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Technical Basis for ASME Code Case N-830, Revision 1 (MRP-418) Direct Use of Master Curve
Technical Basis for ASME Code Case N-830, Revision 1 (MRP-418) Direct Use of Master Curve

Technical Basis for ASME Code Case N-830, Revision 1 (MRP-418)

Direct Use of Master Curve Fracture Toughness Curve for Pressure-Retaining Materials of Class 1 Vessels, Section XI

2017 TECHNICAL REPORT
2017 TECHNICAL REPORT
Curve Fracture Toughness Curve for Pressure-Retaining Materials of Class 1 Vessels, Section XI 2017 TECHNICAL REPORT

Technical Basis for ASME Code Case N-830, Revision 1 (MRP-418)

Direct Use of Master Curve Fracture Toughness Curve for Pressure-Retaining Materials of Class 1 Vessels, Section XI

3002010332

Final Report, October 2017

EPRI Project Manager T. Hardin

All or a portion of the requirements of the EPRI Nuclear Quality Assurance Program apply to this product.

All or a portion of the requirements of the EPRI Nuclear Quality Assurance Program apply to

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The following organizations prepared this report:

Phoenix Engineering Associates, Inc. 119 Glidden Hill Road Unity, NH 03743

Principal Investigator

M. Erickson

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) Washington, DC 20555-0001

Principal Investigator

M. Kirk *

Structural Integrity Associates, Inc. 11515 Vanstory Drive, Suite 125 Huntersville, NC 28078

Principal Investigator

G. Stevens

* The statements, findings, conclusions and recommendations expressed in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

This report describes research co-sponsored by EPRI.

This publication is a corporate document that should be cited in the literature in the following manner:

Technical Basis for ASME Code Case N-830, Revision 1 (MRP-418): Direct Use of Master Curve Fracture Toughness Curve for Pressure-Retaining Materials of Class 1 Vessels, Section XI. EPRI, Palo Alto, CA: 2017. 3002010332.

This document was prepared as part of the ASME Code, Section XI Working Group on Flaw Evaluation. The authors would like to thank the volunteer members of the ASME Code, Section XI Working Group on Flaw Evaluation for their valuable input, feedback, and review of this report, as well as their help and participation in solving the sample problems associated with this effort.

Working Group on Flaw Evaluation Members Who Contributed to This Report:

Russell Cipolla

Intertek

Yil Kim

GE POWER

Mark Kirk & Mike Benson

U.S. NRC

Darrell Lee

BWXT

Cheng Liu & Steven Xu

Kinectrics

Do Jun Shim

Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.

ABSTRACT

Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code) provides K Ic and K Ia fracture toughness models for ferritic steels. These models are based on linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) methods, and were initially developed in the 1970s for incorporation into the ASME Code. The models have remained largely unchanged since their original incorporation into the code. Since the publication of the technical bases documents for the fracture toughness equations contained in Section XI, considerable advancements to the state of theoretical and practical knowledge have occurred, particularly with respect to the amount of available fracture toughness data. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) now has a fracture toughness database containing well over 9,000 fracture toughness values ranging across specimen sizes, test temperatures and strain rates. As part of the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) re-evaluation program, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the industry used this database to develop an integrated model that predicts the mean trends and scatter of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic steels throughout the temperature range from the lower shelf to the upper shelf fracture regions. This integrated model includes the transition fracture toughness Master Curve approach that describes the temperature dependence and scatter in K Jc in the lower transition temperature region, a new model for describing the temperature dependence and scatter of J Ic on the upper shelf, and includes identification of a temperature at which the K Jc curve transitions to upper shelf behavior, marking the upper limit of applicability for the K Jc transition curve. This collection of models was used by the NRC to establish the index temperature screening limits adopted in the Alternate PTS Rule documented in Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50.61a (10CFR50.61a).

The ASME Section XI Working Group on Flaw Evaluation (WGFE) has an ongoing effort intended to implement the K Jc Master Curve (MC) into Section XI of the ASME Code. This effort began with indirect implementation of the MC through use of a transition reference temperature, RTT 0 , defined by using the K Jc T 0 value to replace RT NDT for indexing the ASME K Ic curve. In Revision 0 of Code Case N-830, direct use of the MC was defined as an alternative to using the ASME K Ic curve. Revision 1 to Code Case N-830 (N-830-1) incorporates the complete and self-consistent suite of fracture toughness models developed over the last decade to completely describe the temperature dependence, scatter, and interdependencies between all the fracture toughness metrics (i.e., K Jc , K Ia , J Ic , J 0.1 , and J-R) from the lower shelf through the upper shelf regimes. This report describes the technical basis for Code Case N-830-1.

Keywords

Master curve Fracture toughness model T 0 fracture toughness reference temperature RT NDT fracture toughness reference temperature ASME Section XI Appendix A flaw evaluation procedures

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Deliverable Number: 3002010332 Product Type: Technical Report Product Title: Technical Basis for ASME

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Deliverable Number: 3002010332

Product Type: Technical Report

Product Title: Technical Basis for ASME Code Case N-830, Revision 1 (MRP-418):

Direct Use of Master Curve Fracture Toughness Curve for Pressure-Retaining Materials of Class 1 Vessels, Section XI

PRIMARY AUDIENCE: ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Committees

SECONDARY AUDIENCE: Engineers using Master Curve fracture toughness for vessel integrity evaluations

KEY RESEARCH QUESTION

Currently, the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI methods for evaluation of vessel integrity are based on methodology developed in the 1970s for conservatively representing fracture toughness without actually measuring fracture toughness. It is desirable for the Code to provide a modern suite of best estimate fracture toughness models that provide a complete description of fracture toughness crack initiation and arrest behavior from lower shelf, through transition, to ductile upper shelf regimes for all ferritic steels.

RESEARCH OVERVIEW

The ASME Section XI Working Group on Flaw Evaluation (WGFE) has an ongoing effort intended to implement the K Jc Master Curve (MC) into Section XI of the ASME Code. This effort began with indirect implementation of the MC through use of a transition reference temperature, RT T0 , defined by using the K Jc T 0 value to replace RT NDT for indexing the ASME K Ic curve. In Revision 0 of Code Case (CC) N-830, direct use of the MC was defined as an alternative to using the ASME K Ic curve. The proposed Revision 1 to CC N- 830 (N-830-1) incorporates the complete and self-consistent suite of fracture toughness models developed over the last decade to completely describe the temperature dependence, scatter, and interdependencies between all the fracture toughness metrics (i.e., K Jc , K Ia , J Ic , J 0.1 , and J-R) from the lower shelf through the upper shelf regimes. This report describes the technical basis for Code Case N-830-1. This document was prepared by a small task group to provide information to the Working Group on Flaw Evaluation to support finalization and decision-making on CC N-830-1.

KEY FINDINGS

The technical bases for the fracture toughness models contained in ASME CC N-830-1 are presented in this report. The suite of best estimate fracture toughness models provides a complete description of fracture toughness crack initiation and arrest behavior from lower shelf, through transition, to ductile upper shelf regimes for all ferritic steels.

The best estimate models used for CC N-830-1 are based on updated techniques and available data, sound physical bases, and extensive empirical evaluations that collectively promote confidence in their use for flaw assessment following Nonmandatory Appendix A of ASME Section XI and similar methods.

These models are appropriate for use in both deterministic and probabilistic assessments, as each model describes the full distribution in values about the mean for any temperature and material condition.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY • Equations that allow an analyst to determine any percentile value of interest

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Equations that allow an analyst to determine any percentile value of interest for any of the fracture toughness parameters K Jc , K Ia , J Ic , J 0.1 , and J-R are presented for each fracture toughness model. Specific values of these parameters may be used in deterministic assessments, or the entire distributions may be sampled for use in probabilistic assessments.

WHY THIS MATTERS

The fracture toughness models presented in this report provide a consistent, best-estimate representation of ferritic steel fracture toughness behavior, including uncertainties, to allow quantitative fracture toughness assessments that ensure the safety of nuclear (and other) ferritic components.

HOW TO APPLY RESULTS

Equations are presented for each fracture toughness model that allow an analyst to determine any percentile value of interest for any of the fracture toughness parameters K Jc , K Ia , J Ic , J 0.1 , and J-R. Specific values of these parameters may be used in deterministic assessments, or the entire distributions may be sampled for use in probabilistic assessments.

LEARNING AND ENGAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES Regulatory authorities considering the approval of use of Master Curve technologies for integrity evaluations may also be interested in this report.

EPRI CONTACTS: Timothy C. Hardin, Technical Executive, thardin@epri.com

PROGRAM: Materials Reliability Program, 41.01.04

IMPLEMENTATION CATEGORY: Reference; Early R&D

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NOMENCLATURE

Category

Symbol

Unit

Description

 

KIc

MPa√m

plane strain fracture initiation toughness

KJc

MPa√m

K-equivalent of the value of J measured at cleavage crack initiation

KIa

MPa√m

fracture toughness measured at cleavage crack arrest

Different Fracture

     

Toughness Metrics

JIc

kJ/m 2

ductile crack initiation toughness measured according to ASTM E1820

Jx

kJ/m 2

ductile crack initiation toughness after “x” mm of ductile crack extension

J-R

kJ/m 2

variation of ductile fracture toughness with stable crack extension

 

T0

°C

temperature at which the KJc Master Curve 1 has a

median value of 100 MPa√m

Index

   

temperature at which the KIa master curve has a median value of 100 MPa√m

Temperatures

TKIa

°C

TUS

°C

temperature at which the median KJc Master Curve crosses the mean J Ic upper shelf master curve

Temperature

T

°C

temperature at the crack-tip

Parameters to

p

dimensionless

percentile for the lower bounding curves

Define Statistical

   

T-statistic multiplier for the lower bounding curves.

Bounding Curve

M

p

dimensionless

Standard normal distribution with a mean of zero and standard deviation of 1.0

 

KJc p

MPa√m

value of KJc at percentile p

Used in the KIc or KJc equations

Kmin

MPa√m

20 MPa√m

Ko

MPa√m

value of K Jc at the 63.2 nd percentile

Used in the KIa equation

KIa p

MPa√m

value of K Ia at percentile p

1 Master Curve is only capitalized when referring to the K Jc Master Curve. In all other cases, “master” is used as an adjective to describe the type of curve-fit.

Category

Symbol

Unit

Description

   

JIc p

kJ/m 2

value of JIc at percentile p

 

JX p

kJ/m 2

value of J X at percentile p

 

C

kJ/m 2

leading coefficient of an exponential fit to the J-R curve. value of C in the equation J = C(Δa) n

 

dimensionless

slope of an exponential fit to the J-R curve. The value

 

n

of n in the equation J = C(Δa) n

 

σΔJIc

kJ/m 2

standard deviation of JIc

J

Ic mean

kJ/m 2

mean value of JIc

Used in the J-R and JX equations

Jc(US)

kJ/m 2

value of Jc at TUS

ΔJIc(US)

kJ/m 2

value of ΔJIc at TUS

   

E

GPa

Young’s modulus

 

A

kJ/m 2

fitting parameter in σΔJIc equation

 

B

1/°C

fitting parameter in σΔJIc equation

 

P

dimensionless

percentile in σΔJIc equation

 

P1

dimensionless

percentile in σΔJIc equation

 

P2

dimensionless

percentile in σΔJIc equation

 

ν

dimensionless

Poisson’s ratio, a value of 0.3 can be used

CONTENTS

ABSTRACT

 

v

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

vii

NOMENCLATURE

ix

1 INTRODUCTION

1-1

1.1

ASME Section XI, Appendix A Approach

1-2

1.1.1 Summary of ASME Section XI, Appendix A Flaw Evaluation Procedures

1-2

1.1.2 Treatment of Uncertainties in Appendix A

1-4

1.1.3 Technical Basis for the Appendix A Methodology

1-5

1.1.4 Issues with Appendix A Methodology

1-8

1.2

Objectives of Proposed Code Case N-830-1

1-10

2 OVERVIEW OF CODE CASE N-830-1

2-1

2.1 Introduction

 

2-1

2.2 CC N-830-1 Contents

2-2

 

2.2.1 Inquiry

2-2

2.2.2 Reply

2-2

2.2.3 Discussion of N-830-1

2-2

3 FRACTURE TOUGHNESS MODELS IN CC N-830-1

3-1

3.1

Cleavage Crack Initiation

Toughness, K Jc

3-1

3.1.1

Description of the K Jc Model

3-2

3.1.2

Basic Form

3-2

3.1.3

Distribution

3-2

3.1.4

Theoretical Basis

3-3

3.1.5

Empirical Basis

3-4

3.1.6

Model Validation

3-5

3.1.7

Limits of Applicability

3-6

3.2

Cleavage Crack Arrest Fracture Toughness, K Ia

3-7

3.2.1

Description

of Model

3-7

3.2.2

Basic Form

3-7

3.2.3

Distribution

3-7

3.2.4

Theoretical Basis

3-8

3.2.5

Model Validation

3-9

3.2.6

Limits of Applicability

3-9

3.3

Ductile Crack Initiation Fracture Toughness, J Ic

3-9

3.3.1

Description

of Model

3-10

3.3.2

Basic Form

3-10

3.3.3

Distribution

3-10

3.3.4

Theoretical Basis

3-11

3.3.5

Empirical Basis

3-12

3.3.6

Model Validation

3-13

3.3.7

Limits of Applicability

3-15

4 FRACTURE TOUGHNESS LINKAGE MODELS IN CC N-830-1

4-1

4.1

The Relationship Between Cleavage Crack Initiation (K Jc ) and Upper Shelf (J Ic );

T

US

4-1

4.1.1

Mathematical Form of the Model

4-1

4.1.2

Physical Basis

4-2

4.1.3

Empirical Basis

4-3

4.1.4

Model Validation

4-3

4.1.5

Limits on Validity of the Model

4-4

4.2

The Relationship Between Cleavage Crack Initiation (K Jc ) and Arrest (K Ia )

4-4

4.2.1 Mathematical Form of Model

4-4

4.2.2 Physical Basis for the Model

4-5

4.2.3 Empirical Basis

 

4-6

4.2.4 Model Validation

4-7

4.2.5 Limits on Validity of the Model

4-7

4.3

The Relationship Between Upper Shelf (J Ic ) Crack Initiation and Upper Shelf

Crack Growth (J-R)

 

4-7

4.3.1 Mathematical Form of the Model

4-8

4.3.2 Empirical Basis

 

4-8

4.3.3 Model Validation

4-10

4.3.4 Limits on Validity of Model

4-10

5 IMPLICATIONS OF PROPOSED CHANGES

 

5-1

5.1 Introduction

 

5-1

5.2 Sources of Uncertainties in Fracture Mechanics Analyses

5-1

 

5.2.1 Flaw Size Uncertainty

 

5-2

5.2.2 Stress and Stress Intensity Factor Uncertainty

5-2

5.2.3 Fracture Toughness Uncertainty

 

5-3

5.3

Treatment of Uncertainties

 

5-3

5.3.1 Treatment of Uncertainty Due to Flaw Size and Location

5-3

5.3.2 Treatment

of

Uncertainty

Due

to

Stress

5-6

5.3.3 Treatment of Uncertainty on Fracture Toughness

5-8

5.4 CC N-830

 

5-11

5.5 Code Case N-830-1 Uncertainty Treatment

 

5-12

5.6 Summary

 

5-14

6 POTENTIAL CODE/REGULATORY APPLICATIONS OF CC N-830-1

6-1

6.1 Introduction

 

6-1

6.2 Past Use of the Wallin Master Curve

 

6-2

 

6.2.1 Within the ASME Code

 

6-2

6.2.2 NRC Applications

6-2

6.3

Currently Foreseen Uses of the CC N-830-1 Suite of Fracture Toughness Models

6-4

7 SAMPLE PROBLEMS AND RESULTS

 

7-1

7.1 Introduction

 

7-1

7.2 The Sample Problem

 

7-1

 

7.2.1 Allowable

Toughness Values

 

7-2

7.2.2 Allowable Flaw Size Values

7-3

8 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

 

8-1

9 REFERENCES

 

9-1

A SAMPLE

PROBLEM

1

STATEMENT

 

A-1

B SAMPLE

PROBLEM

2

STATEMENT

B-1

Sample Problem 2 Statement

B-1

C DRAFT CC N-830-1 (VERSION USED FOR SAMPLE PROBLEM 2)

C-1

Direct Use of Fracture Toughness for Flaw Evaluations of Pressure Boundary Materials in Class 1 Ferritic Steel Components

C-1

Section XI, Division 1

 

C-1

-1000

Scope

C-1

-2000

Reference Temperature

C-2

-3000

Toughness

Variability

C-3

-4000

Toughness

Curves

C-4

-4100 Cleavage Crack Initiation toughness, K Jc

C-4

-4200 Cleavage Crack Arrest Toughness, K Ia

C-5

 

-4300

Ductile

Crack

Initiation Toughness, J Ic

C-5

-4400 Ductile Crack Extension Toughness, J-R and J X

C-6

-5000 Applicability Limits

 

C-7

-5100 Ductile Crack Extension Range

C-7

-5200 Lower Temperature Limits on K Jc and K Ia

C-7

-5300 Upper Temperature Limits on J Ic , J-R, and J x

C-7

 

-5400

Intermediate Temperature

Limits

C-7

-6000

Units Conversions

C-8

-7000

Nomenclature

C-8

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1-1 Appendix A Flaw Evaluation Procedure to Evaluate the Continued Serviceability of Ferritic

1-4

Figure 1-2 K Ic Curve (top) and K Ia [K ID ] Curve (bottom) Referenced to RT NDT

1-7

Figure 3-1 Comparison of the temperature dependence exhibited by the J Ic data for the EURO Forge with the model proposed in [65] (i.e., Eqn. (3-15) with uncertainty bounds based on Eqn Figure 3-2 Comparison of the revised J Ic model, Eqns. (3-9) and (3-10), with J Ic data from steels having three different upper shelf toughness (J Ic(288) ) levels Figure 4-1 Relationship between T US and T 0 [11,

3-14

3-16

4-2

Figure 4-2 Schematic illustrating the relationship between the transition and upper shelf toughness, and defining T US as the intersection of the Wallin MC and the upper shelf

4-3

Figure 4-3 Illustration of variation in the temperature separation between the K Ia and K Jc master curves as a function of T 0 [73]

4-5

Figure 4-4 Illustration of the effects of strain rate increase on yield strength elevation for materials having different degrees of prior strain hardening [61]

4-6

Figure 5-1 Schematic illustration of physical causes for systematic over-estimation of flaw size using Figure 5-2 Cumulative probability distribution function showing the relationship between RT NDT and T 0 Figure 5-3 Plot of K Jc , 1% MC bound, 99% MC bound, the RT NDT -indexed K Ic curve, and the RTT 0 -indexed K Ic curve Figure 5-4 Plot of K Jc , 1% MC bound, 99% MC bound, the RT NDT -indexed K Ic curve divided by 2, and the RTT 0 -indexed K Ic curve divided by 2 (for emergency/faulted operating

5-4

5-9

5-9

5-10

Figure 5-5 Plot of K Jc , 1% MC bound, 99% MC bound, the RT NDT -indexed K Ic curve divided by 10, and the RTT 0 -indexed K Ic curve divided by 10 (for normal/upset operating Figure 5-6 Plot of K Jc , 1% MC bound, 99% MC bound, the CC N-830 5% MC bound, the CC N-830 5% MC divided by 2, and the CC N-830 5% MC divided by 10 (for emergency/faulted and normal operating conditions,

5-10

5-11

Figure 5-7 Plot of K Jc , with the 1% MC bound, 99% MC bound, the CC N-830-1 1% MC bound, the CC N-830 5% MC bound divided by 2, and the Appendix A RTT 0 - indexed K Ic curve divided by 2 (all for emergency/faulted operating

5-13

Figure 5-8 Plot of K Jc , 1% MC bound, 99% MC bound, the 0.5% MC bound (CC N-830- 1), the 5% MC bound divided by 10 (CC N-830), and the RTT 0 -indexed K Ic curve divided by 10 (Appendix A) for normal/upset operating conditions

5-14

Figure A-1 Sample Problem Properties

A-2

Figure C-1 Illustration of Intermediate Temperature Limits when 5 th Percentile Bounding Curves are used

C-8

LIST OF TABLES

Table 4-1 RMSD values for different product forms

4-8

Table 4-2 Composition of the J-R curve database

4-9

Table 6-1 Summary of unirradiated RTT 0 value for various Linde 80 weld wire

6-4

Table 7-1 Material Properties for use in Appendix A and Proposed Code Case N-830-1 Sample Problem 2

7-2

Table B-1 Material Properties for use in the Sample Problem 2

B-2

Table B-2 Table for Presentation of Results of the Phase II Sample Problem

B-3

Table C-1 Values of p and M p Corresponding to Different Bounding Toughness Curves

C-3

Table C-2 RMSD values for different product

C-7

Table C-3 Unit Conversion Coefficients

C-8

Table

C-4

Symbols

C-9

Table

C-5

Definitions

C-10

1

INTRODUCTION

Historically, the safety of nuclear power plant pressure-retaining components has been demonstrated using the rules of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code, or Code). Section III of the ASME Code provides Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components, and Section XI provides Rules for In-Service Inspection of Nuclear Plant Components. Both sections of the Code provide methods for assessing stresses and moments contributing to the forces available to drive crack growth in components containing postulated or detected flaws. The Code primarily makes use of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) methods to calculate stress intensity factors, and has fracture toughness models based on empirical data to estimate material resistance to crack extension. Much of the current Code is based on LEFM models of material behavior in the presence of flaws that were developed more than 40 years ago at a time when drop-weight tests [1] and Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact tests [2] were the accepted standards used to estimate metrics that correlate with fracture toughness, such as the nil-ductility temperature (NDT) or ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

The ferritic steels used to fabricate nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) were selected to have sufficient strength and toughness to provide adequate safety margins against overload failure and catastrophic crack extension at all operating temperatures and conditions. To ensure adequate toughness, the RPV steels selected for power plant construction in the 1960s and 1970s, were chosen to have a DBTT well below the expected operating conditions of the plant. The CVN and the drop-weight tests were among the most commonly used test methods for characterizing the DBTT temperature of these steels at that time. However, these tests do not directly provide the specimen-independent measures of fracture toughness required to support an ASME Code analysis. These test results can only be correlated to the measure of the material’s resistance to crack extension. Linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness testing, as prescribed by ASTM Standard E399 [3], was developed to provide a direct measure of a material’s resistance to crack extension using a measure of the critical stress intensity factor required for crack extension, KIc. Such a value allows for more direct comparison to the crack driving force in stress intensity factor calculations.

Linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness testing for RPV materials often requires large specimens to ensure that validity criteria for small scale yielding are met, and the test specimens and procedures are often expensive. As such, testing an adequate number of specimens to fully define a fracture toughness transition curve and reference temperature is expensive. Because of this, the nil-ductility test (used to define NDT) and the CVN test, both of which use smaller test specimens and simpler test procedures compared to those required for valid K Ic determination, became the dominant methods for characterizing material toughness transition temperature, RT NDT , defined as the reference temperature for nil ductility transition to signify the reference temperature below which a material exhibits limited ductility in the presence of a notch. Calculation of RT NDT from a combination of data from NDT and CVN testing is described in Paragraph NB-2331 of Section III of the ASME Code [4]. The prevalence of NDT and CVN

Introduction

data, combined with work performed to correlate these values with K Ic [5, 6], resulted in an RT NDT -referenced K Ic curve that was adopted into the ASME Code, Section XI, Appendix A flaw assessment procedures [7].

There is uncertainty inherent in both the RT NDT and K Ic values determined for a specific material. This uncertainty is caused by the natural material inhomogeneity that controls fracture behavior, and the uncertainties surrounding modeling assumptions, test procedures, and analytical methods used for determining these values. These uncertainties can be treated explicitly by quantifying the uncertainties in these values (defining their distributions) and then either taking a lower bound value, or assigning a factor that is applied to the best-estimate value that directly accounts for the uncertainties. If the distributions in the data are not well established, the uncertainties can be treated implicitly by making conservative assumptions about the operating conditions or using conservative models of material behavior. Explicit treatments of uncertainties are preferred, as they are more transparent, their impact more easily understood, and they can more readily be changed as knowledge and information are expanded. The method employed in ASME Code, Section XI, Appendix A uses both implicit and explicit treatments of uncertainties, which obscures accurate representation of material behavior and increases the difficulty of taking advantage of increased knowledge of material properties.

1.1 ASME Section XI, Appendix A Approach

ASME Code, Section XI, Nonmandatory Appendix A, “Analysis of Flaws,” [7] provides analytical procedures for use in determining the acceptability of flaws for continued service that are detected during inspection and that exceed the flaw acceptance standards of IWB-3500. The procedures are based on LEFM principles and apply to ferritic components with wall thicknesses of 100 mm (4 inches) or greater, and having simple geometries and stress distributions. Appendix A is limited to ferritic steels having a minimum yield strength of 350 MPa (50 ksi) or less, and provides procedures for three areas of flaw assessment: (1) characterization of the flaw size, shape, and location for use in the LEFM analysis, (2) methods for performing crack driving force (stress intensity factor) calculations, and (3) methods for determining allowable material properties (fracture resistance) to be used in the analyses.

1.1.1 Summary of ASME Section XI, Appendix A Flaw Evaluation Procedures

Appendix A, developed based on the work described in References [5, 6] describes a method that can be used to determine whether a ferritic steel component with a detected flaw that exceeds the IWB-3500 flaw acceptance criteria is acceptable for continued use. The methods involve the following steps [7]:

1. Determine the actual flaw configuration in accordance with IWA-3000.

2. Characterize the flaw in accordance with IWB-3610.

3. Resolve the flaw into a simple shape that can be readily analyzed.

4. Determine the stresses at the location of the observed flaw for normal, emergency, and faulted conditions.

5. Calculate stress intensity factors for each condition.

6. Determine the necessary material properties, including the effects of irradiation, if applicable.

7. Determine the following critical flaw parameters:

Introduction

a) a f = expected end-of-life flaw size

b) a c = minimum critical flaw size for normal conditions

c) a i = minimum critical initiation flaw size for emergency and faulted conditions.

8. Using the critical flaw parameters, a f , a c and a i , apply the flaw evaluation criteria of IWB- 3600 to determine whether the observed flaw is acceptable for continued service.

The methods described in Appendix A are based in LEFM, and therefore only apply to conditions for which the ferritic steel of interest exhibits lower transition fracture toughness behavior. For conditions in which the ferritic steel of interest exhibits upper shelf toughness behavior, Appendix A is not applicable. For vessels in these situations the methodology described in Nonmandatory Appendix K, “Assessment of Reactor Vessels with Low Upper Shelf Charpy Impact Levels,” [8] may be used. The Code does not provide any guidance to identify when this transition in behavior occurs.

Figure 1-1 contains a diagram showing the steps of the Appendix A process that are described in 1-8 above. The steps are separated into the major components of the process, as depicted by the Flaw Evaluation, Crack Driving Force Calculation, and Resistance Calculation shaded areas. Flaw evaluation procedures are described in Article A-2000 of Appendix A, and the procedures for calculating the stress intensity factors for use in assessing flaw growth and acceptability are described in Article A-3000. The procedure for determining the appropriate material property for use in comparing to the stress intensity factor is described in Article A-4000. Of particular note, Article A-4000 specifies the lower bounding fracture toughness curve, K Ic , as a function of the difference between the metal temperature, T, and the material RT NDT determined in accordance with Paragraph NB-2331 of Section III of the ASME Code [4]. Where appropriate, RT NDT is adjusted to account for the effects of neutron irradiation embrittlement. Use of RT NDT as a reference temperature value for the K Ic curve provides a level of implicit conservatism that has proven to be sufficiently conservative with respect to expected material toughness behavior [5]. However, the level of conservatism is unknown and varies for different materials because neither RT NDT nor K Ic provide accurate representations of material fracture toughness behavior.

Introduction

Introduction Figure 1-1 Appendix A Flaw Evaluation Procedure to Evaluate the Continued Serviceability of Ferritic

Figure 1-1 Appendix A Flaw Evaluation Procedure to Evaluate the Continued Serviceability of Ferritic Components.

1.1.2 Treatment of Uncertainties in Appendix A

RT NDT is not a true measure of material fracture behavior but only an indication of the temperature below which a material exhibits little to no ductility. Because RT NDT is determined using a combination of nil-ductility drop-weight and Charpy v-notch data, there is a lot of scatter inherent in RT NDT values, and inconsistency in how well a material’s actual ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) is represented by RT NDT . The ASME NB-2331 methods for determining RT NDT were developed to provide conservative estimates of the DBTT.

The use of RT NDT to reference the K Ic curve provides a level of implicit conservatism believed sufficient to very conservatively bound expected material fracture toughness behavior [5]. It is difficult to quantify the conservatism provided by RT NDT because neither RT NDT nor the K Ic lower bound curve provide accurate representations of material fracture toughness behavior. This inaccuracy results in an inconsistent treatment of uncertainties as the level of conservatism (and accounting for uncertainties) varies with each material.

A relatively recent change to Appendix A includes use of a best-estimate T 0 value, if it is available for the material of interest, to calculate an RTT 0 value to be used as the reference temperature adjustment for the K Ic curve instead of RT NDT . While T 0 is considered an accurate representation of a material’s fracture toughness behavior, the ASME Code adds a “margin” by defining RTT 0 as:

RTT 0 = T 0 + 19.4°C

or

RTT 0 = T 0 + 35°F

Eq. 1-1

Introduction

to ensure a very conservative estimate of material resistance to crack growth.

Further conservatism is added in the ASME approach when comparing the K Ic values to the crack driving forces based on the criteria required by Paragraph IWB-3612 of Section XI. The allowable stress intensity factor criteria impose additional structural factors depending on the applicable Service Level: K Ic must exceed K I 10 for normal operating conditions, and must exceed K I 2 for postulated emergency or faulted conditions. The bases for the use of the factors of 2 and 10 are described in Reference [6]. This explicit use of these structural factors further adds additional conservatism with unquantified uncertainty to the Appendix A approach.

Although many changes have been implemented in Appendix A since it was first published, the RT NDT -referenced K Ic curve still provides a conservative method for characterizing material resistance to crack extension. The technical bases for Appendix A are documented in the Welding Research Council (WRC) Bulletin 175 [5] and EPRI Report NP-719-SR [6]. Together, these two documents define flaw characterization methods, material fracture toughness curves, and crack driving force calculation procedures currently contained in Appendix A.

1.1.3 Technical Basis for the Appendix A Methodology

In 1971, the Pressure Vessel Research Committee (PVRC) of the WRC undertook the task to review research and make recommendations on toughness requirements for ferritic materials in nuclear power plant components to both the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee and to the Atomic Energy Commission. Specifically, these recommendations, based on knowledge that was current at the time, were intended to provide ferritic-material-toughness requirements for pressure retaining components of the reactor coolant pressure boundary operating below 370°C (700°F). The goal was that these criteria, together with the stress limits allowed by the ASME Code, would permit the establishment of safe operating procedures for nuclear reactor components under normal, upset, and test conditions.

The requirements and recommendations arising from WRC 175 [5] that pertain to Appendix A, Article A-4000, “Material Properties,” included the following:

A lower bound, temperature-dependent K Ia curve was defined based on a curve drawn below all the K Id (the stress intensity factor under dynamic loading) and K Ia data available at the time, referenced to the drop-weight nil-ductility temperature, T NDT (K Ic data was too high to have any impact on the lower bounding curve) as shown in Figure 1-2. The equation to describe the temperature dependence of K Ia is given by:

K Ia = 13.675 exp [0.0261 (T- T NDT )] + 29.4 (in units of MPam, o C)

K Ia = 1.223 exp {0.0145[T- (T NDT +160)]} + 26.8 (in units of ksiin, °F)

Eq. 1-2

This K Ia curve was then termed the reference toughness K IR curve and was indexed using T NDT to eliminate the need for performing expensive K Ic tests.

To ensure that the transition temperature used to reference the K Ia curve was well below the upper shelf temperature for the material of interest, a criterion was described that combined nil-ductility test results to establish T NDT , and CVN tests to define the temperature at least 33°C (60°F) above T NDT at which Charpy specimens exhibited at least 0.89 mm (35 mils = 0.35 in.) of lateral expansion. These two results were combined to define RT NDT as T 0.89(mm)

Introduction

33 °C (T 35(mils) - 60°F), such that RT NDT was defined as the higher of T NDT or T 0.89(mm) – 33°C

(T 35(mils) - 60°F). An alternate requirement involving both 0.89 mm (35 mils) of lateral expansion and a minimum CVN energy of 68 J (50 ft-lb) was also suggested, i.e., T 68J – 33°C

(T 50(ft-lb) - 60°F). The minimum of the CVN energy and the lateral expansion criteria were recommended to eliminate materials that might have a low transition temperature or very low upper shelf energies from consideration using the K IR -RT NDT procedure.

A very conservative defect size that included a depth of one-quarter of the wall thickness (¼t), a length of six times the depth (or 1.5t), a sharp crack tip, and an orientation perpendicular to the maximum stress direction was recommended.

A safety factor was recommended for application to the crack driving force stresses along with a flaw size safety margin by recommending a reference flaw size considerably larger than the actual or anticipated maximum flaw size.

Procedures for calculating the allowable loading were presented in an Appendix to WRC 175 [5] that involved primary membrane stresses due to pressure and secondary thermal stresses caused by thermal gradients near the crack tip.

Additional safety factors on loading beyond safety factors between 1.0 and 2.0 applied to stresses were not recommended as these were believed to be outside the scope of the PVRC.

The recommendations presented in WRC 175 [5] were modified by Marston, et al. [6] of the newly formed ASME Section XI Working Group on Flaw Evaluation before they were implemented into Appendix A. The modifications included using RT NDT to index the K Ia curve instead of T NDT . A bounding K Ic curve was defined by drawing a curve beneath all the available static plane strain fracture toughness data referenced to RT NDT for the same materials, in a manner similar to that used to define the K Ia curve, defining the temperature dependence of K Ic as:

K Ic = 36.5 + 22.783 exp [0.036 (T - RT NDT )]

K Ic = 33.2 + 20.734 exp [0.02 (T - RT NDT )]

(in units of MPam, °C)

(in units of ksiin, °F)

Eq. 1-3

The K Ia and K Ic curves are shown in Figure 1-2.

While no upper shelf toughness was defined in WRC 175, the EPRI report, or Appendix A, Marston, et al. recommended that the calculations made using the newly proposed J-integral and equivalent energy methods showed upper shelf toughness exceeded 220 MPam even for irradiated materials [7, 8]. Based on this, a value of 220 MPam has been used by many analysts to define the upper limit of applicability for the K Ic curve.

Introduction

Introduction Figure 1-2 K I c Curve (top) and K I a [K I D ]
Introduction Figure 1-2 K I c Curve (top) and K I a [K I D ]

Figure 1-2 K Ic Curve (top) and K Ia [K ID ] Curve (bottom) Referenced to RT NDT ([6]).

Introduction

Because there have been no changes made to these material toughness curves since they were originally published in the 1970s, they retain their inherent conservatisms. These two curves are both similarly affected by degradation due to irradiation through RT NDT . Because both curves are referenced to T-RT NDT , and since irradiation embrittlement is characterized by the temperature at which the CVN energy is 41 J (30 ft-lb), T 41J , the separation between K Ic and K Ia does not change with irradiation. The upper limit of applicability for the linear elastic K Ic curve of 220 MPam (200 ksiin), which is sometimes assumed by analysts, also does not change with irradiation. However, upper shelf Charpy energy values falling below 68 J (50 ft-lb) 2 require an Equivalent Margins Assessment (EMA) by Appendix G to 10 CFR Part 50 [9]. An EMA can be performed using USNRC RG 1.161 [10], or using elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) as described in Appendix K of the ASME, Section XI Code, or using other similar methods that have been developed, such as the Owner’s Groups evaluations representing different nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) vendors.

1.1.4 Issues with Appendix A Methodology

Issues arise in use of the Appendix A method in two main areas:

1. Unquantified uncertainties that are treated both implicitly and explicitly, which result in a very conservative bias in the characterization of material resistance to fracture.

2. Use of models that do not consistently represent material behavior resulting in varying, and unknown, degrees of conservative bias in different situations.

The conservatisms inherent in the Appendix A approach arise, in large part, due to the continued use of RT NDT to reference the K Ic and K Ia curves, as well as the shape (i.e., temperature dependence) of the curves themselves. While correlations have been established between K Ic and CVN behavior versus temperature and irradiation, conservatisms remain and additional margins are typically added to account for material inhomogeneity, uncertainty in material property information available for specific materials, and uncertainties in the use of CVN to provide a measure of material fracture toughness [5, 6]. Structural factors are also added to the estimate of material fracture toughness to account for uncertainties in the knowledge of the stresses at the crack tip used to calculate the crack driving force for crack growth.

Considerable advancements to the state-of-knowledge, both theoretical and practical, have occurred since WRC 175 and NP-719-SR were published, particularly with regards to the amount of available data. These data were used in recent studies to develop a set of integrated, best estimate models that predict the mean trends and scatter of fracture toughness of ferritic steels throughout the temperature range between lower shelf behavior, through DBTT to upper shelf behavior [11, 12]. Comparisons of these new models to the Appendix A methodology reveal areas where Appendix A is inconsistent with trends predicted by the large amount of ferritic steel fracture toughness data now available. Some of these areas include:

1. On the lower shelf, the low-temperature asymptote of the Appendix A K Ic curve does not represent a lower bound to all available data resulting in a non-conservative bias. The ASME model over-estimates the lower shelf fracture toughness at temperatures ≈60°C or more below RTT 0 for all values of RTT 0 . For un-irradiated materials, such low temperatures cannot

2 Parameters in the historical discussion were presented in both Metric and English units. All subsequent discussion will be in terms of metric units.

Introduction

be achieved during normal operations. However, as radiation embrittlement causes the material transition temperature to approach regulatory limits (e.g., the PTS limits of 132 and 149°C in 10CFR50.61 [13]), a temperature 60°C below these values may be within the achievable temperature range during a cool-down event.

2. The temperature dependence of the Appendix A K Ic curve does not accurately reflect the temperature dependence of transition toughness data at all temperatures. This results in a conservative bias, particularly in the lower transition temperature region.

3. On the upper shelf, the K Ic limit of applicability of 220 MPa√m exceeds available data, especially after consideration of irradiation effects. This could result in a non-conservative bias in estimates of fracture toughness. Above RTT 0 of 0°C, 220 MPa√m exceeds the upper shelf fracture toughness of most RPV steels by a considerable amount, suggesting a practical limit on K Ic should be informed by the upper shelf fracture toughness. The upper shelf of many ferritic materials falls below 220 MPa√m, even when J 0.1 3 (the value of J at 0.1 inch crack extension, or 2.54 mm of crack extension) is used as the characterizing parameter. The temperature at which the mean K Jc curve equals the mean J Ic curve, T US , can be used to define the upper limit of applicability for the K Ic curve based on supporting data [11, 14].

4. The separation between the K Ic and K Ia curves depends on the amount of irradiation embrittlement, a functionality not captured by the Appendix A equations. Recently developed data-based models show that, as RTT 0 increases, the K Ic and K Ia curves converge. This convergence is not a feature of the Appendix A curves, which maintain a constant temperature separation. The result of using a constant temperature separation to represent the actual material behavior is that the Appendix A model is overly pessimistic for high values of RTT 0 , indicative of highly irradiated material, and the model over-estimates K Ia at low values of RTT 0 .

5. The temperature above which upper shelf behavior can be expected depends on the amount of irradiation embrittlement, a functionality not captured in the Appendix A equations.

With the development of best-estimate, probabilistic models of material fracture toughness behavior and a clearer understanding of the mechanisms driving crack extension in ferritic steels, the conservatisms inherent in the Appendix A fracture toughness models are no longer necessary. With increased knowledge, extensive additions of data, and better test methodologies, the uncertainties for these models may be quantified and set appropriately to reflect the uncertainties for Charpy, Nil-Ductility and LEFM-based models. In many cases, measurements of both unirradiated and irradiated K Jc fracture toughness are available for various limiting RPV materials, providing a means by which direct comparisons between crack driving force, K I , and the material resistance, K Jc , can be made. This knowledge provides a technical and rational basis for the reduction, or elimination, of the conservatism and unnecessary margins that may prohibit continued plant operation. Test methodologies are continuing to improve with better, standardized ASTM testing procedures to determine more reliable K Jc values from miniature specimens, thereby enabling use of surveillance CVN specimen for determining irradiated T 0

3 Throughout this report we adopt the common nomenclature used in the international literature of J 0.1 (representing the value of J at 0.1 inch of crack extension, and equivalently, representing the value of J at 2.54 mm of crack extension). All formulas for J x (J at x mm of crack extension) are in metric units with x representing the amount of crack extension in millimeters.

Introduction

values. All these advances provide for superior modelling and a sound technical basis for incorporating more accurate, T 0 -based models into Appendix A of the ASME Code.

1.2 Objectives of Proposed Code Case N-830-1

The objective of Code Case N-830-1 is to implement an integrated suite of best-estimate fracture toughness models that can all be determined from a knowledge of a material-specific T 0 value for use in component flaw evaluations. These models are appropriate for use in both deterministic and probabilistic assessments, as each model describes the full distribution in values about the mean for any temperature and material condition. Specific goals for CC N-830-1 implementation include:

1. To ensure that material properties are accurately represented by the latest available best- estimate models, that uncertainties in fracture toughness are well quantified, characterized, and explicitly treated either by use of bounding values or well-understood margins,

2. To ensure that fracture toughness models are appropriately linked to consistently account for the effects of hardening and irradiation,

3. To take advantage of varying degrees of knowledge regarding material properties. For example, measured T 0 values for a given material should result in lower margins, and T 0 values established through correlations should result in larger margins, and

4. To enable predictions and estimates of all toughness values for any level of embrittlement from knowledge of a single value, T 0 .

This report describes the technical bases for new fracture toughness models contained in Code Case N-830-1 that satisfy the above objectives. This document was prepared by a small task group to provide information to the Working Group on Flaw Evaluation to support finalization and decision-making on CC N-830-1. Chapter 2 provides a summary of the information contained in CC N-830-1. Chapters 3 and 4 provide information supporting all of the models contained in CC N-830-1 including the data supporting the empirical derivations, the physical basis for the trends observed in the models, and work performed in validation of the models. Chapter 5 discusses sources and treatment of uncertainty in Appendix A calculations including comparisons between treatment of uncertainty in the current Appendix A, the original CC N-830 and, the proposed CC N-830-1. Chapter 6 discusses applications for CC N-830-1, and Chapter 7 describes results of a several sample problems worked by the WGFE in support of CC N-830-1 development. This report ends with a summary of information supporting CC N-830-1 in Chapter 8.

2

OVERVIEW OF CODE CASE N-830-1

2.1 Introduction

With standardization of the test methodology for obtaining the T 0 fracture toughness reference temperature in ASTM E1921 [15] the stage was set for implementation of T 0 into the ASME Code. This implementation occurred via the adoption of two Code Cases: N-629 in Section XI and N-631 in Section III [16, 17]. These Code Cases proposed use of a T 0 -based reference temperature for use in indexing the ASME’s K Ic curve in Section XI and Section III Code applications. RTT 0 is a T 0 -based transition toughness reference temperature defined by Equation

(1-1).

Code Case (CC) N-830 was approved by ASME in 2014, and was the first direct implementation of the K Jc Master Curve (MC) into the ASME Code [18]. The CC made use of the 5 th percentile lower bound of the Wallin Master Curve as an alternative to the ASME K Ic curve to characterize material resistance to fracture in flaw evaluations. Since that time, work has progressed within the ASME Section XI Working Group on Flaw Evaluation (WGFE) to expand and improve the original CC methods.

To take advantage of the best-estimate fracture toughness models recently developed and linked to T 0 , CC N-830 was modified to include a suite of self-consistent fracture toughness models describing material fracture toughness behavior from lower shelf, through transition, to upper shelf behavior [19]. These models include linkage models that describe the inter-relationships controlling changes in toughness behavior for all toughness parameters with irradiation. The proposed Revision 1 of CC N-830 incorporates a complete suite of best-estimate models that completely describe the temperature dependence, scatter, and interdependencies (such as those resulting from irradiation or other hardening mechanisms) between all fracture toughness metrics (i.e., K Jc , K Ia , J Ic , J 0.1 , and J-R). By incorporating both a statistical characterization of fracture toughness, and the ability to estimate a toughness curve for any percentile bound, CC N-830-1 provides a consistent basis for the conduct of both conventional deterministic flaw evaluations, as well as probabilistic evaluations. Additionally, both transition and upper shelf toughness properties are defined in a consistent manner in one document to provide the analyst an easy means to determine what fracture behavior (i.e., transition or upper shelf) can be expected for any condition.

Overview of Code Case N-830-1

2.2 CC N-830-1 Contents

2.2.1 Inquiry

The inquiry for CC N-830-1 is as follows:

“What current best-estimate (alternative) fracture toughness models and relationships may be used for flaw evaluations performed in accordance with Nonmandatory Appendix A and/or Nonmandatory Appendix K in lieu of the current requirements of these Appendices for the values of K Ic , K Ia , J Ic , J 0.1 , and J-R?”

2.2.2 Reply

The initial portion of the reply for CC N-830-1 is as follows:

“It is the opinion of the Committee that the fracture toughness models based on the Master Curve Method in accordance with ASTM E-1921 may be used in lieu of the current requirements of Nonmandatory Appendices A or K when determining values for K Ic , K Ia , J Ic , J 0.1 , and J-R using the procedures and equations given below.”

CC N-830-1 uses a T 0 value measured in accordance with ASTM Standard E1921, “Standard

Test Method for the Determination of Reference Temperature, T o , for Ferritic Steels in the Transition Range” [15]. Using T 0 , it is possible to estimate the variation of fracture toughness with temperature across the entire range of interest to operating vessels for Class 1 ferritic

reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials. This estimate can be used as an alternative to:

The crack initiation fracture toughness curve, K Ic , of Nonmandatory Appendix A, Subarticle A-4200 for pressure retaining materials other than bolting, and

The crack arrest fracture toughness curve, K Ia , of Nonmandatory Appendix A, Subarticle A-4200 for pressure retaining materials other than bolting, and

The J-integral fracture resistance for the material at a ductile flaw extension of 0.1-in. (2.5 mm), J 0.1 , of Nonmandatory Appendix K for pressure retaining materials other than bolting.

The J-integral fracture resistance for the material and its variation with ductile flaw extension, Δa, J-R, of Nonmandatory Appendix K for pressure retaining materials other than bolting.

The remaining content of the reply to CC N-830-1 defines all these relationships.

2.2.3 Discussion of N-830-1

CC N-830-1 defines best-estimate models of fracture toughness for implementation into the

ASME Code. The CC provides definitions for temperature dependencies and distributions for best-estimate models that describe fracture toughness behavior from the lower shelf, through the transition region, and to the upper shelf. In addition, the linkage models that enable consistent representation of fracture toughness behavior across all temperatures and conditions are defined.

Overview of Code Case N-830-1

These models are based on large databases of measured fracture toughness values such that uncertainties in values are well understood, characterized, quantified and validated. Full distributions are defined for each fracture toughness parameter to enable consistent and explicit treatment of uncertainties in both deterministic and probabilistic assessments.

CC N-830-1 defines bounding values for percentiles of interest for use in deterministic

evaluations. The linkage models ensure consistent data bounds for all material hardening conditions provided the same percentiles are selected for the transition and upper shelf toughness models. The distributions defined for all parameters provide the information required to sample across the expected range of values at each temperature for probabilistic assessments, with the linkage models ensuring that these distributions change synchronously, as material conditions

change.

The materials fracture toughness models presented in CC N-830-1 are meant to be used in lieu of

those described in Article 4000 of the current Appendix A for describing material resistance to

fracture.

flaw analyses. Use of the same percentile bounding value for all toughness curves from lower shelf through upper shelf, coupled with elimination of structural factors, ensures consistent representation of material behavior for all fracture modes. While these recommendations for CC N-830-1 apply explicitly only to the fracture toughness parameter, we argue in Chapter 5 that explicit factors applied to stress and flaw size are not needed due to the conservatisms inherent to

non-destructive flaw sizing and the analytical determination of stresses.

To ensure that the uncertainties inherent in all aspects of flaw analysis are treated appropriately

and consistently, the WGFE plans to develop explicit partial structural factors to apply to each

parameter (flaw characterization, driving force analysis and material resistance) in the flaw analysis to more accurately reflect the uncertainties in that specific parameter. The recommendations contained in CC N-830-1 for appropriate bounding values to use for material

fracture toughness only account for the uncertainties in the fracture toughness parameter.

The best estimate fracture toughness models, linkage models, and technical bases for the models contained in CC N-830-1 are presented in Chapters 3 and 4. The model temperature dependence

and distributions are described, along with a summary of their development and validation,

including limitations on their use.

Lower bounding values of the distributions are recommended for use in deterministic

3

FRACTURE TOUGHNESS MODELS IN CC N-830-1

There are three basic fracture toughness models presented in CC N-830-1; K Jc , and J Ic to describe the initiation fracture toughness in the transition region and on the upper shelf, and K Ia to describe the crack arrest fracture toughness. Measured values of K Jc and K Ia are used to define indexing temperatures (T 0 and TK Ia , respectively) that are material specific. These indexing temperatures were used to normalize the K Jc and K Ia curves to establish a single temperature dependence for each curve. The J Ic curve was normalized to establish the temperature dependence of J Ic for all ferritic steels based on the J Ic value at 288 °C, JIc 288 . Each of these models was empirically derived from large databases of toughness values, but the model forms were informed from a mechanistic understanding of the fracture process that provides a theoretical underpinning to identify empirical trends. The assumption used for all models was that applied energy absorption by dislocation motion prior to fracture is the mechanism controlling the temperature dependence of the fracture toughness. Therefore, these models are applicable only to ferritic steels, and only in temperature regions where deformation is dislocation-dominated.

3.1 Cleavage Crack Initiation Toughness, K Jc

Wallin, working in collaboration with Sarrio and Törrönen, began to publish papers that became the basis for what is now referred to as the Master Curve as part of his doctoral research work in

1984. This work includes two components: a statistical model of cleavage fracture, and a

temperature dependency of fracture toughness common to all ferritic steels [20, 21]. The

concept includes:

a weakest-link failure model that uses a 3-parameter Weibull function to describe the distribution of fracture toughness values at a fixed temperature,

a temperature-dependence described by an inverse Peierls-Nabarro relationship, and

a methodology to account for the effect of crack front length (size effects) on fracture toughness.

Wallin observed that the temperature dependence of fracture toughness is not sensitive to steel alloying, heat treatment, or irradiation [22]. This observation led to the concept of a universal temperature-dependent curve shape for all ferritic steels. Several investigators have empirically assessed the validity of the universal curve shape for both unirradiated and irradiated nuclear RPV steels, with favorable results [23, 24]. These research and development activities led to publication of an ASTM Standard (E1921-97) to estimate the MC index temperature (T 0 ) [15], and, later, to adoption of Code Case N-629 and N-631 in Section XI and Section III of the ASME Code that uses T 0 to establish an index temperature (RTT 0 ) for the K Ic and K IR curves [16]. Note that Code Case N-629 has been replaced by Code Case N-851 to include the proper relationship to TK Ia [25]. Code Case N-851 also has been incorporated into Section XI of the

Fracture Toughness Models in CC N-830-1

Code in both Appendices A and G, and Code Case N-631 is in the process of being included in Section III in NB-2300 [26]. Research, and test and evaluation programs, aimed at enhancing the wealth of information collected on the applicability of the MC and the MC methodology, provide support for direct implementation of the MC and T 0 for use in assessing the fracture safety of critical RPV components.

3.1.1 Description of the KJc Model

The model developed by Wallin, et al. [20] was first presented as an expression for the probability of failure, P f , of a cracked specimen using the simple Weibull form:

=

− �−

Eq. 3-1

where B 0 and K 0 are normalization constants, K I is measured toughness and K min is taken as 20 MPa√m. B 0 can be set to any desired specimen reference thickness but is usually taken as

25.4 mm.

fracture for a specimen of thickness B 0 . The shape parameter is defined by the exponent of 4.

K 0 is the temperature dependent scale parameter taken as the 63.2% probability of

3.1.2 Basic Form

Wallin first suggested a temperature dependence common to all ferritic steels in work published from his Ph.D. dissertation [21]. Further work demonstrated that the alloying, heat treatment and irradiation conditions characteristic of a particular ferritic material only influences the position of the transition fracture toughness curve on the temperature axis, while the variation of cleavage fracture toughness with temperature follows a common form irrespective of these factors [22]. Definition of the temperature dependence of the MC was based on analysis of irradiated and unirradiated K Jc data from Welds 72W and 73W tested as part of the Heavy Section Steel Test (HSST) Irradiation Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) [23]. Normalizing the data to a 25.4-mm-long crack front, the temperature dependent scale parameter, K 0 , was defined by:

= + [. ( )]

Eq. 3-2

where T is the test temperature and T 0 is the temperature at which the measure K Jc value is 100 MPa√m. The median cleavage crack initiation toughness, K Jc(median) , curve was then defined as:

() = + [. ( )]

Eq. 3-3

3.1.3 Distribution

The distribution of data at any given temperature follows a Weibull distribution with a slope of four and K min equal to 20 MPam [20, 23], as shown in Eqn. (3-1). The cleavage crack initiation toughness, K Jc , curve can be defined at any percentile, p, as follows:

= + ( ){()} /

Eq. 3-4

Eqn. (3-4) can be used to produce both lower and upper bound curves. For example, using a value of 0.05 for p would produce a 5% lower bound curve, while using a value of p equal to

0.95 would produce a 95% upper bound curve. The scale factor, K 0 , is given by Eqn. (3-2).

There is no effect of product form or irradiation on Eqn. (3-4).

Fracture Toughness Models in CC N-830-1

Eqn. (3-4) assumes a crack front length of 25.4 mm (1 in.) in laboratory test specimens with straight crack fronts. While an adjustment to Eqn. (3-4) that accounts for different crack front lengths in laboratory test specimens was developed, currently there is insufficient basis to recommend a generic equation that applies to non-straight cracks fronts (e.g., surface breaking cracks, fully embedded cracks, etc.) that are of interest in structural analyses. CC N-830-1 therefore uses Eqn. (3-4) unless the user can demonstrate that a crack front length other than 25.4 mm (1 in.) is appropriate to the structural situation of interest.

3.1.4 Theoretical Basis

Based on dislocation mechanics considerations, Zerilli and Armstrong (Z-A) [27] described the constitutive behavior of metals using an equation that divided the flow behavior due to loading

into dislocation mechanisms that were thermally activated, and those that were not thermally activated. Short range barriers to dislocation motion are those described by length scales on the order of the atomic spacing of the metal that can be affected by changes in temperature and thus lattice atom vibration. These were included in the thermally activated terms in the constitutive

equation.

spacings that are orders of magnitude greater than the atomic spacing of the lattice structure, are not affected by changes in temperature, so they were included in the non-thermally activated constitutive equation terms. The temperature dependence of the flow stress, as derived by Z-A, was controlled by the short-range barriers to dislocation motion with the temperature dependence described by that of the Peierls-Nabarro stress. For body-centered cubic (BCC) metals (e.g., all ferritic steels), the only short-range barriers to dislocation motion are the lattice atoms themselves. All other metallurgical features, including grain boundaries, other dislocations, point defects, precipitates and inclusions, are all considered to be long range barriers, so they do

not affect any control of the temperature-dependent behavior of ferritic steels.

Following the work by Z-A, Natishan, et al. [28-30] demonstrated that the temperature dependence of the fracture toughness in the fracture mode transition region also depends only on the short-range barriers to dislocation motion established by the lattice structure of the material (BCC for ferritic steels). Other microstructural features that vary with steel composition, heat treatment, and irradiation include grain size/boundaries, point defects, inclusions, precipitates, and dislocation substructures; these features only influence the position of the transition curve on the temperature axis (i.e., T 0 as determined by E1921-97), but not the shape of the curve. This understanding suggests that the myriad of metallurgical factors that can influence absolute strength and toughness values exert no control over the form of the variation of toughness with temperature in fracture mode transition. Moreover, this understanding provides a theoretical basis to establish, a priori, those steels to which the MC and T 0 -linked equations should apply, and those to which they should not. On this basis, the MC and T 0 -linked models are particularly good at describing the temperature-dependence of the fracture toughness of all steels having an iron BCC lattice structure (e.g., pearlitic steels, ferritic steels, bainitic steels, and tempered martensitic steels) from lower shelf, through transition and upper shelf behavior, including arrest toughness behavior. Conversely, these temperature-dependent fracture toughness models should not be applied to un-tempered martensitic steels, which have a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) lattice structure, or to austenite, which has a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure.

The statistical model of cleavage fracture proposed by Wallin, Sarrio and Törrönen (WST) [21] was based on an understanding of the weakest link nature of the fracture mechanisms describing

Long range barriers to dislocation motion, i.e., those barriers that have inter-barrier

Fracture Toughness Models in CC N-830-1

cleavage fracture dating to the 1950s. The idea that cleavage fracture of ferritic steel occurs when a critical tensile stress is exceeded at a critical particle evolves from the work of McMahon and Cohen, Curry and Knott, and Smith, among others [31-37]. In the 1970s, Ritchie, Knott, and Rice (RKR), and Curry and Knott incorporated these observations into models that predict, respectively, how toughness changes with temperature, and the scatter of fracture toughness at a single temperature [32-34, 38, 39]. The WST model begins with the notion, most commonly attributed to RKR, that cleavage fracture will initiate and propagate to failure when a critical opening mode stress is exceeded over some critical distance ahead of the crack tip. WST combined an RKR-type model with Curry and Knott’s idea that cleavage fracture is controlled by a “statistical competition between crack nuclei of varying sizes and frequencies in the rapidly changing stress gradient ahead of a {sharp} crack tip” [38]. The most significant contribution of the WST model is not the introduction of a new understanding of cleavage fracture, but rather the important generalizations WST made concerning the cleavage fracture behavior of all ferritic steels.

3.1.5 Empirical Basis

As discussed previously, the empirical basis of the MC temperature-dependence derivation was based on data obtained from the ORNL HSST Irradiation Program [23]. Within the ORNL program, there were two very large datasets containing both unirradiated and irradiated toughness values for welds 72W and 73W. These very large datasets presented an excellent opportunity to study the effects of irradiation embrittlement on the shape of the transition fracture toughness curve with respect to temperature. Even when large shifts in toughness were observed with irradiation, the shape of the temperature-dependence curves remained the same, confirming the theory that the equation describing the temperature-dependence of transition fracture toughness was common to all ferritic steels regardless of their irradiated condition.

In 1984, Wallin [20] demonstrated that the distribution of cleavage fracture toughness values at a single temperature is well represented by a three-parameter Weibull distribution having two parameters fixed: a minimum value (K min ) of 20 MPa√m, and a shape parameter (b) of four. Wallin showed that this distribution applies to ferritic materials that can be considered to have a random distribution of cleavage initiation sites spread homogeneously throughout the material. The only material dependent quantity needed to establish the distribution of cleavage fracture toughness values at a single temperature is the third parameter of the Weibull distribution, the location parameter, which Wallin called K 0 .

The Weibull shape parameter of four is theoretically based. It depends only on the assumption of small scale yielding in the presence of a sharp crack and a homogeneous distribution of potential cleavage initiators spread throughout the ferrite matrix. Wallin drew data from nine literature sources (several dozen data points in all, including both RPV and non-RPV steels, both base materials and welds) to provide empirical evidence that supported a Weibull shape parameter of four [20].

Wallin observed that some experimental data sets were not represented well by a two-parameter Weibull distribution with a shape parameter of four, despite the fact that the data was in good conformance with the underlying assumptions [20]. Referencing the WST work [21], he argued that the primary reason for this departure from theoretical expectation was that:

Fracture Toughness Models in CC N-830-1

… the two-parameter form of the Weibull distribution is used, which assumes no limiting K Ic value beneath which cleavage crack propagation becomes impossible. The existence of a limiting value is, however, physically reasonable. This can also be shown with the WST-model. The WST-model predicts a K min between 5 and 15 MPa√m below which crack propagation is impossible in more than one grain, causing blunted microcracks.

In [22], Wallin used the same literature database described previously to demonstrate that a

reasonable value of K min lies between 10 and 20 MPa√m. In his 2011 textbook, Wallin states

[40]:

The assumption of K min = 10 MPa√m improves the compatibility between experiments and theory, but the best compatibility is obtained when assuming K min = 20 MPa√m. It was thus concluded that realistic values for K min , in the case of normal structural steels would be of the order of 10-30 MPa√m. Since a reliable experimental estimation of K min is not possible [from limited data] … in the standard MC procedure it was adopted a constant value of K min = 20 MPa√m.

ASTM E1921 adopted the value of 20 MPa√m.

A consequence of the work in [20, 21] is that the effect of specimen size (i.e., crack front length)

on fracture toughness was found to scale with the ¼-power of thickness [41-43]. This derives directly from the Weibull shape parameter of four, so it is a theoretical expectation dependent on the same conditions as the shape parameter (i.e., the assumption of small scale yielding in the presence of a sharp crack and a homogeneous distribution of potential cleavage initiators

throughout the ferrite matrix).

3.1.6 Model Validation

Extensive work has occurred since the late 1990s to validate the three fundamental aspects of the MC:

Distribution of K Jc values following a three-parameter Weibull distribution having two parameters fixed (shape parameter of four and a K min equal to 20 MPa√m).

A “size,” or crack front length, effect having an exponent equal to the ¼-power of thickness.

A temperature dependency having an exponential slope of 0.019.

Some of the more extensive efforts are listed below:

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. nuclear power industry undertook an extensive effort to review the MC for potential use in the ASME Code. That effort resulted in the RTT 0 Code Cases [16, 17, 44]. As part of this activity, an extensive empirical database was compiled from the literature and was used to empirically evaluate the three fundamentals aspects of the MC. This work, and closely related efforts (e.g., the Kewaunee plant submittal), are reported in [45-49].

In 2009, the NRC published its own evaluation, using a similar methodology to that used by the industry, but expanded to include more data from the literature [24].

Fracture Toughness Models in CC N-830-1

Between 2000 and 2005, a group of laboratories working under European Commission funding performed extensive K Jc characterization of a single RPV-grade forging to validate the MC. Key papers from this work include [50, 51].

In the early 2000s, the NRC sponsored a study at the University of California at Santa Barbara focused specifically on the size-effect aspect of the MC. This study featured an extensive K Jc characterization using ex-vessel (Shoreham) materials [52, 53].

Across the board these efforts found no substantial deviations from the Master Curve model as originally proposed by Wallin [20-22] and as represented within E1921.

Over the past 15 years, various publications have suggested possible further refinements of the MC concept that are useful in specific situations. These include the following:

On temperature dependence, References [54] and [55] provide information on how the exponential slope of 0.019 is affected by various factors. There is considerable dispersion in the data, but even so, a tendency to a reduction of the value of 0.019 with increasing embrittlement can be seen. Reference [55] provides a formula to estimate this effect.

On K min , a method proposed in Reference [56] enables estimation of a data-set specific value for K min . However, large amounts of K Jc data are needed to use the procedure, and the value of K min of 20 MPam is still seen as a practicable estimate.

Methods have been developed when it is suspect that a particular K Jc dataset may not have been obtained from a homogeneous population of cleavage crack initiators. These methods are particularly useful in application to T 0 values measured on welds [57].

Some empirical evidence demonstrates that, as embrittlement occurs and the crack initiation and crack arrest distributions merge, the constant Weibull shape parameter of four becomes less accurate. EricksonKirk and co-workers [58, 59] postulated that the cause of this behavior might be stable micro-arrests in high embrittlement materials.

All the foregoing reports were reviewed and form the basis for the limits on the applicability of CC-N-830-1, as appropriate. As additional information comes to light, more refined models may be developed for implementation into a subsequent revision of CC N-830-1.

3.1.7 Limits of Applicability

Based on the development and validation work described above, the following limitations for using the K Jc model are contained in CC N-830-1:

The MC K Jc model cannot be applied to non-ferritic steels (e.g., not to hardened martensite, or austenitic steels).

The MC K Jc model may not be applicable to specimens loaded to very high strain rates. At higher strain rates, there may be a slight effect of increasing strain rate that results in an increase in the slope of the transition toughness curve such that toughness becomes less sensitive to temperature. But even at the rates included in the EPRI database, the effect is very slight [11].

Fracture Toughness Models in CC N-830-1

The MC K Jc model cannot be used at temperatures above which crack extension occurs by dislocation motion, void initiation growth, and coalescence (i.e., upper limit of applicability of the MC).

The MC K Jc model may not be applicable at temperatures below which deformation occurs predominantly by twinning (T 0 -160 o C).

3.2 Cleavage Crack Arrest Fracture Toughness, K Ia

Wallin et al. [60] also developed a model for the temperature dependence and distribution of crack arrest fracture toughness, K Ia . Consistent with the MC treatment, Wallin selected the temperature at which the mean measured K Ia value is 100 MPam for use as the temperature to index data from different heats of steel together to form a single crack arrest transition curve. Wallin called this index temperature TK Ia [60].

3.2.1 Description of Model

In questioning the ASME-specified separation between K Ic and K Ia , Wallin, et al. [60] analyzed nine sets of K Ia data using a method similar to that used in developing the K Jc MC. The authors started with the assumption that the K Ia data followed the same temperature-dependence as was observed for the K Jc MC (Eqn. (3-3)), and defined TK Ia as the temperature at which the mean K Ia value equals 100 MPam. They further reasoned that because crack arrest is not a weakest-link mechanism, there shouldn’t be a size effect since the scatter in data is controlled by the matrix properties and not the distribution of crack initiating particles. Using TK Ia to normalize the data from the nine datasets, Wallin confirmed that the assumed temperature-dependence fit the data well.

3.2.2 Basic Form

The mean temperature dependence of K Ia follows the form given for the initiation MC, and is given by [60]:

= + [. ( )]

where TK Ia is defined relative to T 0 using:

= + . [. ]

Eq. 3-5

Eq. 3-6

Assessment of additional data combined with the nine datasets used by Wallin further confirmed the temperature dependence described by Eqn. (3-5) [61, 62]. Moreover, the data suggest that, similar to the initiation MC, the temperature dependence of K Ia is not affected strongly by irradiation [62].

3.2.3 Distribution

Wallin observed that the scatter in K Ia data was less than that observed for K Jc . He assumed a log-normal distribution so that the proportional scatter in K Ia was constant, matching the empirical evidence. A log normal distribution with a variance equal to 18% of the mean value was found to match the data well [60]. Using Wallin’s log normal distribution the crack arrest toughness curve at percentile, p, is defined as:

Fracture Toughness Models in CC N-830-1

for lower bound curves:

for upper bound curves:

= � − .

() =

+ .

Eq. 3-7

Eq. 3-8

Using Eqn. (3-7), a value for p of 0.05 will produce a 5% lower bound curve. A 95% upper bound curve is similarly defined using Eqn. (3-8). When using either of these equations, the value of p cannot exceed 0.5 (0 < p < 0.5). There is no effect of component thickness, crack front length, or product form on Eqns. (3-7) and (3-8).

3.2.4 Theoretical Basis

In 2002, Kirk, et al [61] presented a physically-based mechanism for crack arrest to support the crack arrest toughness model of ferritic steels developed by Wallin [60]. They present a detailed discussion based in dislocation mechanics that demonstrates that the empirical trends observed by Wallin are anticipated physically.

The mechanism controlling the temperature-dependence of crack arrest toughness is the same as that controlling the temperature dependence of initiation toughness, i.e., dislocation motion through the matrix to absorb the applied energy. Crack initiation occurs when energy absorption by dislocation motion can no longer occur and energy is then available to drive crack initiation and growth. Crack arrest occurs when dislocations once again become mobile in a material and can move to the crack tip to absorb the energy of the propagating crack. Because of this, both K Ic and K Ia data are expected to exhibit the same temperature dependence. This temperature dependence results from the temperature dependence of the Peierls-Nabarro stresses required to move dislocations through the ferritic matrix. The temperature dependence of both toughness values is controlled by the atomic arrangement, or crystal structure of the material. Consequently, the temperature dependence of K Ic and K Ia is expected to be common to all ferritic steels.

Wallin observed a significant reduction in the scatter inherent in K Ia data over that observed in K Ic data. The cause of this reduction is based on the difference in the distribution of dislocation- trapping barriers that affect each property. Crack initiation occurs when dislocations accumulate at non-coherent particles (i.e., carbides, grain boundaries, twin boundaries, etc.) and produce enough strain to elevate the local stress at the barrier high enough to fracture the barrier or cause its decohesion from the matrix. These non-coherent particles are large with respect to size and inter-particle spacing relative to the dislocation trapping sites responsible for crack arrest toughness. The non-coherent particles responsible for initiation are of sub-micron size (i.e., 1/10 micron), and their spacing is on the same order. The dislocation-trapping defects responsible for crack arrest (i.e., vacancy clusters, interstitial clusters, coherent and semi-coherent particles, and other dislocations) are of a much smaller size (nanometer) and have a spacing on the same scale. The possible variation in local stress state over the microstructural distances that control crack arrest is also much smaller than that possible over the microstructural distances that control crack initiation. This is due to the high strain rate in front of the moving crack tip, which constrains the development of a large strain field.

The considerably smaller size and spacing of the defects responsible for crack arrest, relative to those responsible for crack initiation, also suggests that crack arrest toughness should not be greatly influenced by the length of the crack front for all crack front lengths of practical concern

Fracture Toughness Models in CC N-830-1

in RPV applications. The size effect observed in crack initiation toughness is due to the weakest link nature of the initiation event, but crack arrest is not a weakest-link phenomena.

3.2.5 Model Validation

After the initial development of the K Ia curve, Wallin continued his analysis with 53 sets of K Ia data. Most of the data consisted of RPV steels, including plates, forgings and welds, both irradiated and unirradiated, but other steels (non-RPV) were included as well. The data sets covered a wide range of yield strengths (280 MPa to 1,082 MPa). To ensure that TK Ia for each dataset could readily be obtained, it was desired that each dataset contained at least ten specimens [60], although several datasets contained fewer specimens.

TK Ia was determined for each dataset and used to normalize the datasets. The normalized data were then compared to the temperature dependence and log normal distribution assumed in the initial model development, and were found to match well, verifying the initial assumptions. The data were then used to develop a correlation between T 0 and TK Ia , as described in Chapter 4.

Other validation efforts have subsequently been conducted, including that of Hein, et al. [62] in the CARINA and CARISMA projects in which RPV materials consisting of six base materials (plates and forgings), seven welds, and weld heat affected zone (HAZ) materials were tested. The data, including both K Jc and K Ia , were used to confirm the efficacy of the MC approach for assessing German nuclear power plant safety. The materials were tested in both the irradiated and unirradiated conditions to assess the effects of embrittlement on the characterization of toughness behavior. Compact crack arrest and duplex crack arrest specimens were tested following the ASTM E1221-10 standard test method [63], and K Ia values used to determine TK Ia for each data set. The results of this program showed that the K Ia master curve, with the temperature dependence described by Eqn. (3-5) and log normal distribution defined by Eqns. (3-7) and (3-8), well represented all the K Ia data sets tested in the CARINA project.

3.2.6 Limits of Applicability

Based on the development and validation work described above, the following limitations for using the K Ia model are contained in CC N-830-1:

The K Ia model cannot be applied to non-ferritic steels (e.g., not to hardened martensite, or austenitic steels).

The K Ia model cannot be used at temperatures above which crack extension occurs by dislocation motion, void initiation growth, and coalescence (i.e., the upper limit of applicability of the MC).

The K Ia model may not be applicable at temperatures below which deformation occurs predominantly by twinning (T 0 -160 o C), but it is believed that cracks arrest does not occur at such low temperatures.

3.3 Ductile Crack Initiation Fracture Toughness, J Ic

To identify the upper limit of applicability of the K Jc MC, EricksonKirk et al. [11, 62] developed a model describing the temperature dependence of upper shelf fracture toughness (J Ic ) that pertained to all ferritic steels. This upper shelf model was used to define the temperature region

Fracture Toughness Models in CC N-830-1

in which fracture transitioned from cleavage-dominated to ductile-crack-extension-dominated, thereby defining a point beyond which the MC should no longer be used.

Both ductile fracture toughness and flow stress measure the ability of a material to absorb energy by dislocation motion. This similarity in mechanism provided EricksonKirk the justification to look to the temperature dependence of the flow stress to define the temperature dependence of the upper shelf fracture toughness. The J Ic model development was based on the Zerilli- Armstrong (Z-A) constitutive equation describing the temperature dependence of the flow stress that was common to ferritic steels [27]. The equation describing the temperature dependence of J Ic was found to be a simple scalar multiple of the temperature dependence predicted by Z-A for flow stress. By assuming this temperature-dependence, individual datasets of J Ic data versus test temperature were fit, and then each dataset was normalized by the mean J Ic at a single temperature. The J Ic at 288 o C was selected as the reference value to use in normalizing the data for model development [11, 64].

3.3.1 Description of Model

Similar to the Wallin MC, the J Ic equation has two components; a temperature dependence common to all ferritic steels, and a distribution that defines the expected scatter in J Ic at any given temperature.

3.3.2 Basic Form

The equation describing the temperature dependence of the mean value of J Ic , is defined in CC N-830-1 as:

= . {[. ( + . )] . } + () () Eq. 3-9(a)

Where T is the temperature in o C and the reference J Ic value is taken at 288 o C. J c(US) and J Ic(US) are given by:

() =

{ + × [. (. . )]}

() = . {[. ( + . )] . }

= {. }

= . + .

Eq. 3-9(b)

Eq. 3-9(c)

Eq. 3-9(d)

Eq. 3-9(e)

There is no effect of component thickness or crack front length on Eqn. (3-9.).

3.3.3 Distribution

The distribution on J Ic is a function of both temperature and prior hardening, as defined by the mean value of J Ic at 288 o C. Based on the work presented by Kirk, et al. [65], the standard deviation for J Ic , σ ΔJIc , is defined in CC N-830-1 as:

= [()]

Eq. 3-10(a)

=

. (. )

=

{, (. ⋅ − . )}

= {, [, ( , )]}

= ()

= ()

+

.

.

Fracture Toughness Models in CC N-830-1

Eq. 3-10(b)

Eq. 3-10(c)

Eq. 3-10(d)

Eq. 3-10(e)

Eq. 3-10(f)

The ductile crack initiation toughness curve at percentile, p, or (1-p), is defined as follows:

for lower bound curves

for upper bound curves:

=

() =

+

Eq. 3-11(a)

Eq. 3-11(b)

As an example, a value for p of 0.05 would produce a 5% lower bound curve using Eqn. (3-11a), and a 95% upper bound curve using Eqn. (3-11b). When using Eqns. (3-11a) and (3-11b), the value of p should not exceed 0.5 (0 < p < 0.5).

3.3.4 Theoretical Basis

In developing the model for upper shelf fracture toughness behavior, EricksonKirk [11, 64] assumed that, since the upper shelf fracture toughness mechanism was dislocation-controlled (void nucleation, growth and coalescence), it should follow the same, or similar, temperature dependence as the flow stress. Starting with the Zerilli-Armstrong constitutive equation for the flow stress in ARMCO iron [27], the Z-A equation for BCC-material flow stress is given by:

=