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PICKING UP PLAGIARISM

The word "plagiarism" has become a dark sign of taboo in classes everywhere. In colleges and businesses,
plagiarism is viewed as malicious and is generally punished by failure of a course or expulsion from a university.

Why all the fuss? Basically, plagiarism is both inconsiderate and unfair. It is inconsiderate to your reader who
has a right to know where information comes from, and it is unfair to those who do not receive credit for their
words..

DIRECTIONS: Your job is to act as "Plagiarism Police." In the following passages, pick the one that is
appropriate and mark why it is acceptable. Then, think about the other passages. Mark why you believe they are
inappropriate.

Original Version 1
"Very often images of protective divinities called 'Mothers,' were found in the vicinity of sacred springs of the
Gallo-Roman period. There were generally three figures in such images, but often a single figure could be found;
a seated female figure with a child in her lap, bearing a striking resemblance to the Virgin of the medieval
period." (From Emile Male's Chartres)

Student Version 1A
Images of protective divinities, called "Mothers," were found near the sacred springs. There were three figures in
such images, but often a single figure could be found: a seated female figure with a child in her lap, bearing a
striking resemblance to the Virgin of the medieval period.

Student Version 1B
Emile Male explains that images of protective gods called "Mothers" were often found near such springs, one of
whom, "a seated female figure with a child in her lap, [bears] a striking resemblance to the Virgin of the Medieval
period" (8).

Student Version 1C
Emile Male points out that images of protective divinities, called "Mothers," were found in the vicinity of sacred
springs of the Gallo-Roman period. There were generally three figures in such images, but often a single figure
could be found: a seated female figure with a child in her lap, bearing a striking resemblance to the Virgin of the
medieval period (8).

Original Version 2
It is not generally recognized that at the same time when women are making their way into every corner of our
work world, only 1% of the professional engineers in the nation is female. A generation ago this statistic would
have raised no eyebrows, but today it is hard to believe. The engineering schools, reacting to social and
governmental pressures, have opened wide their gates and are recruiting women with zeal. The major
corporations, reacting to even more intense pressures, are offering attractive employment opportunities to
practically all women with engineering goals. (Florman, "Engineering of the Female Mind" Harper's)

Student Version 2A
Because women seem to be taking jobs of all kinds, few people realize that only 1% of the professional engineers
in the nation is female. A generation ago, this statistic would have raised no eyebrows, but today it is hard to
believe. The engineering schools, reacting to social and governmental pressures, have opened wide their gates
and are recruiting women with zeal. The major corporations, reacting to even greater pressures, are offering
attractive employment opportunities to many women with engineering futures (Florman 30).

Student Version 2B
The pressure is on to get more women into engineering. The engineering schools and major corporations have
opened wide their gates and are recruiting women zealously. Practically all women engineering graduates can
find attractive jobs. Nevertheless, at the moment, only 1% of professional engineers in the work place are female.

Student Version 2C
According to Florman, though the pressure is increasing to get more female engineers into the work place, only
1% of the current engineering workforce is female. Florman points out that years ago, this would have surprised
no one, but today it seems shocking in light of the increasingly important role of women in the working world. In
order to recruit more women into these engineering positions, schools and corporations are, in turn, offering
positions that are difficult to refuse (30).

Original Version 3
Paul Forash was reasonably typical of the scouts and trappers who opened up the Far West. Born in Kentucky of
poor parents, he never went to school, never learned to read and write. His education was ruthless and complete
in other matters, however. In an environment where man's best friend was his rifle, Forash became an expert
marksman. Survival depended on understanding the myriad mysteries of the forest, and he quickly learned the
ways of its denizens. He learned self-reliance in as hard a way as imaginable; he was orphaned at the age of
eleven when his parents were killed in an Indian raid (Robyns 32).

Student Version 3A
Paul Forash was rather typical of the people who opened the West. He was born in Kentucky of poor parents, and
he never went to school or learned to read and write. His education was ruthless and complete in other matters,
however. Because he lived where man's best friend was his rifle, he quickly became an expert shot. In those days
one had to understand the myriad mysteries of the forest in order to survive, and Forash quickly learned the ways
of its denizens. He learned self-reliance in a very hard way; his parents were killed in an Indian raid when he was
eleven, and he was left an orphan.

Student Version 3B
Paul Forash was the epitome of the Western pioneers. Never learning to read or write, never attending school, and
living in poverty, Paul Forash was forced to depend on understanding the myriad mysteries of the forest and the
ways of its denizens. He learned self-reliance in an environment where man's best friend was his rifle after his
parents were killed by Indians when he was just eleven.

Student Version 3C
In his book, Pioneers of the West, Tim Robyns points out that Paul Forash is a good example of the scouts and
trappers of the early West. His parents, Kentuckians, were poor, and he did not have much ordinary education;
indeed, he remained illiterate all his life. He did, however, become an expert on forest lore and such matters as
trapping and shooting. His parents were killed by Indians when he was only eleven years old, and as a result he
was forced at an early age to get along on his own (32).

Original Version 4
In thirty-seven states, at the turn of the century, a married woman had no right to her children; they were
husband's property (as were her furniture, jewelry, and other possessions), and he could dispose of them as he
wished. (From Peter Gabriel Filene's book, Him, Her, Self: Sex Roles in Modern America, page 33)

Student Version 4A
According to Peter G. Filene's book, Him, Her, Self: Sex Roles in Modern America, "In thirty-seven states, at the
turn of the century, a married woman had no right to her children; they were her husband's property...and he could
dispose of them as he wished" (33).

Student Version 4B
According to Peter Filene, in 1900 a mother did not have any legal right to her own children in thirty-seven states.
The children were the property of their father, who could dispose of them as he wished (33).

Student Version 4C
At the turn of the century, in thirty-seven states, a married woman didn't have any right to her children; they were
her husband's property and he could dispose of them as he wished (Forash 33).