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From the

Editors of

Woodsmith

®

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BBOOKCASESOOKCASES

CABINETS & SHELVES

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450450++ IllustrationsIllustrations && PhotosPhotos Step-by-StepStep-by-Step PlansPlans toto Build:Build:
Step-by-StepStep-by-Step PlansPlans toto Build:Build:
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PlansPlans toto Build:Build:
ClassicClassic CabinetsCabinets ClassicClassic CabinetsCabinets for storage & display TimelessTimeless
ClassicClassic CabinetsCabinets
ClassicClassic CabinetsCabinets
for storage & display
TimelessTimeless ShelvesShelves
TimelessTimeless ShelvesShelves
BeautifulBeautiful BookcasesBookcases
BeautifulBeautiful BookcasesBookcases

you can make in a weekend

with custom design options

A Publication of August Home Publishing

Bookcases

cabinets & shelves

President & Publisher: Donald B. Peschke

Editor: Terry J. Strohman

Managing Editors: Vincent Ancona, Bryan Nelson Senior Editors: Ted Raife, Phil Huber Associate Editors: Dennis Perkins, Randall A. Maxey Assistant Editors: Carol Beronich, Catherine Seiser Editorial Intern: Brianna Nelson

Executive Art Director: Todd Lambirth Art Director: Cary Christensen Senior Graphic Designers: Bob Zimmerman, Jamie Downing, Randy Shebeck Senior Illustrators: David Kreyling, Dirk Ver Steeg Harlan V. Clark, Peter J. Larson, David Kallemyn Graphic Designer: Shelley Cronin Graphic Design Intern: Megan Leafgreen

Creative Director: Ted Kralicek Sr. Project Designers: Ken Munkel, Kent Welsh, Chris Fitch, James R. Downing, Mike Donovan Project Designer/Builder: John Doyle Shop Craftsmen: Steve Curtis, Steve Johnson

Sr. Photographers: Crayola England, Dennis Kennedy Associate Style Director: Rebecca Cunningham Sr. Prepress Image Specialist: Allan Ruhnke Production Assistant: Minniette Johnson Video Director/Editor: Mark Hayes

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Bookcases, Cabinets & Shelves is published by August Home Publishing Company,

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EDITOR’S NOTE

In this book, the editors of Woodsmith and ShopNotes have put together a special col- lection of their favorite bookcases, cabinets, and shelves. Every page is filled with all the photos, step-by-step illustrations, and shop secrets you need to make building these projects a snap. Inside, you’ll find great storage projects to fit just about any style and skill level — from an elegant, heirloom bookcase with several design options (cover) to an easy- to-build country wall shelf (page 66). We’ve even included a few countertop projects to take care of special storage needs. Plus, we’ve provided online bonus mate- rial to make building all of these projects faster, easier, and more accurate.

all of these projects faster, easier, and more accurate. TOPTECHNIQUES for Flawless-Fitting Drawers ®
TOPTECHNIQUES for Flawless-Fitting Drawers ® www.woodsmith.com Vol. 28 / No. 168 Build a Craftsman’s >
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> Built-in Door Storage Options
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> 11 Soft, Leather-lined Drawers
> Easy Jewelry Chest Conversion
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BOOKCASES, CABINETS & SHELVES

bookcasesbookcases

6 3-in-1 Bookcase 8 We took one basic case design, combined it with different details,
6
3-in-1 Bookcase 8
We took one basic case design,
combined it with different details, and
came up with three timeless projects:
Craftsman, country, and traditional.
Classic Modular Bookcase
16
Start with a basic case. Then expand
the design by building additional units
and customizing them with options to
suit your storage needs.
Curved-Front Bookcase
26
The gently curving sides of this book-
case give it a sophisticated look. But
you’ll be pleasantly surprised at how
easily it goes together.

cabinetscabinets

32 Lighted Display Cabinet 34 Building an attractive display cabinet doesn’t have to be a
32
Lighted Display Cabinet
34
Building an attractive display cabinet
doesn’t have to be a lot of work. The
simple construction of this project creates
the perfect place to show off treasures.
Wide-Screen TV Cabinet
40
This design is as up-to-date as the
gear you’ll fill it with. Clean lines and
straightforward joinery make it a great
project to build for your home.
Craftsman-Style Cabinet
50
Like many Craftsman projects, this
cabinet looks good and is full of storage
space. Plus, the woodworking tech-
niques provide just the right challenge.

shelvesshelves

60 Hanging Wall Shelves 62 These easy-to-build shelves attach directly to a wall, so you
60
Hanging Wall Shelves
62
These easy-to-build shelves attach
directly to a wall, so you can arrange
them to fill your needs. And they can be
modified to create a handy wine server.
Country Wall Shelf
66
To give this wall shelf a country look,
we used knotty pine, simple construc-
tion, and a beadboard back. It’s easy to
add doors and make it a cabinet, too.
Dovetailed Display Shelf
72
The classic design and straightforward
woodworking of this small display shelf
add up to a great-looking project that
isn’t a huge time commitment to build.
Five-Tier Display Tower
76
This project is hard to pass up. Build it
for its unique style or its handy storage
capabilities. Either way, your time in
the shop will be well spent.

racksracks && casescases

80 Desktop Book Rack 82 This small shelf can be built in short order from
80
Desktop Book Rack
82
This small shelf can be built in short
order from just a few boards. It’s sure
to make a big difference in the look
and organization of your desktop.
Barrister’s CD Cases 86
The doors flip up and slide into the
cases — just like the doors of full-sized
barrister’s bookcases. But this project is
modified for convenient CD storage.
Countertop Wine Rack
92
This simple, attractive plywood rack
lets you show off your collection of
wines and keep the bottles together
and close at hand.
Beautiful   Bookcases   Here are five different designs to suit just about any room

Beautiful

 

Bookcases

 

Here are five different designs to suit just about

any room decor or any size library. You’ll find

that each project has special features that

present interesting woodworking challenges.

3-IN-1 BOOKCASE

8

MODULAR BOOKCASE

16

CURVED-FRONT BOOKCASE

26

XXXXXX XXXX XXBOOKCASES

3-in-1

Bookcase

One basic design can take on different looks to match your taste and room decor.

A bookcase makes any room more inviting. But finding a bookcase to match your decor can be a challenge. This project solves that problem. It starts with a basic case design. Then you give it a distinct style by adding a few finishing touches. You’ll start by building the case with simple joinery. It includes the sides, top, bottom, and one fixed shelf in the center. After the basic case is built, you’ll add design elements to cre- ate one of three styles: country (lower left photo and page 10),

one of three styles: country (lower left photo and page 10), Craftsman (lower right photo and
one of three styles: country (lower left photo and page 10), Craftsman (lower right photo and

Craftsman (lower right photo and page 12), or traditional (main photo and page 14). The treatments applied to the top panels and base assemblies, as well as additional features like

decorative back panels and doors, are easy to add and sure to bring character to your bookcase. Whatever style suits you, you’ll appreciate the straightforward construction and details.

Country-Style. Beadboard, bun feet, simple moldings, and a painted finish make a perfect combination for a country feel.

Craftsman-Style. An overhanging top supported by corbels and gentle curves on the face frame and base create a Craftsman look for this bookcase.

curves on the face frame and base create a Craftsman look for this bookcase. 8 B

Buildingthe

BasicCase

The case for each bookcase is identical. So no matter which style you choose, that’s the place to start. It’s made up of two ply- wood sides; a top, bottom, and center shelf that are all the same size; and a frame and panel back. Later, a face frame will be added to the front to cover the edges. SIDES. I started by cutting the sides to size. Once that’s done, I cut the dadoes for the top, bot- tom, and center shelves. I finished up with a rabbet on the back edge to hold the back panel (detail ‘a’). The next step is to drill holes for the adjustable shelves. It’s easier to do this now while you can still lay the workpieces side by side. SHELVES. With the sides done, you can cut the top, bottom, and center shelves to size. These pieces are cut slightly narrower than the sides to make room for the back. Cut rabbets on the ends (detail ‘b’) to form a tongue to fit in the dadoes in the sides. Dur- ing glue-up, these pieces will sit flush at the front, leaving a 3 4 "- deep recess at the back for the back frame and panel assembly. ASSEMBLY. Once you have the three shelves and two sides ready, the assembly is pretty easy. The shelves are glued into the dadoes on the sides (detail ‘b’). Then you can square up the case and apply clamps at the joints.

FRAME & PANEL BACK. As I mentioned

earlier, the back of the bookcase is built using frame and panel construction (drawing at right). Plywood panels fit into grooves cut in the rails and stiles, as you can see in detail ‘c.’ (The panels for the country-style bookcase are made from beadboard.) Before assembling the frame, I cut the rabbet along the stiles to mate with the rabbet on the sides

rabbet along the stiles to mate with the rabbet on the sides a. b. c. NOTE:

a.

b. c. NOTE: Size grooves to match thickness of plywood
b.
c.
NOTE:
Size grooves to
match thickness
of plywood
b. c. NOTE: Size grooves to match thickness of plywood (detail ‘a’). After assembling the frame

(detail ‘a’). After assembling the frame and panels, you can glue and nail the back in place. I also fastened the center rail to the fixed shelf. This adds strength

to the case assembly and keeps it square and solid. Now that the basic case is com- plete, you can add the details to create the style of your choice.

NOTE: Back panels differ between styles. See cutting diagram on page 11 for details.

9 c. The first part of the base is just a piece of plywood with
9
c.
The first part of the base is just
a piece of plywood with bullnose
edging attached. So that’s where I
started. After cutting the panel to

size, I added 1 2 "-thick hardwood edging and mitered the corners. At the router table, I routed a bullnose profile on the edging (first drawing at left). And then

I located and drilled the dowel

holes for the bun feet. Once the assembly is attached to the case bottom, you’re ready to add the feet. This is easy since you’ve already drilled the holes for the dowels. A little glue is all you need to fasten them in place.

Now you can turn the book- case upright and work on the top panel. The weight of the case will

act as a clamp for the feet.

TOP PANEL

The top panel on the case is even easier to build than the base. It’s just a piece of plywood with the same bullnose edging added to the front and sides that you used

a. b. Country Bookcase
a.
b.
Country Bookcase

With its beadboard back panel, bun feet, and painted finish, this country-style bookcase has a nos- talgic look. Because it’s painted, I chose to use less-expensive poplar for the face frame, edging, and trim pieces.

poplar for the face frame, edging, and trim pieces. BUILD THE FACE FRAME. I used pocket
poplar for the face frame, edging, and trim pieces. BUILD THE FACE FRAME. I used pocket

BUILD THE FACE FRAME. I used

pocket hole joinery to assemble the face frame. For more information about this easy technique, take a look at the box at the bottom of the opposite page. When you assemble the face frame, make sure that the center and bot- tom rails are flush with the center and bottom shelves. The top rail will sit flush with the top of the case, as you can see in the draw- ing at right. Once you have the face frame assembled, you can glue it to the front of the case.

BASE

Before starting on the top, I turned the unit upside down and worked on the base.

starting on the top, I turned the unit upside down and worked on the base. 10

on the base. To fasten it to the case, a little glue and a few clamps are all you need. Just be sure that the top doesn’t move out of position as you tighten the clamps. The final step is to add cove molding around the top just under the top panel (detail ‘a’). To make this molding, I used a cove molding bit in the router table. I routed the profile on a wide blank and then ripped it free on the table saw.

ADJUSTABLE SHELVES. All that’s left to

complete the bookcase is to add the two adjustable shelves. If you look at detail ‘b,’ you’ll notice that the trim on the front of them is a little different than the bull- nose trim you used earlier. But the procedure is the same. You’ll rout the profile after gluing the hardwood edging to the shelf, using a spacer under the shelf while routing (right drawing at the bottom of the opposite page). FINISH. I decided to use a “two- tone” finish for the bookcase. I painted the beadboard panels a lighter shade than the rest of the case for a unique look.

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES & CUTTING DIAGRAM

A Case Side (2)

3 4 ply. - 12 1 4 x 54

M Face Frm. Top/Btm. Rails (2) 3 4 x 2 1 4 - 31

B Case Fixed Shelves (3) 3 4 ply. - 11 1 2 x 35

N Face Frm. Center Rail (1)

3 4 x 1 1 2 - 31

C Top Panel (1) 3 4 ply. - 14 x 38

O Top Cove Trim (1) 3 4 x 3 4 - 72

D Bottom Panel (1) 3 4 ply. - 13 x 36

P Top Panel Edging (1)

3 4 x 1 2 - 72

E Adj. Shelf (2) 3 4 ply. - 10 5 8 x 34 3 8

Q Bottom Panel Edging (1)

3 4 x 1 2 - 72

F Back Upper Panel (1) 3 8 ply. - 31 1 2 x 19 1 4

R Adj. Shelf Edging (1) 3 4 x 1 - 72

G Back Btm. Panel (1)

3 8 ply. - 31 1 2 x 20 1 2

H Back Frame Stiles (2) 3 4 x 2 1 4 - 54

• (4) Bun Feet

I Back Frm. Top Rail (1) 3 4 x 3 3 4 - 31 1 2

• (8) 1 4 " Shelf Pins

J Back Frm. Center Rail (1)

3 4 x 6 3 4 - 31 1 2

• (12) 1 1 4 " Pocket Hole Screws

K Back Frm. Bottom Rail (1)

3 4 x 5 1 4 - 31 1 2

• (7) #8 x 1 1 4 " Fh Woodscrews

L Face Frame Stiles (2) 3 4 x 2 1 2 - 54

• (4) 1"-dia. x 1" Dowels

Fh Woodscrews L Face Frame Stiles (2) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 1 ⁄ 2 -
Fh Woodscrews L Face Frame Stiles (2) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 1 ⁄ 2 -
Fh Woodscrews L Face Frame Stiles (2) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 1 ⁄ 2 -
Fh Woodscrews L Face Frame Stiles (2) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 1 ⁄ 2 -
Fh Woodscrews L Face Frame Stiles (2) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 1 ⁄ 2 -
Fh Woodscrews L Face Frame Stiles (2) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 1 ⁄ 2 -

How-To:PocketHoleBasics

When assembling the face frames for these bookcases, I turned to pocket hole joinery. This fast technique is a reliable way to join two workpieces together without a lot of fuss. The principle is simple. The pocket hole jig allows you to drill a screw hole at the correct angle, and a stop

1
1

collar on the drill bit controls the depth. It’s just a matter of clamping the jig on the workpiece and drilling the holes (Figure 1).

2
2

You can clamp the workpieces together a couple of ways. A con- ventional clamp works fine for hold- ing the joint tight as you drive the screws (Figure 2). Figure 3 shows a

clamp made specifically for the task. One side of the clamp has a “peg” that fits inside a pocket hole.

3
3
a. Craftsman Bookcase Creating a Craftsman-style book- case involves adding a couple of simple details.
a.
Craftsman Bookcase
Creating a Craftsman-style book-
case involves adding a couple
of simple details. The wide
overhanging top supported
by corbels and gentle curves
gives it that classic look.
b.
BUILD THE FACE FRAME. The face

frame for the front of the case is cut from riftsawn oak. As you see in detail ‘a,’ the top rail has a gentle curve. I used pocket hole joinery to assemble the frame. The only trick is to locate the rails so they’re flush with the top, bottom, and center shelves. Then you can glue it to the case assembly.

TOP PANEL

the front. It’s attached to corbels with dowels. The drawings at the top of the opposite page show how it’s put together. CORBELS. I worked on the corbels first. This way, I could lay the fin- ished top on the corbels to locate the dowel holes to fasten the top.

After cutting the corbel blanks to rough size, I drilled the dowel holes. Then you can shape them on the band saw. Finally, rout the chamfers on the edges before glu- ing the corbels to the case. TOP PANEL. Like I said earlier, the top panel is plywood. After it’s cut

I said earlier, the top panel is plywood. After it’s cut The top of the bookcase

The top of the bookcase is a ply- wood panel with two breadboard ends and hardwood edging on

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES & CUTTING DIAGRAM

A Case Sides (2)

3 4 ply. - 12 1 4 x 54

W Top Panel Edging (2)

3 4 x 1 4 - 35

B Case Fixed Shelves (3)

3 4 ply. - 11 1 2 x 35

X Top Panel Ends (2)

3 4 x 4 - 14 1 2

C Top Panel (1) 3 4 ply. - 14 x 35

Y Adj. Shelf Edging (1)

3 4 x 1 - 72

D Bottom Panel (1) 3 4 ply. - 13 x 36

E Adj. Shelf (2)

3 4 ply. - 10 5 8 x 34 3 8

• (8) 1 4 " Shelf Pins

F Back Upper Panel (1) 1 4 ply. - 31 1 2 x 19 1 4

• (20) 1 1 4 " Pocket Hole Screws

G Back Bottom Panel (1) 1 4 ply. - 31 1 2 x 20 1 2

• (18) #8 x 1 1 4 " Fh Woodscrews

H Back Frame Stiles (2)

3 4 x 2 1 4 - 54

• (4) 1 2 "-dia. x 3 4 " Dowels

I Back Frame Top Rail (1)

3 4 x 3 3 4 - 31 1 2

J Back Frame Center Rail (1) 3 4 x 6 3 4 - 31 1 2

K Back Frame Bottom Rail (1) 3 4 x 5 1 4 - 31 1 2

x 6 3 ⁄ 4 - 31 1 ⁄ 2 K Back Frame Bottom Rail (1)

L Face Frame Stiles (2)

3 4 x 2 1 2 - 54

3 ⁄ 4 x 2 1 ⁄ 2 - 54

M Face Frame Top/Btm. Rails (2) 3 4 x 2 1 4 - 31

N Face Frame Center Rail (1) 3 4 x 1 1 2 - 31

Rails (2) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 1 ⁄ 4 - 31 N Face Frame Center

O Bottom Panel Edging (1)

3 4 x 1 2 - 72

P Base Side Stiles (2) 3 4 x 2 1 2 - 5

P Base Side Stiles (2) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 1 ⁄ 2 - 5

Q Base Front Apron (1) 3 4 x 4 - 31

R Base Sides (2) 3 4 x 5 - 12 1 4

S Base Back Apron (1) 3 4 x 5 - 34 1 2

T Base Front Cleat (1) 3 4 x 1 - 34 1 2

4 S Base Back Apron (1) 3 ⁄ 4 x 5 - 34 1 ⁄ 2

U Base Back Cleat (1)

3 4 x 2 1 2 - 34 1 2

3 ⁄ 4 x 2 1 ⁄ 2 - 34 1 ⁄ 2

V Corbels (4)

3 4 x 2 - 8

3 ⁄ 4 x 2 - 8
c. b. a.
c.
b.
a.

will finish it up (detail ‘b’ below). Use a few screws to attach the bottom panel to the case. LEG ASSEMBLY. From there, I moved on to the leg assembly. I started at the front with the arched apron (detail ‘c’ below) and side stiles. The sides are cut and attached to the front piece, and then the back

is added. Once the leg unit is com- plete, you can attach it to the base panel using cleats at the front and back (details ‘a’ and ‘b’).

ADJUSTABLE SHELVES. Finally, you can build the adjustable shelves. I added hardwood edging to the
ADJUSTABLE
SHELVES. Finally,
you
can build the adjustable shelves.
I added hardwood edging to the
front edge for strength and style.
Then it’s time to apply the finish.

to size, cut slots on both ends to accept tongues on the end pieces (detail ‘b’ at right). Then attach the front and back edging to hide the slots, and trim it flush. The panel ends are pretty simple. Two rabbets form the tongue that fits the groove in the top panel. You’ll need to trim the tongue back on the ends to fit behind the edging, as shown in detail ‘c.’ Now you can glue the rails to the plywood panel. Complete the case by attaching the top. I used a dowel center for locating the holes in the top. Then glue and clamp the top to the cor- bels, as shown in detail ‘a.’

BASE ASSEMBLY

The case rests on a base that’s assembled using pocket hole join- ery. A plywood panel and cleats hold the base to the shelf unit. BOTTOM PANEL. Start on the base by cutting the bottom panel to size. Then apply the mitered edging to the panel and trim it flush. A small chamfer routed on the top and bottom of the edging

a. b. c.
a.
b.
c.
b. the panel, you can shape it on the router table in two passes, as
b.
the panel, you can shape it on the
router table in two passes, as you
see in detail ‘c’ and the upper left
drawings. Now you can attach
the panel to the bottom of the
case and start on the legs.
ASSEMBLE THE LEGS. Although
the

BASE

Look at the drawing above to see how the base is assembled. While it may look like there are a lot of small parts, it’s not difficult. The base starts with a plywood panel. Then purchased legs are added (see Sources on page 98). The first step is to cut the ply- wood panel to size and cut the tongues for the edge molding. After gluing the molding blank to

legs are purchased, a few modi- fications are needed. You’ll need to cut an additional brace for each back leg, as shown in the drawing above, and attach it with pocket screws. I also made corner braces for all four legs (detail ‘b’). Once the legs are assembled, attach them to the base with screws through the corner braces.

TOP PANEL. The top panel is made just like the bottom panel and uses the same molded edging.

just like the bottom panel and uses the same molded edging. a. c. Traditional Bookcase For
a.
a.
c.
c.

Traditional Bookcase

For a more refined look, the traditional-style bookcase is built from cherry plywood and hardwood. Bracket feet, molded top edging, and raised-panel doors add to the overall appeal. FACE FRAME. The face frame for this style of bookcase is pretty straightforward. You just need to position the rails so they’re flush with the three fixed shelves. The pieces are cut to size then assembled with pocket hole joinery. I routed a stopped chamfer on the outside edge of the stiles (detail ‘a’ above). With that done, go ahead and glue the face frame to the case.

‘a’ above). With that done, go ahead and glue the face frame to the case. 14
‘a’ above). With that done, go ahead and glue the face frame to the case. 14
a.
a.
b.
b.
c. After the top is completed, you can glue it to the case. Cove molding
c.
After the top is completed, you
can glue it to the case. Cove
molding adds the finishing touch
(detail ‘c’ on the opposite page).

ADJUSTABLE SHELVES. Now you can

add the adjustable shelves. Like before, you’ll rout the same profile on the edging (detail ‘c’ above).

d. RAISED-PANEL DOORS
d.
RAISED-PANEL DOORS

I built the doors using stub tenon and groove joinery (detail ‘a’ above). Cut the rails and stiles to final size, then work on the joinery before making the panels. RAISED PANELS. To make the raised panels, I used a vertical raised panel bit in a router table. After the doors are assembled, go ahead and install them using

no-mortise hinges. At that point, you can locate and install the magnet block and the door stop, as shown in the drawing above. The last step is to install the mag- net washer on the door frame to align with the magnet block. As you can see, turning a basic bookcase into a classic piece of furniture is all in the details — no matter what the style.

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES & CUTTING DIAGRAM

A Case Sides (2)

3 4 ply. - 12 1 4 x 54

U Magnet Block (1)

3 4 x 1 3 4 - 5

• (13) #8 x 1 1 4 " Fh Woodscrews

B Case Fixed Shelves (3)

3 4 ply. - 11 1 2 x 35

V Door Stop (1)

3 4 x 1 2 - 3

• (2) 2" No-Mortise Hinges

C Top Panel (1) 3 4 ply. - 13 3 8 x 36 3 4

W Adj. Shelf Edging (2)

3 4 x 5 8 - 34 3 8

• (2) 1 1 4 " Bronzed Knobs

D Bottom Panel (1)

3 4 ply. - 12 1 2 x 34 7 8

X Leg Brace (2)

3 4 x 4 1 2 - 3 1 2

• (2) 1 2 "-dia. Rare-Earth Magnets

E Adj. Shelf (2)

3 4 ply. - 10 3 4 x 34 3 8

Y Corner Brace (2)

3 4 x 3 1 2 - 3 1 2

• (2) #6 x 1 2 " Fh Woodscrews

F Back Upper Panel (1) 1 4 ply. - 31 1 2 x 19 1 4

• (8) Shelf Pins

• (2) 1 4 " Washers

G Back Bottom Panel (1) 1 4 ply. - 31 1 2 x 20 1 2

• (12) 1 1 4 " Pocket Screws

• (2) Front Leg Assemblies

H Back Frame Stiles (2) 3 4 x 2 1 4 - 54

• (2) Back Legs

I Back Frame Top Rail (1)

3 4 x 3 3 4 - 31 1 2

J Back Frame Center Rail (1) 3 4 x 6 3 4 - 31 1 2

K Back Frame Bottom Rail (1) 3 4 x 5 1 4 - 31 1 2

L Face Frame Stiles (2) 3 4 x 2 1 2 - 54

M Face Frm Top/Btm. Rails (2)

3 4 x 2 1 4 - 31

N Face Frm Center Rail (1)

3 4 x 1 1 2 - 31

O Top Panel Edging (1) 3 4 x 1 1 2 - 72

3 4 x 3 4 - 72

Q Bottom Panel Edging (1) 3 4 x 1 1 2 - 72

R Door Stiles (4) 3 4 x 2 1 2 - 24 7 8

S Door Rails (4) 3 4 x 2 1 2 - 11 3 16

T Door Panels (2) 5 8 x 11 1 8 - 20 5 8

P Cove Trim (1)

⁄ 2 - 11 3 ⁄ 1 6 T Door Panels (2) 5 ⁄ 8 x
⁄ 2 - 11 3 ⁄ 1 6 T Door Panels (2) 5 ⁄ 8 x

XXXXXX XXXX XXBOOKCASES

Classic

Modular

Bookcase

Classic looks, functionality, and plenty of custom options make this bookcase right at home in any setting.

I’ve built a lot of bookcases — usually designed for a specific space and with an idea in mind about how many books and collectibles it should hold. This time, I wanted something that could complement any room and be a bit more flexible. That’s the beauty of this bookcase — you can customize it for any space. The modu- lar design allows you to build a single basic case, or make two or more and arrange them to hold your entire library. You can stack cases one on top of another, as shown in the photo at left. Or, since the molding on the sides is flush with the case, you can place them side by side. You’ll appreciate the straightforward construction. Each case is built from a sheet of cabinet-grade plywood and trimmed with hardwood edging. (I used oak.) And the seemingly complex crown molding on the top and base is just stacked individual pieces with simple routed profiles. To top it all off, we’ve included the option of adding doors and drawers to take the design one step further. The dovetailed drawers feature a frame-and-panel false front. The doors incorporate a glass panel housed in a solid frame that’s built with mortise and tenon joinery. These details combine to give you a bookcase that will look right at home in any setting.

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS

OVERALL DIMENSIONS:

47!/2" W x 14#/4" D x 76" H

Top

NOTE: Top and base are attached to case with quick-connect bolts and threaded inserts

Case is assembled with dado joints for plenty of strength

 

Hardwood facing on the sides gives the bookcase a frame-and-panel appearance

NOTE: Each

individual case

is made from

a single sheet

of cabinet-

Quarter-round

molding fits

grade plywood

inside the

hardwood

frame

NOTE: For more design options, turn to page 22

WoodsmithSpecials.com

Hardwood

face frame

covers

plywood

edges

Secondary wood (poplar) used for base and top assemblies
Secondary wood (poplar) used for base and top assemblies
Secondary wood (poplar) used for base and top assemblies
Secondary wood (poplar) used for base and top assemblies

Secondary wood (poplar) used for base and top assemblies

Adjustable shelves

have hardwood

edging to

prevent sagging

End pieces are cut to match front profile

NOTE: Upper and lower cases attach with quick- connect bolts Cabinet leveler bracket and foot
NOTE: Upper
and lower
cases attach
with quick-
connect
bolts
Cabinet leveler
bracket and foot
help compensate
for uneven
floors

Hardwood top rail and face rails have simple routed profiles (cove and roundover) to create look of solid molding

17

This way, you can use the same rip fence setting to cut each piece to
This way, you can use the same
rip fence setting to cut each piece
to an identical width.
Next, drill holes for the shelf

pins in the sides. The drawing at right shows the locations. JOINERY. I used dado joints for the cases because they’re not only very strong and easy to make, but they also ensure proper align- ment of the assembly. To cut the dadoes, I turned to the table saw and a dado blade set to match the thickness of the plywood. Then just assemble the cases with glue. You want to make sure that they’re square during assembly. SPACERS. Since the spacers won’t be visible once the case is fully

assembled, I made them out of

inexpensive poplar. Glue them flush to the outside edges of the case top and bottom (details ‘a’ and ‘b’). After that‘s done, you can glue the two sections together. ADD THE BACK. Now you’re ready to screw on the 1 4 " plywood back panel that spans both sections. Don’t worry, the exposed ply- wood edges will be covered later when you add the side frames.

a.
a.
b.
b.
c.
c.

BuildingtheBasicCase

The flexibility of this bookcase means you can add to it any time.

But if you know you’re going to need several cases, you’ll find it’s

a

same time. No matter how many you build and arrange, they all start with the case. CONSTRUCTION. As you see in the drawing above, each case is made up of two smaller sections glued together side by side. Dadoes in the sides hold the top and bot- tom. And spacers installed on the top and bottom of each section serve as anchor points for stack- ing or adding tops and bases.

lot easier to build them at the

CASE PIECES. Start by cutting the sides, top, and bottom to width

at the same time on the table saw.

FRAMING THE CABINET

With the case assembled, you can add hardwood frames. You’ll see in the drawings below that the face frames cover the plywood edges on the front of the case, and the side frames add a “frame-and- panel” look to the ends. The front and side frames are connected by a unique corner assembly that’s the starting point for the trim. CORNERS. Detail ‘b’ highlights the corner connection, showing how the front frame is attached to the side frame with a rabbet joint. I built these corners first so I could be sure to get a good, solid glue

a.

joint before installing them on the case. It would have been dif- ficult to clamp them properly otherwise. I started by cutting both pieces to size. Then, using

a dado blade on the table saw,

cut the deep rabbet on the front

piece. Now it’s a simple assem- bly with glue and plenty of room

to clamp the pieces together.

FITTING THE FRAME. With the corners

assembled, just glue them in posi- tion. Then you can move on to completing the rest of the frame. I started by adding the rest of the pieces to the sides. Once you’ve glued the other trim pieces to the

b.

case, you can start attaching the quarter-round molding to the inside of the frame. I’ve found the best way to add molding is just to take it one piece at a time,

mitering and attaching each piece individually for a perfect fit. Next, add the remaining face frame pieces to the front of the

case, starting with the upper and lower rails, then the center stile.

shelves

complete the case, and they’re easy to make, too. First, cut out the plywood shelf pieces, and rabbet the front edge of each piece. Then just cut a groove in the edging pieces to match the tongue cre- ated by the rabbet (detail ‘d’), and glue the pieces together.

ADJUSTABLE

SHELVES.

The

d.

c.

a. b.
a.
b.
c.
c.

Decorative Base&Top

Bolt & Insert.

!/4"-20 threaded inserts and quick-connect bolts attach the base and top to the case.

With the basic cases assembled and the frames installed, you’re ready to move on to making the decorative base and top. The built-up front moldings and matching side pieces add an ele- gant profile to the bookcase. Assembling the base and top isn’t too complicated either. In fact, they’re just about mirror images of each other. Except for a few minor size changes, the only real difference is that the top adds a panel with oak edging. How- ever, the construction method is the same for both of these pieces. And once again, I used poplar as a secondary wood for all the parts that weren’t visible.

d. A STURDY BASE TOP RAILS. After you’ve formed
d.
A STURDY BASE
TOP RAILS. After you’ve formed

As you can see in the drawing

above, there are three cross sup- ports that tie the base assembly together. To make the notches on the front and back of each sup- port, I used the table saw with

a dado blade set to a height that

matches the thickness of the rail stock. Using an auxiliary fence on the miter gauge to back up the cuts prevents tearout.

FRONT & BACK RAILS. The next step

is to add the front and back rails

that connect the cross supports. Since these parts won’t be visible

when the piece is complete, you can just attach them with screws.

a stable base, it’s time to add the

top rails that allow you to attach

it to the case. These rails fit flush

with the top of the cross supports to provide a solid platform. You’ll want to take note of a couple of

things about these pieces. First, the front top rail is oak, and it has a rounded profile (detail ‘c’). I used a roundover bit at the router table to add that detail before attaching it to the base.

You’ll also want to note the holes in the top rails for the quick- connect bolts. This construction method lets you detach the base and reconfigure the bookcase at

a later date. The threaded inserts

fit into the spacers on the case, and the quick-connect bolts fit through a shank hole drilled through the top rails of the base. You just need to drill the holes for the inserts and bolts according to the layout in detail ‘d.’ Then attach the top rails to the cross supports with glue and screws.

FACE RAIL & ENDS. With the structure of the base complete, you’re ready to move on to the hardwood face and ends. Both of these pieces will need a little work before you can add them to the base. The top edge of the face rail has a decorative cove profile that

I made at the router table. You’ll

want to make this cut in two shal- low passes to avoid burn marks.

a.

b. c.
b.
c.

The ends are cut to match the combined profile of the top and face rails. You can cut the match- ing shape at the band saw and sand it smooth. Then attach the face and ends from the inside of the base using glue and screws.

LEVELER BRACKETS. The last step is

to add the leveler brackets to the base. These allow you to adjust the position of the bookcase to compensate for floors that may not be completely level. Detail ‘b’ on the opposite page shows how these fit on the inside of the base.

THE MATCHING TOP

As I mentioned earlier, the top is

built the same way as the base. But keep in mind there’s a slight difference in the dimensions of

d.

the individual pieces. You’ll also notice that the threaded inserts are installed in the top rather than the case, and the bolts fit in counterbored holes on the inside of the case (detail ‘b’). Other than that, the only major difference is the addition of the top panel. TOP PANEL. The top panel is plywood with hardwood edging. The edging adds another element to the profile of the molding. To make the top, start by cutting the plywood panel. Then it’s just a matter of adding the hardwood trim to the edges and gluing the frame to the top assembly. That completes the bookcase. But the next few pages show you how to customize it by adding doors and drawers to the design.

Optional Drawers&Doors Adding doors and drawers to the bookcase dramatically changes its look. Just take

Optional

Drawers&Doors

Adding doors and drawers to the bookcase dramatically changes its look. Just take a look at the photo at left to see for yourself. In addition to providing some closed storage, they really accent the frame-and-panel look of the sides. Another nice thing about this design is that the drawers are

mounted on runners attached to a removable divider. This means the drawer unit can be added later, even after you’ve com- pleted the bookshelf. The doors are straightforward frame and panel construction. As you can see, I chose to use glass instead of a wood panel. Retainer clips hold the glass in place and make it easier to replace in case of an accident. You’ll also like the no-mortise hinges that save time when installing the doors. Matching drawer and door pulls complete the look. For more information on the hardware used, refer to Sources on page 98.

a. b.
a.
b.
on the hardware used, refer to Sources on page 98. a. b. Adding Drawers Part of
on the hardware used, refer to Sources on page 98. a. b. Adding Drawers Part of

AddingDrawers

Part of what makes the drawers so interesting is the way they’re supported. They slide on a pair of hardwood runners attached to a removable divider, as shown in the drawing above. A stop for the doors is also incorporated into the divider assembly (detail ‘a’).

DIVIDER ASSEMBLY. Like the shelves

in the bookcase, the drawer divid- ers are just plywood panels trimmed with hardwood edging.

The only big difference is you’ll need to notch the sides to accept the shelf supports, as shown in detail ‘a.’ Then it’s just a matter of cutting out the runners and fastening them to the shelves. An easy way to make the runners is shown on the opposite page. DOOR STOP. If you decide to add the doors, you’ll need to include the door stop with the divider assembly. It’s simply a hardwood

strip glued behind the divider edging (detail ‘a’). This piece pro- vides the doors with a solid stop.

DOVETAILED DRAWERS

You’re ready to move on to the drawers. As you see in the draw- ings on the opposite page, they’re dovetailed boxes with false fronts. The frame-and-panel front has quarter-round molding, to match the sides of the bookcase.

NOTE: Drawer molding is #/8" x #/8"

NOTE: Drawer molding is #/8" x #/8" Ply. b. c. DRAWER PULL & STOP. To finish
Ply. b. c.
Ply.
b.
c.
DRAWER PULL & STOP. To finish up
DRAWER PULL & STOP. To finish up

the drawer, add a pull and a stop. The drawer stop is just a piece of hardwood attached to the inside of the case (detail ‘a’). Turning the stop to fit through the slot in the drawer back allows you to remove the drawer. Now you can attach the drawer pull with machine screws from the inside.

on the inside of the frame pieces first. Then you can raise the blade and use the miter gauge to sup- port the cut forming the tongue on the end of each rail. MOLDING. Use the same technique for adding the molding as you did on the side panels. Fit each piece individually, making sure the miters are tight throughout.

How-To: Cutting Drawer Runners

miters are tight throughout. How-To: Cutting Drawer Runners Cut a Wide Groove. With a dado blade

Cut a Wide Groove. With a dado blade set to full width, cut the groove. Then, turn the stock end-for-end and repeat the cut.

Then, turn the stock end-for-end and repeat the cut. Separate the Pieces. Set the rip fence

Separate the Pieces. Set the rip fence and

cut the runners to width. Sanding and some wax will make the drawers run smoothly.

a.
a.

DOVETAILED DRAWER BOX. To cut the

half-blind dovetails, use a router and a dovetail jig. And once again, I used inexpensive poplar for the drawer boxes since they’ll be covered by the false fronts. After cutting the joinery, it’s back to the table saw to cut the groove for the 1 4 " plywood bot- tom. While there, it’s also a good time to cut a notch for the drawer stop on the drawer back. Then glue up the drawers, and add bumpers on the back corners. FALSE FRONT. Although the drawer fronts look a lot like the side panels of the bookcase, they’re actually built a little differently. They incorporate a 1 4 " plywood panel in a rabbet on the rails and stiles, as shown in detail ‘b.’ A tongue cut on the rails also fits in the rabbet on the stiles, keeping the joinery simple. I cut the rabbets at the table saw using a dado blade and an auxiliary fence. You’ll find it works best to cut the long rabbet

a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c. Glass Doors d. With the drawers done,
a. refer to the Online Extras b. c.
a.
refer to the
Online Extras
b.
c.

Glass Doors

d.

With the drawers done, all that’s needed to complete the bookcase are the glass panel doors. PROFILED EDGES. Like the drawers, the doors feature a quarter-round profile to match the sides (detail ‘a’). But here, I did things a little differently. Rather than applying a molding, I routed the profile on the rails and stiles. This creates a more stable door and provides better support for the glass panel. You’ll need to cut the profile and the rabbet for the glass before making any of the joinery cuts. That means a trip to the router table. I used a 3 8 " roundover bit to form the quarter-round molding profile. Then I just cut the rabbet on the opposite side.

GO 2 Online Extras
GO
2
Online
Extras

To find out how to make molded mortise and tenon doors, go to:

WoodsmithSpecials.com

molded mortise and tenon doors, go to: WoodsmithSpecials.com no secret that a pane of glass is

no secret that a pane of glass is more

delicate than a wood panel. For that reason, it’s important to build

a frame that provides as much

support as possible. That’s why I used mortise and tenon joinery. To get started, you’ll need to square the stock on the ends by cutting back the rounded profile at the table saw. For details on making this joint and the miters, go to WoodsmithSpecials.com. Once the joinery is done, glue up the doors. Then secure the glass using plastic retainer clips.

ADD HARDWARE. Now you just need

to attach the doors. The magnetic

catches, strike plates, and door knobs are pretty straightforward.

MORTISE

&

TENON

JOINERY.

It’s

Simply attach them as shown in detail ‘d.’ But the no-mortise hinges can be tricky. To align the hinges, place the

door in the frame and shim it into position with thin spacers. (I often stack a few playing cards to get the position just right.) Then, mark the hinge location on the door and frame. Now attach the hinge to the door and then to the case at the location you marked. The key is to use a self-centering bit to drill the pilot holes and keep the hinge on the mark. No matter what options you choose, this modular bookcase

can be arranged to suit any loca- tion. It’s sure to be a piece that will provide years of service.

BASIC CABINET MATERIALS, SUPPLIES & CUTTING DIAGRAM

A Case Sides (4) 3 4 ply. - 11 3 4 x 34

N Shelf Panel (4) 3 4 ply. - 11 1 8 x 21 3 8

AA

Top Ends (2) 1 1 2 x 2 3 4 - 14 3 8

B Case Top/Bottom (4)

3 4 ply. - 11 3 4 x 22

O Shelf Edging (4) 3 4 x 1 1 2 - 21 3 8

BB

Top Panels (1)

3 4 ply. - 11 3 4 x

44 1 2

C Front Spacers (4)

3 4 x 1 1 2 -

21 1 2

P Base Cross Supports (3)

3 4 x 4 1 2 - 11 3 4

CC

Front/Back Edging (2)

3 4 x 1 1 2 -

44 1 2

D Back Spacers (4) 3 4 x 2 1 4 - 21 1 2

Q Base Front/Back Rails (2) 3 4 x 3 3 4 - 44 1 2

DD

Side Edging (2) 3 4 x 1 1 2 - 14 3 4

E Case Back (1) 1 4 ply. - 34 x 46

R Base Back Top Rail (1) 3 4 x 2 1 2 - 44 1 2

F Front Frame Stiles (2)

3 4 x 1 1 2 - 34

S Base Front Top Rail (1) 3 4 x 3 - 44 1 2

• (16) 1 4 " Shelf Supports

G Side Front Stiles (2)

3 4 x 2 3 8 - 34

T Base Face Rail (1) 3 4 x 3 3 4 - 44 1 2

• (4) Cabinet Leveler Brackets

H Side

Back

Stiles (2)

3 4 x 2 1 2 - 34

U Base Ends (2) 1 1 2 x 4 1 2 - 14 3 8

• (4) Cabinet Leveler Feet

I Side

Rails

(4)

3 4 x 2 1 2 -

7 3 4

V Top Cross Supports (3)

3 4 x 2 3 4 - 11 3 4

• (16) 1 4 " - 20 Threaded Inserts

J Side Molding Horz. (4)

1 2 x 1 2 - 7 3 4

W Top Front/Back Rails (2)

3 4 x 2 - 44 1 2

• (8) 1 4 " - 20 x 30mm Bolts

K Side Molding Vert. (4)

1 2 x 1 2 - 29

X Top Back Bottom Rail (1) 3 4 x 2 1 2 - 44 1 2

• (8) 1 4 " - 20 x 50mm Bolts

L Face Rails (2) 3 4 x 1 1 2 - 44 1 2

M Face Center Stile (1)

3 4 x 1 1 2 - 31

Y Top Front Bottom Rail (1)

3 4 x 3 - 44 1 2

Z Top Face Rail (1) 3 4 x 2 - 44 1 2

2 Z Top Face Rail (1) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 - 44 1 ⁄ 2
2 Z Top Face Rail (1) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 - 44 1 ⁄ 2
2 Z Top Face Rail (1) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 - 44 1 ⁄ 2
2 Z Top Face Rail (1) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 - 44 1 ⁄ 2
2 Z Top Face Rail (1) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 - 44 1 ⁄ 2
2 Z Top Face Rail (1) 3 ⁄ 4 x 2 - 44 1 ⁄ 2

• (54) #8 x 1 1 2 " Fh Woodscrews

• (16) #6 x 1 2 " Fh Woodscrews (Back)

• (16) #6 x 1 ⁄ 2 " Fh Woodscrews (Back) OPTIONAL DOOR & DRAWER MATERIALS,
• (16) #6 x 1 ⁄ 2 " Fh Woodscrews (Back) OPTIONAL DOOR & DRAWER MATERIALS,
• (16) #6 x 1 ⁄ 2 " Fh Woodscrews (Back) OPTIONAL DOOR & DRAWER MATERIALS,
• (16) #6 x 1 ⁄ 2 " Fh Woodscrews (Back) OPTIONAL DOOR & DRAWER MATERIALS,

OPTIONAL DOOR & DRAWER MATERIALS, SUPPLIES & CUTTING DIAGRAM

A Divider Panels (2)

3 4 ply. - 12 x 21 1 2

J Drwr. Front Panels (2) 1 4 ply. - 3 5 8 x 18 5 8

• (2) 1 1 4 " Mushroom Knobs

B Divider Edging (2)

3 4 x

1 1 2 - 21 1 2

K Drwr. Molding Horz. (4)

3 8 x 3 8 - 17 7 8

• (2 pr.) No-Mortise Hinges

C Door Stops (2) 1 2 x 1 - 21 1 2

L Drwr. Molding Vert. (24)

3 8 x 3 8 - 2 7 8

• (20) Plastic Retainer Clips

D Shelf Runners (4) 3 4 x 1 - 11 3 4

E Drawer Front/Back (4)

F Drawer Sides (4) 1 2 x 6 1 8 - 11 1 4

1 2 x 6 1 8 - 21

M Drawer Catches (2) 3 8 x 3 4 - 2

N Door Rails (4) 3 4 x 2 1 8 - 19 7 8

O Door Stiles (4) 3 4 x 2 1 8 - 22 7 8

• (4) Magnetic Catches

• (24) #4 x 1 2 " Fh Ant. Brass Screws

• (8) #4 x 1 2 " Ph Ant. Brass Screws

G Drawer Bottoms (2)

1 4 ply. - 11 x 20 1 2

• (20) #5 x 1 2 " Fh Woodscrews

H Drawer

Front

Stiles (4)

3 4 x 1 3 4 - 6 3 8

• (4) Stem Bumper Glides

• (16) #6 x 1 2 " Fh Woodscrews

I Drawer

Front

Rails (4)

3 4 x 1 3 4 - 18 5 8

• (2) Bin Pulls w/Screws

• (2) 17 3 4 " x 19 7 8 " Glass Panels

3 ⁄ 4 " x 19 7 ⁄ 8 " Glass Panels Also need: 48 "
3 ⁄ 4 " x 19 7 ⁄ 8 " Glass Panels Also need: 48 "
3 ⁄ 4 " x 19 7 ⁄ 8 " Glass Panels Also need: 48 "
3 ⁄ 4 " x 19 7 ⁄ 8 " Glass Panels Also need: 48 "

Also need:

48" x 48" sheet of #/4" oak plywood

⁄ 8 " Glass Panels Also need: 48 " x 48 " sheet of #/4" oak
⁄ 8 " Glass Panels Also need: 48 " x 48 " sheet of #/4" oak

XXXXXX XXXX XXBOOKCASES

Curved-

Front

Bookcase

A simple design that offers a lot of storage in just a little space.

As much as I enjoy a challenge, I have to admit that every now and then it’s nice to build a simple, straightforward project. And with its clean lines and basic design, that’s exactly what this bookcase is. The construction is also straight- forward. There’s no complicated joinery to deal with because the bookcase is built with quick-connect fasteners. And it’s made almost entirely out of plywood, so you don’t have to spend a lot of time gluing up solid-wood panels. But in spite of its simplicity, this project will still throw you a curve — two curves, in fact. If you look at the photo, you’ll see that the sides of the bookcase have a grace- ful curve along the front edge. While these curves add visual appeal, they create a challenge when it comes to edging the ply- wood. Here again, the solution is simple — flexible, iron-on edge banding (photo below).

GO 2 Online Extras
GO
2
Online
Extras

For details on the drilling jig for quick- connect fasteners, go to:

WoodsmithSpecials.com

for quick- connect fasteners, go to: WoodsmithSpecials.com Edge Banding. Iron-on edge banding is easy to apply,
for quick- connect fasteners, go to: WoodsmithSpecials.com Edge Banding. Iron-on edge banding is easy to apply,

Edge Banding.

Iron-on edge banding is easy to apply, even to the curved edges of the bookcase sides (see page 31).

!/4 " Adjustable shelves have five different positions
!/4
"
Adjustable shelves
have five different
positions

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS

OVERALL DIMENSIONS: 27" W x 14#/4" D x 59!/2" H

Top back panel is same thickness as sides to give project the

Sides, shelves, and top back panel are cut from one sheet of plywood

Iron-on edge banding covers plywood edges, see page 31 Spacer prevents look of solid wood
Iron-on edge banding
covers plywood edges,
see page 31
Spacer prevents
look of solid
wood
damage to
edge banding
Main back panel
trapped in grooves
between top and
bottom shelves
and sides
Bookcase
has three
fixed shelves
Two shelves
are adjustable
Quick-connect
hardware allows
bookcase to be
disassembled
Toe kick provides support
and finished look

Back panel

is made

from

plywood

Plywood

panels simplify

construction

Adjustable shelves rest on shelf pins

Edge banding provides protection to bottom edges of bookcase

SIDE SECTION VIEW

Minifix Fastener cam pulls side tight to shelf edge FRONT SECTION VIEW
Minifix Fastener
cam pulls side
tight to
shelf edge
FRONT SECTION VIEW

59

!/2

A

SIDE

9

F

 

UPPER

26

FIXED

SHELF

TOP BACK PANEL

B

11 !/2

26

MIDDLE

FIXED

SHELF

12

G

BACK

PANEL

25 !/2

C

47

!/2

25 !/2

A

SIDE

a. !/4 !/4 !/2 #/4 !/4 A F !/2 SIDE
a. !/4
!/4
!/2
#/4
!/4
A
F !/2
SIDE
b. !/4" Ply. F B !/4 !/2 SIDE SECTION G VIEW
b. !/4" Ply.
F
B !/4
!/2
SIDE
SECTION
G
VIEW
c. !/4 !/4 G !/4 D D !/4 " Ply. E #/4 !/2 SIDE SECTION
c. !/4
!/4
G
!/4
D
D
!/4 " Ply.
E #/4
!/2
SIDE SECTION VIEW
SIDE d. SECTION VIEW G C Middle shelf butts against back panel
SIDE
d.
SECTION
VIEW
G
C
Middle shelf
butts against
back panel

MakingtheCase&Shelves

If you take a look at LOWER D FIXED SHELF the main drawing at left,
If you take a look at
LOWER
D
FIXED
SHELF
the main drawing at
left, you’ll notice that
TOE KICK
25 !/2
E the bookcase has two
sides that are held together
13 !/4
by three fixed shelves. The
25 !/2
first step is to make the sides.
And that starts with a template.
NOTE: Parts
are
#/4 "
plywood.
2
!/4
Back panel
is
!/4 "
plywood
THE TEMPLATE. Making the tem-
plate accomplishes three things.
First, it makes locating the shelf
holes in the sides easier and more
precise. Second, the outline of the
curved front can simply be traced
trim the sides to their final shape.
The box below shows how the
template is made and put to use.
THE SIDES. Once the template is
done, lay it on one of the inside
faces of the bookcase sides. I used
double-sided tape to hold the
template in place while tracing
the curve and drilling the holes
for the shelf hardware (details ‘a’
and ‘b’ below). Simply repeat the
process for the other side piece.
11
TEMPLATE
Place nail
CUTTING THE GROOVE. After remov-
FOR CASE
here
SIDES
10
!/2
onto the sides. Finally, the tem-
plate can be used as a guide to
ing the template, turn your
attention to the groove that runs
along the back edge of each side.
8mm-dia.
holes
2
!/4
How-To:Make&UsetheTemplate
!/4 -dia.
"
holes for
shelf pins
Fence
END VIEW
8mm-dia.
THIRD: Draw
line along guide
Brad-
a.
holes
Drill
!/4"
-
point
59
!/2
FIRST: Place nails at
location points on
hardboard template
dia. hole
50
!/8
bit
Template
#/8
A
10
!/2
37
#/4
Side
Template
blank
14
#/4
b.
26
!/4
Nail
Drill 8mm hole
for fixed shelf
hardware
1#/4
SECOND: Bend
hardboard
18
!/2
guide around nails
!%/32
A
13
&/8
END VIEW
8mm-dia.
holes
Lay Out Curve. Use a narrow strip of
2
#/8
hardboard and nails to lay out the book-
11
!/4
14
Nail
case’s curve on the template.
Drill Shelf Holes. Connector hardware
and shelf pins require two different sized
holes drilled at different depths.
15

These grooves will hold the back panel. Because the 1 4 " plywood used for the back panel is closer to 3 16 " thick, I cut the groove by making two passes on my table saw to get a snug fit.

CUTTING THE CURVE. At this point, all

that’s left to complete the sides is to cut the curved shape. You can see how to finish up the curve in the two drawings below. THE SHELVES. Now it’s time to focus on the shelves. As I said before, the top, bottom, and middle shelves are fixed. They hold the sides together with quick-connect hardware. The other two shelves are adjustable and rest on shelf pins. (Sources are provided on page 98.) After cutting the shelves to size (remember that the fixed shelves are three different widths), set the adjustable shelves aside for now while you continue working on the three fixed shelves.

CUTTING THE GROOVES. I started by

taking the upper and lower fixed shelves over to my table saw. These shelves need grooves to hold the 1 4 " plywood for the back panel, as shown in details ‘b’ and ‘c’ on the opposite page. Once the grooves are cut, take these two shelves and the mid- dle shelf over to the drill press.

A SIDE Waste a. Layout line Rough cut to waste side of layout line TOP
A
SIDE
Waste
a. Layout line
Rough cut to
waste side of
layout line
TOP VIEW
Rough Cut Profile on Sides. Stay

to the waste side of the layout line when rough-cutting the curve.

The first thing to do here is drill the holes for the connector hard- ware. Each connector is made up of two parts: a cam and a pin. The pin is installed into the side of the bookcase, while the cam fits into a hole in the shelf. The tricky part is getting the holes in the shelves aligned with the holes in the sides of the book- case. To help, use a jig like the one shown in the box at right. Instruc- tions for making this jig are provided in the Online Extras.

TOE KICK & TOP PANEL. To provide

some extra support and give the bookcase a more finished look, you can add a toe kick to the bot- tom shelf and a back panel to the top. Both of these are rabbeted to fit into grooves (see details ‘a’ and ‘c’ on the opposite page). The panel is “trapped” in the grooves in the sides, while the toe kick is glued in the groove on the bottom side of the bottom shelf.

TOP PANEL NOTCHES. You’ll notice in

detail ‘a’ (top of opposite page) that the top panel has notches in its upper corners. The notches fit around blocks that will be added to the grooves during assembly to protect the edge banding. With all this done, the next step will be to add the edging and put the bookcase together.

Flush-trim front profile using template as guide Side a. !/2 " Side flush-trim bit END
Flush-trim front
profile using
template as
guide
Side
a.
!/2
"
Side
flush-trim
bit
END
Template
VIEW
Trim it Up. Use a router, a flush-trim
bit, and the template to smooth
the curves in the bookcase sides.
How-To:ShelfHoles Back edge of shelf is set against jig stop 15mm Forstner bit Bottom face
How-To:ShelfHoles
Back edge of shelf
is set against
jig stop
15mm
Forstner
bit
Bottom face
of shelf
a.
D
!&/32
LOWER
D
FIXED SHELF
END
SECTION
VIEW
Drilling the Cam Holes. Drill the holes for the cams from the bottom side of
Drilling the Cam Holes. Drill the holes for the cams
from the bottom side of the shelves. Take care so you
don’t drill through the shelves (detail ‘a’).
NOTE: Shelf is rotated
180° and jig is flipped
end for end
Back edge
of shelf is
set against
jig stop
Bottom face
of shelf
LOWER
D FIXED SHELF
Support block
Rotate & Flip. Rotate the shelf and flip the jig to drill the cam holes
Rotate & Flip. Rotate the shelf and flip the jig to drill
the cam holes in the back of the shelves. You can use
a support block to keep the shelf level.
Edge hole
aligns with
Jig
cam hole
a. TOP SECTION
VIEW
Drill straight
into cam hole

Drilling the Connector Holes. Line up the jig with the

cam holes in order to drill the holes for the connectors in the edges of
cam holes in order to drill the holes for the connectors
in the edges of the shelves.
Use
#/4 "
x #/4 "
spacer block
between back
edge of shelf
and jig stop
C
Support
MIDDLE FIXED
block
SHELF

Middle Fixed Cam Holes. Add a spacer before you

begin to drill the holes in the middle shelf. This accounts for the back panel that it butts up against.

&/8 -wide " edge banding I I UPPER FILLER BLOCK Top back ( !/4 x-)!/4
&/8 -wide
"
edge banding
I
I UPPER FILLER
BLOCK
Top back
(
!/4 x-)!/4
!/2
panel
H ADJUSTABLE
SHELF
!/4 -dia.
"
spoon type
Side
shelf pins
Middle fixed
shelf
Side
25 #/8
H
ADJUSTABLE
12
SHELF
J
J
LOWER FILLER
BLOCK
( !/4 x !/4 - 2 !/2 )
Lower fixed
shelf
&/8 -wide edge banding
"
on all shelf fronts and
bottom case edges
#/4
" Minifix
fastener

CompletetheBookcase

Before you start to assemble the bookcase, you’ll need to apply the edge banding to all the exposed plywood edges. You’ll get cleaner results than you

a. I Case side Upper back Upper filler block is glued in place before applying
a.
I Case
side
Upper
back
Upper filler block
is glued in place
before applying
edge banding
b. Back panel Groove for back panel J Case side
b. Back panel
Groove for
back panel
J Case
side
c. Connector insert nut Connector cam Connector bolt Fixed shelf Case side FRONT SECTION VIEW
c. Connector
insert nut
Connector cam
Connector bolt
Fixed
shelf
Case
side
FRONT SECTION VIEW

cams are tightened, they pull the shelves in tight (detail ‘c’ above). BACK PANEL. Now, slide the back panel into the grooves in the top and bottom shelves and the one bookcase side. Then you can attach the other bookcase side. FINAL DETAILS. All that’s left for you to do is to slide the top back panel and glue filler blocks into the grooves in the sides (details ‘a’ and ‘b’). These blocks will pro- vide the support needed for the edging that covers the grooves. With the bookcase assembled, you’ve added a lot of extra storage with just a little effort.

would with hardwood

edging, especially on the curved sides. The next page gives step-by-step instructions on how to apply the edge banding.

Once you’ve finished with

the edge banding, the bookcase

is ready to be assembled. The main drawing above shows how everything goes together.

INSTALL HARDWARE. Begin to assem-

ble the bookcase by installing the cams and bolts in the fixed shelves and case sides. Then slide each fixed shelf onto the connector bolts in one bookcase side and tighten the cams. As the

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES & CUTTING DIAGRAM

A Case Sides (2)

B Upper Fixed Shelf (1) 3 4 ply. - 11 1 2 x 25 1 2

C Middle Fixed Shelf (1)

3 4 ply. - 12 x 25 1 2

D Lower Fixed Shelf (1) 3 4 ply. - 13 1 4 x 25 1 2

E Toe Kick (1) 3 4 ply. - 2 1 4 x 25 1 2

F Top Back Panel (1) 3 4 ply. - 26 x 9

G Back Panel (1) 1 4 ply. - 26 x 47 1 2

H Adj. Shelves (2) 3 4 ply. - 12 x 25 3 8

I Upper Filler Blocks (2)

J Lower Filler Blocks (2) 1 4 x 1 4 - 2

1 4 x 1 4 - 1 2

3 4 ply. - 14 3 4 x 59 1 2

• (12) 3 4 " Minifix Fasteners

• (8) 1 4 " Spoon Shelf Pins

• (4) 7 8 " Edge Banding (8 ft. rolls)

#/4"x 48"- 96" Cherry Plywood

D A F A B C H H E
D
A
F
A
B
C
H H
E

ALSO NEEDED: One 48" x 48 "

 

" sheet

!/4

One

!/4

x

!/4

""

- 6

" cherry plywood for back panel

rgh. cherry for filler blocks

Iron-On EdgeBanding

Iron-On EdgeBanding Instead of edging the plywood panels of the bookcase with strips of hard- wood,

Instead of edging the plywood panels of the bookcase with strips of hard- wood, I decided to use iron-on edge banding. Edge banding is easy to apply, especially on curved edges like the sides of the bookcase. And since it’s made from solid wood, it blends in perfectly with the project. The edge banding is just a long, narrow strip of 1 32 "- thick veneer. (It’s available in a few different widths and types of wood, refer to the Sources on page 98.) One side of the edge banding is covered with a heat- activated glue. The only thing you have to do to apply it is run a hot iron over it. It’s really that simple, but there are a few details to be aware of. Prep Work. Before you begin to apply the edging, it’s important to fill any voids in the edge of the plywood (Photo 1). This prevents gaps from telegraphing through the band- ing and makes the banding less likely to peel away or chip. Iron On. After sanding the filler smooth, you can apply the edging. All you need is an ordinary clothes iron. Set the iron on high heat (cotton) and place a piece of kraft paper over the banding to prevent scorching. Then simply iron the banding onto the edge of the plywood (Photo 2). I find that I get the best results by ironing a short sec- tion of banding at a time. Fifteen to 30 seconds is usually enough to melt the glue so the banding will adhere. Trim. An inexpensive edging trimmer is used to trim the edge banding flush with the sides of the panel (Photo 3). Once that’s done, you can cut off the ends of the banding with a utility knife. If you’re covering more than one edge, make sure to overlap the banding at the ends.

Edging Supplies.

The only items you need to apply edge banding are an iron, a trimming tool, and some wood filler.

banding are an iron, a trimming tool, and some wood filler. 1 To get smooth results,

1 To get smooth results, be sure to fi ll any gaps or voids in the edge of the plywood before applying the edge banding. After the filler dries, sand it smooth.

the edge banding. After the fi ller dries, sand it smooth. 2 Working in short sections,
the edge banding. After the fi ller dries, sand it smooth. 2 Working in short sections,

2 Working in short sections, iron the edge banding onto the edge of the plywood. A sheet of kraft paper prevents the iron from scorching the banding.

3 Using the trimming tool, trim the edging flush with both faces of the plywood. You can trim the ends of the edge

banding with a utility knife. Then sand all the edges smooth.

Classic

 

Cabinets

Whether you need storage and display space

or a great piece of furniture to serve as a focal

point, each of these cabinets has an easy-to-

build design that is guaranteed to fill the bill.

 

LIGHTED DISPLAY CABINET

34

WIDE-SCREEN TV CABINET

40

CRAFTSMAN-STYLE CABINET

50

XXXXXX XXXX XXCABINETS

Deck copy.

LightedLighted Display Cabinet

Stylish glass doors and interior lighting put the contents on display, but the design and construction of this cabinet hold a few surprises.

This lighted display cabinet can be the perfect accent piece for any room in the house. The beveled glass doors and shelf allow you to display your col- lectibles to full advantage. And the small scale of the cabinet means it will fit in almost any space. But from a woodworking perspective, when you look at it, you’re probably envisioning mortise and tenon joinery and an expensive hardwood used

for its construction. You might be surprised to learn that this project relies on simple, but strong pocket-hole joinery. This means it’s quick and easy to build. And the expensive-looking wood is sim- ply poplar stained with a blend of gel stains. All these elements combine to give you a great- looking project that’s both easy to build and relatively inexpensive. The best of both worlds!

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS

Top conceals pocket screw holes and wiring channels

OVERALL DIMENSIONS:

34" W x 13" D x 32" H

NOTE: Underside of top is beveled on three edges

Pocket-hole joinery used for case and base construction

Rabbets in

cabinet sides

hold plywood

back

Shelf pins in sleeves allow easy adjustment of glass shelf

Screws connect base to the cabinet case

Routed channel holds wiring for recessed lights

Interior lights are recessed in shallow holes in case top

Beveled glass panels allow clear view of items inside cabinet

Cabinet doors

assembled with

easy-to-cut

half-lap joinery

Hardwood glass stop holds panel in rabbet Pewter knob and escutcheon complement glass doors Stout
Hardwood
glass stop
holds panel
in rabbet
Pewter
knob and
escutcheon
complement
glass doors
Stout legs provide
a solid base for
the cabinet

Curved rails on base add decorative detail

CUTTING DIAGRAM (for Materials & Supplies list, see page 39)

1"x 7!/2"- 96" Poplar (Two boards @ 6.3 Bd. Ft. each)

   

D

D

 

L

A

A

D

D

#/4"x

6!/2"-

96" Poplar (4.3 Bd. Ft.)

 
 

G

 

G

H

H

 

H

H

#/4"x

6"-

96" Poplar (4 Bd. Ft.)

 
J
J

E

E

F

F

I

I

I

I

1"x 6"- 96" Poplar (5 Bd. Ft.)

B

B

B

K
K

1"x 6"- 36" Poplar (1.9 Bd. Ft.)

B

B

Also needed: One 48"x 48"

sheet !/4" Birch plywood

Euro-style concealed hinges make fitting inset doors a breeze
Euro-style
concealed
hinges make
fitting inset
doors a
breeze