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Poetry

Poetry

Poetry

Phonetic Expressive Means/ Devices

are used to produce a certain acoustic (auditory) effect To give emphasis to the utterance To arouse emotions in the reader or listener.

In oral speech, intonation and stress are expressed directly by the speaker.

In written speech they are conveyed indirectly by graphical expressive means and by a special syntactical arrangement of utterance

Euphony

Is such a combination of words and such an arrangement of utterance which produces a pleasing acoustic effect (aesthetics) Euphony is generally achieved by means of different sound devices as:

alliteration, assonance, consonance, onomatopoeia etc.

rhythm and rhyme

1. Alliteration

is a phonetic stylistic device,

which aims at imparting a melodic effect to the utterance

by deliberate use of similar consonants in close succession

is a conventional device of

like most phonetic expressive devices, it doesn’t bear any lexical or other meaning, it is only a sort of musical accompaniment of the utterance

Alliteration - Examples

Doubting, dreading, dreams no mortals ever dared to dream before (Poe).

Is widely used in folklore, proverbs, sayings, traditional pairs of words:

out of the frying pan into the fire; safe and sound; as fit as a fiddle; a pig in a poke; as busy as a bee

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

Alliteration: used in

prose - a strong melodic and emotional effect:

The possessive instinct never stands still (Galsworthy)

“Hear the music of voices, the song of a bird, the mighty strains of an orchestra, as if you would be stricken deaf tomorrow. Touch each object as if tomorrow your tactile sense would fail. Smell the perfume of flowers…” - from “Three Days to See” by Helen Keller

book titles:

School for Scandal (R. Sheridan), Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility (J. Austen), Silver Spoon (J. Galsworthy).

More poetry examples

Slowly, silently, now the moon

Walks the night in her silver shoon;

This way, and that, she peers, and sees

Silver fruit upon silver trees…

-- Walter de la Mare, Silver

The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees. The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas. The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor. And the highwayman came riding- Riding – riding— The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door. -- Alfred Noyce, Highwayman

Poetry:

The day is cold and dark and dreary It rains and the wind is never weary. --(Longfellow) She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that’s best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes:

Thus mellowed to that tender light Which Heaven to gaudy day denies. --(Pied Beauty, G.M. Hopkins)

and her eyes: Thus mellowed to that tender light Which Heaven to gaudy d ay d

2. Consonance

Involves consonants but not necessarily in the onset position and could be at the beginning, end or middle of several successive words or lines

Often, eye rhymes are an example of this – good~food~blood, word~lord;

In poetry

I want a hero: an uncommon want When every year and month sends forth a new one Till, after cloying the gazettes with cant The age discovers he is not the true one Of such as these, I should not care to vaunt I’ll therefor take our ancient friend Don Juan… -- Lord Byron, Don Juan

And frightful a nightfall folded rueful a day --(G.M. Hopkins)

‘T was later when the summer went

Than when the cricket came, And yet we knew that gentle clock Meant nought but going home ‘T was sooner when the cricket went Than when the cricket came Yet that pathetic pendulum, Keeps esoteric time --(Emily Dickinson)

The moon was shining sulkily, Because she thought the sun Had got no business to be there After the day was done— “It’s very rude of him,” she said, “To come and spoil the fun!” --Lewis Carrol, The Walrus and the Carpenter

3. Assonance

the repetition of vowel sounds for internal rhyming

within phrases or sentences (a rhyme in this case being just the syllabic resemblance):

on a proud round cloud in white high night; (e.e. cummings)

I must confess that in my quest I felt depressed and restless;

Soft language issued from their spitless lips as they swished in low circles round and round the field, winding hither and thither through the weeds. (James Joyce)

Poetry is old, ancient, goes back far. It is among the oldest of living things.

So old it is that no man knows how and why the first poems

came.

Oh, there goes Rabbit, he choked He's so mad, but he won't give up that easy, no He won't have it, he knows his whole back's to these ropes It don't matter, he's dope He knows that, but he's broke He's so stagnant that he knows When he goes back to his mobile home, That's when it's back to the lab again yo -- Eminem (Lose Yourself)

--Carl Sandburg, Early Moon

The Eagle by Alfred Lord Tennyson

He clasps the crag with crooked hands; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring'd with the azure world, he stands.

The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls.

4. Onomatopoeia

is a combination of speech sounds which aim at imitating sounds produced

in nature (wind, sea, thunder),

by things (machines, tools),

by people (sighing, laughter, crying)

and by animals.

Onomatopoeia is based on metonymy (using a word to stand for one closely related to it).

Onomatopoeia

is often based on and combined with alliteration;

may carry an aesthetic function:

act pleasurably or unpleasurably on the reader’s feelings.

is the poetic device by which sound is used to communicate sense.

The moan of doves in immemorial elms. And murmuring of innumerable bees.

Onomatopoeia

Direct - is contained in words that imitate natural sounds:

buzz, cuckoo, ding-dong…

Indirect - is a combination of sounds, the aim of which is to make the sound of the utterance an echo of its sense (echo-writing):

And the silken, sad, uncertain, rustling of each purple curtain. (E.A. Poe) Indirect Onomatopoeia demands some mention of what makes the sound.

Let’s have one day for girls and boyses When you can make the grandest noises. Screech, scream, holler, and yell – Buzz a buzzer, clang a bell, Sneeze – hiccup – whistle – shout, Laugh until your lungs wear out, Toot a whistle, kick a can, Bang a spoon against a pan, Sing, yodel, bellow, hum, Blow a horn, beat a drum, Rattle a window, slam a door, Scrape a rake across the floor

Noise Day

by Shel Silverstein

Blow a horn, beat a drum, Rattle a window, slam a door, Scrape a rake across

Tlot-tlot; tlot-tlot! Had they heard it? The horse hoofs ringing clear; Tlot-tlot, tlot-tlot, in the distance? Were they deaf that they did not hear?

--Alfred Noyce, Highwayman

In Prose as in Poetry

from The Tunnel* (1995) by William H. Gass

[F]rom a distance, Culp seems presentable and reasonable and normal enough. Approach, however, and you'll hear whirs and clicks, rhymes and puns, jocularities in dialect, jingles in dirty high- schoolese, gibberish he says is pure Sioux.

Culp's conversation is made-up like his Halloween Indian's face. It is simply streaked with zaps, wheeps, and other illustrative noises. I guess I shouldn't say "simply" or "streaked" either. That's not exact. His speech is not outlined or punctuated with clacks or thonks in any ordinary way. It is engulfed in them

Don't ask him the time. He'll tell you it's dong-dong-dong-a-ding and ten ticks.

Pretty women wonder where my secret lies. I’m not cute or built to suit a fashion model’s size But when I start to tell them, They think I’m telling lies.

I say, It’s in the reach of my arms, The span of my hips, The stride of my step, The curl of my lips. I’m a woman Phenomenally. Phenomenal woman, That’s me.

Phenomenal Woman by Maya Angelou

5. Refrain

I walk into a room

Just as cool as you please,

And to a man, The fellows stand or Fall down on their knees. Then they swarm around me, A hive of honey bees.

I say,

It’s the fire in my eyes, And the flash of my teeth,

The swing of my waist, And the joy in my feet. I’m a woman Phenomenally. Phenomenal woman, That’s me.

Men themselves have wondered What they see in me. They try so much But they can’t touch My inner mystery. When I try to show them, They say they still can’t see. I say, It’s in the arch of my back, The sun of my smile, . The grace of my style. I’m a woman Phenomenally. Phenomenal woman, That’s me.

.

.

6. Repetition

Time will eventually

show us the truth.

Time is a mystery;

time is a measure.

Time for us is

valued treasure.

Time to spend;

time to mend.

Time to cry

Time to die.

Time to spend;

time to mend.

Time to hate;

time to wait.

Time is the essence;

time is the key.

Time will tell us

what we will be.

Time is the enemy;

time is the proof.

Valued

Treasure

by Chris R. Carey

from Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Bells”

To the swinging and the ringing of the bells, bells, bells – Of the bells, bells, bells, bells Bells, bells, bells – To the rhyming and the chiming of the bells!

Annabel Lee” by Poe:

And the stars never rise, but I feel the bright eyes Of the beautiful Annabel Lee; And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side Of my darling—my darling—my life and my bride, In the sepulchre there by the sea, In her tomb by the sounding sea.

Casey at the Bat” by Ernest Lawrence Thayer (1888) Oh, somewhere in this favoured land the sun is shining bright, The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light; And somewhere men are laughing, and somewhere children shout, But there is no joy in Mudville:

Mighty Casey has struck out.

Rhyme and Metrical structure

Prosody

Oral traditions

Poetry started with the oral tradition Before books people listened The word was spoken first History sung in verse Bards, Griots, Gnostics, Troubadours, In the beginning there was the Word proverbs, riddles, tales, nursery rhymes, legends, myths, epic songs and poems, charms, prayers, chants, songs, dramatic performances

7. Rhyme

What is it?

the repetition of identical or similar terminal sound combinations.

rhyming words are placed at a regular distance from each other (within a line or at the ends of lines in verse) Why use it?

One way to create euphony. Normal in poetry, less so in prose Two types, end-rhyme or internal rhyme

Rhyme Type

Full or Perfect rhyme – the likeness between the vowel sounds in the last stressed syllables and all sounds that follow them (coda as well as any syllables that follow):

tenderly – slenderly; finding – binding; know – though. Imperfect (slant/near or eye) rhymes)

similarity to the eye, or spelling similarity: proved – loved; brood – blood; slow – law, dizzy – easy.

ain't gon' be cooking all day,

I

I

ain't gon' do your laundry… J.Lo

Imperfect rhyme contd.

Blow, blow, thou winter wind, Thou art not so unkind As man’s ingratitude; Thy tooth is not so keen, Because thou art not seen, Although thy breath be rude. –Shakespeare

And be prosperous, though we live dangerous Cops could just arrest me, blamin’ us, we’re held like hostages (NY State of Mind by Nas, -us sound)

Mixed up – examples from W.B. Yeats

I have met them at close of day Coming with vivid faces From counter or desk among grey Eighteenth-century houses.‘ --Easter 1916,

When have I last looked on The round green eyes and the long wavering bodies Of the dark leopards of the moon? All the wild witches, those most noble ladies … --Lines written in Dejection, W.B. Yeats

Perfect rhymes may be

Masculine (single) – the similarity of one stressed final syllable:

plain – terrain- main; find – declined – mind; Feminine (double) – the similarity of one stressed syllable followed by one unstressed syllable:

daugh.ter – wa.ter, moun.tain – foun.tain;

An example from P.B. Shelley

Alternating masculine and feminine rhymes :

When the lamp is shattered, The light in the dust lies dead, When the cloud is scattered, The rainbow’s glory is shed. When the lute is broken Sweet tones are remembered not When the lips have spoken Loved accents are soon forgot

End rhyme sequences

Couple rhyme – the 1 st and the 2 nd lines rhyme together (a…a):

Away, away from men and towns, To the wild woods and the downs – To the silent wilderness Where the soul need not repress (Shelley, To Jane: The Invitation)

End rhyme sequences

Cross rhyme – the 1 st and the 3 rd lines rhyme together (a…b…a…b) Four seasons fill the measure of the year; There are four seasons in the mind of man:

He has his lusty spring, when fancy clear Takes in all beauty with an easy span

(Keats, The Human Seasons)

End rhyme sequences

Frame rhyme – the 1 st and the 4 th lines rhyme together

(a

b

b

a)

Love, faithful love recalled thee to my mind But how could I forget thee? Through what power Even for the least division of an hour Have I been so beguiled as to be blind?

(--Wordsworth, Surprised by Joy)

Internal Rhyme

Internal rhyme – exists between the middle and final words or syllables of a verse:

The fair breeze blew, the white foam flew, The furrow followed free; We were the first that ever burst Into that silent sea… (S.T. Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)

The functions of rhyme • it signals the end of a line, • marks the

The functions of rhyme

it signals the end of a line,

marks the arrangement of lines into stanzas;

makes rhythm manifest and easily perceptible;

adds greater prominence to the most emphatic place in a poetic line – the end.

8. Rhyme Scheme

Twinkle, twinkle little star How I wonder what you are. Up above the earth so high, Like a diamond in the sky.

Twinkle, twinkle little star How I wonder what you are. Up above the earth so high,
Twinkle, twinkle little star How I wonder what you are. Up above the earth so high,
Twinkle, twinkle little star How I wonder what you are. Up above the earth so high,

Baa, baa, black sheep Have you any wool? Yes sir, yes sir, Three bags full.

Baa, baa, black sheep Have you any wool? Yes sir, yes sir, Three bags full.
Baa, baa, black sheep Have you any wool? Yes sir, yes sir, Three bags full.
Baa, baa, black sheep Have you any wool? Yes sir, yes sir, Three bags full.

a

a

b

b

a

b

c

b

Rhyme Scheme continued…

What is the rhyme scheme of this stanza?

Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow.

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

Did you get it right? aaba

Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow.

I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here
I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here
I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here

a

a

b

a

“Trees” by Joyce Kilmer (aabb)

I think that I shall never see (a)

A poem lovely as a tree. (a)

A tree that may in summer wear (b)

A nest of robins in her hair. (b)

“The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes (aabcb)

The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees. The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas. The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor. And the highwayman came riding- Riding – riding— The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.

“The Cremation of Sam McGee” by Robert W. Service (abcbdefe)

There are strange things done in the midnight sun By the men who moil for gold; The Arctic trails have their secret tales That would make your blood run cold; The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, But the queerest they ever did see Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarg I cremated Sam McGee

Back to Poe and Annabel lee

It was many and many a year ago, In the kingdom by the sea, That a maiden there lived, whom you may know By the name of Annabel Lee; And this maiden she lived with no other thought Than to love, and be loved by me.

9. Rhythm

is a regular alternation of similar or equal units of speech

alternation of stressed and unstressed syllables (stressed vs unstressed is a relative perception of loudness/salience/prominence; a syllable is stressed only vis-à-vis its neighbours)

is a flow, movement, procedure, etc., characterized as beat, pulse or accent, in alternation with opposite or different elements or features

Rhythm is often combined with rhyme, alliteration, and other poetic devices to add a musical quality to the writing.

Rhythm in prose

Is not governed by any definite rules. It is very changeable and is mainly dependent on the author’s artistic sense

Certain parts of prosaic descriptions can be very rhythmical, which produces a certain stylistic effect

Due to rhythm some utterances may sound very solemn and imposing.

Gibreel, the tuneless soloist, had been cavorting in moonlight as he sang his impromptu gazal, swimming in air, butterfly-stroke, breast- stroke, bunching himself into a ball, spreadeagling himself against the almost-infinity of the almost-dawn, adopting heraldic postures, rampant, couchant, pitting levity against gravity. --Salman Rushdie’s 1988 novel The Satanic Verses

Rhythm in prose

is also created by more or less recurrent repetition of some similar units of speech:

repetition of all kinds

Polysyndeton (Austen)

asyndeton (Caesar)

inversion

parallelism

heightens the emotional tension of the narration.

Mrs. Hurst and her sister allowed it to be so—but still they admired her and liked her, and pronounced her to be a sweet girl, and one whom they would not object to know more of. --Pride and Prejudice “Are all thy conquests, glories, triumphs, spoils, Shrunk to this little measure?” --Julius Caesar

JFK to J.Nehru

“And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.”

The story of the Ganges, from her source to the sea, from old times to new, is the story of India's civilization and culture, of the rise and fall of empires, of great and proud cities, of the adventure of man and the quest of the mind which has so occupied India's thinkers, of the richness and fulfilment of life as well as its denial and renunciation, of ups and downs, of growth and decay, of life and death.

(Look up Martin Luther King’s I have a Dream speech).

Rhythm in poetry

Is created by the regular recurrence of stressed and unstressed syllables or equal poetic lines. (Perceivable only as a contrast.)

The regular alternation of stressed and unstressed syllables forms a unit – the foot I think that I shall never see a poem lovely as a tree.

There are 5 basic feet in English poetry (ie grouping of syllables)

Iambus

Iambus • a foot of one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable: • My SOUL

a foot of one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable:

My SOUL /is DARK /– oh QUICK/ly STRING The HARP /and YET /can BROOK /be HEARD…(Byron)

I asked my moth’r for fifty cents to see the el’phant jump the fence. He jumped so high he reached the sky, and didn’t get back till fourth of July.

behold, amuse, arise, awake, return, Noel, depict, destroy, inject, inscribe, insist, employ, "to be," inspire, unwashed, "Of Mice and Men," "the South will rise again."

Othello

Othello

Trochee

Trochee • a foot consisting of one stressed syllable followed by one unstressed syllable: • FARE

a foot consisting of one stressed syllable followed by one unstressed syllable:

FARE thee WELL! And IF for EVer STILL for EVer, FARE thee WELL. -- Byron

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers;

A

If

peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked; Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,

Where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?

happy, hammer, Pittsburgh, nugget, double, incest, injure, roses, hippie, beat it, clever, dental, dinner, shatter, pitcher, Bombay, chosen, planet, chorus, widow, bladder, cuddle, slacker, doctor, market, picket

Song of Hiawatha by Longfellow

On the shores of Gitche Gumee, Of the shining Big-Sea-Water, Stood Nokomis, the old woman, Pointing with her finger westward, O'er the water pointing westward, To the purple clouds of sunset.

Dactyl

Dactyl • a foot consisting of one stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables: • HAIL

a foot consisting of one stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables:

HAIL to the /CHIEF who in /TRIumph ad/VANces/ HOnoured and /BLESSED be the /EVer-green /PINE. (Sir Walter Scott) carefully, changeable, merrily, mannequin, tenderly, prominent, buffalo, Bellingham, bitterly, notable, horrible, glycerin, parable, scorpion, Indianapolis, Jefferson

RandJ Woe is me/-woe is me Romeo/ Montague loved Julie/ Capulet what e'er the / cost, but in the/ end it seems lovers so /torn between Interfa/milial feuds, can be/ lost. --Charles Mcdauel

Anapest

Anapest • Anapest - is a foot consisting of two unstressed syllables followed by one stressed

Anapest - is a foot consisting of two unstressed syllables followed by one stressed syllable:

He is GONE on the MOUNtain,

He is LOST to the FOrest…

(Sir Walter Scott)

understand, interrupt, comprehend, anapest, New Rochelle,

contradict, "get a life, "In the blink of an eye“

Over hill, over dale, Thorough bush, thorough brier, Over park, over pale, Thorough flood, thorough fire.

There was [an Old Man] [in a tree], [Who was hor][ribly bored] [by a bee]. [When they said] ["Does it buzz?]" [He replied] ["Yes, it does!] [It's a re][gular brute][ of a bee!"] --Edward Lear

Annabel Lee Again!

For the moon/ never beams,/ without bring/ing me dreams/ Of the beau/tiful Ann/abel Lee;/ And the stars/ never rise,/ but I feel/ the bright eyes/ Of the beau/tiful Ann/abel Lee;/

Spondee

is a metrical foot consisting of two stressed syllables:

childhood, love-song, heartbreak, drop-dead football, Mayday, DDay, heartbreak, Key West, shortcake, plopplop, dropdead, dead man, dumbbell, childhood, goofoff, racetrack, bathrobe, black hole, breakdown, lovesong

Irregular feet

The regularity of stressed and unstressed syllables is frequently violated as a result of the natural phonetic laws of the English language or the emphatic stress.

The feet of this nature do not typically provide the basis for a metrical line. Instead, they are found as irregular feet in meter based on another type of foot.

Meter – metrical structure - prosody

The basic rhythmic structure of a verse. A metrical line is named based on the number of feet that are in that line:

According to the number of feet per line:

1 – monometer

5

– pentameter

2 – dimeter

6 – hexameter

3 – trimeter

7

– heptameter

4 – tetrameter

8 – octameter

Identifying meter

‘TIS the HOUR when HAPpy FAces

U

SMILE aROUND the TAper's LIGHT;

U

/

U

/

/

U

/

/

U

/

U

/

U

/

WHO will FILL our VAcant PLAces?

/

U

/

U

/

U

/

U

WHO will SING our SONGS to-NIGHT?

/

U

/

U

/

U

Faster than fairies, faster than witches, Bridges and houses, hedges and ditches; And charging along like troops in a battle All through the meadows the horses and cattle:

All of the sights of the hill and the plain Fly as thick as driving rain; And ever again, in the wink of an eye, Painted stations whistle by.

Here is a child who clambers and scrambles, All by himself and gathering brambles; Here is a tramp who stands and gazes; And here is the green for stringing the daisies!

Here is a cart runaway in the road Lumping along with man and load; And here is a mill, and there is a river:

Each a glimpse and gone forever!

--Robert Louis Stevenson From a Railway Carriage

Poem Example – My Papa’s Waltz by Theodore Roethke

Poem Example – My Papa’s Waltz by Theodore Roethke The whiskey on your breath Could make

The whiskey on your breath Could make a small boy dizzy; But I hung on like death:

Such waltzing was not easy.

The hand that held my wrist Was battered on one knuckle; At every step you missed My right ear scraped a buckle.

We romped until the pans Slid from the kitchen shelf; My mother's countenance Could not unfrown itself.

You beat time on my head With a palm caked hard by dirt, Then waltzed me off to bed Still clinging to your shirt.

The whiskey on your breath

A

Could make a small boy dizzy;

B

But I hung on like death:

A

Such waltzing was not easy.

B

We romped until the pans

C

Slid from the kitchen shelf;

D

My mother's countenance

C (?)

Could not unfrown itself.

D

What is the type of foot? What is the metre?

Waltz

A waltz goes 1,2,3,-1,2,3,-1,2,3, and the way the rhythm in the poem is “the whiskey on your breath”, it’s 1,2,3 the same rhythm!

How about some more examples?

We real cool. We Left school. We

Lurk late. We Strike straight. We

Sing sin. We Thin gin. We

Jazz June. We Die soon.

late. We Strike straight. We • Sing sin. We Thin gin. We • Jazz June. We

Gwendolyn Brooks

Passenger

"Let Her Go"

'Cause you only need the light when it's burning low Only miss the sun when it starts to snow Only know you love her when you let her go

Only know you've been high when you're feeling low Only hate the road when you're missin' home Only know you love her when you let her go And you let her go-oh-oh-ooh

And Katy Perry?!

Do you know that there's still a chance for you 'Cause there's a spark in you

You just gotta ignite the light And let it shine Just own the night Like the Fourth of July

'Cause baby you're a firework Come on show 'em what your worth Make 'em go "Oh, oh, oh!" As you shoot across the sky-y-y

Firework

Do you ever feel like a plastic bag Drifting thought the wind Wanting to start again

Do you ever feel, feel so paper thin Like a house of cards One blow from caving in

Do you ever feel already buried deep Six feet under scream But no one seems to hear a thing

You don't have to feel like a waste of space You're original, cannot be replaced If you only knew what the future holds After a hurricane comes a rainbow

Maybe a reason why all the doors are closed So you can open one that leads you to the perfect road Like a lightning bolt, your heart will glow And when it's time, you'll know

You just gotta ignite the light And let it shine Just own the night Like the Fourth of July

'Cause baby you're a firework Come on show 'em what your worth Make 'em go "Oh, oh, oh!" As you shoot across the sky-y-y

Baby you're a firework Come on let your colors burst Make 'em go "Oh, oh, oh!" You're gonna leave 'em fallin' down down down

Boom, boom, boom Even brighter than the moon, moon, moon It's always been inside of you, you, you And now it's time to let it through

But sometimes….

Fog

The fog comes on little cat feet. It sits looking over harbor and city on silent haunches and then, moves on.