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Clinic Highlights Ranked 6th in the nation for Best Clinical Training PRACTICE LAW. PROMOTE JUSTICE.
Clinic Highlights Ranked 6th in the nation for Best Clinical Training PRACTICE LAW. PROMOTE JUSTICE.
Clinic Highlights Ranked 6th in the nation for Best Clinical Training PRACTICE LAW. PROMOTE JUSTICE.
Clinic Highlights Ranked 6th in the nation for Best Clinical Training PRACTICE LAW. PROMOTE JUSTICE.

Clinic Highlights

Clinic Highlights Ranked 6th in the nation for Best Clinical Training PRACTICE LAW. PROMOTE JUSTICE. CHANGE

Ranked 6th in the nation for Best Clinical Training

PRACTICE LAW. PROMOTE JUSTICE. CHANGE LIVES.

Training PRACTICE LAW. PROMOTE JUSTICE. CHANGE LIVES. 4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008 |

4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008 | 202.274.7400 | www.law.udc.edu

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1| About our Clinics 2| Immigration and Human Rights Clinic 3| Juvenile

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1| About our Clinics

2| Immigration and Human Rights Clinic

3| Juvenile and Special Education Clinic

4| Legislation Clinic

5| Criminal Law Clinic

6| Government Accountability Clinic

7| Community Development Law Clinic

8| Housing and Consumer Law Clinic

9| Low Income Taxpayer Clinic

10| General Practice Clinic

11| Chief Justice Roberts Thanks General Practice Clinic Students for their Work with Veterans!

12| Clinical Photos

13| Notes

Work with Veterans! 12| Clinical Photos 13| Notes 4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008

4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008 | 202.274.7400 | www.law.udc.edu

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS “ I had a fulfilling experience testifying on behalf of BRAWS before the DC
“ I had a fulfilling experience testifying on behalf of BRAWS before the DC Council

I had a fulfilling experience testifying on behalf of BRAWS

before the DC Council in

support of B21-0696, now

DC Law 21-201. The

opportunity to testify gave

me invaluable experiences

that I will take with me for the rest of my law career. I was able to compose and deliver testimony on behalf of a client, field media

questions and conduct interviews as a tool to educate the public about

the issue of taxation on feminine hygiene products and its significance. Plus, I was confident enough in

my research to be able to

answer anticipated follow-

up questions from DC

Councilmembers and other

advocates who were interested in this area of

social equality.

- Shannon Cooper, ‘17, Legislation Clinic

Our Clinics

T he Clinical Program at the University of the District

of Columbia David Clarke School of Law (UDC

Law) represents a significant departure from tradi-

tional legal education. One vital purpose is to pro-

vide legal services to residents of the District of Columbia who could not otherwise afford representation. A second purpose is to prepare students for practice. Based on time-honored sys- tems of apprenticeship, the clinical approach has also proven its effectiveness as a method of teaching the law by applying theory to the resolution of actual legal disputes.

Thus, the faculty and students in UDC Law clinics are engaged in the practice of law on a continuing basis. By representing clients with actual legal problems, students learn substantive law and lawyering skills in the most realistic setting. This ex- perience not only contributes to a better understanding of the law learned in the classroom, but also gives UDC Law gradu- ates a significant advantage in the workplace.

All UDC Law students participate in at least two of the follow- ing clinics:

1. Community Development Law Clinic

2. Criminal Law Clinic

3. General Practice Clinic

4. Government Accountability (Whistleblower) Clinic

5. Housing & Consumer Law Clinic

6. Immigration & Human Rights Clinic

7. Juvenile & Special Education Law Clinic

8. Legislation Clinic

9. Low Income Taxpayer Clinic

Clinic 8. Legislation Clinic 9. Low Income Taxpayer Clinic 4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC

4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008 | 202.274.7400 | www.law.udc.edu

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

Prof. Harris, students, and clients at Immigration Court in Arlington, Virginia IMMIGRATION & HUMAN RIGHTS
Prof. Harris, students, and clients at Immigration Court in Arlington, Virginia
IMMIGRATION & HUMAN RIGHTS CLINIC
The Immigratiion and Human Rights Clinic represents asylum seekers fleeing violence and persecution at
interviews with immigration officials and in litigation before the Immigration Court, the Board of Immigration
Appeals, state court, United States District Court and the United States Court of Appeals.

T he Immigration and Human Rights Clinic, be-

gun in 2010, initially focused on

“crimmigration” – representing noncitizens

caught up in the complex interplay between

asylum for a Honduran mother of two, a survivor of ex- treme domestic violence and an activist for improved education in Honduras. This summer we also won asy-

 

our criminal justice and immigration systems. In recent years, however, the Clinic has shifted focus to respond to the Central American refugee crisis and to represent the families fleeing violence and persecution in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala.

This semester, Clinic students are representing three Honduran families in immigration court proceedings. Students have been working diligently on fact investiga- tion and declaration drafting to support the cases as they go to trial in the Spring and Fall semester in 2018. In the Spring, we will also appear in court for two young Sal- vadoran girls seeking citizenship. Students will be busy preparing for trial, drafting briefs, preparing opening and closing statements and preparing clients, witnesses, and experts for direct and cross examination.

Last April, Clinic students secured asylum protection for a Salvadoran mother and child who fled extortion and death threats from a powerful transnational criminal or- ganization. In May, we secured protection for a Guate- malan woman who had been kidnapped at the age of sev- enteen and forced into a relationship. In June, we won

lum for a lesbian couple fleeing Russia because of perse- cution based on their LGBT status and relationship.

This semester the Clinic embarked on two partnerships with local nonprofit organizations. We traveled to the immigrant detention center in Farmville, Virginia, where working with the DC-based Capital Area Immigrants Rights (CAIR) Coalition, we conducted intakes of de- tained adult immigrant men. This heartbreaking experi- ence exposed students to the fast-paced and high stakes nature of detention work.

In November 2017 we also partnered with Human Rights First to offer an asylum-filing workshop for adults with children appearing in the Baltimore immigration court. Students in the Clinic worked with members of the LatinX Law Students Association and our first-year Clinical Associates (who volunteer within the Clinic as part of their Community Justice Project) to help families complete the required application for filing in court or at the asylum office. This experience highlighted for stu- dents access to justice issues within the immigration court system and the importance of counsel representing asylum seekers.

Co-Directors Kristina Campbell, the Jack and Lovell Olender Professor of Law, and Prof. Lindsay Harris

- Prof. Saba Ahmed

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

UDC Law student Rebecca Krassel, left, and Prof. Lauren Onkeles-Klein, testifying at a DC Council
UDC Law student Rebecca Krassel, left, and Prof. Lauren Onkeles-Klein, testifying at a DC Council oversight hearing on DC Public School practices.
JUVENILE AND SPECIAL EDUCATION CLINIC
The Juvenile and Special Education Clinic protects students from improper school discipline practices and policies
and ensures that students with disabilities receive the accommodations and services to which they are entitled.

T he Juvenile and Special Education Clinic ex- pands access to justice for DC’s students and their families in relation to special education and school discipline. Law students, working

under faculty supervision, learn critical skills while providing free, high-quality representation to parents, guardians, and adult children in special education and disciplinary matters.

Essentially, by arranging for children to receive needed special education services, clinic professors and law stu- dents ensure that the delinquency system responds ap-

propriately to the children's needs for care and rehabilita- tion. In a large number of cases, the clinic is able to pro-

tect children from punitive responses or to extricate chil-

dren from the delinquency system altogether.

Sometimes, however, systemic change is needed. Exces- sive and un-reported suspensions and expulsions of DC public school students pose severe problems for both stu- dents and their advocates. On Tuesday, July 18, the Washington Post ran an article on its front page exposing several issues with undocumented suspension and other

DC Public School “push-out” practices. This article was

mainly the result of the advocacy (and the complaint filed) by the Clinic, working in conjunction with Advo-

cates for Justice and Education, (AJE) which was found- ed by, and is currently led by, UDC Law Juvenile and Special Education Clinic alumni.

In late October 2017, the DC Office of the State Superin- tendent for Education (OSSE) agreed with the Clinic - and found that DCPS violated the Individuals with Disa- bilities in Education Act (IDEA) by unlawfully exclud- ing students with disabilities from school, inaccurately recording absences, and denying students necessary, le- gally required supports and protections.

“Illicitly preventing students from entering school and denying these same students necessary and legally re- quired services, protections, and supports, is absolutely devastating for these kids,” said Clinic Director Lauren Onkeles-Klein. “Rather than receive critical instruction, therapies, and interventions, these students are consid- ered truant and left to languish at home or on the streets.

“The practice of illegally preventing children from at- tending school and entering fraudulent information into the attendance system calls into question all of DCPS’s data regarding claims of reductions in suspensions and truancy,” said Onkeles-Klein. “We hope that this infor- mation helps serve as a catalyst for immediate systemic action.”

helps serve as a catalyst for immediate systemic action.” Clinical Director/ Professor Lauren Onkeles - Klein

Clinical Director/ Professor Lauren Onkeles-Klein

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

Students at the U.S. House of Representatives Education and Workforce Committee Meeting

of Representatives Education and Workforce Committee Meeting LEGISLATION CLINIC In the Legislation Clinic, students
LEGISLATION CLINIC In the Legislation Clinic, students learn about legislative lawyering and experience the development
LEGISLATION CLINIC
In the Legislation Clinic, students learn about legislative lawyering and experience the development of public
policy first hand, representing nonprofit and community organizations before local and national legislative
bodies, regulatory agencies, and in the courts.

T his semester, Jews United for Justice

(JUFJ) is one of the Clinic’s clients. JUFJ

is a grassroots community group that leads

the DC Paid Family Leave Campaign - a

coalition of over 200 businesses, nonprofits, and na- tional networks working to bring effective paid fam- ily and medical leave to the District and move for- ward with the implementation of the Universal Paid

Leave Amendment Act (UPLA), which went into effect in April.

Over the summer, five bills were put forth to change certain components of the new law. On October 10th, DC Council Chair Mendelson convened a hearing at which more than 100 people testified. A 13-person Clinic team—comprised of faculty, stu- dent attorneys and 1L clinic associates—was at the hearing with JUFJ for 12 hours. 3Ls Hannah Amundson, Grace Emery, Tom Moore, and Mar- yann Mennano led our team’s work by providing significant research on a critical issue.

At the hearing, JUFJ asked Grace Emery to testify on behalf of Sarah Comeau, a former teacher whose job was eliminated after 11 years of service when she notified her employer that she was preg- nant. Hannah Amundson testified on behalf of the Little Red Fox café, representing numerous local businesses who support the UPLA in its current state. Professor Karin also testified, in her personal capacity, about the impact that the bills may have on retaliation against workers. Karin and Emery sub- mitted written testimony about potential retaliation against workers at local universities.

According to Amundson, who was the final witness at the hearing, “it was very fulfilling to have the last word on behalf of defending the UPLA.” Moore agreed, “it was really humbling to see our client use the work we put in as a team as part of a much broader movement and collective action on behalf of so many people across the city.”

action on behalf of so many people across the city.” Clinical Director, Jack and Lovell Olender

Clinical Director, Jack and Lovell Olender Prof., Marcy Karin - Prof. Laurie Morin - Prof. Monica Bhattacharya

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS Alumni working in criminal law include our Class of 2017 defenders, Thomas Matthew (MD
Alumni working in criminal law include our Class of 2017 defenders, Thomas Matthew (MD Office
Alumni working in criminal law include our Class of 2017 defenders, Thomas Matthew (MD Office
of the Public Defender) (top left), Nana Yankah (Massachusetts Committee for Public Counsel Ser-
vices), Marsha Williams (Defender Assn. of Philadelphia) (far left), and Max Kauffman (NM Law
Office of the Public Defender, Albuquerque). A few of our prosecutors—all with the Asst. State’s
Attorneys for Prince George’s County, MD, include, (above from left) Jacqueline B. Oudia, ’10, La-
trice Flucas-Cush, ’03, Stacey Cobb-Smith, ’06, Julia Gagne Rupert, ’14, and Lakuita N. Bittle, ’15.
CRIMINAL LAW CLINIC
The Law Students in Court Criminal Law Clinic provides students the opportunity to represent adult clients
charged with misdemeanors in DC Superior Court and children involved in delinquency matters.

O perated by DC Law Students in Court

(DCLSIC), the Clinic provides students

with the opportunity to represent adult

clients charged with misdemeanors in

Students handle cases for clients charged with mis- demeanors such as simple assault, unlawful entry, assault on a police officer, and sexual abuse. Prior to their clients’ first court appearances, each student interviews his or her incarcerated client and crafts a persuasive argument to present to the arraignment judge to obtain his or her client’s release from jail under the least restrictive conditions possible. Stu- dents thoroughly investigate their cases with their fellow students, go to the scenes of the alleged of- fenses, take photographs, and interview various wit- nesses and police officers in order to gather facts and develop case theories. As a result of the infor- mation they gather students file numerous pretrial motions and prepare for trial throughout the year.

Many of the students obtain dismissals in their cli-

ent’s cases before trial, or obtain favorable outcomes such as diversion agreements. Others handle the en- tire case through trial. Ninety-five percent of cases result in dismissals or acquittals at trial!

DC

Superior Court and children involved in delin-

quency matters. Although supervised by attorneys, the students themselves are responsible for every as- pect of their cases. Students conduct extensive fact investigations, including finding and interviewing defense and government witnesses, undertaking pre- trial discovery, preparing and filing pleadings, en- gaging in plea negotiations, arguing motions, and representing their clients at trial and other proceed- ings, such as probation revocation hearings.

Students learn effective lawyering skills and receive trial advocacy training through weekly classroom seminars, guest lectures, one-on-one supervision,

and

case-rounds with their colleagues. The program

provides supervision and instruction that emphasizes zealous advocacy and reflection.

Executive Director Moses Cook

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS GAP Legal Director and clinical professor, Tom Devine,’80, speaking at TEDx Wilmington, July 2016.
GAP Legal Director and clinical professor, Tom Devine,’80, speaking at TEDx Wilmington, July 2016. GOVERNMENT
GAP Legal Director and clinical professor, Tom Devine,’80,
speaking at TEDx Wilmington, July 2016.
GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY CLINIC
The Government Accountability Project Clinic provides students with a unique opportunity to work with
leaders in the legal community who preserve freedom of speech by protecting those who blow the whistle on
corporate and governmental abuses of power that betray the public trust.

T he Government Accountability Project

(GAP) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan public

interest organization that promotes gov-

ernment and corporate accountability

ers are adhering to the law or whether laws need strengthening.

GAP is particularly concerned with government agencies that misuse their own whistleblower pro- tection mechanisms. They have had cases where an agency’s internal investigators have themselves re- taliated against a whistleblower.

through advancing occupational free speech and ethical conduct, defending whistleblowers, and em- powering citizen activists.

GAP's lawyers and law students represent govern- ment and private employees who are threatened with retaliation for speaking out against fraud, waste, mismanagement, abuse of authority, envi- ronmental dangers, and public health and safety problems. GAP clients span a wide spectrum, in- cluding persons who deal with environmental is- sues, nuclear oversight, food and drug safety, work- er health and safety, patient care, international re- form and national security.

Clinic students primarily focus on three dimensions of the work: 1) investigating claims of retaliation and developing evidence to support the claims; 2) filing complaints under the Whistleblower Protec- tion Act and other anti-retaliation laws; and 3) con- ducting legal research to monitor whether employ-

Students have played important roles in these cases. In one, a GAP Clinic student’s investigation of re- taliation against a federal law enforcement officer who disclosed corruption led to a settlement with the agency and prevented the obstruction of an in- ternational drug smuggling probe.

In a second case, a student drafted a successful peti- tion requesting a stay of a firing of a Department of the Interior employee who had disclosed the agen- cy’s shortcutting of the environmental reviews nec- essary for offshore oil drilling in the Arctic Ocean.

In addition to learning the intricacies of whistle- blower law, GAP Clinic students are exposed to and work with a wide variety of environmental and employment law.

Clinical Director/Professor Tom Devine

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

Welcome New CDL Clinic Co-Director, Professor Etienne Toussaint! COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT LAW CLINIC In the Community
Welcome New CDL Clinic Co-Director,
Professor Etienne Toussaint!
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT LAW CLINIC
In the Community Development Law Clinic, students learn transactional lawyering skills through representing
nonprofit organizations and small, urban entrepreneurs. They explore and implement models of legal practice
that assist clients in developing control and ownership of economic and social assets in their communities.

S tudents in the Community Development Law Clinic (CDLC) learn transactional and business lawyering skills while representing nonprofits and small, urban entrepreneurs.

CDLC clients offer a diverse range of subject matter. In addition to tenant associations and housing coop- eratives, students are representing nonprofits that provide services to incarcerated youth, offer job

readiness training for asylum seekers, and enable childcare workers to form their own businesses.

Clinic students provide clients with a wide range of direct legal services to help them establish and oper- ate their businesses and programs. Students advise clients on business structure; prepare articles of in- corporation, bylaws, partnership agreements, and business contracts; advise clients on basic tax law, zoning, licensing, intellectual property, and other le- gal issues; research trademarks and prepare trade- mark applications; prepare applications for tax ex- empt status and represent clients in the application process with the IRS; and mediate business disputes. Clinic students also help prepare and conduct client workshops on critical legal issues.

The student begins by ascertaining the client’s goals. Following an analysis, the student and client plan an approach. They may start with the basics: drafting organic rules to guide the organization’s functioning, advising on governance issues or educating the client about the responsibilities of a Board of Directors. They may partner with accounting or other consult- ants to achieve solutions to financial needs, such as accessing capital, or conducting risk assessments. They may work with others, including organizers or policy makers, to resolve community-wide problems. Finally, they may negotiate and prepare documents for complex transactions, including sales of real es- tate – experiences that many lawyers do not get until they have several years of post-law school employ- ment under their belts.

During the 2016-17 academic year, students assisted three housing cooperatives that provide homes to 57 families in structuring their loans and resolving other financial challenges. Students are helping a tenant association acquire and renovate 14 units of slum rental housing property and convert them to a coop- erative for the building’s residents.

them to a coop- erative for the building’s residents. Clinic Co - Directors, Professor Louise Howells

Clinic Co-Directors, Professor Louise Howells and Professor Etienne Toussaint

-

Prof. Jerome Hughes

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS HOUSING & CONSUMER LAW CLINIC The Housing and Consumer Law Clinic fights for safe
HOUSING & CONSUMER LAW CLINIC The Housing and Consumer Law Clinic fights for safe and
HOUSING & CONSUMER LAW CLINIC
The Housing and Consumer Law Clinic fights for safe and affordable housing for some of the most vulnerable
DC residents by defending against illegal evictions, bringing affirmative habitability actions, challenging illegal
rent increases and combating housing discrimination.

M any DC residents struggle to retain safe and affordable housing. When their housing is threatened, many seek assistance from the Housing & Con-

sumer Clinic. Ms. M.’s story is one example of the critical assistance students provide.

Ms. M., an elderly DC resident who has lived in her current apartment for almost ten years, is retired, functionally illiterate and relies on her son and brother to assist her in routine matters, including those affecting her housing. She receives a subsidy to help cover her rent, but fell behind in her pay- ments after the DC Housing Authority (DCHA) raised her rent and initiated eviction proceedings.

Clinic students Rahul Tilva, ‘17, and Tijuana Barnes, ’18, investigated the case. They learned that Ms. M.’s apartment was riddled with housing code violations that had not been addressed by the DCHA, despite her requests. Mice and roach infesta-

tions, peeling paint, broken floor tiles and a broken fence were among the violations that threatened her health and safety.

The students defended the eviction action and assist- ed Ms. M. with pre-trial fact development (“discovery”). They conducted settlement negotia- tions with DCHA, prepared Ms. M. and her family members for mediation and represented her in the mediation process. Their advocacy resulted in a set- tlement with DCHA that enabled her to make up the unpaid rent in small increments based on her ability to pay and that requires DCHA to remedy all of the housing violations. She expects that the repairs will be completed soon.

The students thus prevented an elderly resident from becoming homeless and substantially improved her living conditions. Ms. M. was relieved that she would not lose her apartment and was very happy with the advocacy our students provided.

and was very happy with the advocacy our students provided. Clinical Director/ Professor Norrinda Brown Hayat

Clinical Director/ Professor Norrinda Brown Hayat

۰ Prof. Jasmin Mize

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS LOW-INCOME TAXPAYER CLINIC The Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) gives students the opportunity to help
LOW-INCOME TAXPAYER CLINIC The Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) gives students the opportunity to help clients
LOW-INCOME TAXPAYER CLINIC
The Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) gives students the opportunity to help clients overcome serious
financial hardship by resolving tax problems which threaten their stability. LITC clients are persons of modest
means, often low-wage immigrant workers, for whom the assistance can be life-changing.

This fall, the LITC successfully concluded a client matter dating back to 2014. The clients, a blind low- income couple, were originally referred to the LITC by a community organization. Their tax debt was due to the mishandling of an otherwise tax-sheltered account. In 2014, the Clinic represented them in U.S. Tax Court, reducing their tax debt by 75%. In an attempt to resolve the remaining debt, the Clinic filed an Offer in Compromise based on Effective Tax Administration (ETA). ETA Offers are largely based on public policy principles and have a very low acceptance rate. Following the de- nial of the ETA Offer, Clinic students appealed the IRS's determination. The case ultimately resulted in an in-person IRS Appeals Conference, and many months later, the Clinic was notified that the appeal was successful. Working with the couple has been a profound and humbling experience for clin- ic students and supervisors.

The LITC often receives requests for assistance from those employed in a wide range of political

industries. Last year a local embassy employee, who supported a large family on an extremely modest embassy salary, contacted the Clinic for assistance regarding U.S. tax debt he could not resolve on his own. The Clinic successfully filed an Offer in Com- promise on his behalf that was quickly accepted. In a touching show of appreciation, the LITC benefit- ted from a delicious home-cooked meal provided by the client and his family.

Last year, LITC launched a joint pilot with the Har- vard Law School Tax Clinic. The Tax Court Re- search Project (TCRP) is intended to connect unrep- resented taxpayers with participating LITCs across the country. Two students enrolled in the Fall 2017 Clinic are pictured conducting on-site Tax Court re- search (Chris Pascual and Emily Backes, photo, above right). Special thanks to Nyasha Simmons, the LITC's 2017 EJW Summer Research Fel- low, and the 1L students who participated in the TCRP last year for their assistance in launching the national TCRP pilot!

Clinical Director/ Professor Jacqueline Laínez Flanagan

۰ Professor Megan Newman

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

Clinic Students and Faculty at a U.S. Supreme Court Lecture GENERAL PRACTICE CLINIC Students in
Clinic Students and Faculty at a U.S. Supreme Court Lecture
GENERAL PRACTICE CLINIC
Students in the General Practice Clinic represent low-income clients dealing with some of life’s hardest issues.
Many help seniors and persons with disabilities remain as independent as possible and avoid
institutionalization. Others help resolve family problems that are likely to escalate and traumatize children.

I n the past year, the Clinic has provided direct benefits to DC’s low-income seniors and equipped students with the knowledge and ex- perience they need to become capable elder

law practitioners. To reach more seniors, the Clinic has forged relationships with nonprofits that work with low-income seniors such as the Whitman Walker Clinic, DC KinCare Alliance, Ward 7 Legal Services Providers, the Children’s Law Center (whose clients are frequently in the care of grand-

parents), and Justice in Aging.

One recent highlight was recognition given the Gen- eral Practice Clinic for our work to obtain court- appointed guardians for incapacitated veterans. In addition to a Certificate of Appreciation, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) presented the Clinic students with a letter of recognition signed by U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts Jr., thanking them for their outstanding work on behalf of America’s veterans!

Examples of legal assistance most recently provided by General Practice Clinic students for low-income seniors include:

Researched, analyzed and wrote an exhaustive white paper on health and safety issues for an organizational client that serves persons (including seniors) struggling with substance abuse;

Secured guardians for veterans who have lost the ability to make healthcare and financial deci- sions in cooperation with the DC Veterans’ Hos- pital;

Drafted wills and advance directives;

Assisted older clients caring for their disabled adult children with legal issues involving guardi- anship, child support arrearages, and public ben- efits;

Protected the ability of seniors to remain in their homes and avoid institutionalization;

Represented seniors in child custody cases.

 Represented seniors in child custody cases. Clinical Co - Directors Professor Faith Mullen and Professor

Clinical Co-Directors Professor Faith Mullen and Professor Tianna Gibbs

۰ Professor Natasha Bennett

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

Chief Justice Roberts Thanks General Practice Clinic Students for their Work with Veterans! Working in
Chief Justice Roberts Thanks General Practice Clinic
Students for their Work with Veterans!
Working in partnership with the VA Medical Center, students in the General Practice Clinic sought and obtained guardians for older
veterans who lacked capacity to engage in safe discharge planning. As a result, the older clients now have someone responsible for
making sure they receive the best care in the best settings to meet their needs. On May 1, 2017, the U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs
presented a Certificate of Appreciation to UDC David A. Clarke School of Law for that advocacy, together with a letter of recognition
signed by U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts Jr.

In recognition of Professor Faith Mullen and her students at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law

Thank you for this opportunity to share my apprecia- tion for the outstanding work of Professor Faith Mullen and her students at the University of the District of Columbia David Clarke school of law on behalf of this country's vet- erans. By volunteering to help obtain guardians for incapaci- tated veterans who lack family or resources to appear in the Superior Court of the District of Columbia, Prof. Mullen and her students have demonstrated their commitment to the legal profession and to the duty we all share to engage in public service. It is fitting that we honor them at today's ceremony. I join in congratulating the professor and her students for their pro bono work.

Sincerely, John Roberts Jr.

for their pro bono work. Sincerely, John Roberts Jr. ” 4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington,
for their pro bono work. Sincerely, John Roberts Jr. ” 4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington,

4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008 | 202.274.7400 | www.law.udc.edu

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS “ I particularly enjoyed my experience working with BRAWS because our client was so
“ I particularly enjoyed my experience working with BRAWS because our client was so enthusiastic
“ I particularly
enjoyed my
experience working
with BRAWS because our
client was so enthusiastic
about learning how to
navigate the policy
world, and we saw the
immediate results of our
advocacy. We combined
our activism and
resources as student
attorneys with her
passion, and together
were able to testify in
support of a bill that
passed the DC Council.
- Aysha Iqbal, ’17,
Legislation Clinic
DC Council. ” - Aysha Iqbal, ’17, Legislation Clinic 4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC

4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008 | 202.274.7400 | www.law.udc.edu

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS NOTES 4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008 | 202.274.7400 | www.law.udc.edu -

NOTES

CLINIC HIGHLIGHTS NOTES 4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008 | 202.274.7400 | www.law.udc.edu -

4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008 | 202.274.7400 | www.law.udc.edu

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PRACTICE LAW. PROMOTE JUSTICE. CHANGE LIVES.

Washington, DC PRACTICE LAW. PROMOTE JUSTICE. CHANGE LIVES. 4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008

4340 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008 | 202.274.7400 | www.law.udc.edu