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INSTITUTE OF EARLY CHILDHOOD MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY

SELF EVALUATION REVIEW

November 2009

The Institute of Early Childhood (IEC) is a multidisciplinary department with specialists in early childhood education, leadership and management, psychology, linguistics, sociology, the creative arts, and difference and disability. The period of early childhood is internationally recognised as spanning the years from birth to eight. IEC staff share a common teaching and research focus on this period of human development. IEC graduates may be employed as early childhood teachers in preschools, long day care centres, local councils and the early years of school. IEC staff have long established links with the early childhood profession, and extensive experience working with industry partners and government departments.

This review is timely as early childhood services in Australia are subject to major reforms as a result of the Australian Government’s Early Childhood National Quality Agenda for early childhood. Simultaneously, at the state government level, teacher education programs in NSW are required to demonstrate that they meet a set of 46 standards in order for their graduates to gain accreditation with the NSW Institute of Teachers. Macquarie University is itself engaged in a major change process with a new undergraduate curriculum and an academic restructure leading to IEC being located in the Faculty of Human Sciences along with the departments of Education, Psychology, Linguistics and Medicine.

These changes have profound implications for IEC and open up opportunities for greater collaboration with other departments in Macquarie University, other universities, and state and national policy makers.

THE INSTITUTE OF EARLY CHILDHOOD

The Institute of Early Childhood comprises the following inter-related elements:

Academic and professional staff body

Children and Families Research Centre, and

Mia Mia Child and Family Study Centre.

The Institute of Early Childhood is custodian of two collections which are integral to its cultural history and teaching programs:

The IEC Art Collection was established early in the 20 th century. The collection includes many works by prominent Australian artists including important works by Aboriginal artists. There are also special interest items such as Middle Eastern textiles. Media include ceramics bark, wood, canvas and silk.

The IEC Archives contain documentation and artefacts pertaining to early childhood education in Australia dating back over 100 years.

Institute Advisory Board

Board members include persons of eminence, persons holding positions of responsibility in the professional fields served by the IEC, and senior leaders from organisations which employ IEC graduates. The IAB’s terms of reference include the following:

Enhance the standing of the IEC in the field

Assist the IEC to fulfil its goal of promoting social justice

Improve the understanding of early childhood within the university and the community

Provide a forum for dialogue with major employers of IEC graduates, and

Encourage outreach with early childhood professionals working in the field.

IEC Foundation

The IEC Foundation was established in 2001 to support initiatives of the IEC and promote them in the community. Under the chairmanship of Sir John Carrick, the Foundation has raised funds which are used to provide scholarships for early childhood students and research funding for high quality projects pertaining to early childhood development.

HISTORY OF THE INSTITUTE OF EARLY CHILDHOOD

The Institute of Early Childhood traces its origins back to the 19th century, when the Kindergarten Union established a course to train early childhood teachers in the Froebelian method. In 1898, the original course was extended from two to three years, reflecting the Kindergarten Union's emphasis on the educational potential of early childhood services, as

opposed to the provision of care as an end in itself. The Nursery School Teachers College was established in 1931 to prepare teachers for the Sydney Day Nursery centres.

1931 to prepare teachers for the Sydney Day Nursery centres. Plate 1: S tudent teachers using

Plate 1: Student teachers using Froebel gifts, Froebel school, Sydney, 1908, Institute of Early Childhood, Macquarie University,

iec/i/000001.

During the 1970s, the Australian Government became involved in the financial support of early childhood education, and this culminated in the establishment of the two constituent colleges as Colleges of Advanced Education in 1976. By 1982 these two Colleges were amalgamated to form an autonomous Institute within the Sydney College of Advanced Education. The new Institute was a strong combination of early childhood expertise from a range of disciplines. When Sydney College of Advanced Education was disbanded in 1989, the Institute became the Institute of Early Childhood, a department of Macquarie University.

Plate 5: Using Froebel Gifts, Woolloomoolo Kindergarten, Sydney, 1908, Institute of Early Childhood Collection, Macquarie University,

IEC/i/000002.

Childhood Collection, Macquarie University, IEC/i/000002. The Institute of Early Childhood brought with it, into the

The Institute of Early Childhood brought with it, into the university, some important strengths, including its international reputation as a leader in early childhood teacher education and research. A further strength is its longstanding involvement in key organisations and employer groups in the field.

REPORT ON LAST REVIEW RECOMMENDATIONS

A formal review of the former Division known as the Australian Centre for Educational Studies (ACES) was undertaken in 2003. At that time ACES comprised the following departments:

Institute of Early Childhood

School of Education (now Department of Education)

Macquarie University Special Education Centre (MUSEC) and

Institute for Higher Education Research and Development (IHERD).

The recommendations of that review were not specific to individual Departments and many were beyond the capacity of individual Departments to implement. Table 1 lists the recommendations and their implementation.

Table 1: Recommendations and implementation following 2003 review

Recommendation

Implementation and completion

ACES develop a shorter and more accessible Division meta-level Strategic Plan which shows links to the University plans and priorities.

Achieved 2007.

ACES undertake an annual review of achievements against the Strategic Plan and priorities.

Achieved.

That performance management and mentoring be extended systematically across ACES.

The previous Performance Management System was replaced by a university-wide PDR system in 2008.

That ACES sets realistic targets and strategies for improving research outputs.

Detailed in the ACES Research Strategic Plan.

That a senior position be appointed at Division level to achieve synergy across departments and harness research strength.

Professor Kevin Wheldall from MUSEC was appointed.

ACES take account of national policy directions and priorities to focus staff and HDR research activities.

Ongoing.

ACES hold an annual showcase of research within ACES and the wider community.

Showcase a regular annual event.

Further joint planning and collaboration in all teacher education programs.

Ongoing.

Increased collaboration in Stage One of Primary teacher education training to ensure graduate capabilities across K – 6 key learning areas and understanding of pedagogical debate K – 2.

Some shared teaching in Maths, Science and Technology units. Primary and early childhood students undertake units in other department.

More systematic monitoring of unit review and follow up.

Achieved.

Review current support for HDR students including

Achieved.

selection of topics to fit ACES priorities

access to ICT resources

intellectual engagement

Consider introducing an annual Dean’s lecture for students and staff.

Continue to develop moves to unite ACES geographically and operationally

Not possible.

Develop stronger presence through advocacy and research in primary education

[Not relevant to IEC.]

Re-establish the School of Education Advisory Board as a feature of the TEP

[Not relevant to IEC.]

Increase collaborate with the ICT Centre

Achieved in the Maths, Science and Technology units

BACKGROUND AND HISTORY OF DEPARTMENT SINCE LAST REVIEW

There have been far reaching changes in the social and political context of early childhood services in Australia since the last review. These have important implications for the Institute of Early Childhood and Macquarie University. In 2007 the Rudd Labor Government developed its National Quality Framework to improve the quality, access and equity of early childhood services. The core of the Australian Government’s reform agenda focuses on three key aspects of early childhood services:

national quality standards and enhanced regulatory arrangements

a quality rating system, and

a national early years learning framework, and

universal access to a preschool program for all children in their year prior to full-time schooling. This is to be a play-based education program delivered by a university qualified early childhood teacher.

Financial incentives will be offered to children’s services which employ a university qualified early childhood teacher in a teaching role. Children’s services who employ a teacher with a 3- year university early childhood teaching qualification will receive a $6,000 subsidy and those who employ a 4-year university early childhood teaching qualification will receive an $8,000 subsidy from 2011. It is anticipated that this reform will place pressure on childcare staff to upgrade their qualifications by enrolling in a university degree program. IEC already has well established and highly regarded undergraduate programs which are poised to meet this increased demand.

These national reforms have highlighted a serious shortage of university qualified early childhood teachers. Several universities have recently introduced early childhood teacher education programs (for example University of Sydney, Australian Catholic University, University of Notre Dame), thus increasing competition for Macquarie University’s early childhood programs.

A related issue is a projected shortage of early childhood academics. Professor Sue Willis,

Chair of the Australian Council of Deans of Education, has estimated that, in the next 3 years, an additional 225 early childhood academics will be needed in universities to meet the

demand for early childhood graduates (ACDE Conference, 2008). Many staff at IEC have

been approached by other universities who are actively recruiting early childhood academics

to deliver their newly introduced programs. The implications for Macquarie University are to

provide an environment which will attract and maintain its academics in this highly competitive context.

There have also been major changes to the regulatory environment at the state level. The

NSW Institute of Teachers was established by Act of Parliament in 2004 to oversee a system

of accreditation and recognition of a teacher's professional capacity against professional

standards (NSW Institute of Teachers website). In order for their graduates to be eligible to teach in any NSW school, initial teacher education providers must demonstrate that the 46 professional standards have been met.

This change has had an enormous impact on universities offering early childhood (birth to 8 years) programs, due to the definition of “teach” enshrined in the Act of Parliament:

teach” – means to undertake duties in a school that include (but are not limited

to):

the curriculum (as determined by the Board of Studies) for primary or secondary

schools in accordance with the Education Act 1900, and

(a)

the direct delivery of courses of study that are designed to implement

(b) responsibility for assessing student participation, performance and

progress in such courses (NSW Institute of Teachers website)

Central to this definition is the construction of a teacher as one who delivers the NSW Board of Studies curricula. Therefore it is now necessary for early childhood graduates to demonstrate content knowledge and pedagogical strategies for the whole of K – 6, rather than specializing in the K – 2 curricula, as has always been the case prior to 2007.

As with all other birth to 8 years programs in NSW, it was necessary for IEC to revise its

BEd(ECE) program to cover the period from birth to 12 years, while endeavoring to retain its early childhood pedagogical specialization. This huge time-consuming task was completed

in June 2009 and the revised program was submitted to the NSW Institute of Teachers.

Approval is pending.

The fact that both IEC and Department of Education are offering a primary teaching qualification, albeit through very different pathways, has opened up new opportunities for collaboration through shared teaching of the core primary units for grades K – 6. Macquarie University has the potential to position itself as a premier institution for teacher education in NSW by offering a suite of programs providing a choice of pathways to a teaching qualification. A further implication is that the Practicum Officers in each department will be

able to work together to place IEC and Education students in primary schools, thus achieving efficiencies and mutual support.

CURRENT POSITION

As a result of the national, state and university changes detailed above, IEC engaged in a 2- day professional development program in 2008 to formulate a new vision, mission and values statement, and to consider strategic directions.

IEC Mission

The Institute of Early Childhood is committed to maximising opportunities for young children, families and communities through research, teaching, learning and advocacy.

IEC Values

The Institute of Early Childhood values integrity, collegiality, respect, intellectual rigour and social justice.

Planning and Implementation Process

All IEC staff are encouraged to participate in decision-making, through:

An annual 2-day Retreat each February

A series of forums throughout the year focusing on Learning and Teaching, and Research and HDR

Monthly IEC Department Meetings

2 – 3 IEC Learning and Teaching Committee meetings per year

2 – 3 IEC Research and HDR Committee Meetings per year.

OPERATIONAL PLANS

Prior to the restructure of the university into Faculties in January 2009, the Institute of Early Childhood used a modified version of the ACES Learning and Teaching, and Research Strategic Plans, which were developed within the Division of ACES and implemented mostly at Department level. Please note that the new Macquarie University Learning and Teaching Plan, and Research Plan, had not been completed in 2008.

IEC Learning and Teaching Plan 2007 – 2008

Strategic

KPI

Strategies

Action

Imperatives

IEC is committed to the delivery of high quality, responsive Indigenous teacher education programs

IEC programs will align with federal policy promoting Indigenous teacher education

Strengthen relationships with Indigenous groups and providers

- Liase with Indigenous community groups and Warawara

Build knowledge of relevant epistemologies

- Guest speakers

- Grants

 

- Workshops

- Research

- Professional development

IEC integrates

Increase IEC access to technology

Form ICT committee

- Articulate IEC’s current access to technology

innovative

technologies in

 

- Identify resources needed and examine opportunities for partnering with technology providers

learning and

teaching

Increase use of innovative

Identify opportunities for technology

- Examine blackboard

technologies in delivery of units

Increase staff and students’ mastery of technology in current units

integration in teaching and assessing

Identify current practice and opportunities for integration

potential, discuss with CFL and engage in staff training.

- Create examples of technology rich delivery of units & provide observer access

- Survey current student technology use in units

- Identify and promote key units where technology can be integrated

IEC values high quality learning and teaching

All staff use available evaluation tools

Identify available tools for evaluation within and outside the university

- Evaluation tools are explored

- Provide professional development in selected tools

 

Expand mentoring program to include casual staff

Define and develop clear guidelines to support casual staff

 

Enhance student

Increase CEQ & TEDS scores

Inform final year students of CEQ & encourage return

- Include CEQ focus points in outlines (like the graduate capabilities)

satisfaction with

our programs

 

Encourage past students to develop ongoing relationship with IEC

Explore opportunities for ongoing communication

- Website to host forum

- Afternoon teas etc

IEC values a diverse local, national and international student population.

Increase national and international student applications

Strong web presence

- upgrade website

Increase school leavers’ and TAFE students’ awareness of program

Identify possible post graduate specialisations, with

- liaise with the marketing department

 

development of IEC information kit & DVD Review and enhance support for international students

-

links to research strengths in IEC
links to research strengths in IEC

links to research strengths in IEC

links to research strengths in IEC

IEC Research and HDR Strategic Plan 2007 - 2008

KPI

Strategies

 

Action

Increase research

Define research active

 

- liaise with research office

activity

 

Determine IEC research agenda

 

- Identify IEC research themes

- develop IEC research agenda and policy

Map current research agenda

 

- send proforma to all staff seeking research interests, publications and grants for the last five years.

- Collate responses

Disseminate data about current and proposed research endeavours

 

- to IAB

- on IEC webpage

Publish in high impact journals & present at international peer reviewed conferences

- Identify rankings based on emerging ERA

- Identify & promote C1 conferences with staff

Increase inter-

Host key national and international visiting scholars

Explore national and international scholarships

disciplinary

connections

   

Increase internal collaborations within new faculty

Devote one research forum to meeting other departmental research chairs within the new faculty.

Increase staff

Identify research networks (such

-

Research active staff join and actively participate in research networks

engagement with

research networks

as ARACY) and possibilities for IEC membership

 

IEC Community Engagement and Impact Strategic Plan 2007 - 2008

Strategic

KPI

Strategies

Action

Imperatives

IEC is committed to the use of high quality practitioner resources

High quality practitioner resources developed by IEC staff

Identify needs in the resource market

- Support staff in negotiating contracts to develop materials

IEC is committed to ongoing advocacy and input to policy development

IEC staff provide representation on key university and external committees

Identify current committee membership

 

Identify key committees IEC should be represented on

- Nominate IEC staff for key internal and external committees

IEC is a high profile provider of professional development

Publicly available database of IEC professional development & consultation

Survey staff, identify and describe possible PD courses

- Registration of professional development courses with the NSW Institute of Teachers

IEC staff are listed on the university list “of experts”

- Contact Access Macquarie

- Disseminate information to staff

IEC Staff and Student Wellbeing Strategic Plan

Strategic

KPI

Strategies

Action

Imperatives

IEC is an organisational unit that values and supports its staff and students

Staff research to align with staff teaching

Review current relationships between research and teaching

Staff research areas identified and mapped to teaching

Increase professional development opportunities for staff and students

Organise and promote internal and external professional development seminars

- grant writing

- media training

- staffing website

- time management seminar

Staff workloads reflect staffing formula (to support T&L, research and CO)

Review current practices with a view to maximise efficiency

- map staff time to deliver and assess units

- examine staff preference for researching and teaching options

Student workloads

Review current unit workloads for students ensuring parity

- map student time to complete units

comply with

university policy

- examine delivery modes and explore alternatives

ADMINISTRATIVE AND LEADERSHIP STRUCTURES

In line with its commitment to collaborative decision-making, leadership and administration roles are frequently conflated in IEC. All staff members demonstrate leadership at one level or another, from individual unit coordination to key roles as committee chairs. Many staff also serve on University and Faculty Committees in a range of roles.

Executive Dean Faculty of Human Sciences

Executive Dean Faculty of Human Sciences

Executive Dean Faculty of Human Sciences
Head of Department Institute of Early Childhood

Head of Department Institute of Early Childhood

Head of Department Institute of Early Childhood

Chair: Learning and Teaching Committee

Chair: Research Committee

Chair: HDR Committee

Administrative Roles: Academic staff

Please see IEC Staffing Handbook for detailed descriptions of administrative roles and responsibilities.

Academic Administrative Role

Undergraduate Coordinator

Staffing Coordinators

Undergraduate Coordinator Distance

International Student Coordinator

Postgraduate Coursework Coordinator

Promotions and Marketing Coordinator

Honours Coordinator

Website Coordinator

Warawara Academic Liaison Officer

IEC Art Collection Coordinator

Chair: Plagiarism Committee

Sessional Staff Coordinator

Chair: Appeals and Exclusions Committee

Fieldwork Coordinators for each Professional Experience unit

Professional Experience Coordinator

IEC Ethics Coordinator

Grad Dip and BTeach Coordinator

Publications Coordinator

Administrative Roles: Professional Staff

Head of Department

Department Administration Manager Level 7

Undergraduate Student Services Officer Level 6

Practicum Officer (job share) Level 6

Administration Assistant

Level 5

Postgraduate and HDR Student Services Officer (0.5) Level 6

Practicum Support Officer Level 4

Children and Families Research Centre

Director

Deputy Director

Administration Officer

Level 7

Academic Research Staff

CURRENT BUDGET POSITION

 

2006

2007

2008

2009

Expected

result

Total income

3,614,877

3,884,695

4,125,320

4,504,955

Academic

1,819,428

2,001,738

2,188,681

2,877,655

salaries

Academic

265,673

265,102

265,211

123,150

casuals

General salaries

172,932

182,044

169,854

357,143

General casual

32,736

24,474

49,986

64,075

All other costs eg on-costs, travel, consumables

1,238,718

1,332,290

1,442,550

911,965

Total

3,529,487

3,805,648

4,116,282

4,333,988

expenditure

Operating

85,390

79,047

9,038

170,967

surplus

(deficit)

The above figures include the IEC Operating Budget only. They exclude the budgets of Mia Mia, Children and Families Centre, the Practicum budget, and research grants and consultancies. It can be seen that during 2009, IEC engaged in a careful review of the delivery of its programs and use of resources, leading to an overall predicted surplus of

$170,967.

STAFFING PROFILE 2009

 

Institute of Early Childhood

Academic FTE

Continuing

Fixed term

A

0.5

A

3

B

13.8

B

5.9

C

2.8

C

0

D

3

D

0

E

2

E

0

Total FTE

22.1

8.9

Professional FTE

Continuing

Fixed term

H3

0

H3

0

H4

0.29

H4

0

H5

0

H5

1.5

H6

1.2

H6

1

H7

0

H7

2

Total FTE

1.49

4.5

Please note: Fixed term does not include contractors. Currently IEC has a full time level 3 equivalent contractor employed in an administrative assistant position. The figures exclude Mia Mia Child and Family Study Centre staff, however it does include all other staff including Research Centre staff and Research Assistants on contract.

ACADEMIC STAFF QUALIFICATIONS 2009

Highest qualification

Continuing

Fixed Term

Total

Bachelors

0

0

0

Masters coursework

4

1

5

Masters by research

1

2

3

PhD

17

6

23

Currently doing PhD

1

2

3

These figures do not discriminate between full time and part time staff. They include staff in the Children and Families Research Centre.

ACADEMIC STAFF APPOINTMENTS AND RETIREMENTS

2007 - 2009

 

New

Retirements:

New

New

appointments:

continuing

appointments:

appointments:

continuing

positions

contract > 12 months

contract < 12 months

positions

Level A

0

0

2

0

Level B

5

0

6

3

Level C

0

3

0

0

Level D

0

0

0

0

Level E

1

1

0

0

These figures do not discriminate between full time and part time staff. They include staff in the Children and Families Research Centre.

Honorary Associates

Emeritus Professor Jacqueline Goodnow

Dr Margaret White

Dr Louie Suthers.

STAFF DEVELOPMENT

Participation in annual 2-day Retreat each February.

New continuing staff receive a 0.5 teaching load in their 1 st semester.

Induction programs are held for new contract and casual staff.

ICT sessions are provided to staff, including use of whiteboards and Smart Notebook.

Attendance at university induction program is expected.

Attendance at library training sessions is recommended.

New staff are mentored by colleagues and unit coordinators.

Regular research colloquia.

An IEC Staffing Manual is available.

All staff, academic and professional, are required to participate in a Performance Development and Review cycle, implemented in 2008. There are 4 PDR advisers at IEC.

Workload Patterns

IEC WORKLOAD MODEL

In accordance with the Enterprise Agreement, academic staff work for 1579 hours per annum. Three workload patterns are possible:

Teaching and research – the most common pattern for staff who are research active. Staff who work this pattern receive an allocation of 500 hours per annum for their research activities.

Teaching mainly – for staff who are not actively engaged in research, and/or contract staff. Staff who work this pattern receive an allocation of 150 hours per annum for their research activities.

Research mainly – for staff who have large external research grants.

IEC uses a software program which calculates staff workloads based on 750 hours per semester. The remaining 79 hours are allocated to all staff to attend field and university meetings, Open Days, and other activities.

The following table sets out the allocations which the IEC staff website makes for different types of academic activity.

IEC Staffing Allocations

Activity

Allocated staff hours

1 hour lecture (internal only)*

6 hours

1 hour tutorial

1 hour

tutorial preparation

1.5 hours

hour seminar (400 & 800 level units only

2

8 hours

internal marking (includes an embedded allocation for consultation)

1 hour/student/semester for 3 credit pt unit

1 hour 20 mins/student/semester for 4 credit pt unit

 

+

5 minutes per student per week

online tutorials – for units which only run externally and which conduct tutorials online (ie not general consultation)

1

hour/student /semester

external marking (also includes consultation)

1

hour/student/semester for 3 credit pt unit

1

hour 20 mins/student/semester for 4 credit pt unit

+

5 minutes per student per week

external consultation

5

minutes per student per week

unit coordination

0-99 students: 0.5 hours/week

100-149 students: 1 hour/week

150 + students: 1.5 hours/week

prac supervision

16 hours/semester for full-time staff members

(ie 2 students x 2 visits x 4 hours/ student or

4

students x 1 visit x 4 hours/student)

research student supervision (calculated over 22 weeks/semester)

part-time student: 2 hours/week

full-time student: 4 hours/week

 

principal and associate supervisors are to decide how to divide these hours

new unit writing

new 3 cp = 78 hours

new 4 cp = 104 hours

major revision 3cp = 39 hours ie half

major revision 4 cp = 52 hours

LEARNING AND TEACHING

THE DISTINCTIVENESS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD AS A SEPARATE DISCIPLINE

Early Childhood and Education are two separate and discrete disciplines, informed by different philosophical and theoretical frameworks. Within the discipline of Early Childhood, education is conceived of broadly in terms of the overall development of the child from birth to 8 years, including physical, social, emotional, linguistic and intellectual development. Understanding home, family and community influences, and their pedagogical implications for children’s development, drives Early Childhood education. Observation is the basis of early childhood teaching. Students gain skills in observing and interpreting young children’s behavior, underpinned by theoretical understanding, and then formulating objectives to facilitate each individual child’s development. Thus early childhood education does not fit easily or naturally with the more content-based curriculum focus of Primary School education. Hence IEC’s research and teaching synergies lie naturally with a range of disciplines such as Psychology, Linguistics, Sociology, Indigenous Studies and other social science areas. Early childhood academics and practitioners must negotiate issues within a complex cultural and regulatory environment, which are inherently different from the issues facing Education departments.

IDENTIFICATION OF CURRENT CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Challenges include meeting the accreditation and regulatory requirements set out in the introduction, while maintaining a high quality program which produces graduates who are valued by employers and respected in the field.

Additional challenges include a shortage of research active early childhood academics in a fiercely competitive field, requiring thoughtful support of current staff as they move towards research active status.

Opportunities are set out in the final section of this review.

EVIDENCE OF ALIGNMENT WITH UNIVERSITY AND FACULTY PRIORITIES

IEC’s plans align closely with university and faculty priorities. Current foci include the recruitment and retention of undergraduate, postgraduate and HDR students, internationalization and increased provision for students from diverse backgrounds.

UAI AND FIRST PREFERENCE TRENDS LAST 2 YEARS: BE(ECE)

Year

2008

2009

1

st preference

164

257

All

296

498

preferences

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 2009

There will be major revisions and changes to the following programs which will be implemented progressively from January 2010. These revisions and changes have resulted from:

The Macquarie University curriculum review

The mandatory requirements of the NSW Institute of Teachers

The mandatory requirements of the NSW Department of Community Services

National and state reforms in early childhood policy and regulatory frameworks.

All IEC programs are available for study internally, by distance mode or mixed mode.

Program

Entry

Duration

Advanced

Comments

requirements

standing

BEd(ECE)

HSC; UAI >72

yrs full time, pro rata part time.

4

Yes

Birth to 8 years*

Or Diploma

Accreditation:

Or Non award or Jubilee pathway

 

NSW DoCS and NSW Institute of Teachers

BTeach(Birth to

Diploma

2.5 yrs full time

Yes

External and block on campus

5 years)

Accreditation:

NSW DoCS

BTeach(Early

Various

yrs full time, spaced over 4 years

3

Yes

Indigenous only

Childhood

Services)

Accreditation:

NSW DoCS;

   

other states

various.

Grad Dip Early Childhood (Birth to 5 years)

Qualified

2

yrs

Accreditation:

primary teacher

 

NSW DoCS

or BTeach(ECS)

* A submission has been made to the NSW Institute of Teachers with a revised BEd(ECE) program to cover the period from birth to 12 years.

POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMS 2009

Postgraduate offerings have not been affected by changes to the same extent as the undergraduate offerings.

The Master of Teaching (Birth to 5) was introduced in 2007 to meet demands for a postgraduate early childhood teacher qualification. Within each Masters program are embedded a Postgraduate Diploma (24 credit points) and a Postgraduate Certificate (12 credit points).

Program

Entry

Duration

Advanced

Comments

requirements

standing

Master of

Bachelors in any discipline

2

yrs full time,

 

Graduates are qualified teachers of children birth to 5 years. Accreditation:

Teaching (Birth

 

to 5)

GPA of at least 2.5 in UG

pro rata part time

IELTS of 7

NSW DoCS

Master of Early Childhood

Bachelors degree in the social sciences, some professional experience with children

   

Does not lead to a teaching qualification

Postgraduate

Bachelors

1

year part time

 

Pathway to

Certificate in

degree

 

HDR entry

Research

Methods

Offered jointly

by Education

and IEC

Master of

Bachelor degree and 2 years relevant work experience and written application

   

Does not lead to a teaching qualification.

Educational

Leadership

(Early

 

Childhood

Education)

IEC Postgraduate Coursework Enrolments 2007 - 2009

 
 

2007

2008

2009

2009

New students

New students

New students

Total enrolled

Master of

18

33

33

59

Teaching (Birth

to 5)

Master of Early Childhood

13

12

7

28

Postgraduate

2

0

3

3

Certificate in

Research

Methods

Master of

2

2

4

6

Educational

Leadership

(Early

Childhood

Education)

Other

3

3

3

9

TOTAL all new students

       

TOTAL

5

11

10

 

international

students

(3 MTeach)

(7 MTeach)

(9 MTeach)

Please see Appendix 1 for a complete list of programs, units and enrolments for the previous 3 years.

ENROLMENT FIGURES

Total Enrolments by Department from 2005 to 2009 (EFTSL)

 

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Dept of Education Dept of Linguistics Dept of Psychology Institute of Early Childhood Institute of Human Cognition and Brain Science School of Advanced Medicine

830.2

851.0

798.4

738.1

837.1

824.3

856.7

832.9

791.7

792.5

1072.4

1109.5

1151.6

1111.4

1195.1

720.4

697.6

688.7

709.8

663.7

62.1

69.4

107.7

88.4

100.9

 

5.0

18.2

34.5

Faculty total

3509

3584

3584

3458

3624

IEC and Education EFTSL in 2009 across different programs as a percentage of all Faculty programs

EFTSL

UG

PG

HDR

Non-

Domestic

International

Total

award

May 2009

Education

649.8

153.3

24.8

9.1

783.4

53.7

837.1

(% of

(27.8%)

(16.5%)

(8.1%)

(15.8%)

(26.3%)

(8.4%)

(23.1%)

FHS)

IEC

577.8

70.9

6.2

8.7

594.8

68.9

663.7

(% of

(24.8%)

(7.6%)

(2%)

(15.1%)

(19.9%)

(10.7%)

(18.3%)

FHS)

Faculty

2333.2

926.1

306.3

57.6

2982.2

641.5

3624

Totals

IDENTIFICATION OF AREAS OF EXCELLENCE IEC Teaching Awards

Jenny Nicholls: Australian Learning and Teaching Council Citation for Outstanding

Contribution to Student Learning 2008.

Marina Papic: Faculty of Human Sciences Learning and Teaching Award for “scholarship, innovation and respect for diversity in teaching which enhances student learning” 2008.

Kate Highfield: Faculty of Human Sciences Dean’s Citation for Outstanding Contributions to student Learning “through integration of technology in teaching and learning; and supporting students in application of theory, skills and knowledge”

2009.

IEC Teaching Grants

Kate Highfield: Macquarie University Emerging Technologies Grant scheme for project titled “examination of the tools available in the social networking platform, NING, to facilitate discussion and reflection in Mathematics, Sciences and Technology learning”. $9,464.

Kate Highfield, Peter Whiteman and Manjula Waniganayake: Teaching Equipment Grant Scheme award for “provision and effective use of technology infrastructure to enhance student learning, motivation and experience of early childhood student teachers”. $33,782 COURSE EXPERIENCE QUESTIONNAIRE (CEQ) Overall Satisfaction ratings for IEC compared with national average

 

Number of

% agreement

National average % agreement

responses

2008

101

82

68

2007

83

91.6

68.3

2006

58

74.14

 

LEARNER EXPERIENCE UNIT RESULTS BY UNIT AND 3 YEAR TREND

 

S1 2007

S2 2007

S1 2008

S2 2008

S1 2009

 

IEC

ACES

IEC

ACES

IEC

ACES

IEC

ACES

IEC

Faculty

Clear goals

3.9

3.96

3.91

3.94

4.01

4.00

4.03

Not

4.22

4.00

and standards

 

available

Organisation

3.85

3.91

3.81

3.88

3.93

3.93

3.97

Not

4.04

3.94

 

available

Learning

3.79

3.95

3.83

3.93

3.96

3.99

3.96

Not

4.01

3.98

Support

 

available

Intellectual

3.92

3.90

3.90

3.95

3.94

3.94

4.00

Not

4.11

3.96

challenge

 

available

Appropriate

3.71

3.71

3.79

3.74

3.76

3.77

3.85

Not

4.01

3.89

assessment

 

available

Feedback

3.58

3.51

3.63

3.54

3.67

3.60

3.74

Not

3.83

3.58

 

available

Appropriate

3.74

3.68

3.64

3.69

3.73

3.71

3.76

Not

3.86

3.82

workload

 

available

It can be seen that IEC’s results have steadily improved relative to Division and Faculty aggregated average ratings. In Semester 1, 2009, IEC’s results were higher than the Faculty average on every criterion.

BENCHMARKING

Staff from the IEC undertook a benchmarking exercise in 2004-2005 with Edith Cowan University. The benchmarking process focused on the Bachelor of Education (ECE), as both universities offer this program. Areas examined include program content, assessment, practicum, student diversity and engagement, and flexible learning and teaching approaches. An analysis of the benchmarking exercise has been published jointly by IEC and Edith Cowan staff:

Bowes, J., Fleet, A., Maloney, C., & Stamopoulos, E. (2006). Quality assurance of teacher education programs through benchmarking. Journal of Australian Research in Early Childhood Education, 13(2), 141-150.

Benchmarking is also facilitated by IEC staff attendance at the NSW Professional Experience Council Meeting. This meeting comprises representatives from NSW universities and enables comparisons to be made in numbers of students undertaking early childhood professional experience units across several universities in NSW. Numbers of students undertaking TAFE diploma and certificate programs are also tabled at these meetings.

INPUT FROM EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDERS The Institute Advisory Board’s feedback has been taken into account in unit and program revision in an ongoing cycle. For example, IAB members provided feedback on a mandatory health unit and provided key information relating to children under 5 years. More recently, the IAB had major input into the Professional Experience and Management units and this has informed the revision of Guided Experience documentation so that it more effectively relates to current thinking and expectations of employers.

STUDENT BACKGROUNDS The Institute of Early Childhood has been delivering the BTeach(ECS) in collaboration with Warawara Department of Indigenous Studies for over 10 years. This is a targeted Indigenous only program which is offered in block mode to students who attend on campus sessions 4 times each year. They are offered ongoing tutorial support in their home communities as well as intensive support while on campus. To date, 56 BTeach(ECS) students have graduated and are now university qualified early childhood teachers. A publication has been published setting out the experiences of the BTeach(ECS) graduates with a view to encouraging more Indigenous early childhood practitioners to gain a university teaching qualification. This is distributed free to early childhood centres and to other interested persons. Fleet, A., & Kitson, R. (2009). (Eds.). Deadlier with a degree: True stories, many voices. Institute of Early Childhood, Macquarie University.

A copy of this publication is provided in the material accompanying this review. Current challenges include recruiting an Indigenous early childhood academic to lecture in IEC programs, and negotiating different accreditation requirements in different states.

RESEARCH

Research and HDR in vocational programs like early childhood and education are characterised by a number of demographic features:

Older cohort of HDR candidates

Honours programs are relatively recent and not widely undertaken in early childhood programs, hence most HDR have many years’ experience in the workforce before returning at a later stage to undertake doctoral studies. According to figures presented at the 2008 ACDE

Conference, the Chair of ACDE:

Of all commencing research doctorate students (2005)

Education

70% are 40+ years of age

All fields

27% are 50+ years of age 31% are 40+ years of age 12% are 50+ years of age

Part time candidacy

The majority of IEC HDR candidates undertake their research programs part time. Most are mature age, with family and employment responsibilities. Therefore in time completions at IEC typically take 8 years, rather than 4 years. HDR scholarships are not available for part time candidature, therefore IEC doctoral students usually need to work part time to support themselves and their families.

RESEARCH OUTPUTS

IEC RESEARCH INCOME

Research Income by Department and Faculty overall 2004 - 2007

Research

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Income

Education

27,148

91,648

157,335

226,673

   

IEC

1,456,444

1,506,216

1,587,424

836,916

   

Linguistics

206,911

390,808

537,136

285,603

   

(includes

AMEP)

Psychology

1,175,996

1,377,962

1,076,777

1,607,522

   

Faculty Total

7,523,704

8,138,990

8,181,729

6,940,553

   

Research

Income

While smaller than the Departments of Linguistics, Psychology and Education, IEC has received more research income than any other department except Psychology. IHCBS (includes MACCS, MUSEC and MeLCoE) are not included here, due to lack of comparability in student and staff demographics.

IEC RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS

Total IEC weighted publications 2005 - 2008

 

2005

2006

2007

2008

Total

Average

per FTE

continuing

staff

A1 Book

0

0

1

0

1

 

B1 Book

22

12

6

7

47

 

chapter

C1 Journal

13

7

17

28

65

 

article

E1

0

4

1

3

8

 

Conference

paper

Total

       

121

5.5

It can be seen that IEC’s publication of C1 articles has increased significantly in 2008. Final numbers for 2009 are not yet available.

Total weighted publications by Department and Faculty overall from 2004 to 2007

Department

Academic

A1

B1

C1

E1

Total

Average

staff (FTE)

per FTE

06/09

Education

25.8

5

28

61

49

143

5.54

IEC

29.8

2

46

53

7

108

3.62

Linguistics

59.7

4

85

148

28

265

4.43

(includes

AMEP)

Psychology

46.4

2

15

247

12

276

5.94

Faculty Total

192.1

13

244

690

110

 

5.23

This table includes figures for 2004 to 2007 only. IEC’s publication numbers greatly increased in 2008. Academic FTE staff numbers include permanent and contract academic staff only, but not casual, professional, clinical educators or school staff. These are staff numbers for 2009 and make the assumption that staff numbers have not changed significantly from 2007 to 2009.

Despite IEC’s substantial research income in the last 5 years, its total publication rate to 2007 is lower than the other departments in the Faculty as a proportion of staff. This may be due to a relatively large number of early career researchers joining IEC over the last 5 years (5 new level B appointments). There is also a lag time between obtaining a grant and being in a position to publish the findings. This would appear to be the case, as the above table has not taken into account the DEEWR publications for 2008 and 2009, which show a large increase.

IEC RESEARCH ACTIVE STAFF

Percentage of research active staff in 2003: 47%

Percentage of research active staff in 2009: 58%

In 2009, 58% of all staff (including 0.5 and above, contract and continuing) have been deemed research active, according to Macquarie University’s definition, which is:

“To be deemed research active, a staff member must be an author on 5 DEEWR weighted publications over the last 5 years and be engaged in other specified activities such as HDR completions.”

The last formal review of research active status was undertaken in 2003, when IEC had 47% staff deemed research active, so there has been substantial improvement in the last 6 years.

Strategies to improve this figure to reach the university’s target of 80% are being considered. Becoming research active is particularly challenging for many IEC staff. On campus and block teaching sessions occur in February and during mid-semester and mid-year recesses. The implications are for IEC to consider whether it can continue to offer the same number of programs in the same manner of delivery. Discussions have begun with staff to consider these issues.

RQF BENCHMARKING EXERCISE WITH NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY: 2007

In 2007 Macquarie University undertook a research benchmarking exercise with Newcastle University. Participants were research active staff at each university, with research activity defined as 4 DEST Proxy publications in the years 2001 – 2006 inclusive. Esteem factors were also included. Each researcher included in the exercise was given a rating out of 5, with 5 being the highest possible rating. IEC’s ratings were as follows:

Rating

IEC staff

Distribution MQ

 

N

%

%

5

0

0

3

4

2

14

28

3

8

57

49

2

3

21

15

1

1

7

5

Total staff included

14

100%

in

trial

It

can be seen from this table that there were proportionally more IEC staff rated from 1 – 3

according to RQF criteria, compared with MQ as a whole, with proportionally fewer staff receiving the higher ratings of 4 and 5. Since this RQF trial, IEC has appointed a CORE Professor in Early Childhood, who is playing a mentoring role and increasing research productivity in the department, especially with early career researchers. Also numbers of DEEWR rated publications increased in 2008 and 2009, whereas the RQF trial was based on publications from 2001 – 2006.

AUDIT OF END USER TAKE UP: 2007

The Divisions of ACES and Information and Computing Science (ICS) were involved in a trial end user audit activity run by the MQ Research Office in 2007, collecting data on “the social, environmental, cultural, economic and/or commercial impact that the University’s research has had, both within Australia and nationally” (EKT Audit guidelines, Research Office) from 2003 - 2007.

While results for individual departments in ACES are not available, the percentage of staff receiving ratings from A (most impact) to D (least impact) are as follows:

 

ACES %

ICS %

A rating

13

3

B rating

12

12

C rating

16

12

D rating

16

16

These results indicate that ACES research has had more impact on end users than research in ICS. It should be noted, however, that these were self evaluations by staff and that the system

of determining impact was a trial only.

HDR CANDIDATES

ACES: Full time total EFTSL 2004 – 2008 commencing and continuing HDR Candidates by attendance

 

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

ACES Full

19.3

16.3

16.4

19.7

20.9

time

ACES Part

28.1

24.4

20.6

21.4

21.3

time

L&P Full

100.7

116.5

122.2

155.2

200.0

time

L

& P Part

48.5

50.3

55.7

61.1

56.8

time

MQ Full time

591.2

670.9

674.8

744.0

876.2

Total

MQ Part time

264.9

270.2

270.2

283.0

281.7

Total

HDR load and completions by former Division and Faculty Total

 

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

ACES

83

79

70

76

80

candidates

ACES HDR

47.5

40.6

36.9

41

42.2

EFTSL

ACES

6

6

13

10

12

Completions

ACES

   

4

3

6

withdrawals

L

& P

240

254

285

333

375

candidates

L

& P HDR

149

166.8

177.9

216.3

256.7

EFTSL

         

L

& P

25

29

35

36

46

Completions

L

& P

   

11

10

13

withdrawals

Faculty Total

196.5/31

207.4/35

214.8/48

257.3/46

298.9/58

RESEARCH AWARDS

Marina Papic received the NSW Institute of Educational Research’s award in recognition of outstanding educational research.

Fay Hadley received the Early Childhood Australia Doctoral Thesis Award for 2009.

Shirley Wyver received the Dean’s Citation for Outstanding HDR Supervision in 2008.

RESEARCH AND HDR COLLABORATION WITHIN MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY

Research collaborations within Macquarie University illustrate the strong links between IEC and Psychology, as evidenced in joint supervision of HDR students, co-publications and research project work. While not as frequent, IEC also shares HDR supervision with Education and research activities with Education and Linguistics.

AREAS FOR DEVELOPMENT

Increase HDR enrolments. Progress has already been made, with 6 new HDR students already accepted for PhDs in 2010. A further 8 students are currently undertaking the Postgraduate Certificate in Research Methods as a pathway to doctoral studies. Predicted number of HDR candidates in IEC in 2010 = 20

Support more staff to become research active. Systems are in place to support IEC staff to increase their research activity and productivity.

EXTERNAL ENGAGEMENT

In accordance with its vision and mission of maximizing opportunities for children and families, the Institute of Early Childhood has over 100 years of experience in advocating for the rights of women, children and disenfranchised and vulnerable members of society. IEC staff have played a major role in influencing government policy and social reforms.

Many IEC staff have senior roles or are members in professional organizations including:

Early Childhood Australia and the NSW Early Childhood Reference Group.

IEC is frequently approached by bodies interested in incorporating an early childhood perspective into their work. Recent approaches have included the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Sydney Botanic Gardens, NSW Police Education Officers and the Oasis Young Parents Program of the Salvation Army.

Institute Advisory Board

The Institute Advisory Board has provided a valuable source of external advice to the Institute of Early Childhood over many years. The advisory group keeps the IEC in close touch with developments in the early childhood field and provides external review of the IEC programs. The IAB also advises the Institute about its research, community outreach and other activities. Members of the IAB are invited to the positions on the basis of their long term contribution to the early childhood field.

Mia Mia Child and Family Study Centre

Mia Mia offers the community, staff and students a long day care service for children from 6 weeks until they start school. This centre is an integral part of the Institute of Early Childhood and provides unique opportunities for staff research and observational studies for units offered in child development, curriculum studies and early childhood education. The observation of children at the centre is of value in assisting students to see and understand the practical implications and the relevance of course work to the teaching situation. Three videos have been made to date and are used as a teaching resource in many early childhood institutions.

The centre is used for

child study;

curriculum planning and teaching studies; parent/teacher studies;

developing students' ability through mini-teaching and micro-teaching experience, and production of teaching films and videotapes

Due to the international reputation of IEC and Mia Mia Child and Family Centre, it welcomes a large number of visitors each year, including staff from universities in China, India, Korea and Japan.

Music Program for Children

The Institute of Early Childhood's music program for children offers music classes for children aged from 4 months to 8 years of age. The classes provide children with an introduction to music. There are opportunities for children to experience a wide range of music activities including singing, moving and dancing to music, playing instruments, listening to music and playing listening games as well as creating music.

International Student Playgroup

This supported playgroup was established in collaboration with the MQ International Office to provide support for international students with young children. Using the facilities and expertise of the IEC, the playgroup meets fortnightly.

EXAMPLES OF INVOLVEMENT AT NATIONAL AND STATE POLICY LEVEL

Four IEC staff members, Sandra Cheeseman, Marina Papic, Peter Whiteman and Jane Torr, were part of the consortium which successfully tendered to write the Early Years Learning Framework. This is Australia’s first national early childhood curriculum framework, and it will be required in all early childhood centres from mid-2009.

In March 2009, IEC welcomed the Honourable Maxine McKew MP, then Parliamentary Secretary for early Childhood Education and Childcare. Ms McKew emphasised the Government’s commitment to create additional university places for Early Childhood Teachers.

Wendy Shepherd was invited to serve as an expert in early childhood on a COAG working party to review quality standards for children’s services. This panel was convened by Maxine McKew.

Jennifer Bowes participated in the COAG Working Group on Education, Skills, Training and Early Childhood Development in Melbourne on May 2008.

The Children and Families Research Centre at IEC, led by Jennifer Bowes, has rapidly expanded since it was launched by Julie Bishop in 2007. It has received $423,000 in funding and has 4 doctoral students and 6 postdoctoral research fellows.

Mia Mia has also received visits from the Julie Bishop in 2007, Maxine McKew in December 2007, 2008 and 2009, senior policy advisers to the Julia Gillard in 2008 and 2009, and senior policy advisers from the NSW Department of Community Services.

Jane Torr and Wendy Shepherd (director of Mia Mia Child and Family Centre) participated in the 2-day symposium in Canberra on 28 and 29 May, to frame a national curriculum for children from birth to 8 years, called the Early Years Learning Framework. This framework when completed will be implemented nationally.

Jane Torr represented MU at an Australian Council of Deans of Education meeting with Maxine McKew to discuss the release of 1500 new Commonwealth Supported Early Childhood education places over the next 3 years.

Jane Torr and Sandra Cheeseman attended the launch by the Julia Gillard of the Big Steps in Childcare campaign run by the LHMU Childcare Union, which represents childcare workers nationally.

Jane Torr was commissioned to provide a review of the national quality assurance guidelines for children’s services by the National Childcare Accreditation Council.

Alma Fleet and Ros Kitson from IEC, and Jeanne Townsend from Warawara, are part of an Indigenous teacher education initiative in NSW, called InTER.

Alma Fleet has been involved in a National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Early Childhood Skills training network, initiated by Eva Cox and the Dusseldorp skills forum.

Manjula Waniganayake, Sandra Cheeseman and Katey de Gioia were commissioned by the Professional Support Coordinators Alliance to undertake a national research study into the professional development support needs of childcare staff in Australia.

Professor Jacqueline Hayden coordinated a meeting of experts at IEC as part of the Joint Learning Initiative on Children and Ethnic Diversity (JLICED).The JLICED has been funded

at close to $1 million AUD to investigate issues around young children and ethnic diversity from diverse perspectives. Hayden's learning group investigated the relationship between early childhood programs and macro level policies which target social inclusion. Experts from around the world were invited to meetings at Macquarie University on Sept 10 and 11,

2009.

EXAMPLES OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND ENGAGEMENT WITH THE FIELD

Several IEC staff are involved in practitioner inquiry projects, focused on preparing early childhood staff to implement the Early Years Learning Framework.

Alma Fleet, Catherine Patterson and more recently Katey de Gioia, have been engaged in various projects with schools including Santa Sabina Junior School, Barker College, PLC Croydon,

Marina Papic and Camilla Gordon have provided professional development in early numeracy and sciences to 93 professionals who work in Aboriginal-run children’s services in rural, regional and remote areas in NSW.

Rosalind Kitson and Peter Whiteman of the Institute of Early Childhood (IEC) have been actively engaged in a joint venture with the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales (COFA), under the auspices of the Australia Council for the Arts to prepare educational resources to accompany the Australian contribution to La Biennale di Venezia. This prestigious visual arts exhibition presents contemporary works of artists representing more than 77 countries and is visited by over 295,000 people during the five months of the exhibition.

Kerry Hodge is among 106 Australians to receive a Churchill Fellowship in 2009. Kerry has been awarded the Nancy Fairfax Churchill Fellowship, which will allow her to visit overseas programs for gifted preschoolers to learn about their approaches to identifying gifted children, curriculum, parent involvement and transition to school. She will also visit demonstration centres for early childhood curricula that show potential for use with gifted preschoolers and have discussions with providers of pre-service and in-service training in gifted education for early childhood teachers. Kerry will travel to the USA, Canada and the United Kingdom for 6 weeks in April-May 2010.

ISSUES, TRENDS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

INCREASED COLLABORATION WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

IEC has a long history of collaborating with the Department of Education and other departments in Macquarie University at the postgraduate and HDR levels. IEC and Education jointly deliver a suite of units which are components of their Master, Diploma and Certificate programs. Several HDR candidates have experienced shared supervision between IEC and Education. IEC also has strong research and teaching connections with Psychology and Linguistics.

Collaboration at the undergraduate level in the delivery of the primary component of the BEd(ECE) program will be important for increased efficiency in sharing resources and expertise. There have already been moves in 2009 to facilitate greater collaboration. IEC students will be required to enrol in EDUC289 from 2010 onwards, and there are plans for IEC and Education to jointly offer units in the creative arts and physical health and personal development. Likewise, IEC is working with staff in Linguistics and Mathematics to make LING120 and MATH106 required units to meet the NSW Institute of Teachers requirements.

IEC supports the creation of closer links with other departments but considers it essential that it retains its name and organizational status as a separate department within Macquarie University. Employers of IEC graduates seek early childhood teachers who have a sound knowledge and understanding of the philosophical orientations and pedagogical practices unique to the field. The distinctiveness of early childhood is emphasised in the governance structures and accountability requirements which drive the work of contemporary early childhood educators. Opportunities for shared teaching with the School of Education at the undergraduate level will need to be undertaken carefully and in consultation with early childhood employer bodies and stakeholders, in order to maintain the high reputation of the Institute and to assuage concerns in the field of a “push-down” curriculum with minimal early childhood content.

Amalgamation with other departments may jeopardize the overall integration and functioning of this unique organizational unit. In universities where early childhood departments have been amalgamated with education departments, there has been a gradual decline in the early childhood focus and less visibility and status accorded to early childhood education. Given the size of the Institute of Early Childhood, its historical and cultural origins which create cohesiveness and a sense of shared purpose in its staff, and its international reputation and “brand visibility”, it is in the interests of Macquarie University to retain the Institute of Early

Childhood as the largest distinct early childhood teacher education and research facility in Australia and indeed in the Southern Hemisphere.

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Joint Development of a Graduate Diploma in Primary Education

As early childhood initial teacher education programs in NSW move to a birth to 12 model, there is a growing demand from graduates seeking to upgrade their qualifications to cover the Primary age range. Without additional costs to IEC and Education, it would be possible to develop a Graduate Diploma in Primary Education for early childhood graduates.

Shared Practicum Office K – 6

It is in the interests of both departments to combine their K – 6 practicum offices to increase efficiency, share knowledge and expertise, and present a unified face to the primary teaching community. This is particularly relevant as separate funding for Practicum has been reduced substantially in 2010 and will not be available at all in 2011.

Increased Internationalisation

There is a desperate shortage of early childhood teachers in Australia, NZ and throughout Asia. IEC is frequently approached to provide teacher education programs in Korea, China, Hong Kong, Singapore and India. International student numbers in IEC’s programs has increased in the last 2 years at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Feedback from international students currently at IEC indicates that they value the status attached to a degree from the Institute of Early Childhood.

Postgraduate Certificate in Child Development

Discussions are underway to offer this program jointly with the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. Personnel working in NGOs and other aid organizations are increasingly aware of the plight of young children in disadvantaged communities, and in conflict and natural disaster areas, and are seeking to increase their understanding of young children’s development and wellbeing.

Prepared by Associate Professor Jane Torr Head of IEC

13/11/09

APPENDIX 1

IEC Enrolment Numbers for 2006-2009

Unit

Avail

2006

2007

2008

2009

ABEC112

External

X

X

24

X

ABEC120

External

X

30

X

21

ABEC121

External

X

28

X

X

ABEC150

External

X

X

24

X

ABEC210

External

X

27

X

X

ABEC211

External

X

X

25

X

ABEC212

External

X

24

X

1

ABEC215

External

X

X

X

18

ABEC220

External

31

X

X

X

ABEC222

External

X

27

X

1

ABEC225

External

X

X

X

24

ABEC240

External

X

X

X

20

ABEC241

External

23

X

X

X

ABEC311

External

30

X

X

12

ABEC320

External

X

22

X

X

ABEC340

External

X

22

X

1

ABEC350

External

32

X

X

X

ABEP130

External

X

X

20

X

ABEP230

External

26

X

X

14

ABEP330

External

X

19

X

X

ABFS110

External

X

29

X

X

ABFS210

External

X

2

X

X

ABMG140

External

X

X

24

X

ACES842

Internal

5

X

2

X

ACES842

External

7

X

10

X

ACES845

External

X

X

1

3

ECED817

Internal

X

16

25

28

ECED818

Internal

X

13

25

26

ECED819

Internal

X

20

24

29

ECED819

External

X

11

10

18

ECED820

Internal

X

16

23

28

ECED820

External

X

15

21

11

ECED821

Internal

X

13

22

19

ECED822

Internal

X

18

21

15

ECED822

External

X

17

15

8

ECED823

Internal

X

16

22

15

ECED823

External

X

16

6

12

ECED824

Internal

X

15

22

15

ECED824

External

X

7

9

8

ECED825

Internal

X

X

11

22

ECED826

Internal

X

X

13

20

ECED826

External

X

X

12

11

ECED827

Internal

X

X

12

21

ECED828

Internal

X

X

8

20

ECED828

External

X

X

12

9

ECED829

Internal

X

X

9

13

ECED830

Internal

X

X

x

13

ECED830

External

X

X

16

6

ECED840

Internal

2

X

X

X

ECED840

External

6

X

X

X

ECED841

Internal

3

X

X

X

ECED841

External

12

X

X

X

ECED842

Internal

5

X

X

X

ECED842

External

7

X