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BIOL1040

Biological Chemistry
Lecture 1 Macromolecules
Luke Guddat, SCMB
Building 76- luke.guddat@uq.edu.au

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Overview
All living things are made up
of four classes of large
biological molecules:
carbohydrates, lipids,
proteins, and nucleic acids.
Within cells, small molecules
are joined together to form
larger molecules (anabolism).
opposite is catabolism
Macromolecules are large
molecules composed of
thousands of covalently
connected atoms.
Molecular structure and
function are inseparable. T-RNA
Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia
Macromolecules are polymers,
built from monomers

A polymer is a long molecule consisting of


many similar building blocks.
These small building-block molecules are
called monomers.
Three of the four classes of lifes organic
molecules are polymers:
carbohydrates,
proteins,
nucleic acids.

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


The synthesis and breakdown of polymers
A condensation reaction,
or dehydration reaction,
occurs when two monomers
bond together and lose a
water molecule.
Enzymes are
macromolecules that speed
up the dehydration process.
Polymers are disassembled
to monomers by hydrolysis,
a reaction that is essentially
the reverse of the
dehydration reaction.

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Carbohydrates serve as fuel
and building material

Carbohydrates include sugars and the


polymers of sugars.

The simplest carbohydrates are


monosaccharides, or single sugars.

Carbohydrate macromolecules are


polysaccharides, polymers composed of many
sugar building blocks.

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Sugars
ketose

Glucose (C6H12O6) is the most common


monosaccharide.
Monosaccharides are classified by:
the location of the carbonyl group (as aldose or
ketose),ketose or ketone

the number of carbons in the carbon skeleton.


aldose has a C double bond O (a carbonyl group), polar, delta positive around carbon and delta negative around oxygen

aldose aldehyde

carbonyl
Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia
Fig. 5-3

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Sugars
Though often drawn as linear skeletons, in
aqueous solutions many sugars form rings.
Monosaccharides serve as a major fuel for
cells, and as raw material for building
molecules.
attraction because of the delta positive and delta
negative between the C and O respectively, H
breaks off because the attraction is so strong and
joins the O in carbon 1

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Sugars
A disaccharide is formed when a dehydration
reaction joins two monosaccharides.
This covalent bond is called a glycosidic
linkage.

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Polysaccharides

Polysaccharides, the polymers of sugars,


have storage and structural roles.

The structure and function of a polysaccharide


are determined by its sugar monomers and
the positions of glycosidic linkages.

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Storage polysaccharides
Starch, a storage
polysaccharide of
plants, consists entirely
of glucose monomers.

Plants store surplus


starch as granules simple storage carbohydrate,
one type of connectivity (not
sure if right word)

within chloroplasts and


other plastids.

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Storage polysaccharides
Glycogen is a
storage
polysaccharide in
animals.
Humans and other
vertebrates store
glycogen, mainly in
liver and muscle
cells. more branching here
than amylopectin

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Lipids are a diverse group of
hydrophobic molecules
Lipids are the one class of large biological
molecules that do not form polymers.
Lipids have little or no affinity for water.
Lipids are hydrophobic because they consist
mostly of hydrocarbons, which form nonpolar
covalent bonds.
The most biologically important lipids are fats,
phospholipids, and steroids.

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Fats
Fats are constructed
from two types of
smaller molecules:
glycerol and fatty acids.
Glycerol is a three-
carbon alcohol with a
hydroxyl group attached
to each carbon.
A fatty acid consists of
a carboxyl group
attached to a long
carbon skeleton. Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia
Fats separate from water because water
molecules form hydrogen bonds with each
other and exclude the fats.
In a fat, three fatty acids are joined to glycerol
by an ester linkage, creating a
triacylglycerol, or triglyceride.

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Fats
Fatty acids vary in length
(number of carbons), and in
the number and locations of
double bonds.
Saturated fatty acids have
the maximum number of
hydrogen atoms possible
and no double bonds.
Unsaturated fatty acids
have one or more double
bonds.
Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia
Fats
A diet rich in saturated fats may contribute to
cardiovascular disease through plaque
deposits.
Hydrogenation is the process of converting
unsaturated fats to saturated fats by adding
hydrogen. instead of carbon being on same side of double bond
http://fyi.uwex.edu/safepreserving/files/2013/11/transfat.jpg

Hydrogenating vegetable oils also creates


unsaturated fats with trans double bonds.
very hard to break down molecules with trans double bond

These trans fats may contribute more than


saturated fats to cardiovascular disease.
Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia
Fats
The major function of
fats is energy storage.
Humans and other
mammals store their fat
in adipose cells.
Adipose tissue also
cushions vital organs
and insulates the body.

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Phospholipids
phosphate is negatively charged, choline group is positively charged

In a phospholipid,
two fatty acids and a
phosphate group are
attached to glycerol.
The two fatty acid tails
are hydrophobic, but
the phosphate group
and its attachments
form a hydrophilic
head. hydrophobic barrier that prevents molecules we dont want from entering the cell

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Phospholipids
When phospholipids are added to water, they
self-assemble into a bilayer, with the
hydrophobic tails pointing toward the interior.
Phospholipids are the major component of all
cell membranes.

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Nucleic Acids and DNA

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


From DNA to protein- The flow of
genetic information
DNA is double
stranded providing
directions for its own
replication.

DNA directs synthesis


of messenger RNA
(mRNA) and, this,
controls protein
synthesis.

Protein synthesis
occurs in ribosomes
(molecular machine).
Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia
Nucleic acids (DNA, RNA) store and
transmit hereditary information
The amino acid sequence of a polypeptide
(i.e. a protein) is programmed by a unit of
inheritance called a gene.
Genes are found within DNA.
One DNA molecule includes many genes

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


Components of DNA and RNA

Fig. 5-27

Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia


The structure of nucleic acids
Nucleic acids are polymers
called polynucleotides.
Each polynucleotide is made of
monomers called nucleotides.
Each nucleotide consists of a
nitrogenous base, a pentose
sugar, and a phosphate group.
Adjacent nucleotides are joined
by covalent bonds that form
between the OH group on the
3 carbon of one nucleotide, and
the phosphate on the 5 carbon
on the next.
These links create a backbone
of sugar-phosphate units, with
nitrogenous bases as
appendages.
Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia
Nitrogeneous bases and sugars
There are two families of
nitrogenous bases:
pyrimidines (cytosine,
thymine, and uracil)
have a single six-
membered ring,
and purines (adenine
and guanine) which
have a six-membered
ring fused to a five-
membered ring.
In DNA, the sugar is
deoxyribose; in RNA, the
sugar is ribose. Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia
Assembly of DNA
A DNA molecule has two
polynucleotides, which spiral
to form a double helix.
In the DNA double helix, the
two backbones run in
opposite 5 3 directions
from each other, referred to
as antiparallel.
The nitrogenous bases in
DNA pair up and form
hydrogen bonds:
adenine (A) always with
thymine (T), Which would have the greater
and guanine (G) always with stability, a sequence of double
cytosine (C). stranded DNA rich in G+C or A+T?
Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia
From Gene to Protein
The flow of information is
based on a triplet code
(codon): a series of non-
overlapping, three-
nucleotide words
These triplets are the
smallest units of uniform
length that can code for all
the amino acids
Example: AGT (on the DNA
template) codes for the
amino acid serine.
Note the functions of the
template strand and the
mRNA Campbell, Reece, Meyers Biology 8e 2009 Pearson Education Australia