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Smart Grid Maturity Model Update | October 2010 1 SGMM Update October 2010
Smart Grid Maturity Model Update | October 2010 1 SGMM Update October 2010

Smart Grid Maturity Model

Update | October 2010

Smart Grid Maturity Model Update | October 2010 1 SGMM Update October 2010
Smart Grid Maturity Model Update | October 2010 1 SGMM Update October 2010
Smart Grid Maturity Model Update | October 2010 1 SGMM Update October 2010
Smart Grid Maturity Model Update | October 2010 1 SGMM Update October 2010
Smart Grid Maturity Model Update | October 2010 1 SGMM Update October 2010

1

SGMM Update October 2010

About the Smart Grid Maturity Model The Smart Grid Maturity Model (SGMM) is a management

About the Smart Grid Maturity Model

The Smart Grid Maturity Model (SGMM) is a management tool that utilities can leverage to plan their smart grid journeys, prioritize their options, and measure their progress as they move toward the realization of a smart grid. The SGMM was founded by utilities for utilities when the Global Intelligent Utility Network Coalition, a smart grid collaboration of 11 utilities, saw the need in the industry for this tool. The model describes eight domains, which contain logical groupings of incremental smart grid characteristics and capabilities that represent key elements of smart grid strategy, organiza- tion, implementation, and operation. Utilities use the SGMM to assess their current state of smart grid implementa- tion, define their goals for a future state, and generate inputs into their roadmapping, planning, and implementa- tion processes. As more and more utilities around the globe participate and the SGMM experience base grows, the SGMM becomes an increasingly valuable resource for helping to inform the industry’s smart grid transformation.

SDG&E is working hard to realize the benefits of smart grid. Going through the SGMM Navigation process with our cross-cutting smart grid team gave us an opportunity to take a step back to share diverse perspectives and take stock of our progress and strategic direction. We look forward to benefiting not just from our own use of the model but to sharing experiences and lessons learned with other utilities in the SGMM community.

Lee Krevat, Director Smart Grid, San Diego Gas & Electric

SGMM Navigation Process

The SGMM Navigation is a structured approach to applying the SGMM through a facilitated workshop process. SEI-certified SGMM Navigators work with the utility’s smart grid team to complete the SGMM Compass survey on a consensus basis – promoting internal information sharing and discussion. After scoring and analyzing the survey, the Navigator leads a second workshop to review the findings and use them to set organizational aspirations for an agreed time horizon – and to discuss related motivations, obstacles, and required actions. These outputs are valuable inputs into the utility’s ongoing planning and implementation process, and they set a baseline for measuring progress.

The Navigation process provides benefits to the utilities using the SGMM, the Navigator supporting the utility, and the SGMM community as a whole. Utilities report significant value from the detailed reports with data that feeds into the strategic planning process—including comparisons to the model and the community as well as individual aspirations and associated actions. Utilities also benefit from the improved communication and consensus building promoted by the workshop discussion of current and desired smart grid status.

The Navigator adds industry expertise to the process and has an opportunity to better understand the goals and rationale of the utility’s smart grid improvement efforts.

The community benefits by having the SGMM applied and used in comprehensive and consistent fashion, improving the completeness and fidelity of the data. In addition to maturity profile data, the data collected in the Aspirations Workshops can contribute to a deeper understanding of smart grid trends. On an aggregated basis, this data can help inform utilities in their planning and other stakeholders as they provide products and services to support these plans.

PREPARATION Figure 1: Steps in the Navigation process
PREPARATION
Figure 1: Steps in the
Navigation process
SURVEY WORKSHOP
SURVEY
WORKSHOP
ANALYSIS
ANALYSIS
ASPIRATIONS WORKSHOP
ASPIRATIONS
WORKSHOP
WRAP UP
WRAP UP
The SEI Announces the SGMM V1.1 Product Suite In September 2010, Carnegie Mellon University’s Software

The SEI Announces the SGMM V1.1 Product Suite

In September 2010, Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute (SEI) published V1.1 of the Smart Grid Maturity Model (SGMM). This version of the model was pilot tested with more than 30 utilities to ensure the quality and usability of the update. With V1.1, users will benefit from a significantly improved model and supporting product suite that is built upon the familiar architecture created in previous versions of the model. Because the architecture was retained, organizations can compare their current V1.1 results against those obtained using earlier versions of the model.

against those obtained using earlier versions of the model. V 1.1 PRODUCT SUITE   • De

V 1.1 PRODUCT SUITE

 

De f i n i ti o n d o c u m e n t

Model

M a t ri x

Compass

• Compass Survey yields maturity ratings and performance comparisons

Survey

Navigation

• Expert-led workshops to complete Compass and use results to inform objectives

Process

 

• Overview seminar

Training

• SGMM Navigator course

Licensing

 

• License organizations and certify individuals to deliver Navigation process

Figure 2: Overview of the product suite New Unchanged 16% 22% Significantly changed Slightly 28%
Figure 2: Overview of the
product suite
New
Unchanged
16%
22%
Significantly
changed
Slightly
28%
changed
34%

Figure 3: Changes in model characteristics from V1.0 to V1.1

Specific V1.1 Improvements

An Expanded SGMM Model Definition Document

The model architecture has been codified and refined to ensure more consistent maturity progression within each domain.

Organizations still receive a maturity profile of their rating in each domain, but they no longer receive a single overall maturity rating.

A consistent labeling scheme ensures easy mapping among model artifacts.

New content better describes the SGMM levels and domains.

New security and critical infrastructure characteristics have been incorporated.

The characteristics now include more explanatory and educational text as well as more examples for clarification to enable consistent understanding and application of the model.

An Updated and Refined SGMM Survey, Now Called Compass

The new Compass includes demographic, scope, and performance questions in addition to questions about the achievement of model characteristics.

Users can move easily between the Compass survey and the Model Definition with a one-to-one mapping between Model Definition characteristics and Compass questions.

Sixty-two percent of Compass questions or answer options have been updated to elicit more accurate and consistent responses.

Twenty-nine new questions were added to support the new characteristics that were added to the model. Eight questions were removed.

A New SGMM Navigation Process

The SGMM Navigation process defines a five-step process for how an organization can use the model to help chart a technical, organizational, and operational path through its grid modernization effort.

SGMM Navigators are industry experts trained and certified by the SEI to guide utilities through the process and to help them to use the outputs in their ongoing planning and implementation.

Users of the SGMM Navigation process report finding substantial value in the information sharing and consensus building that occurs through the facilitated workshops.

This repeatable process also allows for consistent application of the model across markets, organizations, and time and increases the quality of SGMM community data.

The latest release of the SGMM is available at: http://www.sei.cmu.edu/goto/SGMM.

Early Trends in Repeat Use of the SGMM to Track Progress A small but growing

Early Trends in Repeat Use of the SGMM to Track Progress

A small but growing number of utilities have now taken the SGMM

survey more than once. The figure below summarizes the before and after maturity profiles of these organizations.

5 4 3 2 1 0 1 st 2 nd st st 1 2 nd
5
4
3
2
1
0
1 st
2 nd
st
st
1
2 nd
1
2 nd
1 st
2 nd
st
2 nd
1 st
2 nd
1 st
1
2 nd
1 st
2 nd
Maturity Level

Figure 4: Average and range of maturity scores for utilities that have completed the SGMM survey twice

Strategy,Management, and Regulatoryfor utilities that have completed the SGMM survey twice Organizationand Structure Grid Operations Work and Asset

Organizationand Structurethe SGMM survey twice Strategy,Management, and Regulatory Grid Operations Work and Asset Management Technology

Grid Operationsand Regulatory Organizationand Structure Work and Asset Management Technology Customer ValueChain

Work and Asset Managementand Regulatory Organizationand Structure Grid Operations Technology Customer ValueChain Integration Societal and

TechnologyStructure Grid Operations Work and Asset Management Customer ValueChain Integration Societal and Environmental

CustomerGrid Operations Work and Asset Management Technology ValueChain Integration Societal and Environmental As the

ValueChain IntegrationOperations Work and Asset Management Technology Customer Societal and Environmental As the SGMM community expands,

Societal and EnvironmentalAsset Management Technology Customer ValueChain Integration As the SGMM community expands, more and more utilities will

As the SGMM community expands, more and more utilities will use the SGMM as part of their ongoing planning, implementation, and progress measurement cycles. This will provide useful feedback for the utilities themselves and potentially valuable insights for the community as a whole. For example, looking at the SMR and OS domains in Figure 3, users may infer that these utilities have shown the most progress in these two domains as

they are foundational in terms of establishing the vision, strategy, regulatory pathway, funding, organizational structure, workforce preparedness, and other fundamental building blocks for a smart grid transformation. This analysis also provides useful feedback into the ongoing improvement and evolution of the model itself. For example, V1.1 tightened the characteristics of the SE domain

in response to user and reviewer input. This may be a factor in the

slight decline in SE ratings.

This repeat-use analysis is an example of the type of analysis the SEI will be able to perform as the SGMM database grows. Other examples may include segmented analysis and comparison by utility size, type, geography, or other variables pattern identification from community lessons learned correlations of maturity and performance over time

These more granular analyses will generate additional insights for use in industry planning and implementation, business case development, progress measurement, and performance feedback.

Pepco Holdings has been involved with the SGMM since its inception. We recently completed the survey again, using the SGMM Navigation process. This was helpful in fostering candid, fact-based discussion of where we have been, where we are today, and where we expect to be in the future. We look forward to using the tool as an integral part of our ongoing planning and transformation process, and in measuring our progress over time.

George Potts Vice President, Business Transformation Pepco Holdings, Inc.

DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION WORK WITH ELECTRIC UTILITIES? ARE YOU AN INDUSTRY EXPERT?
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION WORK WITH ELECTRIC UTILITIES? ARE YOU AN INDUSTRY EXPERT?
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION WORK WITH ELECTRIC UTILITIES? ARE YOU AN INDUSTRY EXPERT?

DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION WORK WITH ELECTRIC UTILITIES? ARE YOU AN INDUSTRY EXPERT?

DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION WORK WITH ELECTRIC UTILITIES? ARE YOU AN INDUSTRY EXPERT?
WORK WITH ELECTRIC UTILITIES? ARE YOU AN INDUSTRY EXPERT? The SEI offers a training and certification
The SEI offers a training and certification program to enable industry experts to become SEI-Certified
The SEI offers a training and certification program to enable industry experts to become SEI-Certified
The SEI offers a training and certification program to enable industry experts to become SEI-Certified

The SEI offers a training and certification program to enable industry experts to become SEI-Certified SGMM Navigators. If you would like more information about this program, please contact info@sei.cmu.edu or (412) 268-5800.

Navigators. If you would like more information about this program, please contact info@sei.cmu.edu or (412) 268-5800.
Navigators. If you would like more information about this program, please contact info@sei.cmu.edu or (412) 268-5800.
Navigators. If you would like more information about this program, please contact info@sei.cmu.edu or (412) 268-5800.
Navigators. If you would like more information about this program, please contact info@sei.cmu.edu or (412) 268-5800.
Navigators. If you would like more information about this program, please contact info@sei.cmu.edu or (412) 268-5800.
Navigators. If you would like more information about this program, please contact info@sei.cmu.edu or (412) 268-5800.
SGMM Community Community Data The SGMM community continues to grow, with nearly 100 utilities having

SGMM Community

Community Data

The SGMM community continues to grow, with nearly 100 utilities having participated to date. The figures below show the aggregate maturity profile, geographic distribution, and type of operation for this expanding community.

5 4 3 2 1 0 Maturity Level
5
4
3
2
1
0
Maturity Level

The SGMM helped to define and clarify a roadmap for smart grid implementa- tion. We were able to assess our existing plan and make changes to it; the tool shows that there is more than one way to construct a smart grid plan. We feel that the SGMM tool really shows the breadth of the smart grid.

The final report offers an objective analysis of our utility; it provides more weight to the results and has created a communication tool that we can share with the community to help us leverage support as we set a future vision.

AMP members on their participation in the pilot study

AMP members on their participation in the pilot study Figure 5: Average and range of maturity

Figure 5: Average and range of maturity scores for all SGMM Compass survey responses

SINGLE FUNCTION

PARTIALLY INTEGRATED

2 Functions

responses SINGLE FUNCTION PARTIALLY INTEGRATED 2 Functions 2.2 Generation, Distribution % 2.2 % Generation,
responses SINGLE FUNCTION PARTIALLY INTEGRATED 2 Functions 2.2 Generation, Distribution % 2.2 % Generation,

2.2

Generation, Distribution

%

2.2

%

INTEGRATED 2 Functions 2.2 Generation, Distribution % 2.2 % Generation, Transmission 9 Transmission, Distribution % 25.8
INTEGRATED 2 Functions 2.2 Generation, Distribution % 2.2 % Generation, Transmission 9 Transmission, Distribution % 25.8
INTEGRATED 2 Functions 2.2 Generation, Distribution % 2.2 % Generation, Transmission 9 Transmission, Distribution % 25.8
INTEGRATED 2 Functions 2.2 Generation, Distribution % 2.2 % Generation, Transmission 9 Transmission, Distribution % 25.8

Generation, Transmission

9

Transmission, Distribution

%

25.8

Distribution Only

%

10.1

Distribution, Retail

%

2.2 %
2.2 %

Transmission Only

Only % 10.1 Distribution, Retail % 2.2 % Transmission Only 4.5 Generation, Distribution, Retail % 4.5

4.5

Generation, Distribution,

Retail

%

4.5

Generation, Transmission,

Distribution

%

27 %

Generation, Transmission, Distribution, Retail

12.4

Transmission, Distribution,

Retail

%

FULLY INTEGRATED

4 Functions

PARTIALLY INTEGRATED

3

Functions

Figure 6: Detailed breakdown of utility type reported by SGMM users

Generation

%

Transmission

%

Distribution

%

 

%

38.3

55.3

91.5

Retail

52.1

Figure 7: Functions reported by SGMM users (percentages equal more than 100 because many users report multiple functions)

Broader Participation – Public Power In addition to expanding the size of the SGMM community,

Broader Participation – Public Power

In addition to expanding the size of the SGMM community, the

SEI is making a concerted effort to increase the diversity of the community. Among the steps taken to elicit broad-based input and

participation was the creation of a stakeholder panel to represent the full range of SGMM stakeholders. One question voiced by panel members was to what extent the SGMM could be useful to all types – investor-owned, publicly owned, cooperative – and sizes of utilities. With the support of the Department of Energy and the American Public Power Association’s Demonstration of Energy- Efficient Developments (DEED) research program, the SEI conducted

a pilot study using the SGMM Navigation process with American Municipal Power (AMP), in Columbus, Ohio, and 22 of its member utilities.

The participating utilities found that the SGMM provided a common language and framework for discussing smart grid and recommended it for other public power utilities.

At the same time, the SEI gained valuable insight into how the SGMM can be made accessible and useful to the public power sector, and the SEI plans to continue to conduct this kind of outreach to the broad spectrum of U.S. utilities.

Other 14% Asia/Pacific 13% United States EMEA 60% 13%
Other
14%
Asia/Pacific
13%
United States
EMEA
60%
13%

Figure 8: Distribution of SGMM users by region

International Application

Utilities outside the United States continue to use the SGMM as they have since its inception. More recently, the SEI has been asked to work with government authorities to apply the SGMM at a national or regional level.

In the summer of 2010, the Mexican national utility, Comisión

Federal de Electricidad (CFE), and the Mexican Energy Ministry, Secretaría de Energía de México (SENER), became the first organizations to apply the SGMM at the national level as an aid in developing a national smart grid roadmap. CFE is one of the world’s largest utilities, serving 33.9 million customers.

After familiarizing themselves with the SGMM, the CFE/SENER team selected a group from three CFE divisions (representing

different regions, load profiles, and conditions within Mexico) to participate in an SGMM pilot, thus providing insight at both the national and regional levels. With the support of the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Embassy in Mexico City, CFE applied the model using the SGMM Navigation process facilitated by the SEI. A group of some 30 CFE and SENER staff members completed the Compass survey in a workshop in Mexico City. A month later,

a CFE/SENER team traveled to Washington, D.C. for a second

workshop to review the findings and use the SGMM in setting aspirations for smart grid planning and deployment.

The CFE team found the process very helpful in identifying issues for discussion, providing a baseline for measuring progress, and generating valuable inputs into the planning process. CFE and SENER agreed that the SGMM can be usefully applied at the national level in developing a smart grid roadmap for Mexico, and potentially for other countries embarking on a smart grid transformation.

100,000,000

10,000,000

1,000,000

100,000

10,000

1,000

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100

Survey Respondents

Figure 9: Meter count for SGMM users.

Highlights from the Aspiration Workshops Conducted in 2010 SGMM Motivations What motivates your aspirations?

Highlights from the Aspiration Workshops Conducted in 2010

SGMM

Motivations What motivates your aspirations?

Actions What actions must happen?

Obstacles What obstacles must be overcome?

Domains

SMR

• improved business performance, success, and growth

• integrate with existing strategy

• budget constraints and justification

• secure funding

• skepticism of value

• improved productivity and profitability

• prioritize and plan

• scale, scope, and pace of change

• educate stakeholders

OS

• empowered and involved workforce

• create a unified vision, strategy, goals,

• resistance to change

• improved decision making

and plan

• culture

• addressed aging workforce

• provide training

• skill gaps

• transform policies and processes

GO

• supported distributed generation (DG) cost savings

• deploy the necessary infrastructure

• interoperability and availability of

• implement plan

technology

• resiliency and reliability

• develop improved analytic capabilities

• risk and complexity

• security and privacy

WAM

• decreased recovery time

• improve GIS systems

• high-risk environment

• increased asset utilization and extend asset life

• develop standards for new technologies

• managing large amounts of data

• perceived ROI

TECH

• systems integration and compatibility

• enforce architecture and standards

• cyber security risks

• security and critical infrastructure protection

• fill application gaps

• regulatory and statutory issues

• devise IT master plan

• increased systems complexity

• complex grid operations management

• develop dynamic data distribution model

• technology lifespan

CUST

improved customer

• develop customer enabling technologies

• customer willingness, acceptance, and adoption

• satisfaction

and programs

• choice

• understand customer wants/needs

• privacy issues

• quality of service

• educate customers

• customer attitudes and behaviors

• empowerment

VCI

• market demand for DG

• obtain regulatory approvals

• tariff structure

• enabled supply and demand management

• create new rate structures

• reduced revenue from reduced use

• promote adoption of enabling

• marketplace readiness

• fuel diversity

technologies

• cross company pricing

• reduced emissions

• develop DG incentives

SE

• meeting public policy objectives

• develop clear direction

• ability to make it cost effective

• being socially responsible

• define and report metrics and measures

• balancing conflicting goals among

• sustainability

• support technological advancements

stakeholders

• improved image

Figure 10: Data points gathered during aspirations workshops conducted in 2010 with 20 utilities

Smart Grid Maturity Model: Matrix The Matrix offers a summary view of the Smart Grid

Smart Grid Maturity Model: Matrix

The Matrix offers a summary view of the Smart Grid Maturity Model. It has an easy-to-access format with shortened versions of the expected characteristics contained in the model and is an excellent reference for SGMM users.

 

Technology (TECH) IT architecture, standards, infrastructure, integration, tools

Customer (CUST) pricing, customer participation and experience, advanced services

PIONEERING

1 Autonomic computing and machine learning are implemented.

1 Customers can manage their end-to-end energy supply and usage levels.

2 There is automatic outage detection at the premise or device level.

5

2 The enterprise information infrastructure can automatically iden- tify, mitigate, and recover from cyber incidents.

3 Plug-and-play, customer-based generation is supported.

4 Security and privacy for all customer data is assured.

 

5 The organization plays a leadership role in industry-wide informa- tion sharing and standards development efforts for smart grid.

OPTIMIZING

1 Data flows end to end from customer to generation.

 

4

2 Business processes are optimized by leveraging the enterprise IT architecture.

3 Systems have sufficient wide-area situational awareness to en- able real-time monitoring and control for complex events.

1 Support is provided to customers to help analyze and compare usage against all available pricing programs.

2 There is outage detection and proactive notification at the circuit level.

3 Customers have access to near real-time data on their own usage.

4 Predictive modeling and near real-time simulation are used to optimize support processes.

4 Residential customers participate in demand response and/or utility-managed remote load control programs.

5 Performance is improved through sophisticated systems that are informed by smart grid data.

5 Automatic response to pricing signals for devices within the customer’s premise is supported.

6 Security strategy and tactics continually evolve based on changes in the operational environment and lessons learned.

6 In-home net billing programs are enabled.

7 A common customer experience has been integrated.

INTEGRATING

1 Smart grid-impacted business processes are aligned with the enterprise IT architecture across LOBs.

1 The organization tailors programs to customer segments.

3

2 Two-way meter communication has been deployed.

 

3 A remote connect/disconnect capability is deployed.

2 Systems adhere to an enterprise IT architectural framework for smart grid.

3 Smart grid-specific technology has been implemented to improve cross-LOB performance.

4 The use of advanced distributed intelligence and analytical capa- bilities are enabled through smart grid technology.

4 Demand response and/or remote load control is available to resi- dential customers.

5 There is automatic outage detection at the substation level.

6 Residential customers have on-demand access to daily usage data.

 

5 The organization has an advanced sensor plan.

7 A common experience has been implemented across two or more customer interface channels.

8 Customer education on how to use smart grid services to curtail peak usage is provided.

6 A detailed data communication strategy and corresponding tactics that cross functions and LOBs are in place.

9 All customer products and services have built-in standards based on security and privacy controls.

ENABLING

2

1 Tactical IT investments are aligned to an enterprise IT architec- ture within an LOB.

1 Pilots of remote AMI/AMR are being conducted or have been deployed.

2 Changes to the enterprise IT architecture that enable smart grid are being deployed.

2 The organization has frequent (more than monthly) knowledge of residential customer usage.

3 Standards are selected to support the smart grid strategy within the enterprise IT architecture.

4 A common technology evaluation and selection process is applied for all smart grid activities.

5 There is a data communications strategy for the grid.

3 The organization is modeling the reliability of grid equipment.

 

4 Remote connect/disconnect is being piloted for residential cus- tomers.

5 The impact on the customer of new services and delivery pro- cesses is being assessed.

6 Pilots based on connectivity to distributed IEDs are underway.

6 Security and privacy requirements for customer protection are specified for smart grid-related pilot projects and RFPs.

7 Security is built into all smart grid initiatives from the outset.

INITIATING

1 An enterprise IT architecture exists or is under development.

1 Research is being conducted on how to use smart grid technolo- gies to enhance the customer’s experience, benefits, and partici- pation.

1

2 Existing or proposed IT architectures have been evaluated for quality attributes that support smart grid applications.

3 A change control process is used for applications and IT infra- structure.

2 Security and privacy implications of smart grid are being investi- gated.

4 Opportunities are identified to use technology to improve depart- mental performance.

5 There is a process to evaluate and select technologies in align- ment with smart grid vision and strategies.

3 A vision of the future grid is being communicated to customers.

 

4 The utility consults with public utility commissions and/or other government organizations concerning the impact on customers.

DEFAULT

   

0

Smart Grid Maturity Model: Matrix   Strategy, Management, and Regulatory (SMR) vision, planning, governance,

Smart Grid Maturity Model: Matrix

 

Strategy, Management, and Regulatory (SMR) vision, planning, governance, stakeholder collaboration

Organization and Structure (OS) culture, structure, training, communications, knowledge management

PIONEERING

5

1 Smart grid strategy capitalizes on smart grid as a foundation for the introduction of new services and product offerings.

1 The organizational structure enables collaboration with other grid stakeholders to optimize overall grid operation and health.

2 Smart grid business activities provide sufficient financial resources to enable continued investment in smart grid sustainment and expansion.

2 The organization is able to readily adapt to support new ventures, products, and services that emerge as a result of smart grid.

 

3 New business model opportunities emerge as a result of smart grid capabilities and are implemented.

3 Channels are in place to harvest ideas, develop them, and reward those who help shape future advances in process, workforce competencies, and technology.

OPTIMIZING

1 Smart grid vision and strategy drive the organization’s strategy and direction.

2 Smart grid is a core competency throughout the organization.

1 Management systems and organizational structure are capable of taking advantage of the increased visibility and control provided by smart grid.

4

3 Smart grid strategy is shared and revised collaboratively with external stakeholders.

2 There is end-to-end grid observability that can be leveraged by internal and external stakeholders.

 

3 Decision making occurs at the closest point of need as a result of an efficient organizational structure and the increased availability of information due to smart grid.

INTEGRATING

1 The smart grid vision, strategy, and business case are incorporated into the vision and strategy.

2 A smart grid governance model is established.

1 The smart grid vision and strategy are driving organizational change.

2 Smart grid measures are incorporated into the measurement system.

3 Performance and compensation are linked to smart grid success.

3

3 Smart grid leaders with explicit authority across functions and lines of business are designated to ensure effective implementation of the smart grid strategy.

 

4 Required authorizations for smart grid investments have been secured.

4 Leadership is consistent in communication and actions regarding smart grid.

5 A matrix or overlay structure to support smart grid activities is in place.

6 Education and training are aligned to exploit smart grid capabilities.

ENABLING

2

1 An initial smart grid strategy and a business plan are approved by management.

1 A new vision for a smart grid begins to drive change and affect related priorities.

2 A common smart grid vision is accepted across the organization.

2 Most operations have been aligned around end-to-end processes.

3 Operational investment is explicitly aligned to the smart grid strategy.

3 Smart grid implementation and deployment teams include participants from all impacted functions and LOBs.

 

4 Budgets are established specifically for funding the implementation of the smart grid vision.

4 Education and training to develop smart grid competencies have been identified and are available.

5 There is collaboration with regulators and other stakeholders regarding implementation of the smart grid vision and strategy.

5 The linking of performance and compensation plans to achieve smart grid milestones is in progress.

6 There is support and funding for conducting proof-of-concept projects to evaluate feasibility and alignment.

INITIATING

1

1 Smart grid vision is developed with a goal of operational improvement.

1 The organization has articulated its need to build smart grid competencies in its workforce.

2 Experimental implementations of smart grid concepts are supported.

2 Leadership has demonstrated a commitment to change the organization in support of achieving smart grid.

3 Discussions have been held with regulators about the organization’s smart grid vision.

3 Smart grid awareness efforts to inform the workforce of smart grid activities have been initiated.

DEFAULT

   

0

Smart Grid Maturity Model: Matrix   Value Chain Integration (VCI) demand and supply management, leveraging

Smart Grid Maturity Model: Matrix

 

Value Chain Integration (VCI) demand and supply management, leveraging market opportunities

Societal and Environmental (SE) responsibility, sustainability, critical infrastructure, efficiency

PIONEERING

5

1 The optimization of energy assets is automated across the full value chain.

1 Triple bottom line goals align with local, regional, and national objectives.

2 Resources are adequately dispatchable and controllable so that the organization can take advantage of granular market options.

2 Customers control their energy-based environmental footprints through automatic optimization of their end-to-end energy supply and usage level (energy source and mix).

 

3 Automated control and resource optimization schemes consider and support regional and/or national grid optimization.

3 The organization is a leader in developing and promoting industry-wide resilience best practices and/or technologies for protection of the national critical infrastructure.

OPTIMIZING

1 Energy resources (including Volt/VAR, DG, and DR) are dispatchable and tradable.

2 Portfolio optimization models that encompass available resources and real-time markets are implemented.

1 The organization collaborates with external stakeholders to address environmental and societal issues.

2 A public environmental and societal scorecard is maintained.

4

3 Programs are in place to shave peak demand.

3 Secure two-way communications with Home Area Networks (HANs) are available.

4 End-user energy usage and devices are actively managed through the utility’s network.

 

4 Visibility and potential control of customers’ large-demand appliances to balance demand and supply is available.

5 The organization fulfills its critical infrastructure assurance goals for resiliency, and contributes to those of the region and the nation.

INTEGRATING

1 An integrated resource plan is in place and includes new targeted resources and technologies.

2 Customer premise energy management solutions with market and usage information are enabled.

1 Performance of societal and environmental programs are measured and effectiveness is demonstrated.

2 Segmented and tailored information that includes environmental and societal benefits and costs is available to customers.

3 Programs to encourage off-peak usage by customers are in place.

3

3 Additional resources are available and deployed to provide substitutes for market products to support reliability or other objectives.

 

4 Security management and monitoring processes are deployed to protect the interactions with an expanded portfolio of value chain partners.

4 The organization regularly reports on the sustainability and the societal and environmental impacts of its smart grid programs and technologies.

ENABLING

2

1 Support is provided for energy management systems for residential customers.

1 Smart-grid strategies and work plans address societal and environmental issues.

2 The value chain has been redefined based on its smart grid capabilities.

2 Energy efficiency programs for customers have been established.

3 Pilots to support a diverse resource portfolio have been conducted.

3 The organization considers a “triple bottom line” view when making decisions.

 

4 Secure interactions have been piloted with an expanded portfolio of value chain partners.

4 Environmental proof-of-concept projects are underway that demonstrate smart grid benefits.

5 Increasingly granular and more frequent consumption information is available to customers.

INITIATING

1

1 Assets and programs necessary to facilitate load management are identified.

1 The smart grid strategy addresses the organization’s role in societal and environmental issues.

2 Distributed generation sources and the capabilities needed to support them are identified.

2 The environmental benefits of the smart grid vision and strategy are publicly promoted.

3 Energy storage options and the capabilities needed to support them are identified.

3 Environmental compliance performance records are available for public inspection.

 

4 There is a strategy for creating and managing a diverse resource portfolio.

4 The smart grid vision or strategy specifies the organization’s role in protecting the nation’s critical infrastructure.

5 Security requirements to enable interaction with an expanded portfolio of value chain partners have been identified.

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Smart Grid Maturity Model: Matrix   Grid Operations (GO) reliability, efficiency, security, safety, observability,

Smart Grid Maturity Model: Matrix

 

Grid Operations (GO) reliability, efficiency, security, safety, observability, control

Work and Asset Management (WAM) asset monitoring, tracking and maintenance, mobile workforce

PIONEERING

1 Self-healing capabilities are present.

1 The use of assets between and across supply chain participants is optimized with processes defined and executed across the supply chain.

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2 System-wide, analytics-based, and automated grid decision making is in place.

2 Assets are leveraged to maximize utilization, including just-in- time asset retirement, based on smart grid data and systems.

OPTIMIZING

1 Operational data from smart grid deployments is being used to optimize processes across the organization.

2 Grid operational management is based on near real-time data.

1 A complete view of assets based on status, connectivity, and proximity is available to the organization.

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3 Operational forecasts are based on data gathered through smart grid.

4 Grid operations information has been made available across functions and LOBs.

5 There is automated decision-making within protection schemes that is based on wide-area monitoring.

2 Asset models are based on real performance and monitoring data.

3 Performance and usage of assets is optimized across the asset fleet and across asset classes.

4 Service life for key grid components is managed through condition-based and predictive maintenance, and is based on real and current asset data.

INTEGRATING

1 Smart grid information is available across systems and organizational functions.

2 Control analytics have been implemented and are used to improve cross-LOB decision-making.

3 Grid operations planning is now fact-based using grid data made available by smart grid capabilities.

4 Smart meters are important grid management sensors.

1 Performance, trend analysis, and event audit data are available for components of the organization’s systems.

2 CBM programs for key components are in place.

3

3 Remote asset monitoring capabilities are integrated with asset management.

4 Integration of remote asset monitoring with mobile workforce systems, in order to automate work order creation, is underway.

 

5 Grid data is used by an organization’s security functions.

6 There is automated decision-making within protection schemes.

5 An integrated view of GIS and asset monitoring is in place.

6 Asset inventory is being tracked using automation.

 

7 Modeling of asset investments for key components is underway.

ENABLING

1 Initial distribution to substation automation projects are underway.

1 An approach to track, inventory, and maintain event histories of assets is in development.

2 An integrated view of GIS for asset monitoring based on

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2 Advanced outage restoration schemes are being implemented, which resolve or reduce the magnitude of unplanned outages.

3 Aside from SCADA, piloting of remote asset monitoring of key grid assets to support manual decision making is underway.

4 Investment in and expansion of data communications networks in support of grid operations is underway.

location, status, and interconnectivity (nodal) has been developed.

3 An organization-wide mobile workforce strategy is in development.

INITIATING

1 Business cases for new equipment and systems related to smart grid are approved.

2 New sensors, switches, and communications technologies are evaluated for grid monitoring and control.

3 Proof-of-concept projects and component testing for grid monitoring and control are underway.

1 Enhancements to work and asset management have been built into approved business cases.

2 Potential uses of remote asset monitoring are being evaluated.

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3 Asset and workforce management equipment and systems are being evaluated for their potential alignment to the smart grid vision.

 

4 Outage and distribution management systems linked to substation automation are being explored and evaluated.

5 Safety and security (physical and cyber) requirements are considered.

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About the Software Engineering Institute

In 2009, Carnegie Mellon University’s

Software Engineering Institute (SEI) became the steward of the SGMM.

A global leader in software and systems

engineering, security best practices, process improvement, and maturity modeling, the SEI is partnering with government and industry to improve the

security, resiliency, and interoperability

of the grid. With the support of the

Department of Energy and the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the SEI and its collaborator APQC are maintaining and evolving the SGMM as a resource for industry transformation.

About APQC

APQC is a non-profit member-based research organization with more than 30 years of systematic quality and process improvement research experience. APQC is working in collaboration with the SEI to evolve the SGMM and to analyze and maintain the data collected from organiza- tions that use the SGMM.

the data collected from organiza- tions that use the SGMM. For general information about the SEI
the data collected from organiza- tions that use the SGMM. For general information about the SEI

For general information about the SEI and for information about the SGMM Customer Relations Phone: 412-268-5800 FAX: 412-268-6257 info@sei.cmu.edu

Software Engineering Institute 4500 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15313-2612 www.sei.cmu.edu

1

Get the latest release of the SGMM at www.sei.cmu.edu/goto/SGMM SGMM Update October 2010

Get the latest release of the SGMM at www.sei.cmu.edu/goto/SGMM

SGMM Update October 2010

15313-2612 www.sei.cmu.edu 1 Get the latest release of the SGMM at www.sei.cmu.edu/goto/SGMM SGMM Update October 2010