to paint it? This is my reason why: spears, shields, arrows, buildings, trees and boats to name but

a few items that you could end up painting. Wood is something you will find pretty much in any gaming genre and can be the most dominant feature of

a gaming board.

As sculpting and casting has become such a fine art these days many miniatures and terrain pieces come with wood detail already cast on them and I find the easiest way to paint these pieces is by dry brushing.

WHAT IS DRY BRUSHING?

Dry brushing is a very quick way of painting wood but can also be used to paint chain mail and many other features of a miniature. Dry brushing can be as easy as painting on two different colours or as complex as painting on many shades and weathering.

To dry brush you simply start of by undercoating the figure with your preferred colour. In this painting example I have chosen to work from a base colour of Games Workshop Chaos Black. I have chosen black because if you miss bits it does not stand out as much as a white base coat would - and with dry brushing this can easily happen!

Once the base coat is dry I painted the whole of the area in Foundry (F) 13A Spear Shaft Shade. Once this was dry, I applied the first layer of dry brushing (F) 13B Spear shaft . To dry brush you simply add paint to the brush covering the top end of the bristles and then paint a piece of cloth or tissue until it looks as if there is no paint left on the brush. Some painters are known to use the brush against their skin (in the area of the hands) until the cracks of the skin begin to show. I find this too messy.

You then brush lightly over the chosen area until you are satisfied with what you have achieved. I tend to use a soft flat headed brush that’s a good size for the area I am about to dry brush. Don’t worry about using expensive brushes as dry brushing kills your brushes quickly, cheap one’s work just fine for this. (See images 1 & 2)

For the second dry brush I followed the same sequence, this time using (F) 13C Spear shaft light and I just apply it in the same fashion as the first dry brush. (See image )

As the figure is a forest goblin you would think his living conditions where probably quite damp and dirty, so to reflect this on the wood I gave a slight dry brush of (F) 29C Moss light. If you don’t have this colour to hand you could use a simple Ochre colour with a tint of green which will work just as well.

As you can see from the images there is a metal rim around the shield so I decided to dry brush a shadow using the base colour (F) 13A Spear Shaft shade mixed with a dab of (GW) Chaos Black. With a smaller brush I dry brushed around the rim of the shield where the metal meets the wood. To finish off I use a very watered down wash of the same colour I just dry brushed with, washing it over the shield to blend it in, shading the wood grain quickly and simply. (See image )

The metal of the shield was painted using NMM (Non Metallic Metals) but that’s an article for another day. Now we have looked at painting wood using the dry brushing technique lets take a look at how we can paint a spear or object that has no sculpted detail on it to dry brush.

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PAINTING WOOD WITHOUT DRY BRUSHING

Using the same miniature as before, we now concentrate on the spear. You can see it’s just a pole with no detail sculpted onto it to resemble grain, unlike the shield which gave us plenty to work with. What I hope to achieve here is to paint a nice wood effect, but without taking hours on it.

As with the shield I used (GW) Chaos Black as the undercoat and once dry I gave the spear a complete coat of (F) 13C Spear shaft light. You will note that I started in reverse to the normal Foundry paint technique, with the light colour as my base coat. The next phase is to create a fake grain using a darker shade, so the process is almost reversed from dry brushing where you start off with the dark colour. (See image 1)

Once the base colour is dry and the first fake grain effect applied I decided that I wanted to make the spear look old and slightly rotten as I doubt you would find a Wood Goblin running around with a perfectly straight, varnished pole, unless he stole it of course! (See image 2)

Now I wanted to add some depth to the wood grain and make it look even more crooked, so with a 75% mix of (F) 13A and 25% (GW) Chaos Black I painted in some dark areas on the spear especially at the base to give the impression of rot setting in. (See image )

To finish of the spear it’s time to bring out the dark areas by adding some light – which sounds crazy, but bear with me. To give a rotten damp feel

I used (F) 29B Moss light which I watered down slightly (not to a wash

consistency) and I painted next to the dark areas so the contrast between dark and light would make each colour stand out, exaggerating the detail, making it more noticeable. With that dry the spear is now complete. (See image )

Painting wood on a miniature is one of those things that you can play about with all day, as there is so much that can be done. I think the key to getting it right is to look at the miniature or scenery and paint it according to the conditions of where they are. Varnish can also play a part here, if you want wood to look old, use a gloss varnish first as it is stronger, but once dry go over with matt varnish to dull it down.

I hope you find this article useful and if it’s taught me one thing, it’s to

respect wood. It might just be a spear or a bucket, but it has its place and deserves as much attention as everything else on a miniature. With that in

mind have fun; I’m off to hug a tree!

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as much attention as everything else on a miniature. With that in mind have fun; I’m

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“I’ve always liked this miniature set from Games Workshop and when I had the chance
“I’ve always liked this miniature set from Games Workshop and when I had the chance
“I’ve always liked this miniature set from Games Workshop and when I had the chance

“I’ve always liked this miniature set from Games Workshop and when I had the chance to paint one up for a commission I jumped at the chance. As you can see old Treebeard is a lot of wood and I wanted to create the effect of weathered age and gnarled wood. To get this effect I used many, many stages of dry-brushing, incorporating many tones of brown before the final colour stage of pale green (like the Foundry Moss I used in this article). It took a long time to finish this guardian of the forest, but it was worth every hour!”

Moss I used in this article). It took a long time to finish this guardian of

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I was posed a question by Neil Fawcett about whether

I would feel comfortable taking part in wargames that

represented events that were either very recent, current or that may have a personal effect on me. A number of scenarios were discussed, such as the re-fighting of Pegasus Bridge at a 1:1 ratio and then actually naming each figure, i.e. would you want to be responsible for the death or wounding of a named character? Another scenario included operating in a modern scenario that was still current, such as the hills and caves of Afghanistan, the dust of Iraq or political quagmire of the Middle East.

Being a member of HM Armed Services I am required to be available to carry out these tasks for real and for me the aforementioned questions generally do not cause many problems. Military personnel have to be able to practice and train tactics, techniques and procedures all the time. All available means are employed and this includes tabletop exercises directly equating to the hobby of wargaming. But there are many gamers out there who may face conundrums when re-enacting certain events or indeed attempting to see what would actually happen if Israel were to fully invade Lebanon in order to seek and destroy Hezbollah. Would it be right to wargame that?

As I continued my rummaging I came across Neil’s 1982 Lebanon War set of miniatures. I’d heard about these:

rather a beautiful set of vehicles, miniatures and buildings, and I got to thinking about whether I’d game this 25 year- old conflict now, as in while the current conflict is active (at time of writing). I have to say I would and I set myself the task of persuading the guys at Wargames Journal to run some articles.

Whilst ferreting around in Neil’s snooker/gaming room at his home I found a 10mm doodlebug and launcher model

- Pendraken I believe. My family lived in South London

during WWII and hence were subjected to both the Blitz and the subsequent V1 and V2 campaigns. An interesting dilemma surfaced when I pondered the idea of playing the Spitfire pilot chasing and shooting down these rockets, or the Germans defending a launch site against Allied forces.

For me it was less about whether I felt it was ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ and more about whether I wanted to. I don’t feel

it would be wrong to play the Germans in this scenario; a

bit limiting maybe and certainly much more fun to be the Spitfire pilot, whizzing around tipping the rockets off their trajectory or blasting them away.

Next I found Neil’s latest figures: some 0mm scale US Marines that are current for the last 10 years of action. Nice miniatures that are oh-so-current …so is it ok to game these guys? Again, yes it is, well to me anyway. It’s a game and it’s not real and therefore I also think the magazine should run modern articles that use these miniatures.

Ethics can be seen to have two levels. Some are absolute and hence are immovable, and include ideas such as the Ten Commandments – no matter where you are in the world these commandments are literally set in stone. Some are relative and hence carry caveats about where one draws the line. An example may relate to the concept of punishment and revenge, where in one society capital punishment is expected and in another it is abhorred. As members of society we all carry responsibilities about our behaviour and conduct, and there are consequences that would need to be faced if we crossed certain behavioural lines. As gamers, at what point does our behaviour and ethical attitude quite simply become wrong?

Some people look at wargames and can remain very detached about the whole experience - apart from when their brilliantly painted and nicely flocked unit of Imperial Guard Grenadiers break when attacked by Spanish conscript militia! Others get quite upset when viewing a game that may appear to be too close to the line. But what is that line? Are under 16’s who play first person computer shoot-‘em-up games crossing that line, especially when their mission places them in the front line of Iraq or Afghanistan as a member of a special forces team with objectives that may be morally challenging? This is often digital carnage and very, very graphical.

These are some questions that many of us in the wargaming hobby may have faced or have yet to do so. They will always resurface and need addressing as each new member of the community appears. Healthy debates are always worth having and quite simply starting an argument can be fun – but be prepared for the consequences. One day you will be challenged, whether you want to be or not, so perhaps it is almost a duty to prepare your own moral ground in support of your chosen hobby.

I’ll leave you with some questions that should allow us to continue the debate either now or perhaps at a later date:

1. What ethics do you attach to your views about warfare?

Have you even bothered to think it through yet?

2. Is the study and practice of warfare (including wargaming) morally wrong?

. Should games and war be separated or can they combine?

. Is chess the most morally corrupt game in the world due to its representation of the death of a country’s ruler?

5. Or is it just a game? So let’s just get on with it

Major Dave Fielder Royal Marine Commandos

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Sir Jacob Astley was a mainstay of King Charles I’s Oxford Army during the first round of English Civil Wars, 162-5.

Astley was born at Melton Constable in Norfolk and first saw action with Sir Walter Raleigh’s expedition to the Azores in 1597 at the age of 18. Three years later he was fighting the Spanish at the battle of Nieuport. Knighted in 162 by King James I, Astley saw further action during the Thirty Years War serving under Gustavus Adolphus. In 169, at the invitation of Charles I, he returned to England to fight in the Bishops’ Wars. Things did not go according to plan for the English. Astley commanded the infantry during the defeat at Newburn which led to the loss of Newcastle to the Scots.

By the time Astley joined King Charles at Nottingham in August 162 he clearly had a wealth of professional military experience upon which to draw. In the first major engagement of the war at Edgehill (2rd October 162) the Earl of Lindsey, the Royalist foot commander, flew into a rage at what he perceived to be Prince Rupert’s perpetual interference, effectively resigning his command. Lindsey would die at the head of his regiment in the ensuing fight. Astley, who had previously tutored Rupert while on the continent, took command of the foot. As the guns opened that afternoon, Astley muttered a battle prayer:

‘O Lord! Thou knowest how busy I must be this day: if I forget thee, do not thou forget me’.

After the inconclusive fight, Astley remained in command of the Royalist foot for the remainder of the First Civil War. As befits a professional soldier he, along with Rupert, tried to instil greater discipline into the Royalist forces, though they could not completely rid the army of the numerous gentlemen amateurs whose cash and titles bought them commissions. A g o o d competent, professional soldier, when it came to politicking

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Astley often lacked the ability to counter the arguments of those in the king’s circle with less combat experience than himself.

Astley went onto fight at Gloucester and first Newbury in 16 and Arundel and Cheriton the following year. At second Newbury he was instrumental in the defence of Shaw House, then oversaw the retreat of the Royalist Army back to Oxford. In thanks Charles raised him to the peerage as Baron Astley of Reading in November 16.

At Naseby Astley once again commanded the Royalist foot and after the defeat fought in the West and Wales until finally captured in March 166 at Stow-on-the-Wold, the last battle of the First Civil War. After the battle Astley, smoking his pipe while seated on a drum, famously remarked to the Parliamentarian forces:

“Well, boys, you have done your work, now you may go and play - if you don’t fall out among yourselves.”

When the Second Civil War broke out in 168 Astley, by now 69, would not break the parole he gave after Stow-on-the-Wold. Sir Jacob Astley died at Maidstone in February 1652.

The Vignette This superb vignette was painted by Martin Robson who has been dabbling with painting wargame figures on and off for nearly 20 years. Martin has a keen eye, as you can see from these models, and a passion for military history. He completed his BA and PhD in the department of War Studies at Kings College London and then joined Conway Maritime Press as Project Editor while undertaking postdoctoral research as a Caird Senior Research Fellow at the National Maritime Museum.

He was co-editor of The Age of Sail and has contributed to many publications. We are looking forward to Martin creating a number of articles for Wargames Journal in the near future.

Martin added, “The figures to the left are from the excellent Bicorne Miniatures range with the flag from GMB Designs. The majority of the paints used were Foundry, with the odd Vallejo, Coat d’Arms and Games Workshop colour. Although the Foundry three stage paint system is to be recommended, I prefer to give a good darker base coat to each colour. For example, for the flesh I used Foundry Spearshaft as a base, followed by the Foundry Flesh colours. It is surprising the different subtle tone differences that can be achieved by just varying the base coat. Give it a go!

Once complete the figures were varnished with Humbrol Gloss Enamel to give a good protective coat (these figures are for gaming, not just sitting in a cabinet!), then two coats of Daler Rowney Cryla Matt to give a flat finish. Use a flat brush to really work the varnish into crevices, then work it out – don’t let it pool.

When everything was dry I used PVA to stick them onto a large GW round plastic base. Once set I used Unibond tile grout (spice coloured) to texture the base. This was highlighted with Vallejo Cork Brown, then Sand Yellow. Once dry, PVA was applied and the base dunked in hairy grass.”

Check out http://shrimproll.blogspot. com for more images.

Introduction This scenario is based around a little known incident which in historical terms has

Introduction This scenario is based around a little known incident which in historical terms has been understandably eclipsed by the concurrent relief of the siege of Derry. In wargaming terms it lurks deep in the shadows beyond the Battles of The Boyne and Aughrim.

It is particularly interesting because of its size and

the nature of the encounter which could be described as a running battle. I have chosen to compile a brief historical background to place the scenario in context. My sources for this were ‘A Jacobite narrative of the war in Ireland’ (a project from the history department of University College, Cork), ‘The popular history of England’ (Charles Knight, 1859), the recent Osprey title ‘The Battle of the Boyne’, Alan Sapherson’s ‘William III at war in Scotland & Ireland and a variety of military and historical websites. Although broadly in agreement these sources do conflict markedly on detail not only in the sequence of events on the day but in the number and composition of the troops involved.

Rather than see this as a problem I have looked on it as an opportunity for flexibility in terms of the Orders of Battle I offer for the scenarios. I was working to

a very tight deadline to finish this article and had

originally intended to bang it out in short order as a

brief two page wargaming guideline but the research element drew me deeper and deeper into the subject and proved to be a very rewarding exercise in itself. As at the time of writing I have been unable to find any single body of text which draws together the various elements contained herein or which attempts to analyse from a military perspective, some of the anomalies in unit organisation. To that end, the article may be able to claim some original thought and research which adds to a deeper understanding of the battle.

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Historical Background In March 1689 James II landed in Ireland to continue the long struggle to regain his lost throne. There was no Williamite field army on the island but of course several Protestant enclaves had already crystallised as points of resistance. Derry is by far the most well known of these in modern times. It was laid siege by an enthusiastic but ill equipped Jacobite Army one month after the Stuart King landed and was to remain so for over three months. By 28 th July 1689 the situation was critical and if the siege had continued the city would most probably have fallen within a matter of days. This would have provided an enormous fillip to the cause of James II but as it turned out, the morale boost fell to the Williamites as the city was re-supplied on July 28 th and the siege lifted finally on the 31 st . In summary, much military activity was going on at sea and on land across the north of Ireland in the summer of 1689. It was undertaken by several sub commands of both sides who were working theoretically in concert but often in practice were not.

Another important location of Williamite resistance was the town of Enniskillen in County Fermanagh. The garrison here quickly formed into regiments and began actively mounting raids on the Jacobite lines of communication. The Jacobite general Justin McCarthy the newly promoted Viscount Montcashel was sent by the Earl of Tyrconnel with a small ‘flying camp’(sic) consisting of four thousands of horse, foot and dragoons (some sources say 5,000) to capture Crum Castle about 16 miles from Enniskillen. The reduction of the castle would have made the taking of Enniskillen easier but Montcashel found his command wanting in terms of artillery and the position of the castle made it difficult to capture. After some bloody frontal assaults and close quarter fighting he gave up and headed north west in the direction of Enniskillen.

The Jacobite plans were known to the enemy probably through espionage and treachery and the garrison of Enniskillen had already sallied forth under the competent English officers Wolseley and Berry to attack their potential besiegers. It is thought this Williamite force numbered some three thousands of foot and horse and so initially was inferior in size to that of Montcashel. On the march, the bulk of Montcashel’s horse and dragoons were operating as a vanguard under Brigadier Anthony Hamilton. Hamilton’s command had previously been independent and had only recently amalgamated with that of Montcashel. Both leading elements unexpectedly collided on the road at a place called Lisnaskea (some sources say Hamilton was lured into an ambush following an initial success) and began to engage. Montcashel with the main body of Jacobites, was still some way distant. Hamilton after a brief fight gave an order which he later maintained was ‘wheel left’ but which was delivered by Captain Lavallin as ‘to the left about’. The former order would have resulted in the Jacobite horse retiring upon their main body, the actual order resulted in the cavalry turning tail and leaving the field with the brigadier!

This military blunder resulted in the hapless Montcashel now finding himself outnumbered and having to take rapid measures to avert disaster. The Jacobites retired through Newtownbutler burning it to deny cover to their pursuers. The distance between Lisnaskea and Newtownbutler is between five and six miles. Assuming that the main Jacobite body was between the two settlements at the time of the cavalry clash is fairly safe as subsequently Montcashel is described as retreating through the latter. Just how far behind his cavalry vanguard he was, is impossible to determine. The retreat may however have taken a couple of hours.

Neither the time of day nor prevailing weather is mentioned specifically in any of the accounts. Montcashel then apparently took position on some high ground to the south of the town. One source describes him placing his body of troops on a pass(sic) which traversed a morass. On one flank beyond the morass lay a wooded area although which flank is not clear. He placed two or three light guns across the road blocking the causeway and braced the guns with a troop of Horse behind. On either flank he placed

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his Foot. His force was now perhaps composed of 2,500 – 2,900 men (sources say that after his cavalry was chased off Jacobite numbers were inferior to the Protestant forces). The Williamites came on, taking some casualties but halted on the far side of the morass.

One source says Wolseley sent forward his horse, forced the causeway, captured the guns and compelled the Jacobites to flee after a single hasty volley. Another says he sent some of his infantry around the Jacobite flank and through the woods. These appeared unexpectedly, and the shock caused the Jacobite force to turn tail and run. Yet another says that infantry crossed the morass, took out the guns thus allowing the cavalry to cross by the causeway. John Kinross in his book makes no mention of Lisnaskea and has Hamilton’s dragoons driving Berry and the Protestant vanguard back on Wolseley. The Jacobites take up position but the Protestants attack first with infantry, killing the gunners and at this point the Jacobite dragoons turn tail and flee leaving Montcashel to pick up the pieces. Despite this title being quite obviously a specialist study of the campaigns of 1689-91 the description of the action at Newtonbutler seems the least well researched and is at odds with almost every other source. What is not in dispute is that Montcashel was wounded and captured.

Afterwards both Brigadier Hamilton and Captain Lavallin (the officer who had transmitted the order to the vanguard) were brought to trial. The brigadier was acquitted but the captain was put to death still protesting that he had delivered the order exactly as requested. One source states casualties on both sides were light. Whilst another puts Protestant loses at 70 killed and wounded and the Jacobites at 1,400 (equating to as many as 50% of the total combatants) lost in a bloody pursuit along with all drums and colours!

Scenario construction The scenario offers some excellent wargaming potential. The troops on both sides will be overwhelmingly classed as inexperienced. The force sizes are small and the battlefield is not typical. I have created a basic scenario with three additional options. All are listed below;

1. The battle fought as per history

2. The return of the routed Jacobite Horse later in the battle

3. The battle fought with both forces at full

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strength from the outset 4. The cavalry clash fought separately and having an influence on the troops available for the subsequent main engagement.

To provide additional variety, the scenario can be played either as a regimental sized action or as a company level engagement. I use Beneath the Lily Banners for both levels of game but 1644 is a rule set which also suits the game type well. Any rules which you are comfortable with will fit but I strongly recommend you follow the scenario specific guidelines later in the article to prevent a very quick and one sided experience. If BLB is used at regimental level then the game will be rather small and over in a couple of hours. The rules however allow small actions like this to be fought at company level. In this case the game would be quite large and may take four to five hours. I have listed the orbats for both scales of game. These can be adapted for any rule set you prefer.

Figure to man ratios Beneath the Lily Banners uses a 1:35 figure to man ratio at regimental level. In the rules I suggest an alternative of 1:5 for company level actions but for this scenario I would recommend 1:10 be taken as

rules I suggest an alternative of 1:5 for company level actions but for this scenario I

the norm. This is mainly due to historical evidence pointing towards oversized troops, squadrons and regiments being present at the battle. It thus makes the rule mechanisms easy to transpose. In the larger scale action a 6 figure cavalry squadron would equate to 210 men. This ties in nicely with Sapherson’s estimate of largish dragoon troops numbering 60-70 all ranks. Three troops being the standard subdivision of a squadron at this time makes the arithmetic quite neat. At the company level the 6 figure wargaming cavalry squadron would be the equivalent of 60 men which is close to the oversize troop structure mentioned in sources.

Foot regiments in BLB are normally composed of three 6 figure stands. In the large action figure to man ratio this would equate to 630 men – considerably lower than the 920 man regiments we are assuming to be present at Newtownbutler but typical of field battalion strengths throughout the Wars of 1688- 1697. One way round this is to ignore the anomaly! A second is to give the Jacobites all five foot regiments named in the website orbat source I mention at the end of the section on Notes on the Jacobite Force later in the article. Another way would be to form two twelve man (two 2 x 6 figure stands) commanded

to form two twelve man (two 2 x 6 figure stands) commanded shot units and attach

shot units and attach them to the Jacobite army. This takes care of the cumulative 870 ‘surplus headcount’ across the three large foot regiments. The Protestant Army I have dealt with differently as I believe enough corroborative evidence exists to allow them three foot regiments of average strength for the period and theatre. In gaming terms that means three BLB infantry battalions each of three 6 figure stands, the central stand being armed with pike.

With regard to infantry strengths in the company level scenario, an infantry company was composed in theory of 70 men. In Ireland at that time between one in six and one in two men could have a pike dependent on how well or poorly equipped the unit was. Using the 1:10 figure to man ratio previously suggested infantry companies would muster a meagre 7 figures. Not only would this be very brittle and difficult to manage in gaming terms but it would look unattractive on the table. I recommend the following solution. Combine the companies in each battalion into sub divisions of three companies. Each subdivision of three companies will be represented by three figure bases each of six figures. The companies can be assumed to have massed their pikes in the centre and placed a wing of shot either side in the standard way a pike and shot unit would deploy. Four of these subdivisions would make a regiment and can operate semi independently on the table. The final ‘company’ should be musket armed (one six figure stand) and be attached to the Colonel or operate independently. Effectively a battalion of figures under the normal BLB organisation becomes three companies for the company level game. The orbat is laid out using this logic. With 1644 the units can simply be constructed using the appropriate number of figures.

Note on unit strengths, composition and Orders of Battle. The Orders of Battle are somewhat conjectural and compiled by me. I have been able to discover only one source of names for the regiments present at the battle which although useful, threw up several anomalies which make its provenance somewhat questionable. When in doubt, I chose to base units on typical compositions of forces in the field during the conflict. For the company level scenario I have cut the Protestant foot regiments down to 10 companies each to keep the ratio of troops proportional to the Jacobite units. An alternative was to reduce the number of figures per company which is easy to do if your collection is singly based or you re-fight the battle using 1644. If you have a multi based collection

15

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like my own and are using a rule system which shoots

by ‘firing groups’ like BLB, then to keep the firing groups (of 6 in this case) intact it is easier to remove

a number of entire groups to keep the ratios right and

the rule mechanisms working. A final alternative would be to deploy all of the companies but treat each base of figures as representing 4 or 5 figures to begin with regardless of how many actual figures are on the stand. This way attrition will remove firing groups at

a quicker rate.

Notes on the Jacobite Force Sapherson states that Montcashel’s force consisted of

a dragoon regiment, some horse and three regiments of

foot – about 5,000 men. He also states that in the initial

contact of the two vanguards Berry scattered thirteen troops of dragoons under Hamilton. This is curious and potentially contradictory in itself. Elsewhere in the organisation section of his book Sapherson lists as part of the Jacobite Army six dragoon regiments and mentions two others. On paper they should have either six or eight troops each, although one has 11 troop captains listed in its roster. Another is cited as having twelve troops present at the Boyne. He concludes that units may have fielded more than their established number of troops. All of this is logical but the battle evidence offered goes beyond even these potential estimates of over strength units.

One could deduce that there were actually less than thirteen troops ‘scattered’ at Lisnaskea (and that someone somewhere over time has exaggerated the Jacobite strength) or, that there was one regiment which had at least thirteen troops (possible but not probable) or, that there was more than one dragoon regiment represented in Montcashel’s force or, that some of the mounted troops in the engagement where in fact horse and not dragoons. Working from official establishments of the time a troop of dragoons would at full strength be roughly 60-70 officers and men. Thirteen troops could then field 780-910 men, possibly more if a lot of volunteers were available.

Sapherson concludes that some Jacobite dragoon regiments may have fielded as many as 800 men each in the early stages of the war. These numbers should not be dismissed but must be treated with caution as figures presented in the same book for Williamite dragoon regiments in the same period of the conflict produce average troop strengths of 56 all ranks and 403 all ranks in a regiment.

Before dealing with the Horse the infantry deserve

20

some scrutiny. The Irish regiments of James were built on the English model; thirteen companies each of 60 to 70 men plus a regimental staff giving on paper between 790 - 920men per regiment. If Montcashel had three regiments of this size, that makes between 2,370 and 2,760 foot. It is possible that the regiments were bigger if the oversize dragoon regiments can be taken as an indicator of Jacobite enthusiasm for the cause but actual strengths listed for identified units elsewhere in the book rarely if ever reach these levels. The average for battalions in the field is between 600 and 650, far less than my minimum stated theoretical establishment figure of 790 above.

If we add together the dragoon total of 910 with the

foot total of 2,760 we get 3,760. There were some light guns which with crews, wagons and transports may have amounted to 100 men maximum. This

force is described by one source as a ‘Flying camp’ the implication being that it was travelling light. If we assume little in the way of wains and hangers on, that leaves us either 240 Horse if the approximate 4,000 figure is to be believed or 1,240 Horse if the 5,000

is accepted. I prefer to go with the lower strength for

the Jacobites for two reasons. Firstly, winners write history and it would be in the interests of any cause to create the impression that their own smaller force defeated a vastly superior enemy. Secondly, if the

Jacobites did in fact have 910 dragoons and roughly 1,200 horse then up 50% of their force would appear to have been mounted. Even by the norms of the period, where cavalry were much more numerous, this figure seems high.

I offer this analysis not as a study in pedantry but to allow gamers to draw their own conclusions about the composition of Montcashel’s force whilst still offering my own OoB for those disinclined to reach for calculator and reference book.

I have chosen to give Montcashel a regiment of

Horse and use as justification the fact that Horse

and Dragoons are cited in every source and that Sapherson’s indefinable ‘some horse’ could be anything from a troop to a regiment.

The only source I could find which actually named the Jacobite regiments present was a website http://

mackays1626.com/Site/Dumbartons166085-677.html

belonging to a Jacobite re enactment group based in Virginia. They have a detailed order of battle for the armies of both sides in Ireland during the period 1688-91. Not only are the regiments listed but also the engagements known for each unit. This is very

useful but creates more problems for those who like clarity. The site lists the following Jacobite foot regiments as being present at Newtownbutler:

Viscount Montcashel’s, Fielding’s, O’Bryan’s, Richard Butler’s and Dillon’s. What is curious about this is the site also states that all of these regiments entered French service on April 18 th 1689. The Battle of Newtownbutler took place on July 31 st 1689. It is possible that the regiments stayed together in Ireland for months after being officially transferred but this seems rather anomalous.

Students of the period will recognise that these five named regiments are those promised by King James II as the nucleus of an Irish Brigade for the French Army in exchange for the French units that Louis XIV sent to Ireland to strengthen the Jacobite army. They are the core of the body which has passed into folklore as the ‘Wild Geese’. The orbat listed is extensive and covers the entire Jacobite army in a 30 month period of campaigning but nowhere does it mention any dragoon or horse regiments present at Newtownbutler thus directly contradicting Sapherson’s assertion of force composition stated earlier. For these reasons and because of the emphasis placed by all accounts on the prominence of cavalry during the entire battle I dismissed this orbat from a Jacobite perspective for my own gaming but have included it in the orbats section for those looking for an alternative.

As a final note if all five foot regiments were present and in the numbers prescribed by regulations, the total would be somewhere in the range 3,950 to 4,550. Add to that 13 troops of dragoons and we are getting nearer 6,000 men excluding any horse and artillery present.

The Williamite Force Even less is known about the Williamite troops as Newtownbutler if the majority of sources are considered. It is likely that they were mostly Enniskillen men as the town was a centre of Protestant resistance or at least that they were local to the County Fermanagh area. It is unlikely that they were uniformed as the regiments were recently raised as part of armed resistance and the area was subject to Jacobite focus and troop movements. A mention later in Sapherson’s book of Inniskilling men being extremely reluctant to swap their red coats taken from the Jacobites for new grey ones from England suggests a policy of acquisition through combat as opposed to supply and provisioning from the authorities or government. These garments were captured early in the war and the quantity was sufficient to clothe two companies

21

who served in Zachariah Tiffin’s Regiment.

It is extremely probable that they were in fact captured during the action at Newtownbutler. Tiffin’s date of appointment as colonel of the regiment is 20 th June 1689, roughly one month before the battle. His regiment was raised in Enniskillen and made up of local men who later fought at the Boyne and Namur in 1695. They marched into history as the 27 th of Foot ‘The Inniskillings’. Other web histories stated that in 1689 the town raised foot and dragoons but no mention is made of Horse. I have crossed referenced several sources but could find no further detail. If Tiffin’s regiment conformed to the norm they would have accounted for 920 men or roughly one third of Wolseley’s force. Dragoons are mentioned and in the clash at Lisnaskea mounted men under Berry chased off Hamilton’s dragoons or horse. There is also mention in at least one source of the Protestants using their cavalry to cross the causeway after the Jacobite guns had been cleared by the infantry moving through the bog. It is possible, but not likely, that a smaller force of dragoons or horse may have been able to chase away nearly 1,000 Jacobite dragoons as Lisnaskea.

Again here I am using logic and probability to deduce as opposed to fact and I would concede that stranger things have happened but it is more likely that the forces were evenly matched. If the Protestant units were raised in line with regulation then two regiments may have met Hamilton’s thirteen troops. I have decided to make these one each of horse and dragoons each having 6 troops or two squadrons. This leaves us with roughly 1,000 unaccounted for troops. The easiest solution is to provide Wolseley with another large regiment of foot.

I have left the data from the re enactors website till last. They state that the following Williamite units were at Newtownbutler; Wolseley’s Horse, Wynne’s Dragoons, Gustavus Hamilton’s, Zachariah Tiffin’s & Colonel Lloyd’s regiments of Foot. This actually tallies a lot closer with what I have discovered by crossing referring other sources. The men are all stated to be Enniskilleners and at typical strengths for the war in Ireland the totals would be around 900 of Horse and dragoons and 2,100-2,200 foot making the 3,000 estimates stated elsewhere believable. My recommendation is that gamers go with this orbat which allows for typically sized regiments and not with the less numerous larger sized regimental theory of the previous paragraph.

The troop ratings for both sides are arbitrary but reflect the fact that the conflict had not long started, most of the Protestant regiments were less than one month old and that the efforts of both sides had exhibited amateurism both at leadership and company level. The Jacobite Horse is widely accepted to have been disciplined, brave and formidable in relative terms. I have listed the Beneath the Lily Banners morale classes and suggest that if BLB is used to play the game at regimental level, players make sure each foot regiment has a central stand of pikemen and is only allowed to fire muskets with two stands of figures.

Orders of Battle for Regimental scale action using Beneath the Lily Banners, 1644 or any other appropriate rules system.

The Jacobite ‘Flying camp’ under Justin Macarthy Viscount Montcashel

Vanguard under Brigadier Anthony Hamilton (Commander rating: Plodder)

Regiment of Dragoons (BLB rating: Raw) 4 squadrons Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Drilled) 1 squadron

Main Body under Montcashel (Commander rating:

Average)

Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Drilled) 1 squadron Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes Command shot (BLB rating Raw) 2 stands of muskets Command shot (BLB rating Raw) 2 stands of muskets

2 Light guns (BLB rating Raw)

The Enniskillen Garrison under Colonel Wolseley

Vanguard under Colonel Berry (Commander rating:

Average)

Wolseley’s Horse (BLB rating Raw) 2 squadrons Wynne’s Dragoons (BLB rating Raw) 2 squadrons

Main Body under Colonel Wolseley (Commander rating: Good)

Zachariah Tiffin’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes Gustavus Hamilton’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes

Colonel Lloyd’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

3 stands of muskets

Orders of Battle for company scale action using Beneath the Lily Banners, 1644 or any other appropriate rules system of choice.

The Jacobite ‘Flying camp’ under Justin Macarthy Viscount Montcashel

Vanguard under Brigadier Anthony Hamilton (Commander rating: Plodder)

Regiment of Dragoons (BLB rating Raw) 13 troops of 6 figures Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Drilled) 3 troops of

6 figures

Main Body under Montcashel (Commander rating:

Average)

Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Drilled) 3 troops of

OR

6 figures

Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Drilled) 1 squadron

Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

Montcashel’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

with pikes

6

figures with pikes)

Dillon’Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

pikes

6

figures with pikes)

Richard Butler’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

with pikes

6

figures with pikes)

Fielding’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

pikes

6

figures with pikes)

O’ Bryan’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw) with pikes

1

company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

22

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

6

figures with pikes)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

6

figures with pikes)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

1

company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

Butler’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

1

company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

6

figures with pikes)

 

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

6

figures with pikes)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

1

company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

2

Light guns (BLB rating Raw)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

6

figures with pikes)

The Enniskillen Garrison under Colonel Wolseley

1

company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

OR

Vanguard under Colonel Berry (Commander rating:

Average)

Montcashel’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

Wolseley’s Regiment of Horse (BLB rating Raw) 6

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

troops of 6 figures

6

figures with pikes)

Wynne’s Regiment of Dragoons (BLB rating Raw)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

6

troops of 6 figures

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

Main Body under Colonel Wolseley (Commander

6

figures with pikes)

rating: Good)

1

company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

Dillon’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

Zachariah Tiffin’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

6

figures with pikes)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

6

figures with pikes)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

6

figures with pikes)

6

figures with pikes)

1

company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

1

company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

Fielding’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

Gustavus Hamilton’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

Raw)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

6

figures with pikes)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

6

figures with pikes)

6

figures with pikes)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

1

company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

6

figures with pikes)

 

1

company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

O’Bryan’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating Raw)

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

Colonel Lloyd’s Regiment of Foot (BLB rating

6

figures with pikes)

Raw)

2

3 companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x Jacobite Objective: 6

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

Jacobite Objective:

6

figures with pikes)

You must hold position and repulse the imminent

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

attack. Victory will be complete if you are able to

6

figures with pikes)

counterattack and drive the Rebels off the field.

3

companies of Foot (2 x 6 figures with muskets, 1 x

6

figures with pikes)

Deployment is shown on the accompanying map

Scenario Option 2: The Battle of Newtonbutler

1

company of Foot (1 x 6 figures with muskets)

1. The game has a limit of 10 turns. As historical

Scenario Option 1: The Battle of Newtonbutler – Historical re-fight Williamite Objective:

You must drive the Jacobite Army from the field. Victory will be complete if you do so without losing more than 50% of your own strength

accounts are not specific about which flank the woods appeared on I have placed woods on both flanks.

– Hamilton returns! Objectives and deployment are as per scenario option:

1. The game has a limit of 10 turns

2

3 squadrons (1 Horse, 2 Dragoons) 12 troops (3 Horse, 9 Dragoons)

4

(1 Horse, 2 Dragoons) 12 troops (3 Horse, 9 Dragoons) 4 The potential return of the

The potential return of the Jacobite vanguard Starting from the beginning of game turn 3 the Jacobite player is allowed to roll two D6 every turn. When the sum total of these rolls reaches 21, Brigadier Hamilton arrives back on the field having rallied his troops.

To determine exactly how many of the vanguard return roll a DAverage and consult the table below:

DAv score

Company size action

Regimental size action

2

1 squadron (Horse)

4

troops (2 Horse, 2 Dragoons)

3

2 squadrons (1 Horse, 1 Dragoon)

8

troops (3 Horse, 5 Dragoons)

25

5

All

All

To determine precisely Hamilton’s point of arrival number the table edges 1-4. Dice using a D4 to locate the arrival. Now divide the chosen table edge into three equal sections. Roll a D3 to locate the precise point of entry. The vanguard will enter in line of troops or squadrons depending on the scenario scale chosen.

Scenario Option 3: The Battle of Newtownbutler

– Conjectural

In this scenario option the cavalry clash at Lisnaskea has never taken place and the two forces meet at full strength in open country north of Newtownbutler.

Lay out a table on flat or gently rolling terrain. A road should run from one long table edge across and exit on the other. Each player must place three terrain features each from the following selection: Small wood, small hill, enclosure, small marshy area. Each player can choose up to three of the same type of terrain piece. Terrain pieces can be placed adjacent to each other. Once this is completed roll off for choice of long table edge. Winner chooses. Players should then draw a map and mark on the disposition of their forces. When this is completed place all troops on the table and begin the game.

There is no turn limit on this scenario. The object for each side is to win the day.

Scenario Option 4: The Battle of Newtownbutler

– Conjectural with preliminary cavalry clash

In this final scenario option the cavalry clash at Lisnaskea is fought out before the main bodies meet. Set up a table as described in option 3. Dice for choice of table edge. Dice for initiative and the winner can choose to place a troop/squadron first or offer this to his opponent. Players should alternate placement until all troops are on the table. The orders of battle for Hamilton and Berry’s vanguards should be used to form each force. Deployment can be anywhere up to the table midpoint on own side of table.

Surprise To simulate the shock of two vanguards bumping into each other unexpectedly use the following method to decide which side keeps its head and maintains the initiative. Each player rolls a D6. The player with

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HWP001 Command Advancing 1, Pickelhaube HWP002 Command Advancing 1, Feldmutz HWP003 Command Advancing 2, Pickelhaube HWP004 Command Advancing 2, Feldmutz HWP005 Mounted Officers Advancing/Charging, Pickelhaube HWP006 Mounted Officers Advancing/Charging, Feldmutz HWP009 Running, Rifle at Trail, Pickelhaube, Full Kit HWP010 As HWP009 but wearing Feldmutz HWP011 Running, Rifle at Trail, Pickelhaube, Light Kit HWP012 As HWP011 but wearing Feldmutz HWP013 Characters Running, Rifle at Trail, Pickelhaube HWP014 Characters Running, Rifle at Trail, Feldmutz

Prussian Line Infantry Skirmishers Advancing

HWP020 Skirmishing Command, Pickelhaube HWP021 Skirmishing Command, Feldmutz HWP022 Skirmishers Advancing & Advancing Opening Cartridge Box, Pickelhaube, Full Kit HWP023 As HWP022 but wearing Feldmutz HWP024 Skirmishers Advancing & Advancing Opening Cartridge Box, Pickelhaube, Light Kit HWP025 As HWP024 but wearing Feldmutz HWP026 Skirmishers Advancing Firing & Advancing Loading, Pickelhaube, Full Kit HWP027 As HWP026 but wearing Feldmutz HWP028 Skirmishers Advancing Firing & Advancing Loading, Pickelhaube, Light Kit HWP029 As HWP028 but wearing Feldmutz HWP030 Line Infantry Skirmishing Characters

Prussian Line Infantry Casualties

HWP040 Line Infantry Casualties 1 (pose/equipment/headgear variations)

26

Mention Wargames Journal when you place your order and you can buy the rules for only £15 plus 4 Euro P&P anywhere in the world! That’s a £5 saving!!!

This offer lasts from April 25th 2008 until May 11th.

27

the highest score is allowed a free move at the start of the game. This can involve declaring charges if any enemy troops or squadrons are within range. Charged units attempting to counter charge take their morale check at a +1(if BLB is used).For other rule sets modify morale test modifiers ‘to counter charge’ in a way that makes this more difficult for the force that has been surprised.

Fight five turns of play. The side which has the most intact squadrons by the end of T5 is deemed to have come off best in the fight. Any squadrons in rout or under 50% strength at the end of T5 are removed from play. Clear the table and follow the set up procedure described in Option 3 to create a new table set up. Once this is done the winner of the cavalry clash can choose which table side they wish to set up on and they can also make the opposing player deploy fully before they themselves deploy. The cavalry remaining intact at the end of the cavalry clash are added back into the main forces and can be deployed for battle.

Terrain The hill should be treated as gentle but giving an advantage to those on higher ground. BLB gives a

28

+1 melee modifier for this. The morass should be impassable to horses and artillery. Foot should treat it as very difficult going and be disordered when in it. Some of the historical sources say that the ground in the morass had dried out sufficiently in the warm summer weather to allow the Protestant Horse to cross but for this scenario I have not allowed it. The woods should be difficult going for both horse and foot. The few buildings on the southern edge of Newtownbutler and the woods should be treated as soft cover and could be represented as burned out cottages.

Table size

If the regimental level game is played I recommend a

6 x 4 foot or 6 x 6 foot table. For the company level game which has far more units I would recommend an

8 x 6 or 10 x 6 foot table in 28mm scale. For a 15mm game these sizes could be reduced significantly.

Deployment The accompanying map shows troop dispositions as

far as can be determined from available sources. As

a variation, players may actually wish to deploy one

or two Jacobite regiments in column of march on the

road out of Newtonbutler but about half way across

the table. The Protestant foot can be deployed on the road also in March column

the table. The Protestant foot can be deployed on the road also in March column but their dragoons and horse may be positioned forward of Newtonbutler and with a possibility of catching the enemy before they cross the causeway and form up with the rest of their army.

Beneath the Lily Banners special rules recommendations BLB has several additional rules which can be used to give this action some further depth and flavour. I recommend the following are used:

Capturing colours and standards p26 Melee modifiers for Jacobite Horse p32 Melee modifiers for Jacobite/Williamite foot p32

If you do not have BLB I suggest that you make the Jacobite Horse superior in melee combat to the Williamites. I also recommend that you give an extra ‘religious antipathy’ melee bonus when the foot of each side charge into combat.

29

Modifying the scenario for other periods.

This scenario could easily transpose into other periods with little or no adjustments. I suggest the following would be easy to do

An AWI early period encounter with locally recruited Loyalists and American volunteers clashing on the march.

ECW early to mid war encounter anywhere in the country with the retinues of important local men meeting as they march towards each other.

An early war ACW clash between large but inexperienced regiments of volunteers perhaps even from the same State.

Results There is enough variation in the scenario options to fight four different games. The sides although not equal are close enough to give each force a chance of winning without being sterile and even on the points or army list principle. I have enjoyed the challenge of this game on several occasions and am certain some of you will too.

References

Books

‘A Jacobite narrative of the war in Ireland’ (a project from the history department of University College, Cork) ‘The popular history of England’ (Charles Knight,

1859),

‘The Battle of the Boyne’ Campaign title 160 (Michael McNally) Osprey Publishing ‘William III at war in Scotland & Ireland’ (Alan Sapherson) Raider Books ‘The Succession of Colonels of the British Army from 1660 to the present day’ (NB Leslie, Society for Army Historical Research, Special publication No11,

1974)

‘The Boyne & Aughrim, The War of the two Kings’(John Kinross), The Windrush Press ‘Irish BattlesAmilitaryHistoryof Ireland’G.A.Hayes- McCoy (Appletree Press) ‘1644’ ECW Rules (Rick Priestley) Wargames Foundry ‘Beneath the Lily Banners’ Fast play wargames 1660- 1720 (Barry Hilton 2008) WordTwister Publishing

Websites

http://mackays1626.com/Site/Dumbartons166085-677.

html

http://www.leagueofaugsburg.com

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1

1

MAKING A SIMPLE A-FRAME HOUSE

Left: The best bit about Dark Age buildings is that they are, generally speaking, pretty
Left: The best bit about Dark Age buildings
is that they are, generally speaking, pretty
simple. We made this one out of balsa wood
and a roll of teddy bear fur! As you can see
it was four pieces and a length of fur that is
long enough to cover the long rectangular
roof sections when assembled.
Below: Assembly is pretty simple and we
used the No More Nails adhesive to hold
it all together. The fur was applied using
PVA.
Below: Now for the really odd bit - making
a mess of the fur by painting it with PVA
glue. This does, if you get it right, take your
fur and turn it into straw!
Below: Once it has all dried the next step is
to give it a base upon which it can reside.
You can simply place it on a flat base or be
a little bit more adventurous. This is a slice
of 50mm polystyrene that has been carved
into a rough shape and then covered in
cat litter! A bit absorbent but it works
well as a rough and cheap basing material.
The A frame building can then be glued
down, some more detailing applied (we
added an outside loo and dug out some old
weapons and shields and glued them to the
base. A quick coat of brown paint and it is
ready for some dry-brushing. As you can
see from our LOTR pictures on page 83 it
blends in easily with the GW figures, but
will work equally well with Saxon figures
from Gripping Beast.

To the soldiers on the ground the aircraft of the WWI pilots must have seemed almost invincible as they flew over the battlefields. But the life expectancy of these brave aviators wasn’t very long and the arrival of men like von Richthofen, Bishop, Mannock, Ball, Immelman, Guynemer and others made the life of the more average pilot very dangerous indeed. We present for your gaming pleasure a complete set of rules covering WWI aerial combat and even if you don’t have any miniatures – well we’ve provided everything you need. Feel free to photocopy the graphics we’ve created and you can also download them at www.wargamesjournal.com

INTRODUCTION

It was a time that needed heroes, men who would take to the

skies in wood and canvas aircraft that usually had a top speed of a little over 100mph. Death was close to the tail of most young pilots but there were the exceptions, men who defied the Grim Reaper and kept fighting on. Names like von Richthofen, Rickenbacker, Guynemer, Bishop, Mannock and Ball were the stuff of aerial legends. These names flew aircraft with names like Fokker, Spad, Albatros, Nieuport and Sopwith Camel.

Above the battlefields of World War I the first aerial dog fighting took place as Allied and German pilots duelled for domination. Planes were a new invention and aerial combat even newer.

So how did it all start? On April 1, 1915 a French pilot by the name of Roland Garros shot down a German Albatros airplane.

His Morane Parasol aircraft had been modified to allow a machinegun to fire forward past the propellers, a design that was specifically for the purpose of aerial combat. Garros had worked with designer Raymond Saulnier to reinforce the aircraft’s propeller blades so that they could deflect bullets from

a forward-firing machinegun.

Garros was to see some success in his role as a dog-fighter pilot, right up until the point when he was forced to land in German territory and, unable to burn his airplane, both he and it

fell into enemy hands. You could say that Garros and his airplane ushered in a new era of aviation.

Following its capture the airplane was taken to Anthony Fokker so he could replicate the system for German fighters. However,

Fokker was not happy with the concept of using a reinforced system, thinking it inadequate for the role, and so he developed

a synchronised propeller system in which the prop would

momentarily stop when the machine gun was fired. The result

of this work was an aircraft called the Fokker E.III Eindecker. Its

premiere on the aerial battlefield was to see German pilot Max Immelman score a kill on August 1, 1915.

As a side note, Roland Garros escaped from a German prison

camp on February 15, 1918 and returned to France. Welcomed

as a hero, the pioneer of aerial combat had come home.

It was to be a bloody period for the Allied pilots as they found themselves helpless against the German planes. Bombing missions into German territory were halted by the French and morale plummeted amongst the pilots who referred to themselves

as “Fokker fodder.” The period of advantage allowed the German

pilots to steadily build up kills and more and more medals were pinned to puffed-out German chests. The aforementioned Max Immelman and Oswald Boelke ruled the skies over France, flying together and practising their aerial combat tactics and

The gaming table can be as complex or as simple as you want it to
The gaming table can be as complex
or as simple as you want it to be.
Here we simply used a 4’ x 4’ grass
board, lined up our Aces and away
we went.

6

techniques. Germany protected its new advantage and an Eindecker was never allowed to cross enemy lines where it might be shot down, captured, and ultimately copied.

The time of advantage, however, ended in 1916 when a German pilot managed to get lost in heavy fog and landed in France. Captured, the plane was dismantled and it wasn’t long before the British launched the Sopwith Strutter and the French introduced the Nieuport 17. The two aircraft used the synchronised system from the captured Eindecker but also combined the synchronised propeller system with stronger engines. Testimony as to how this changed fighting in the skies came with the death of Immelman on June 18, 1916 - the French and the British suddenly announced their reign over the skies.

The change in air power led the German development of the

Albatros D.I, the first airplane developed for the sole purpose of aerial combat. But it took time to bring this machine to bear and

as the war continued in the summer of 1916 Allied airplanes flew

freely over the Front. It had a major impact on the morale of the

German troops on the ground.

Germany’s loss at the Battle of the Somme provoked a swift response from the German military planners, showing it was

a necessity to gain air superiority. National resources were

directed toward Albatros production and Oswald Boelke was called back from a propaganda tour. He quickly organised the nation’s aerial combat resources into Jagdstaffeln, or hunting squadrons, which were commonly known as Jastas.

These units were not attached to any ground units and were moved around, not patrolling the skies but scrambling to reported sightings of enemy aircraft and then hunting them down. This was aggressive aerial combat and it was all based around a set of doctrines created by Boelke, which were basically a set of aerial combat techniques developed to cover attack and tactics.

Pilots for the first Jasta were hand picked by Boelke and within their ranks was a former aerial observer named Manfred von Richthofen, soon to achieve fame as the “Red Baron.” Flying the new Albatros airplanes the Jastas were deadly fighting units and, hitting the skies in the fall of 1916, the first five weeks of action saw Boelke double his personal kill count to 0, but he was to soon die in a midair collision with a squadron mate. Now a new commander took over: von Richthofen.

mate. Now a new commander took over: von Richthofen. The true extent of the Jastas’ power

The true extent of the Jastas’ power came in April 1917 at the Battle of Arras, better known as “Bloody April.” The French had withdrawn their squadrons to rest, having had enough of

a mauling at the hands of the Jastas. The British decided to

fight on, believing that numerical superiority - 85 fighters over

the 11 German fighters - was enough to ensure victory. The

Germans were to smash the British, a staggering one third of its fighter force killed, and the flying life expectancy of a British pilot was a mere 17½ hours.

“Bloody April” forced the British to reassess their aerial combat

strategy, following the Germans in a bid to bring quality and not quantity to bear. The month of April was to see the end (again!)

of German air superiority. A new machine, the Sopwith Camel,

was to take to the skies and this small, light airplane with twin forward-firing machineguns flown by experienced pilots was to make a difference. Then the French arrived with the Spad

XIII and it wasn’t long before the Americans arrived, flying the

aforementioned Spad XIII and the Nieuport 28.

flying the aforementioned Spad XIII and the Nieuport 28. 7 By the fall of 1917 the

7

By the fall of 1917 the war was taking its toll on the German nation and shortages of raw materials had slowed aircraft production.

But this didn’t stop the designers coming up with new designs

and here we have the arrival of the Fokker D.VII, considered by

many to be the best combat aircraft that took to the skies during

the Great War. But large enough numbers were never made and

so its impact on the war was marginal.

THE GAME Knights of the Sky (KotS) is a game for two or more players in which the battle between the first fighter pilots can be recreated. The game is simplistic in nature to enable it to be picked up quickly and played easily. It is ideal for more than two players battling it out at the same time. KotS uses dice and cards to play.

REQUIREMENTS To play this game you’ll need D6s, a tape measure or two, a board of some description and a pack of playing cards. The various cards and reference sheets are supplied in this magazine and will need to be photocopied and mounted onto the cards with some spray mount or other adhesive material. Alternatively they can be downloaded from the WJ web site.

Typically the game is played on a ’ by ’ gaming board and we used 1/100th scale pre-painted Corgi models to play this game

but you can use your own preferred miniatures without needing to adjust the rules. However, if you don’t have any models of your own we have provided you with counters so you can get playing as soon as possible. For the 1/100th scale models we mounted them on 5” hexagonal bases, but if you are using smaller scales you will want to reduce the size of these appropriately.

REFERENCE SHEETS Each aircraft is represented by a sheet, on which all of its necessary information is displayed. These include such things as its current state of damage, pilot lives, how powerful its guns are and any bonuses it gives you when performing manoeuvres. Each player needs one of these reference sheets for his particular aircraft.

a new hex side. This is known as banking and allows the plane

to adjust its heading ready for the next manoeuvre and to also target enemy planes.

Each manoeuvre has a difficulty rating of between 1 and 6, depending on how hard the manoeuvre is to perform. When the order is attempted roll a D6; if the difficulty is equalled or beaten the manoeuvre is successful, if not the plane moves forward one hex distance instead. Players can also voluntarily choose to just move forward one hex instead of attempting a manoeuvre. Certain planes give bonuses to certain manoeuvre attempts depending on the plane’s advantages, so a faster plane will more easily make manoeuvres relating to speed and a more manoeuvrable one can turn more easily.

MANEOUVERING To play this game you will need 8 manoeuvre cards in total

If

If

Use the manoeuvre hex template to determine where the plane ends its movement and what route it takes to get there. If at any

by preparing two lots of cards from sheet one and one from sheet two. These cards then dictate how planes move across

point the plane crosses the path of another roll one, two or three D6s depending on whether the pilot is Novice, Seasoned or Ace.

the gaming board and contain a variety of aerial manoeuvres

all 1’s are rolled the planes collide and are destroyed.

that can be played out during a game turn. At the start of the turn each player draws three, four or five manoeuvre cards

SHOOTING

at any point during a manoeuvre a plane come into another

depending on the skill of the pilot. Of these they must use three during the turn. A Seasoned pilot with four cards can therefore

pick which one not to use, and an Ace selects his best three out of his five cards.

Manoeuvre Cards

plane’s fire lane (this is simple to see by imagining parallel lines exiting the aircraft’s hex from the direction the aircraft is facing)

and the plane can be shot at. This can be as a result of either plane’s manoeuvre but each plane may only shoot once per manoeuvre phase. Measure the range to decide whether it’s close, medium or long range. If the plane is further away than

Novice

long range then it cannot be hit. Roll a number of D6s depending

Seasoned

on the pilot’s skill - one, two or three D6s for Novices, Seasoned

Ace

5

pilots and Aces respectively.

Players play manoeuvre cards at the same time in three

SHOOTING

INCHES

TO HIT

manoeuvre phases. In each phase they secretly select the one

Close

1-12

+

they want to use in the current phase and place it face down

Medium

1-2

5+

on the board. Once all players have done this the cards are

Long

25-6

6

turned over. Aces get to perform their manoeuvre first, followed by Seasoned pilots and finally Novices. Once everyone has

SKILL

D6s ROLLED

performed the manoeuvre the next card is selected by all players

Novice

1

and played out in the same way. This is repeated once more for

Seasoned

2

the third and final card. At the end of a manoeuvre the plane may be turned 5 degrees to either the left or right so that it is facing

Ace

The Camel on the bottom right is about to turn quickly in a bid to
The Camel on the bottom right is about to
turn quickly in a bid to shoot the German

8

For each hit that is caused a number of D6s are then rolled based on the effectiveness of the plane’s machineguns. This is its gun rating. A Sopwith Camel for example has a gun rating of , so that if its pilot scores two hits, six dice will now be rolled. Each roll of + then causes a single point of damage to the enemy aircraft. When the aircraft can no longer take any more damage it is destroyed.

Aircraft have three damage ratings: Light, Medium and Heavily damaged. When the aircraft suffers Medium damage the number of cards the pilot receives is reduced by one, and then a further one when it becomes Heavily damaged, thereby lessening the plane’s overall effectiveness as it sustains more and more damage. If a natural 6 is rolled the pilot has been wounded and loses a wound. When the pilot has no wounds left he has been killed and the plane is removed from play, regardless of how much damage it has left to take. Each pilot starts with wounds, but some Aces may have more.

PLAYING THE GAME You don’t need to worry particularly about scenarios with this game - just get a plane each and start as far away on the table as possible. It’s best to play one-off games with equal pilot skills if there are just two of you, though if you are playing uneven sides in a multiplayer game then the sides can be evened out with the pilot skills. So, you might have two Novice pilots fighting a single Seasoned pilot, or two Seasoned pilots against an Ace.

To make the game more fun it can be played as a campaign, with players starting as Novices on the road to becoming Aces. To do this all players start as Novices and each time they cause a plane to be destroyed they add a kill to their kill count. If multiple players damage a plane it’s the player who actually causes the destroying shot who claims the kill. Once he has got two kills the pilot starts the next game as Seasoned and then at five kills they are an Ace. Then for every five additional kills they gain one roll on the trait table. Roll 2D6 and refer to the trait table to find out

which trait the Ace receives. If a pilot rolls a trait he already has he may roll again. If the second roll is also a trait he already has he may pick one. Once the Ace has all the traits he cannot gain any more. By that point he will equal to the Red Baron himself!

2D6 ROLL

TRAIT

2 Fast Shooter +1 to hit at Close Range when shooting

3 Gunner +1 to hit at Medium Range when shooting

4 Smooth Flyer +1 to Turn manoeuvres

5 Consistent Shot Can re-roll any 1’s when shooting

6 Lucky Devil You get to choose any trait you want

7 Slippery Enemies receive -1 to hit when shooting

8 Trickster +1 to Slip and Immelman manoeuvres

9 Dodge

Any pilot wounds are negated on a D6 roll of

6

10 Speed Demon +1 to Move and Fast Move manoeuvres

11 Marksman +1 to hit at Long Range

12 Trigger Happy Roll an additional dice when rolling for shooting

IN CONCLUSION As you can see the game is very simple and very quick to learn. As with most games arguments may occur and if this happens just roll a dice each and the highest roll decides who is right. Happy flying!

S K Y

L E G E N D S

There are many Aces who served with distinction during the Great War and this list is, in no way, complete.

Erich Lowenhardt Germany KIA – 1918

54 Kills

Erich was a former infantryman who had the misfortune of bailing out of his crippled aircraft, only to find his parachute wouldn’t open.

He wasn’t on the scene for very long but we’ll forever remember his name because he is the inventor of the “Immelman Turn’. He died fighting 7 enemy aircraft.

Oswald Boelcke Germany KIA – 1916

40 Kills

apparently a gifted athlete and his number if kills would have been higher if it had not been for one year of hospitalisation.

Jim ‘Mac’ McCudden England KIA – 1918

57 Kills

Fritz Rumey

 

A former aircraft engineer turned pilot who was

Germany KIA – 1918

His name is not that well known today but Oswald was a true innovator and his rules for

a ‘natural’ pilot.

45

Kills

air combat are still studied today. The first pilot

Billy Bishop

Wounded twice and returning to active duty

Manfred von Richthofen

to use Fokker’s synchronised machinegun in combat.

Canada Survived the war

after both incidents, Fritz was killed in a mid-air collision with an enemy aircraft.

‘Mick’ Mannock England KIA – 1918

72

Kills

Known as ‘The Lone Hawk’ this man liked to fly alone and was a prolific hunter of German

Germany KIA – 1918

61

Kills

aircraft. As Canada’s top ace he accredited his success to practice and great eyesight!

80

Kills

Mick was the top ace for England during WWI.

Known by several titles (the Red Baron, Red Devil or Red Knight), Manfred painted his plane

Despite his amazing tally of kills he was, so it is said, a very humble man.

Eddie Rickenbacker USA Survived he war

bright red to scare his opponents. A prolific

Phil Fullard

26

Kills

pilot, he is the most famous Ace of WWI.

England

Survived the war

As the USA’s top ace, Eddie was awarded the

Max Immelman

15

Kills

40

Kills

Medal of Honour. He once faced off against 7

Germany KIA – 1916

The expression ‘bag the Hun’ is almost too apt for Phil who apparently downed three enemy aircraft before breakfast once. He was

German aircraft single-handedly and managed to shoot 2 of them down.

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SHEET 1

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6

The two 28mm figures come from Foundry’s Darkest Africa range and we have used the Foundry Paint System to create them. Nine colours (3 shades of each) were used in total and a simple basing technique finished them off.

7

1

Having taken delivery of a batch of Wargames Foundry paints I decided that I would play around with its three tone paint system. As I had been

painting some hunters and explorers for the dinosaur hunt article on page I kept two miniatures to one side as the subjects for this Brush Strokes article.

1

The figures are from the Wargames Foundry Darkest Africa range and have bags of character. I picked the cricket chap and the manservant, because they are fun and have some cool details that make them stand out.

2

There was a minimum of mould flash, which I quickly cut off with a Stanley knife. I based them up on two pence pieces with super glue and

glued sand to both the base and two pence pieces with PVA glue.

2

I sprayed them with Humbrol Matt Black aerosol and undercoated them

with Inscribe Acrylics Raven. I tend to be a bit slapdash with sprays, so

I covered the bits I missed with Raven or Burnt Umber, and after all, two layers are better than one.

That is Stage 1 so far, but I decided to paint the base as well. I normally paint the bases at the end of the process, but if you paint a batch of twenty or thirty figures it can be easier to do it first. That way you can drybrush the bases with a large brush.

3

3

I painted the bases with Inscribe Acrylic Burnt Umber and then

drybrushed with Anita’s Acrylic Coffee and Miniature Paints Sand. I painted the edge of the two pence pieces with Raven to clean up where

I had scuffed them while drybrushing. After this all of the paints I used were Wargames Foundry.

4

In Stage 2 I started colour matching between the cricket chap and manservant so that I could use the same colours. I used Dusky Flesh 6A on the manservant’s skin, leaving some black on the face to give shadow. I also used it to paint the bindings on the cricket bat. I used

Flesh 5A on the cricket chap’s skin, leaving some black in his earholes for shadow. I also used it on the bottle lid on the manservant’s platter.

4

In Stage I built up the muscle tone on the manservant with Dusky Flesh 6B and 6C, exaggerating the facial detail with the highlights. I also used them to highlight the cricket bat bindings. I built up the muscle tone on the cricket chap with Flesh 5B and 5C, and also used them to highlight the bottle lid. It irks me to do it, but I put blobs of 6C and 5C on the knuckles of each figure, because it looks striking.

5

In Stage I painted the platter and cricket bat with Spearshaft 1A, while

I painted the mug and cricket chap’s belt with Deep Brown Leather 5A.

On the web site this paint is listed as Brown Leather 5A; I have stated

here what was written on the lid.

5

In Stage 5 I highlighted with Spearshaft 1B and C, and Deep Brown Leather 5B and C. I painted vertical lines on the bat, rings around the rim of the platter and horizontal lines on the mug and belt with each highlight. This helps define the objects, even if what you paint is nonsense(!)

6

In Stage 6 I painted the clothing on both figures with Raw Linen 0A; it

was a bit of an experiment because 0A looks ‘green’. I had committed myself though, and got total coverage of paint on the clothes, rather than having black shadows on it.

8

6

the world’s meanest streets await Ambush Alley is a modern miniature wargame that allows players
the world’s meanest streets await Ambush Alley is a modern miniature wargame that allows players

the world’s meanest streets await

Ambush Alley is a modern miniature wargame that allows players to recreate the intense counter-insurgency actions in an urban environment that have become the hallmark of 21st century warfare. The rules revolve around a universal mechanic that is easy to grasp but supports a high level of detail and rewards sound tactical play. The game’s dynamic turn sequence captures the turmoil of the modern city fight and integrated fog of war keeps things chaotic and unpredictable!

Ambush Alley contains complete rules for all the key elements of modern counter-in- surgency and street-fighting, including:

Civilians on the Battlefield

Full Vehicle Rules

Special Assets & Off-Board Support

Night Combat

UAVs

IEDs and VBIEDs

Building Clearing

And much more!

Ambush Alley includes five scenarios and sample organizational charts for US, British, and Australian forces.

The game can be played at any scale from 15mm up. 15mm scenarios call for a 2’x2’ table, while 28mm games only require a 4’x4’ table.

Ambush Alley is easy on the pocketbook where miniatures are concerned. Few scenarios require more than ten figures for the Regular force and a dozen or so for the Insurgents.

Ambush Alley also offers full solo-play rules, so players can still have fun pushing their figures around the table even when a flesh and blood opponent isn’t available!

Learn more at www.ambushalleygames.com!

blood opponent isn’t available! Learn more at www.ambushalleygames.com! ambush alley games www.ambushalleygames.com 9

ambush alley games

www.ambushalleygames.com

9

O O C C U U 7 7 N N 1 1 T T N
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7 7
N N
D
D
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R
C C
I I
E E
I I
O O
Y
Y
E
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D
D
A
A
U U
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E E
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You break down the blind side and tear

You break down the blind side and tear

through the defence. You're out in the

through the defence. You're out in the

clear. Almost. The only thing standing

clear. Almost. The only thing standing

between you and rugby glory is 120kg's of bone crunching

between you and rugby glory is 120kg's of bone crunching

muscle. You've got the pace, but have you got the guts?

muscle. You've got the pace, but have you got the guts?

Pound your opponents with fearless forward drives, feed

Pound your opponents with fearless forward drives, feed

the ball to your ever elusive backs, chip n' chase, or play

the ball to your ever elusive backs, chip n' chase, or play

it safe and kick for touch. Whatever your rugby tactics

it safe and kick for touch. Whatever your rugby tactics

or game plan Crash Tackle™ lets you decide when to

or game plan Crash Tackle™ lets you decide when to

Make the breaks, force the errors, and

Make the breaks, force the errors, and

take your chances!

take your chances!

www.crashtackle.co.za

www.crashtackle.co.za

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50

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7

In Stage 7 I painted the bulk of the raised areas on the clothing with Raw

Linen 0B. I did the same on large surface areas like the shoulders and skirt. I then painted over 0B with 0C, leaving a generous margin of

0B showing underneath. I also painted irregular shapes of 0C, leaving lines of 0B underneath to give shadow.

7

Raw Linen looks a bit odd, like baby puke or mustard. I would advise trying Canvas 8A, B and C, or Boneyard 9A, B and C. My choice would be Arctic Grey A, B and C, which gives a very clean white finish.

8

In Stage 8 I painted the ‘house colours’ of the cricket chap on both figures. I painted the manservant’s towel with alternate lines of Deep Blue 20A and Orange A. The cricket chap was a bit more awkward. I painted his cap and tie in alternate 20A and A, with an Orange peak on

the tie and both colours in a triangle on the cricket bat.

8

In Stage 9 I highlighted the Deep Blue with 20B and C, and Orange with

B and C. These were fine details, so I painted two thick lines with B on both colours. Then I painted two thin lines with C on both highlights. The shade and light tones of Deep Blue and Orange are quite subtle, so they probably work better on large areas.

9

In Stage 10 I painted the hair on both figures with Arctic Grey A, plus

the cricket chap’s belt buckle and the label on the bottle. At the same time as this I painted the bottle and the cricket chap’s shoes with Deep

Mauve 58A.

9

In Stage 11 I highlighted the hair, buckle and label with Arctic Grey B

and C, painting horizontal lines on the hair, with vertical lines on the belt buckle and label. I also highlighted the bottle and shoes with Deep Mauve 58B, and highlighted the bottle again with 58C.

10

I painted the eyes on both figures with Arctic Grey B, though you could probably use any pale whitish colour like Canvas 8C or Boneyard 9C. One trick is to paint in both corners of the eye so the undercoat shows through. I painted the whole eye, and added the iris in using

Deep Mauve 58B.

10

In Stage 12 I glued Woodland Scenics static grass to the base, followed

by a clump of Woodland Scenics Tree Foliage for each figure. It gives

a nice dense finish. The bases were then tidied up with black paint. Voila!

11

12

The bases were then tidied up with black paint. Voila! 11 12 11 12 Too busy

11

12

Too busy thinking about the cricket fields of England, this intrepid adventurer is about to get far more than just a glass of sherry!

51

We’ve long been fans of the miniatures that are designed by the Perry Twins, Alan and Michael. Their passion for a subject cannot be questioned and is clearly illustrated by their miniatures, none more so than by their superb range of 0mm Peninsular Napoleonic figures. The images on these two pages were supplied by the Perrys and feature resin models from Grand Manner.

Picture 1 shows French infantry fighting its way into a Spanish town, English troops supported by loyal Spanish Guerrillas defending. Picture 2 shows a group of French moving in from behind the buildings, perhaps trying to outflank the defenders.

52

Picture shows Lippe Infantry and you have to marvel at a few things here: one of the Perrys is a dab hand at PhotoShop we think, merging the bases of the figures into the shot, along with the buildings. But most of all we love the poses of the miniatures, the apparent nonchalance of the figure to the right who is clearly checking to make sure his fingers haven’t fallen off. And who would want to mess with the man-mountain to the left?

The drama of Picture is what makes this image - the dismounted Hussar and his horse adds to the overall feel of defenders valiantly fighting against the enemy. The armed monk is a great figure and the ‘sniper’ on the roof looks set to make a kill any moment.

The buildings in this picture are the latest additions to Grand Manner’s 28/0mm Latin Hispanic range. The work done by the company has obviously caught the eye of the Perrys and although aimed at 28/0mm figures they clearly work with these 0mm minis.

The life of these Spanish infantry (Picture 5) is set to get busy, as the French decide to capture the town. This shot captures the quality of the resin along with the casual infantry, one clearly priming his weapon as another, weapon just propped over his shoulder, watches on.

Our final image (Picture 6) shows a much larger group of French infantry entering the town, word of the defenders having reached the commanders, who despatch new troops to bolster the assault.

It was one of the toughest missions of D-Day and worthy of its place in the history books. But Pegasus Bridge pipped it to the winning line as the most celebrated Paratrooper mission of 1944. We look at the complexity of the Merville Battery and provide a 28mm scale skirmish map and a complete Rapid Fire scenario aimed at 20mm miniatures.

INTRODUCTION Located at the eastern end of the Normandy coastline is the small port town of Ouistreham. At the time of the D- Day Invasion on June 6th, 19 this quiet fishing town was to become the focus of intense fighting. The beach assaults on Sword and Juno beaches by the British and Canadians are well documented, as are the exploits of the US forces at Omaha and Utah.

One of the critical elements of the invasion was the consolidation of forces around a defended bridgehead, from which the ground forces could quickly pour into the French landscape. The eastern flank of the assault was key to this and the task of defending it (the bulk of the German tank strength in Paris would come this way) was given to the 6th Airborne Division.

Acting as a buffer the Division performed many famous operations during the Normandy landings, the most famous of which is the capture - intact - of the bridges over the Caen Canal and the River Orne at Benouville. The attack and capture of ‘Pegasus’ Bridge and the River Orne (‘Horsa’) Bridge have received huge publicity and are wargamed around the world.

But the Merville Battery has not been given the same attention and indeed is often an unknown mission for many. The Paras were given the job of silencing a battery of four concrete gun emplacements near the village of Merville, miles east of Ouistreham. Intelligence showed that these casements housed 155mm calibre guns which could do significant damage to the troops landing on the beaches. This threat had to be neutralised.

THE MISSION Merville Battery was given to the 9th Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, which was part of the rd Parachute Brigade. The battalion’s Commanding Officer was Lt Colonel Terence Otway. This battalion had evolved from the 10th Battalion, The Essex Regiment.

However, the Battery was not going to be a pushover. A 00-yard anti-tank ditch, 15ft wide by 10ft deep, wound its way around the west and north-western sides. Then two belts of barbed wire surrounded the whole Battery, the outer being tricky, but the inner being, to quote Neil Barber, ‘fearsome’, at 6ft high by 10ft deep. Just to add insult to injury, between these belts was a minefield and around the other approaches to the Battery were more minefields. An estimated 160 men were garrisoned here, manning 15 to 20 weapons pits, each containing to 5

5

machine guns and up to three 20mm anti-aircraft guns.

Dropping Zone (DZ) ‘V’, a group of fields 1¼ miles east of the objective, was to be secured by ‘C’ Company, 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion. Pathfinder Paras of the 22nd Independent Parachute Company would then mark the DZ in order to guide in the main drop. ‘A’ Company, 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, was to protect the left flank of the 9th Parachute Battalion in its approach march and attack on the Battery. Prior to the assault 100 heavy bombers were to ‘soften up’ the objective; the result of this was to make the landscape in and around the Battery resemble the craters on the moon.

This mission had been well rehearsed on a full size mock- up of the Battery, every man knowing precisely his role in the assault, and several special groups had been formed to carry out the pre-attack tasks. A Rendez-Vous (RV) Party was to drop at 12.20am to organise and control the assembly of the Battalion on the DZ. Jumping with them was A ‘Troubridge’ (Battery Reconnaissance) Party which was to head straight for the Merville Battery. Its tasks were to make a reconnaissance of the Battery, meet the Battalion outside the objective, advise the CO on the prospects of his plan and lead the unit along to the assault by the best route.

The main body of the Battalion was due to begin jumping at 12.50am. First out was a Taping Party which was to reconnoitre and clear gaps in the minefields up to the perimeter fence, marking the best approach to the Battery as indicated by the Troubridge Party. This was a complex mission with many crucial elements, some of which are listed below:

• 90 minutes were allowed to reorganise and get clear of

the RV, and so the moving off time was set for 2.5am.

• The Battalion would assault at a pre-arranged ‘firm base’, about 500 yards from the Battery, sometime between .10am and .20am.

• The plan also called for Horsa gliders, carrying men of ‘A’ Company, plus some 591 Parachute Squadron Engineers, to land within the Battery perimeter itself. These engineers carried the explosives that were to destroy the guns.

• As the gliders arrived above the Battery a mortar would

illuminate the area around the casemates with star-bombs. At .0am, as the first glider was due to land, the bugler would sound another signal and the firing of star-bombs would stop. The attack would then go in. ‘B’ Company

was to blow gaps in the inner wire and ‘C’ Company was to carry out the assault.

IT NEVER GOES TO PLAN The pre-attack parties made their jumps, but the Canadians were dropped over a wide area, 0 or so of them hitting the DZ, the rest scattered within a one mile radius. Fortunately little resistance was met on the DZ and the Pathfinders set up the navigational aids. However, the drop had damaged a number of the ‘Eureka Beacons’. The Troubridge Party landed next and they were followed by the bombers.

Two nasty surprises awaited the Paras: firstly, the fields in the area were surrounded by water-filled ditches, almost moat-like. Secondly, the Germans had opened the sluice gates of the nearby River Dives, flooding the fields over a wide area to the east of the DZ to a depth of around feet.

The main force of around 50 men was carried by 2 Dakotas and as they approached the DZ they were met with heavy flak fire and also a dust cloud, generated by the earlier inaccurate bombing, caused the drop to go awry. Colonel Otway’s own plane took three goes to get the Paras out and only 7 of the 20 men managed to disentangle themselves in time to jump while over the DZ. The Taping Party landed in the water and lost the tape. By the time Otway reached the RV hardly anyone was there.

Worse news was to greet Otway: the gliders transporting the 9th Battalion’s mortars, anti-tank guns and mine detectors had also not arrived and there was also only one Vickers machine gun. There was to be no support equipment for the assault on the Battery. By the appointed time of 2.5am only 110 men had reported to the RV, but Otway had a small ‘window’ of time and this allowed another 0 Paras to arrive. The force stood at 150 men.

En route they met Major George Smith, commander of the Troubridge Party who informed them that his men had cut the outer wire fence, crossed the large minefield and listened to the German sentries, ascertaining that the defences were no tougher than expected. But the mine clearing had been hampered by the loss of the mine detectors and his men had cleared a path with their bare hands, marking a path by scraping their feet in two lines in the earth. Also, the attack by the heavy bombers had missed the Battery!

As if things couldn’t get any worse for the Paras the gliders carrying the engineers also hit trouble, one returning to England almost immediately. But two did manage to continue towards their target. By am Otway had formed a new plan based on his 150 men and it was a simple one:

make two holes through the barbed wire and send two assault teams through, each splitting off into two groups, one for each casement. Another team would neutralise the German machinegun posts and as for the gliders, well they would get what support they could when they landed.

As it turned out the gliders were not to be a concern. The first one missed the target, thinking the village of Gonneville was the target, and when the error was realised it was too late and the Horsa crashed into the water. The second glider crashed 500 yards to the east of the Battery into an orchard. As they exited they entered a firefight with some German troops in the area.

GAPS APPEAR With more gaps in his plan than a string vest Otway bravely fought on and as the gaps in the wire were blown the Paras

This map is an abstract of the area and provides enough detail to plan and
This map is an abstract of the area
and provides enough detail to plan
and play a skirmish level assault on
Merville Battery. As you can see the
minefields make this a tricky assault
and the trench/barbed wire hamper
the way in.
We are currently making a 28mm
scale version of the battery and
we plan to play the game on an
8’ x 6’ gaming table using Artizan
Paratroopers, Foundry Germans
and Grand Manner terrain.

55

went in, running head first into the assault, sten guns firing from the hip. It was around .0am when the chaos began and vicious hand-to-hand fighting took place for roughly 20 minutes until the defenders finally surrendered. As the Paras entered the casements they found 100mm field guns in place – the main armament had yet to be fitted. With no explosives the Paras did what they could to put the guns out of action.

By the end of the assault only 75 Paras were left standing. They had taken 22 prisoners, with the remainder of the Germans presumed killed or escaped from the ‘Red Devils’. The mission was a success – of sorts. The bravery of these men was a credit to their unit and to the leadership of Otway who, being faced with overwhelming odds against success, managed to grasp victory out of the jaws of a mis-jump!

THE DAY AFTER THE DAY Interestingly, on D+1 the Battery was, believe it or not, recaptured by the Germans and there were claims that it opened fire on the beaches. The commander of the

6th Airborne Division, a Major-General Richard Gale, apparently ordered that the Battery be again silenced, but this time it was Nos. and 5 Troops of No Commando that were given the job.

The initial assault went well for the commandos who retook Merville Battery, the Germans inside fighting to the death, inflicting light wounds on the commandos. However, Major John Pooley was killed in the assault. Soon after this a major counterattack by the Germans, this time with armoured support, seems to have inflicted much larger casualties on the commandos.

There is some debate over whether the Commando raid was really needed, but I suppose at the time it was. Merville Battery was nowhere near as ‘dangerous’ as it could have been, but like Point du Hoc, you don’t know the truth of it until significant risk has been taken and losses incurred. With the bombing mission having failed so badly to make any impact on the Battery the Para raid was needed, or lives would have been lost on Sword Beach.

SCENARIO INTRODUCTION BY NEIL BARBER

A u t h o r

o f

‘ T h e

D a y

T h e

For nearly twenty years the story of the 9th Parachute Battalion’s D-Day assault on the Merville Gun Battery barely raised a mention amongst the myriad of books produced. Although Cornelius Ryan had featured it in his 1959 book The Longest Day, Darryl F Zanuck’s subsequent film could not include two British special operations and so the seizure of Pegasus Bridge was chosen. Publicity- wise it has possibly taken until now to recover some of the recognition that it deserves.

For those not familiar with the action, the Overlord planners believed that the Battery, situated beyond the Orne River at the eastern end of the invasion area, had the capability of causing havoc on Sword Beach. With the 6th Airborne Division providing a defensive buffer for that flank of the invasion, the 9th Parachute Battalion was allocated the task of silencing the Battery before the seaborne invasion commenced.

The Merville Battery had four gun casemates with concrete walls up to six feet thick, with further protection afforded by a covering of six feet of earth. Each held one gun that, from the size of the casemates, was estimated to be around 150mm calibre. Various other concrete buildings were dotted around the Battery to command, supply and defend these casemates. The defences were formidable, involving machinegun posts, an anti-aircraft gun, minefields, thick belts of barbed wire and on the northern side a deep anti-tank ditch. It was believed to be garrisoned by around 150 men.

In the early hours of D-Day, for various reasons beyond their control the battalion suffered a horrendously scattered drop and the Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Terence Otway, was left with only 150 men from his original 600-plus to carry out the assault. Engineers

R e d

D e v i l s

D r o p p e d

I n ’

attached to the battalion, who were to perform the actual destruction of the guns, did not arrive. Three assault gliders containing men of ‘A’ Company were to land inside the Battery just before the appointed time of assault. However, each glider suffered problems and only one managed to land close to the Battery but this did, fortunately, play an important role in preventing a German patrol from coming in behind the Paras.

In darkness, the men stormed the site and fought their way into the casemates. Inside, they were confronted with Czech-built Skoda field guns of 100mm calibre. The main armament had not yet arrived. Even so, without the engineers’ explosives they had little or nothing to damage the guns. Various methods were tried to make them unserviceable such as using Gammon bombs or by dismantling the breech blocks. Shortly after, another German Battery along the coast began to shell the site and they rapidly withdrew, taking what wounded they could with them. Gathering at a Calvary further along the road, a headcount was taken. Only seventy-five men were still on their feet. More than fifty paratroopers lay dead within the Battery.

Even though the guns were smaller than expected, their efforts were not to be in vain. The Merville Battery was not given the opportunity to wreak the havoc that it no doubt would have. The bravery and sacrifice of these men contributed to the establishment of the Sword beachhead and thus saved many lives.

And so I hope that the following game serves to motivate you to find out more or perhaps furthers your interest, maybe even visit the site of one of the Parachute Regiment’s epic achievements.

56

Mark is well known as a Rapid Fire scenario writer and when the need for a scenario that is more than just an assault on the Battery came about he was a perfect candidate to create one. The scenario is for Version 2 of the rules but will work with older variations as well.

BACKGROUND In the early hours of June 6th, 19 the British rd Airborne Brigade was tasked with destroying both the gun emplacements of the Merville battery and the vital bridges near Varaville. German local forces were poorly equipped and dispersed but, as bad luck would have it, the British forces were also widely dispersed. For the British commander the key was to quickly marshal available forces and complete both tasks as soon as possible.

TERRAIN The game is played on an approximately 9’ X 6’ table. All buildings start intact. The Merville Battery area is treated as four “bunkers” - each bunker is classed as prepared defences. The whole battery is surrounded by 1” of wire. Woods are a continuous feature for movement, provide soft cover and restrict visibility. Flooded areas are a continuous obstacle for infantry and impassable to vehicles. Elevations are a continuous feature for movement

and block line of sight. Hedges, barbed wire and mines are treated as detailed in Rapid Fire.

SCENARIO RULES The game length is 10 moves, starting with British turn 1 and ending with German turn 12. Turns 1-5 are at night. Use the night fighting rules from the Rapid Fire rule book.

On turn 6 HMS Arethusa will automatically fire on the Merville battery. Place the IDF template over the battery and roll 6 x 150mm guns.

To destroy either the Merville gun or the Varaville bridge any British element adjacent to the target and stationary may roll a D6. The bridge is destroyed on a , , 5 or 6.

British airborne troops are equipped with Bangalore torpedoes. Likewise the German defenders would be aware of lanes in the wire. Instead of a turn to cross

BRITISH ORDER OF BATTLE [ALL ELITE] 3rd Parachute Brigade (-), 6th British Airborne Division

22nd Independent Parachute Company 2 x Detachments (each figures – no morale test required)

1st Canadian Parachute Battalion (morale test @ 50% survivors) HQ CO + 5 figures, PIAT, 2” mortar (turn 1)

2 x Rifle Companies each 8 figures (turn 1)

Support Company 6 figures, Vickers MMG, ” mortar, Horsa glider, 6 figures, jeep + trailer, flamethrower, PIAT (turn )

9th Parachute Battalion (morale test @ 50% casualties)

HQ CO + 5 figures, PIAT, 2” mortar (turn 2)

2 x Rifle Companies each 8 figures (turn 2)

Support Company 6 figures, Vickers MMG, ” mortar, Horsa glider, (turn )

6 figures, jeep + trailer, flamethrower, PIAT

Brigade HQ * Horsa glider, 6 figures, 2 x jeep & trailer (turn ) *highest level HQ for morale purposes

Off-Shore Artillery HMS Arethusa 6 x 150mm (turn 6)

GERMAN ORDER OF BATTLE [ALL REGULAR] Elements 716th Infantry Division

3rd Battalion, 736th Infantry Regiment (-) (morale test @ 15 casualties) HQ CO + 6 figures (VARAVILLE) Rifle coy 11 figures, Panzerfaust, MMG (VARAVILLE) Rifle coy 11 figs, Panzerfaust, MMG (MERVILLE BATTERY)

1st Battalion, 1716th Regiment gunners, 1 X 100mm Skoda (Czech) leFH /19 field gun, figures, MMG, 8 figures (MERVILLE BATTERY * fixed 180 degree arc to the front) *Merville Battery is treated as a four “bunkers”

642nd Ost Battalion (-) (morale test @ 15 casualties) HQ CO + 6 figures (SALLENELLES) Rifle company 11 figures, Panzerfaust, MMG (SALLENELLES) Rifle company 11 figures, Panzerfaust, MMG (FRANCEVILLE PLAGE **)

** German troops in Franceville Plage may enter at either point A or B on the next German turn following the first shots by either side.

5757

barbed wire treat it as a linear obstacle (i.e. roll D6) for both British attackers and German battery defenders (i.e.

if counterattacking).

DEPLOYMENT AND ARRIVALS German forces set up first as indicated. German forces may not move or fire during turn one: British airborne forces were widely dispersed. Instead of the standard rules use the following.

Two markers should be placed in the centre of two different hexes to mark the two battalion drop zones (DZs). These are used for reference points and represent the Eureka beacons and marker panels placed by the pathfinders.

For each element or crew served weapon & crew roll a D6

for dispersal (1-2 = on target, - = 12”, 5 = 2”, 6 = 6”) and randomise around the square as best you can. If an element lands in a flooded area it is lost. If it lands in a square containing woods or hedges or a square containing

a BUA roll a D6 (the score = # casualties).

Throw a second D6 for each support weapon (6 = destroyed). In the case of the BUA the survivors are placed in the open adjacent to the BUA. The element may not move during the turn that it is dropped.

Gliders may land anywhere on the board that is clear as per the standard rules. No reserve fire is permitted against gliders or paratroops in the first turn.

VICTORY CONDITIONS To win the British must destroy the gun in the Merville

Battery AND destroy the Varaville bridge. The Germans win

if they prevent the destruction of both the Merville battery AND the Varaville bridge. Any other result is a draw.

ABOVE RIGHT: The Horsa glider carrying the support

company lands safely and the Paras quickly deploy objective of the Merville Battery ahead of them

their

Vicious hand-to-hand combat took place as the Paras overpowered the German defenders

took place as the Paras overpowered the German defenders SOURCES • Orne Bridgehead (Battle Zone Normandy

SOURCES

Orne Bridgehead (Battle Zone Normandy Series) – Lloyd Clark

The Big Drop – John Golley

Pegasus Bridge/Merville Battery – Carl Shilleto

The Red Devils – From Bruneval to the Falklands – G.G. Norton

D-Day 1944 (3) Sword Beach & British Airborne Landings – Osprey Campaign – Ken Ford

Operation Market-Garden supplement – Colin Rumford

D-Day 6th June 1944 Campaign Guide – Colin Rumford

(Wargames Illustrated #183, December 2002) – David Bickley

The Penguin Atlas of D-Day – John Man

Merville Battery scenario - Nap Nuts Singapore Gamers http://napnuts.tripod.com/cf_merville.htm

The Battle for the Village of Varaville

www.junobeach.org/e//can-tac-par-willes-e.htm

Canadian Army HQ Report No. 26, The 1st Canadian

Parachute Battalion in France (June 6th – September 6th,

1944)

www.forces.gc.ca/hr/dhh/downloads/ahq/ahq026.pdf

59

59

These rules are designed to be a set of modifications to enable you to play

These rules are designed to be a set of modifications to enable you to play Napoleonic battles with the Warmaster Ancients rules. The WA mechanics couldn’t be simpler and without too much tweaking enable fast and furious Napoleonic games with a minimum of fuss.

form squares and only artillery can be limbered or unlimbered.

Changing Formation: Changing between formations first requires the use of a successful order.

SCALE You can use these rules to play any scale of game, whether battalion, brigade or divisional level. The Warmaster rules are based around the unit, which in Napoleonic gaming would naturally equate to a battalion, but there is no reason why you cannot have that unit representing a brigade and the stands that make it up representing battalions. It’s entirely up to you.

Movement: In WA infantry normally move 20cm, cavalry 0cm and artillery 10cm. Ignore these values and instead use the table below to determine how fast a unit can move, which will depend on what formation it is in.

     

Infantry

Cavalry

Artillery

   

Line

20

0

-

   

Column

0

60

-

UNIT SIZE The standard size of a unit in Warmaster is stands, but in these rules this is increased to . This allows for greater formation flexibility within the game that suits Napoleonic warfare far better than stands.

   

Square

0

-

-

   

Skirmish

0

60

-

   

Limbered

-

-

10/20 (Horse Art.)

   

Unlimbered

-

-

0

FIGURE/BASE SIZE WA is designed for 10mm scale models with a 0mm by 20mm base, but that doesn’t mean you cannot use your 28mm figures on 0mm squares, or any other scale or base size. As long as you use a common system with your opponent anything can work, as long as the base size width is double its depth for infantry, and with cavalry and artillery the depth is double the width. For example, if you have your models all based on 0mm squares then two bases side by side will form one stand (for infantry), or two bases one behind the other will act as a single cavalry/artillery stand.

Skirmish: A skirmishing unit is used to harass the enemy with its greater tactical flexibility, but such units can be isolated and vulnerable. Units in this formation count as skirmishing under the normal rules. In addition a skirmishing unit cannot be brigaded,

is

hit on a 5+ instead of +, cannot be supported in combat and

in

combat enemy stands are only hit on 6+.

Column: A unit in column formation moves faster than normal but is very vulnerable to both ranged and close combat. Such a unit is hit on + in shooting and combat.

ATTACKS For the sake of convenience this attribute is now split into two:

attacks for Shooting and attacks for Combat.

HITS This becomes less a measure of the physical toughness and endurance of a unit and more an indication of its skill, tactics, and training, so that a stand of the same number of men can have 2, , or even 5 hits. Cavalry typically have 1 more hits than infantry.

SAVES Units no longer have saves. To represent the armour that some cavalry wore, such units have additional hits in close combat.

MORALE All units have a Morale rating, which is the modifier used when making a command role to order the unit.

RANGE Infantry have 15cm shooting range, artillery have 0cm and horse artillery have 0cm.

FORMATIONS Units follow the normal formations given in the WA rulebook but in Napoleonic games these can cause additional advantages and disadvantages in certain circumstances. There are also new formations to reflect the period. The formations are: line, column, square, skirmish, limbered and unlimbered. Only infantry can

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Square: This formation was used primarily to protect a unit from a cavalry charge and it was exceptionally effective doing just that.

A unit in square is arranged in just that, a square, with bases at

right angles to form the shape and each stand receives an extra

attack dice in combat against cavalry and they in turn are only hit on a 5+. However, they are more vulnerable to shooting and are hit on a +.

ARMY LISTS Below are generic lists for the French, British, Russian, Prussian and Austrian armies of the period. These do not relate to specific battles and might need to be modified to better represent the quality of the armies at different parts of the period.

COMMANDERS For each 1,000 points of troops the army receives a single general, one divisional commander, and two brigade commanders with Command values dependant on the army in question.

 

General

Divisional

Brigade

French

10

9

8

British

9

8

7

Russian

9

8

7

Prussian

8

7

6

Austrian

8

7

6

FRENCH

TYPE

SHOOTING

COMBAT

HITS

MORALE

POINTS

Old Guard

Infantry

3

3

4

+1

90

Young Guard

Infantry

3

3

3

+1

80

Grenadier

Infantry

2

3

4

+0

80

Line

Infantry

2

3

3

+0

60

Light

Infantry

1

2

2

+0

40

Guard

Cavalry

-

4

5

+1

120

Heavy

Cavalry

-

3

5

+0

100

Light

Cavalry

-

3

4

+0

80

Foot

Artillery

4

1

2

+0

90

Horse

Artillery

4

1

2

+0

90

ENGLISH

TYPE

SHOOTING

COMBAT

HITS

MORALE

POINTS

Guard

Infantry

3

3

4

+1

90

Line

Infantry

2

3

3

+0

60

Light

Infantry

1

2

2

+0

40

Heavy

Cavalry

-

3

5

+0

100

Light

Cavalry

-

3

4

+0

80

Foot

Artillery

4

1

2

+0

90

Horse

Artillery

4

1

2

+0

90

AUSTRIAN

TYPE

SHOOTING

COMBAT

HITS

MORALE

POINTS

Grenadier

Infantry

3

3

3

+0

80

Line

Infantry

2

2

3

+0

60

Light

Infantry

1

2

2

+0

40

Heavy

Cavalry

-

3

5

+0

100

Light

Cavalry

-

2

4

+0

80

Foot

Artillery

4

1

2

+0

90

Horse

Artillery

4

1

2

+0

90

RUSSIAN

TYPE

SHOOTING

COMBAT

HITS

MORALE

POINTS

Guard

Infantry

3

3

3

+1

80

Line

Infantry

2

3

3

+0

60

Light

Infantry

1

2

2

+0

40

Militia

Infantry

1

1

2

-1

20

Heavy

Cavalry

-

3

5

+0

100

Light

Cavalry

-

3

4

+0

80

Foot

Artillery

4

1

2

+0

90

Horse

Artillery

4

1

2

+0

90

PRUSSIAN

TYPE

SHOOTING

COMBAT

HITS

MORALE

POINTS

Grenadier

Infantry

3

3

3

+0

80

Jager

Infantry

3

3

2

+0

70

Line

Infantry

2

3

3

+0

60

Light

Infantry

1

2

2

+0

40

Heavy

Cavalry

-

3

4

+0

90

Light

Cavalry

-

3

3

+0

70

Kreikorps

Cavalry

-

3

2

+0

60

Landwehr

Cavalry

-

2

2

+0

55

Foot

Artillery

4

1

2

+0

90

Horse

Artillery

4

1

2

+0

90

 

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62
6

6

INTRODUCTION Wacht am Rhein was a formidable battle plan, audacious and crazy all at the same time. You can imagine the German commanders looking through fearful eyes at the Fuhrer as he detailed the plan for the first time on October 11th, 19. By 000 on December 16th German forces from the 5th Panzer Army were infiltrating over the River Our and at 050 Operation Herbstnebel (or Autumn Mist) began with artillery positions opening up against forward US positions in the Ardennes. Some 0 minutes later the artillery ended and German troops began to advance… the Battle of the Bulge had begun.

The offensive caught the Allies off guard but by the evening of December 16th General Bradley had ordered the 10th Armoured Division to Bastogne and Eisenhower had agreed to release the XVIII Airborne Corps and move it to the Ardennes. Those of you who know their history, or indeed have watched HBO’s Band of Brothers, will know the significance of this.

Less than 2 hours after it began the Germans had overwhelmed the 110th Infantry Regiment HQ in Clerf and a gap in the American lines had been smashed open. The game was afoot. On midnight of the same day CCR 9th Armoured Division was moved to block the approaches to Bastogne and by the evening of the 18th elements of the 101st Airborne had arrived at Bastogne.

On December 19th the first German recce units were probing the outskirts of Bastogne and by nightfall of that day US defences at Wiltz were overpowered, and another road to Bastogne was in German hands. US commanders were concerned by this and a hurried meeting of Eisenhower and senior US commanders was called to discuss the problem. December 20th saw control of the US First and Ninth Army units moved to Montgomery’s 21st Army Group.

By noon of December 20th the Germans had hit problems and Field Marshal Model was forced to redeploy his II SS-Panzer Corps after the 6th Panzer Army failed in its attack in the centre. On the 21st III Corps of Patton’s Third Army moved to relieve Bastogne, engaging the enemy in vicious fighting along the way. Meanwhile the 116th Panzer Division reached its objective of Hotton, but was unable to secure the town. Intense fighting for the road junctions in the Tailles plateau area began.

December 22nd was to see a bloody Bastogne contacted by the German commanders requesting that the forces surrender. Here we have General McAuliffe’s famous one word reply… ‘Nuts’.

With Bastogne surrounded, Panzer Lehr Division moved out towards the River Ourthe and that night a high-pressure front brought clear skies and freezing temperatures to the area. On the morning of the 2rd

The Paras find defensive cover as they await the assault of Das Reich’s Panzer Grenadiers. Figures by Battle Honours.

The Paras find defensive cover as they await the assault of Das Reich’s Panzer Grenadiers. Figures

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US forces were forced to withdraw from the St Vith area and by lunchtime II SS Panzer Corps, with the II SS Panzer Division at the lead, moved to secure the Tailles plateau. The evening saw 2nd Panzer Division report that it was within 9km of the River Meuse near Dinant and later 2nd SS Panzer Division Das Reich overran US forces and seized the Manhay road junction.

On Christmas Day the weather changed and clear weather brought with it intense Allied air support. This day also saw the US 2nd Armoured Division surround and destroy the advance guard of the 2nd Panzer Division in the Dinant area. By the 27th the 2nd SS Panzer Division was forced out of Grandmenil and Manhay and the 6th Panzer Army altered its status from ‘offensive’ to ‘defensive’.

Over the next few days the combat turned into a grind for both forces, but the German offensive actions in the Ardennes failed to make headway. By January rd the Germans were all but beaten; the last attempt by Manteuffel was made to capture Bastogne, which also failed. At this point the US First Army moved to link up with Patton’s Third Army, a move which happened on January 16th. On January 28th any territory that had been lost to German troops had been retaken by US forces.

THE GAME What you have just read is a brief rundown of the combat in the Ardennes. As you can imagine it was a bloody affair and allows for many exciting scenarios and mini-campaigns to be played. What we offer is a fast play, lunch time style game that is intended

offer is a fast play, lunch time style game that is intended to be played using

to be played using skirmish rules and 28mm scale miniatures. You can easily play the game using any skirmish rules - we opted for the NUTS! rules from Two Hour Wargames because we wanted an unpredictable feel to the game.

Our game takes place on the evening of December 2rd as Das Reich moves to overrun the US troops around the Manhay road. We’ve created the fictional town of Marchefort and created a made-up encounter between advance forces of Das Reich which are forcing their way to the Manhay road junction, looking

to secure a bridge that spans one of the tributaries of

a major river in the area. A small group of US infantry

are dug in around the bridge, supported by 2 tanks (1

x Sherman and 1 x Wolverine) but are faced by elite troops of Das Reich.

The German troops are under orders to advance rapidly and secure the bridge, not in an ‘at all costs’ mode, but with haste. The German commander does not have the luxury of dilly-dallying.

“The aim of Wacht am Rhein was to split the Allied forces into two and
“The aim of Wacht am Rhein was to split the Allied forces into two and then move on to capture
Antwerp. From this position of strength the Germans would then move to encircle four Allied
armies, destroy them and then sue for a peace treaty that favoured the Axis forces. Easy when
you say it fast enough. In support of what we now call the Battle of the Bulge were three sub-
operations codenamed Hermann, Greif and Wahrung.
Hermann involved the mustering of what was left of the Luftwaffe for an assault on Allied airfields
in Belgium, the Netherlands and France on January 1st, 1945. Some 1,100 Luftwaffe aircraft
destroyed 439 aircraft, predominantly on the ground. Greif was the notorious ‘false flag’ operation
in which German troops, masquerading as US soldiers, struck out to seize (hence ‘greif’) the
initiative by causing confusion amongst the US forces. Dressed as MPs the German troops, under
the command of the almost legendary Waffen-SS Commando Otto Skorzeny, changed signposts
and caused massive levels of confusion amongst the American troops they encountered. Wahrung
was linked to Greif as German agents attempted to infiltrate rail and port complexes, looking to
disrupt the Allied supply operations. There was a fourth operation – Nordwind – which saw the
German Army Group G launch a vicious assault against the thinly stretched Seventh US Army in
the Alsace. This is to be the subject of a future article by Rich Jones.”

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TERRAIN As you can see from the map this is a 6’ x ’ gaming

TERRAIN As you can see from the map this is a 6’ x ’ gaming table with the bridge at one end and the buildings at the other. The middle of the board is spanned by roads and littered with trees, hedges and any random scattered terrain you see fit. As this is a night time game the amount of terrain in the middle of the gaming table is not critical, unlike the normal NUTS! game which generally demands plenty of terrain to skirmish around.

US ORBATS AND DEPLOYMENT Historically the American forces in the area of Manhay were Task Force Brewster, 50th Parachute Infantry, 82nd Airborne Division, /517th Parachute Infantry, 82nd Airborne Division, CCB, rd Armoured Division and CCA, 7th Armoured Division.

You can take whatever troops you like to deploy in defence of our fictional bridge, and as you can see from our pictures we elected to use paratroopers from the /517th to act as a human shield against the attacking Panzer Grenadiers of Das Reich.

The first group of US troops MAY be deployed in the house in C1, hopefully not playing out the role of sacrificial lambs. We recommend that no more than four figures are deployed inside this house. During our game testing we allowed a bazooka to be deployed, but not any machineguns as this is supposed to be a forward listening post. The troops will be alert due to the noise of the armour in the early morning setting.