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SCREEN ANALYSES 17

If fractions obtained from a series of fluid velocities 1-in. and 2-in. sizes, but the 9-in. and 10-in. sizes are
are collected and weighed, a complete size analysis almost alike for practical purposes. All the material
may be obtained. under 1 in. down to a micron would be in one
Centrifuging. Sedimentation is too slow for fraction.
particles of diameterunder J^ micron. Therefore a A more satisfactory series of screens is one in which
centrifugal force is substituted for the normal force the opening of each successive member varies from
of gravity when the size of very small particles is to the next by a multiplier such as to give a series having
be determined. openings of 8, 4, 2, 1, J^, and so forth. These sizes
Other Methods. The coercive (magnetic) force
TABLE 4. TYLER SCREENS6
of a paramagnetic material such as magnetite is
directly proportional to its specific surface, regardless
Interval, = v/2, for Closer Sizing
of its shape. This relationship has served as a Standard
means of determining the surface, or size, of such Interval
particles. The amount of light transmitted through
-V2,
Wire
Aperture, Aperture, Aperture, Mesh
a suspension of a definite quantity of the finely Diameter,
in. in. mm Number
divided solid in kerosene in a tube of specified dimen in.

sions depends upon the projected area of the par


ticles and is used as a method of determining particle
1.050 1.050 26.67 0.148
size.2 The surface size of quartz particles has been 0.883 22.43 0.135
measured in research work by the rate of solution 0.742 0.742 18.85 0.135
in solutions of hydrofluoric acid. It is assumed that 0.624 15.85 0.120
0.525 0.525 13.33 0.105
the rate of solution in mass per unit of time is directly
0.441 11.20 0.105
proportional to the surface area of quartz. 0.371 0.371 9.423 0.092
0.312 7.925 2^ 0.088
0.263 0.263 6.680 3 0.070
SCREEN ANALYSES 0.221 5.613 3^ 0.065
0.185 0.185 4.699 4 0.065
Screens are generally used for control and analyti
0.156 3.962 5 0.044
cal work. of wire mesh cloth,
They are constructed 0.131 0.131 3.327 6 0.036
the diameters of the wire and the spacing of the 0.110 2.794 7 0.0326
wires being closely specified. These screens form 0.093 0.093 2.362 8 0.032

the bottoms of metal pans about 8 in. in diameter 0.078 1.981 9 0.033
0.065 0.065 1.651 10 0.035
and 2 in. high, whose sides are so fashioned that the
0.055 1.397 12 0.028
bottom of one sieve nests snugly on the top of the 0.046 0.046 1.168 14 0.025
next. 0.0390 0.991 16 0.0235
Screen Aperture and Screen Interval. The 0.0328 0.0328 0.833 20 0.0172

clear space between the individual wires of the 0.0276 0.701 24 0.0141
0.0232 0.0232 0.589 28 0.0125
screen is termed the screen aperture. Frequently
0.0195 0.495 32 0.0118
the term mesh is applied to the number of apertures
0.0164 0.0122
0.0164 0.417 35
per linear inch; for example, a 10-mesh screen will 0.0138 0.351 42 0.0100
have 10 openings per inch, and the aperture will be 0.0116 0.0116 0.295 48 0.0092

0.1 in. minus the diameter of the wire. Mesh is 0.0097 0.248 60 0.0070
0.0082 0.0082 0.208 65 0.0072
therefore a nominal figure which does not permit
0.0069 0.175 80 0.0056
accurate computation of the screen openings or 0.0058 0.0058 0.147 100 0.0042
aperture without knowledge of the wire sizes used 0.0049 0.124 115 0.0038
by the manufacturer. 0.0041 0.0041 0.104 150 0.0026

The screen interval is the relationship between the 0.0035 0.088 170 0.0024
0.0029 0.0029 0.074 200 0.0021
successive sizes of screen openings in a series. A
0.0024 0.061 230 0.0016
simple arithmetic series might be used such that the 0.0021 0.0021 0.053 270 0.0016
screen openings are 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 in., 0.0017 0.043 325 0.0014
for example. The weakness of such a system is 0.0015 0.0015 0.038 400 0.0010

that there is a large relative difference between the