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International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 1

2016 International Mind, Brain and


Education Society Conference
SEPTEMBER 1517
CHELSEA HOTEL, TORONTO, ONTARIO
IMBES
IMBES has a committed, professional
board of directors that are dedicated to
the mandate of IMBES. Our current board
of directors is profiled below. To view
more information on a director, please visit
our website at www.imbes.org for their
biographical information.

OFFICERS

Dr. Daniel Ansari, President

Dr. Doris Alvarez, Vice President


INTERNATIONAL MIND, BRAIN
Dr. Mary Helen Immordino-Yang,
& EDUCATION SOCIETY President-Elect

Dr. Bert De Smedt, Secretary

Dr. Brad Allison, Treasurer


Our mission is to facilitate
cross-cultural collaboration
BOARD MEMBERS
in biology, education
Dr. Silvia Bunge
and the cognitive and
Dr. Joanna Christodoulou
developmental sciences.
Dr. Bruce McCandliss

Dr. Nora Newcombe

Dr. Mariano Sigman

Dr. Michael Thomas

Rebecca Gotlieb, Student Representative

Bea Goffin, Executive Assistant to the Board

PROGRAM COMMITTEE:
Daniel Ansari, Silvia Bunge, Mary Helen
Immordino-Yang and Bruce McCandliss

AWARDS COMMITTEE:
Brad Allison, Doris Alvarez, Bruce
McCandliss, Mariano Sigman and
Mary Helen Immordino-Yang
4
Agenda
International Mind, Brain and Education Society InternationalInternational
Mind, Brain and
Mind,
Education
Brain andSociety
Education
Conference
Society 5

Thursday, September 15 Saturday, September 17


TIME WHAT IS HAPPENING LOCATION TIME WHAT IS HAPPENING LOCATION

2:00 PM5:00 PM Registration Churchill Court 7:30 AM8:30 AM Breakfast Churchill Ballroom

5:15 PM5:30 PM Welcome and Conference Overview Churchill Ballroom 8:30 AM9:30 AM Janet Werker, University of British Columbia Churchill Ballroom
Keynote Address Perceptual Foundations of Language Acquisition
5:30 PM6:30 PM Tania Lombrozo, University of California, Berkeley Churchill Ballroom 9:30 AM10:00 AM Break and Poster Set Up
Keynote Address The Good, The Bad and the Beautiful 10:00 AMNOON 5 Concurrent Symposia
Spatial thinking and STEM education (pg.12) Seymour

Bilingualism, bilingual education, and neural organization for learning to read (pg.13) Gerrard

Friday, September 16 Integrating Mind, Brain and Education through Teacher-Researcher Collaboration (pg.14) Churchill Ballroom A

Probing the relationship between number sense and math achievement: Stevenson
insights from training studies (pg.14)
TIME WHAT IS HAPPENING LOCATION
Revealing the invisible: multimodal analysis of implicit game-based learning (pg.15) Churchill Ballroom B
7:30 AM8:30 AM Breakfast Churchill Ballroom
NOON1:30 PM Poster Presentations (pgs. 2124) & Buffet Lunch Churchill Court
8:30 AM9:30 AM Clancy Blair, New York University, The Development of Self-Regulation in Churchill Ballroom Meet the Funders Q & A Stephenson
Keynote Address Early Childhood
1:35 PM3:30 PM 4 Concurrent Symposia
9:30 AM9:40 AM Break Churchill Ballroom
Factors supporting childrens early informal science learning (pg.15) Seymour
9:40 AM11:40 AM 3 Concurrent Symposia
Growing up in a digital world: the good, the bad and the ugly (pg.9) Seymour Stevenson
MBE perspectives on the learning of fractions and their magnitudes (pg.16)

New neuroimaging insights into the brain bases of typical reading and reading disorders (pg.9) Gerrard
Fadeout and persistence of the effects of early childhood educational interventions: Churchill Ballroom B
Problems and possible solutions (pg.17)
Science and mathematics education: Possible educational implications supported by Stevenson
recent neuroeducational studies (pg.10)
The interdependence of brain and cognitive development in social context and Churchill Ballroom A
implications for education (pg.17)
11:45 AM1:15 PM Lunch and Award Presentations Churchill Ballroom
1:15 AM1:45 PM Poster Set Up Churchill Court 3:30 PM3:45 PM Break Rossetti
1:45 PM3:45 PM 5 Concurrent Symposia 3:45 PM4:45 PM Marla Sokolowski, University of Toronto, Gene-Environment Interplay in Individual Rossetti
Keynote Address
Differences in Behaviour
The bilingual advantage: Evidence, controversy, and implications for Churchill Ballroom B
translational practice (pg.10) 5:00 PM6:00 PM Reception and Poster Award Presentations Bb33 Restaurant
Introducing Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, IMBES President-Elect
Translational work in mind, brain and education: Mapping the field Churchill Ballroom A
{Kurt Fischer symposium} (pg.11)

Reconciling domain-specific and domain-general influences on numerical cognition: Gerrard


Implications for education (pg.11)

Science learning, education and cognitive neuroscience (pg.12) Seymour

Neuroscience and development of executive function (pg.12) Stevenson

3:55 PM4:55 PM Pasi Sahlberg, Harvard Graduate School of Education, About the Facts and the Myths Churchill Ballroom
Keynote Address KEYNOTES
about Education in Finland: Mind, brain and smart education policies
5:00 PM7:00 PM Poster Presentations and Reception (pgs. 1821) Churchill Court SYMPOSIA
8:00 PM Student and Postdoctoral Student Forum Churchill Ballroom
6 International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 7

educational change in Finland explain how different types of mechanistic paragon of the
and has published numerous experience at different points manner in which genes interact
academic and professional articles in development interact with with the environment to impact

Keynote Speakers
and book chapters. He is an active and shape these initial biases, behaviour. She trail-blazed the
contributor to global education and how changing sensitivities development of a branch of
dialogue through his columns and bootstrap language acquisition. In Behaviour Genetics that addresses
op-eds that have appeared in the this endeavor, she studies infants the genetic and molecular bases
Washington Post, The Guardian, and young children growing up in of natural individual differences
The Conversation and CNN. His different language communities, in behaviour and is best known
professional honors and awards including infants growing up with for her discovery of the foraging
Cognition. She blogs about to NYU, he spent ten years as include the 2012 Education two or more languages from birth. gene. She has published over
psychology, philosophy, and an assistant and then associate Award in Finland, the 2013 Her work has been recognized 140 publications, given 250
cognitive science for NPRs professor in the department of Grawemeyer Award in the United with many awards including the invited lectures and multiple
13.7: Cosmos & Culture. Human Development and Family States, the 2014 Robert Owen Killam Research Prize, the UBC international distinguished visiting
Studies at Penn State University. Award in Scotland, and 2016 Alumni Prize in Social Sciences, the professorships. She was awarded
He received his doctorate in Lego Award in Denmark. He is a Jacob Bieley Prize (UBCs premier a Fellow of the Royal Society of
developmental psychology and a former Director General of CIMO research prize), and the Anne L. Canada (RSC) in 1998 for her
masters degree in public health (Centre for International Mobility Brown Award in Developmental pioneering work in the field of
from the University of Alabama at and Cooperation) at the Finlands Psychology. In November, 2015 she Behavioural Genetics and held
Tania Lombrozo is Birmingham in 1996. Ministry of Education and Culture was awarded the Gold Medal from a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair
an Associate Professor of
in Helsinki, and visiting Professor the Social Sciences and Humanities in Genetics and Behavioural
Psychology at the University of
of Practice at Harvard Universitys Research Council of Canada, and in Neurology from 2001-2015. Her
California, Berkeley, as well as
Graduate School of Education. He September, 2016 designated as a awards include: the Genetics
an affiliate of the Department
is currently Professor of Practice University Killam Professor at UBC. Society of Canadas Award of
of Philosophy and a member of
at the University of Helsinki and She is an elected Fellow of many Excellence (2007), University
the Institute for Cognitive and
a visiting Professor of Practice at societies, including the Canadian Professorship (2010), Senior Fellow
Brain Sciences. She received
Clancy Blair, PhD, Professor, the Arizona State University. More and American Psychological of the Canadian Institute for
her Ph.D. in Psychology
Department of Applied on his website: pasisahlberg.com Associations, the Royal Society Advanced Research (CIFAR) and
from Harvard University in
Psychology, Steinhardt School and Twitter: @pasi_sahlberg of Canada, the Cognitive Science the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond
2006 after receiving a B.S. in
of Culture, Education, and Society, the American Association Jubilee Medal both in 2013 and
Symbolic Systems and a B.A.
Human Development, New York for the Advancement of Science, the Distinguished Investigator
in Philosophy from Stanford
University, is a developmental and the American Academy of Arts Award from the International
University. Dr. Lombrozos
psychologist who studies self- and Sciences. Behaviour and Neurogenetics
research aims to address
regulation in young children. His Pasi Sahlberg is a Society (2014). She directed
foundational questions about
research focuses primarily on Finnish educator, author the Life Sciences Division of the
cognition using the empirical
the effects of early life stress on and scholar. He has worked Academy of Sciences of the RSC
tools of cognitive psychology
executive function development, as a schoolteacher, teacher from 2009-2012 and she currently
and the conceptual tools of
the relation of executive educator, researcher and policy co-directs the Child and Brain
analytic philosophy. Her work
functions to other aspects of advisor in Finland and has Development Programme of CFAR
focuses on explanation and
self-regulation, and the relation studied education systems and where she is the Weston Fellow.
understanding, conceptual
of executive functions to school reforms around the world. In his
representation, categorization,
readiness and early school long career in education, he
social cognition, and causal
achievement. His projects include has served the World Bank in
reasoning. She is the recipient Janet F. Werker is Professor
a longitudinal study in which he Washington, DC, the European
of numerous early-career and Canada Research Chair in the
examines early experiential and Commission in Torino, Italy,
awards including the Spence Department of Psychology at the
biological influences on self- and the OECD as education
Award from the Association University of British Columbia.
regulation development and specialist. He currently advises
for Psychological Science, Her research interests center on
three randomized controlled several governments about
a CAREER award from the understanding the perceptual
trials of innovative early education policies and reforms.
National Science Foundation,
education curricula designed to
foundations of language acquisition Marla B. Sokolowski, PhD,
and a James S. McDonnell He is the author of a best-seller in infancy. She studies both the FRSC is a University Professor.
promote executive functions and book Finnish Lessons 2.0:
Foundation Scholar Award neural and behavioral foundations Her research is esteemed
self-regulation. Prior to coming What can the world learn from
in Understanding Human of speech and language processing worldwide as a clear, integrative
in young infants, and seeks to
Keynote Abstracts International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 9

Tania Lombrozo, University of California, Berkeley and some of them have not. In this presentation I explore
The Good, The Bad, and the Beautiful common myths, established facts and some lessons from

Like scientists, children and adults are often


motivated to explain the world around them, including
why people behave in particular ways, why objects have
Finnish schools and education system. I explain the key
characteristics of Finlands school system and how they
resonate with and often oppose those in other countries.
In the end I discuss briefly how evidence from mind,
Symposia
some properties rather than others, and why events unfold brain and education have influenced policy decisions and
as they do. Moreover, people have strong and systematic how we should forward for better future.
intuitions about what makes something a good (or
Growing up in a digital world: The Optimizing education through digital learning
(Michael Levine, Joan Ganz Cooney Center). After short
beautiful) explanation. Why are we so driven to explain? good, the bad and the ugly presentations, the group will invite open discussion on
And what accounts for our explanatory preferences? Janet Werker, University of British Columbia Fri., Sept. 16, 9:40am11:40am: Seymour Room these hot button items.
In this talk Ill present evidence that both children and Perceptual Foundations of
adults prefer explanations that are simple and have broad Language Acquisition Chair: Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Temple University and
scope, consistent with many accounts of explanation from The Brookings Institution New neuroimaging insights into
philosophy of science. The good news is that a preference We study the earliest foundations of language Speakers: Kathy Hirsh-Pasek; Roberta Michnick
for simple and broad explanations can sometimes improve acquisition, in the perceptual biases young infants show Golinkoff, The University of Delaware; Anna Sosa, Northern
the brain bases of typical reading
learning and support effective inferences. The bad news for processing language from the first days of life. We Arizona University; Jennifer Zosh, Pennsylvania State University and reading disorders
is that under some conditions, these preferences can then explore how these biases change as a function Brandywine; Michael Levine, Joan Ganz Cooney Center; Michael Fri., Sept. 16, 9:40am11:40am: Gerrard Room
systematically lead children and adults astray. of growing up with one or more languages, and how Rich, Harvard University
growing perceptual knowledge of the native language Chair: Marc Joanisse, University of Western Ontario
intersects with higher levels of language acquisition. Our Children are in the midst of a vast, unplanned experiment, Speakers: Marc Joanisse; Jeffrey Malins, Haskins Laboratories;
Clancy Blair, New York University work shows that infants not only listen to the speech surrounded by digital technologies. Though the smart James Booth, University of Texas, Austin; Jeffrey Gruen,
The Development of Self-Regulation around them, and in this way learn about the properties phone was introduced in 2007 and tablets appeared only Yale University
in Early Childhood of the native language, but that they also watch others 6 years ago, a recent survey reported that three-fourths Discussant: Maureen Lovett, SickKids, University of Toronto
speaking and that both heard and seen speech influence of children under the age of 4 years had their own mobile
This talk will describe recent advances in the scientific their development. Bilingual infants may be particularly device (Kabali et al., 2015)! At the apex of this boom is Functional neuroimaging of reading is entering its third
study of self-regulation in early childhood, focusing on adept at this. More recently we have begun to explore the introduction of applications (apps) for tablets and decade, and continues to generate considerable ongoing
the development of executive functions, the complex how infants own oral motor movement interact with smartphones, as well as toys like talking shape sorters interest. Of note is the wealth of new information about
thinking skills that are important for learning in school heard and seen speech. Recent findings, and the that come alive through an implanted digital chip. how literacy development changes the brain, and about
and for controlling behavior and emotions. Research in implications of this work for ensuring optimal language Indeed, educational apps which as of December 2015 the neural markers of developmental dyslexia. Yet we
neuroscience indicates that stress and adversity early acquisition for all children, will be presented. stand at 1.5 million apps in the App Store are largely continue to struggle with question of how to apply these
in life negatively impact executive functions and self- unregulated and untested. And play with digital toys is findings to understanding, identifying and ameliorating
regulation in young children. A growing body of research only now being investigated. As one magazine boasted, reading disorders. This symposium brings together
in early intervention and early childhood education, Marla Sokolowski, University of Toronto Gone are the days when a spinning top or wind-up car experts who are using cutting-edge neuroimaging
however, indicates that self-regulation and executive Gene-Environment Interplay in were the pinnacle of toy technology. Nowadays kids techniques to examine typical reading development and
functions can be fostered through supports for families Individual Differences in Behaviour expect their toys to connect to the internet, paired with reading impairment in children. Talks will present data
and through innovative programs that enhance the smart devices (www.gizmag.com/best-tech-toys- from multiple neuroimaging modalities including fMRI
quality of childrens early education experiences. We are interested in how DNA variation predisposes chirstmas-2015-guide/40640/). and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), as well as event-
organisms to be more or less affected by their experiences related potentials (ERPs). Of special interest are studies
(gene-environment interactions), how our experience gets This symposium surveys the digital landscape and asks that link neuroimaging data to individuals behavioral
Pasi Sahlberg, Harvard Graduate School embedded in our biology (epigenetics) and finally how about the consequences of growing up in a digital and genetic markers. A key goal of the symposium is to
of Education DNA variation interacts with epigenetic processes to affect world. Building on decades of work from the Science present findings in a way that is informative to researchers
About the Facts and the Myths about behaviour. Experiential affects, like developmental ones of Learning, the symposium features top scientists interested in the application of basic science to clinical
Education in Finland: Mind, brain and smart can occur on different time scales. For example nutritional in medicine, psychology, communication, and media and educational settings. That is, this research focuses
education policies or social adversity (or enrichment) can occur throughout speaking on 4 topics: 1) A Primer on Mediatrics: What much less on questions of which brain region does
an organisms life, in early life alone with enduring effects the science can tell us about the effects of digital what, and instead seeks to be relevant to how reading
Finland is the poster child of education and the on later life stages, or acutely over a matter of minutes media on health and development (Michael Rich, researchers approach issues concerning the identification
destination of tens of thousands of education tourists or hours. To address these issues we take a genetic Harvard University); 2) Can we put real education of reading disorders, competing views about instructional
seeking inspiration to school improvement and education perspective using mostly Drosophila melanogaster but into educational apps? (Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Temple techniques in the classroom, and the efficacy of
system change. Since the mid-2000s educators around also rats and humans and consider both candidate single University & Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, University intervention methodologies.
the world have been asking what makes some education genes and candidate pathways. This approach provides of Delaware); 3) Parents interaction with children
systems perform better than others, and why some interesting opportunities and challenges because many around talking versus traditional toys (Anna Sosa,
countries seem to be stuck in mediocracy. There are genes and pathways that modulate behaviour have Northern Arizona University; Jenn Zosh, Pennsylvania
numerous theories of change and programs to better multiple functions (pleiotropy) and do themselves exhibit State University Brandywine); and, 4) Tap, Click, Read
education, some of them have proved to be successful plastic responses to experience.
10 International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 11

Science and mathematics would increase participants performance. Indeed two Translational work in mind, brain Math competence is of critical importance for individual
types of interventions, (1) activating inhibitory control success in modern society, yet a significant proportion
education: Possible educational mechanisms and (2) increasing the salience of the and education: Mapping the field of economically active adults fail to acquire the
implications supported by recent perimeter, significantly improved students performance. Fri., Sept. 16, 1:45pm3:45am: Churchill Ballroom A necessary math skills to enable that success. Accordingly,
ever increasing research attention is being paid to
neuroeducational studies In proportional reasoning the role of congruity and Kurt Fischer Symposium in Mind, Brain and understanding how humans learn math so that we can
Fri., Sept. 16, 9:40am11:40am: Stevenson Room salience was studied. It was found that accuracy was Education develop more effective teaching methods. The cognitive
lower and RT was longer in conditions in which there foundations of emerging mathematical abilities are under
Chair: Reuven Babai, Tel Aviv University was an intuitive interference (no correspondence Chair: Marc Schwartz, The University of Texas at Arlington intense debate: most existing work focuses either on
Speakers: Reuven Babai; Patrice Potvin, Universit du Qubec between congruity and salience). Brain-imaging showed Speakers: Marc Schwartz; Joanna Christodoulou, MGH domain-specific cognitive skills, such as non-symbolic
Montral; Ruth Stavy, Tel Aviv University lower activation in fronto-parietal numerical processing Institute of Health Professions; Donna Coch, Dartmouth College; number sense, or on domain-general attentional and
Discussant: Layne Kalbfleisch, George Washington regions for these conditions. These findings suggested Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, University of Southern California; executive skills, often pitting them against each other. This
University that the automatic processing of natural numbers that Juliana Pare-Blagoev, Johns Hopkins University symposium brings together researchers using a range of
compose the ratios suppress the comparison of ratios approaches to investigate the roles of domain-general
Many students encounter difficulties in solving a wide as a function of congruity and salience. Reducing this The emerging and interdisciplinary field of Mind, Brain, and and domain-specific cognitive skills, as well as their neural
range of problems in science and mathematics. Research interference when solving ratio problems in school Education is addressing a number of intriguing challenges. substrates, in mathematics learning and assessment. We
on students conceptions and reasoning in science and could be achieved by directing students to calculate Clear theoretical boundaries do not yet exist, and there is argue that an overarching framework encompassing these
mathematics indicates that some of these difficulties may rate per unit. A preliminary study suggests that this is not a unifying set of methodological and conceptual tools multiple skills and their interactions over time is necessary.
stem from intuitive interference. Overcoming this intuitive a promising approach. that define the field. In fact, such an outcome may lack the Importantly, discussion will focus on interdisciplinary
interference is therefore a key pedagogical challenge. In same relevance that it has for disciplines or subdisciplines and cross-cultural perspectives as the speakers work
this symposium we will describe several lines of cognitive because the number of tools and the ways in which they with schools in Canada, the US and the UK and span
neuroeducational studies carried out in order to deepen The bilingual advantage: Evidence, are being used in MBE is still growing. Thus, defining developmental psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and
understanding of these difficulties and their underlying education.
reasoning mechanisms. We will also discuss possible controversy, and implications for individual work within the framework of MBE requires
students and researchers new to the field to recognize the
educational implications that are supported by recent translational practice processes that underscore the mission of IMBES, as well as Scerif will discuss an ongoing project exploring preschool
neuroeducational studies. Fri., Sept. 16, 1:45pm3:45am: Churchill Ballroom B the kind of work emerging from the field. mathematical development. The aim is to develop a more
comprehensive model of the cognitive and educational
Students express a variety of intuitive scientific Chair: J. Bruce Morton, Brain and Mind Institute, University of This presentation will explore the unique ways in which foundations of numerical skills, by: a) investigating the
conceptions that are often resistant to instruction. Western Ontario researchers in IMBES have been pursuing research with MBE interplay of both domain-general (attention, executive
Such conceptions can prevail and distract learners Speakers: J. Bruce Morton; Kenneth Paap, San Francisco State as an organizing framework. Each presentation will address functions) and domain-specific (number sense, symbolic
from producing accurate answers. Indeed, scientific University; Gigi Luk, Harvard School of Education; Debra Titone, and balance two different goals: (1) providing a selection of understanding) foundations for math longitudinally; b)
performance appears to be delayed when the problem McGill University key theoretical and methodological approaches used by the establishing a partnership between cognitive scientists,
contains interfering irrelevant salient variables. Recent Discussant: Raymond Klein, Department of Psychology and researcher; and, (2) mapping out the researchers journeys education experts, and practitioners. Lefevre will talk about
neuroimaging studies have shown that overcoming the Neuroscience, Dalhousie University reflecting more serendipitous events and insights that the role of subitizing, the core system of processing small
interference is associated with neural activations related guided their work in MBE. The dual approach supports a exact numerosities, in numerical learning. She will explore
to the function of inhibition. These results suggest that There is abundant evidence that a lifetime of speaking more complex picture of how the researchers gained critical whether subitizing is domain-specific, domain-general, or
initial conceptions persist through the development of two languages bestows cognitive advantage and may basic knowledge that is relevant to the MBE community, both, and highlight implications for education. Matejko
expertise and can coexist and interfere with scientific protect the brain from neurological decline associated while also helping the audience think strategically about will present a study investigating the neural substrates
conceptions. Teaching models that are consistent with the with aging. Critics however charge basic claims are how to pursue their own work in MBE. underlying arithmetic, visuo-spatial working memory
idea of coexistence will be discussed. overblown and represent a biased interpretation of (VSWM) and number processing. Much behavioral evidence
available data. Translating insights from bilingualism has demonstrated a strong relationship between these
As for scientific concepts, irrelevant salient variables research into educational practice therefore poses Reconciling domain-specific and abilities, therefore they may have common underlying
intuitively interfere with students reasoning. In unique challenges. What are the benefits of a bilingual neural substrates. Matejko will discuss an fMRI study that
the symposium we will describe two examples of education? Are they primarily cultural, or are there
domain-general influences on investigates how the arithmetic network overlaps with
such interference, one in geometry and another in additional long-term cognitive and neurological benefits numerical cognition: Implications those for VSWM and basic number processing and how
proportional reasoning. linked to the mastery of multiple languages? Does a for education these shared networks change over development. Price
bilingual curriculum promote the development of higher- will discuss results from two recent studies investigating
In geometry, a brain-imaging study indicated that Fri., Sept. 16, 1:45pm3:45am: Gerrard Room
order cognitive abilities, or does it tend to select for the relationship between brain structure and performance
overcoming this interference is associated with activation intellectually stronger students? This symposium brings on a standardized math measure (Woodcock-Johnson)
in prefrontal brain regions known for their executive Chair: Gaia Scerif, University of Oxford
together a panel of distinguished scholars with widely and performance on the Tennessee Comprehensive
inhibitory control. This study suggested that intervention varying views on these questions. The goal is an open Speakers: Gaia Scerif; Jo-Anne Lefevre, Carleton University; Achievement Program (TCAP) math subtest, respectively.
aimed at activating inhibitory control mechanisms could discussion of the basic science and its implications for Anna Matejko, University of Western Ontario; Gavin Price, Results suggest that while performance on standardized
improve students success. This study also suggested that translational practice. Vanderbilt University math measures is associated with grey matter density in the
increasing the level of salience of the relevant variable left parietal lobe (a region related to processing numerical
12 International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 13

magnitude), TCAP math performance is associated with Neuroscience and development symposium, we discuss enhancement in spatial thinking Bilingualism, bilingual education,
higher density in the bilateral hippocampal formation from two perspectives:
and the right inferior frontal gyrus, regions associated of executive function and neural organization for
with learning and memory. Thus, considering the role of Fri., Sept. 16, 1:45pm3:45am: Stevenson Room (1) Developmental Factors: Spatial thinking is an learning to read
development and environment in the relation between overarching cognitive construct comprising distinct Sat., Sept. 17, 10:00amNoon: Gerrard Room
neuroscience and education is of critical importance. Chair: Frederick Morrison, University of Michigan spatial skills. Spatial navigation, an important spatial
Together, these presentations address key questions about Speakers: Jennie Grammer, University of California; skill, is a complex cognitive process imperative for our Chair: Iouila Kovelman, University of Michigan
the role of fundamental cognitive processes and their Stephanie Haft, University of California San Francisco; Maria everyday functioning in the environment. Understanding Speakers: Iouila Kovelman; Lisa Lopez, University of South
neural substrates in mathematics learning and performance. Arredondo and Benjamin Katz, University of Michigan developmental factors influencing individual differences
Florida; Marc Joanisse, University of Western Ontario; Xi Chen,
Successes and challenges in bridging research and practice in spatial navigation can aid in designing timely
University of Toronto
will be discussed. Extant research suggests that childrens executive functions interventions. Adolescence is a time of increasing mobility
(EF), such as working memory, response inhibition, and and independent navigation for young people, yet we
Bilingualism is a common life experience, yet little is known
attentional control, predict academic success throughout know little about how large-scale spatial thinking changes
Science learning, education and the course of schooling. However, much remains during this period. In the first two presentations, we
about the impact of bilingualism on childrens neural
architecture for learning to read. This symposium offers
cognitive neuroscience unknown regarding the neural mechanisms underlying EF discuss findings from two independent studies examining
four studies/presentations aiming to disambiguate the
development. While the use of neuroscience techniques spatial navigation in pre-adolescence and adolescence.
Fri., Sept. 16, 1:45pm3:45am: Seymour Room nature of bilingual acquisition by investigating the impact
to study the development and improvement of executive Collectively, we present spatial navigation findings for
of home language environment, age of acquisition, and
function is a fairly recent phenomenon, there is a participants ranging from 8 years to 19 years of age.
Chair: Adam Green, Georgetown University learner variability on childrens emergent literacy and the
growing body of research in the field that has significant In both studies, participants completed a test of small-
Speakers: Silvia Bunge, University of California at Berkeley; neural networks supporting dual language mastery. This
implications for educators and scientists alike. This scale spatial perspective taking (Spatial Orientation Test,
David Kraemer, Dartmouth College; Christian Schunn, is done through systematic investigations of bilingual
symposium will focus on new work that draws on a variety Hegarty & Waller, 2004) and explored a novel virtual
University of Pittsburgh and monolingual children attending either bilingual or
of neuroscience methods, including EEG, fMRI, fNIRS, and environment (Silcton; Weisberg et al, 2014). Following
monolingual educational settings, observed through
Discussant: Robert Kolvoord, James Madison University non-invasive brain stimulation to study EF, in the service exploration, participants completed direction estimation
multiple behavioral as well as neuroimaging (fMRI, DTI
of two primary questions. First, how do these findings and map-building tasks that assessed the accuracy of their
and EEG) methodologies. The first study used fMRI
Effective science education requires both imparting improve our understanding of the link between executive cognitive map of the virtual environment. We discuss and
imaging with 5-year-old children attending Chinese-
knowledge and developing cognitive resources and function and academic achievement, and the underlying contrast developmental trends in accuracy on different
English and Spanish-English schools. During phonological
strategies, especially reasoning skills, to meaningfully neural mechanisms supporting this connection? Second, spatial measures in the two studies. We suggest that
awareness tasks, children with better combined dual
integrate that knowledge for deep understanding how might this work be used to improve educational mental representations created as a result of large-scale
language proficiency showed greater activation in left
and innovation in the sciences. Work presented in this pedagogy and learning outcomes, either indirectly or navigation are still developing during pre-adolescence
hemisphere regions typically associated with language
symposium engages the neural how of effective science directly? These questions will frame the work presented and adolescence, and spatial perspective taking appears
and literacy, as compared to children with lower combined
education by investigating howknowledge is represented during the symposium, which will include ERP research to play a key role in accuracy.
dual language proficiency. Study two investigated low-
in the brain, and how learning-related changes in the of schooling effects on EF (Grammer), imaging work that income Spanish-English preschoolers, finding that Spanish
developing brain support the development of scientific explores the connection between kindergarten EF and (2) Cognitive Factors: Spatial thinking is central to
exposure and use at home had a significant impact on
reasoning capacities. Attention will be paid to differences later literacy acquisition (Hoeft & Haft), an fNIRS study many scientific domains like GIScience, which involves
childrens emergent literacy skills. Taken together, these
in efficacy between educational strategies, including investigating the connection between bilingualism and understanding multi-level spatial relations. GIScience,
fMRI (study 1) and behavioral literacy findings (study 2)
consideration of science reading strategies, intensive EF in children (Arredondo), and transcranial direct-current itself can act as a tool for improving spatial thinking. In the
emphasize the importance of dual language experiences
reasoning training, spatially based approaches to STEM stimulation to improve learning of EF-intensive tasks (Katz). third presentation, we focus on the cognitive and neural
for learning to read. The third study uses multimodal
learning, and individual differences in learning styles consequences of using Geographic Information Systems
neuroimaging methods (fMRI, DTI, EEG) to understand
that can inform selection of educational strategies. The (GIS), which are computer-based mapping systems that
translation of this science to real-world learning will Spatial thinking and allow users to simultaneously represent different layers
individual differences in bilingual acquisition of English,
French and Chinese. Finally, the fourth study expands from
be a major theme, including research that is testing STEM education of spatial information. For example, a city planner could
bilingualism to multilingualism. This studys longitudinal
hypotheses from the educational cognitive neuroscience simultaneously represent land parcels, housing density,
Sat., Sept. 17, 10:00amNoon: Seymour Room findings suggest that multilingual children achieve
lab by investigating the impact of real-world high school housing cost, and the location of parks when planning
similar reading proficiency to children learning only two
STEM education on structural and functional plasticity in a new sub-division. We hypothesize that thinking about
Chair: Nora Newcombe, Temple University languages. The findings are discussed in terms of bilingual
the brain. By engaging the how of science learning, the complex spatial relations in this way can facilitate both
Speakers: Nora Newcombe; Alina Nazareth, Temple University; language transfer theories and how learning to read in
presented work informs fundamental neural mechanisms spatial thinking and problem-solving skills. Therefore, we
Jennifer Sutton, University of Western Ontario; David Uttal, two new languages offers reciprocal support towards the
that transcend cultural boundaries, providing a strong basis are investigating the impact of enrollment in a high school
Northwestern University emergence of robust literacy networks. The symposium will
for cross-cultural collaboration. Investigations of individual course that emphasizes GIS (i.e. the GeoSpatial semester,
therefore offer new evidence to inform theories of reading
differences in the neurocognition of learning also have or GSS). Pre- and post-test assessments of spatial tests and
acquisition as well as educational practice for bilingual
the potential to support efforts at reducing inequalities Spatial thinking is critically important for education, problem solving indicate substantial improvement in spatial
learners of different languages.
in STEM achievement across demographic groups. Panel particularly in Science, Technology, Engineering, thinking. We are currently completing MRI data collection
discussion among the presenting authors will directly and Mathematics (STEM). Enhancing spatial thinking to identify structural and functional plasticity that mediates
address questions of translation to real-world learning therefore could improve performance in STEM courses, these improvements.
environments, and cross-cultural engagement in STEM. which are often notoriously challenging. In the current
14 International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 15

Integrating mind, brain and Presentation 2:


Revealing the invisible: Multimodal shifting, and inhibition. The studies include effectiveness
Enhancing Young Childrens Spatial and Numerical Skills Through a research (to what extent are the games able to train the
education through teacher- Research-based Professional Development Model
analysis of implicit game-based targeted cognitive skill?) as well as identification of game
researcher collaboration learning features that increase the impact of the games. They
Sat., Sept. 17, 10:00amNoon: Churchill Ballroom A Presentation 3: Sat., Sept. 17, 10:00amNoon: Churchill Ballroom B will report on results from studies with high school and
Stories from the Field: Educators Perspectives on Implementing the college students and with neuro-atypical populations.
Chair: Jodi Asbell-Clarke, TERC They will also discuss findings from other studies related
Chair: Zack Hawes, Brain and Mind Institute, University of PD Model in Their Own Classrooms and Schools
to the adaptivity of the in-game algorithm and other
Western Ontario Speakers: Jodi Asbell Clarke; Ibrahim Dahistron-Hakki,
design features and executive function subskills.
Speakers: Cathy Bruce and Tara Flynn, Trent University; Petra Landmark College; Jan Plass and Bruce Homer, New York University

Le Duc, Ontario Ministry of Education; Joan Moss, OISE/


Probing the relationship between Discussant: Paul Darvasi, Royal St. Georges College
Our panel, facilitated by Paul Darvasi, a master teacher at
University of Toronto; Beverly Caswell, University of Toronto; number sense and math achievement: St Pauls College will facilitate the discussion among the
Jodi Asbell-Clarke will discuss how EdGE at TERC is
Zack Hawes; Michelle Cain and Nicole Thomson, Rainy River Insights from training studies designing games that use sticky game mechanics within
panelists and the audience about research questions that
District School Board Sat., Sept. 17, 10:00amNoon: Stevenson Room lie at the interface of cognitive and neuroscience, Game-
STEM relevant environments to support and measure Based Learning analytics; multimodal data collection. The
implicit learning in games. Data mining detectors used discussion and questions will be guided by the theme
In this symposium, teachers, researchers, and school- Chair: Miriam Rosenberg-Lee, Stanford University School on the data logs from Impulse are able to show that of revealing learning that may be invisible (e.g. implicit
board numeracy consultants present a teacher Professional of Medicine students who demonstrate game behaviors consistent learning that is demonstrated through behaviors) through
Development (PD) model that offers a promising approach
Speakers: Miriam Rosenberg-Lee; Joonkoo Park, University of with an implicit understanding of Newtons laws of traditional educational assessments.
to bridging the gap between research and practice. In
Massachusetts - Amherst; Moira Dillon, Harvard University motion (e.g. consistently push more massive object
the first of three presentations, we describe the Math for
Discussant: Jennifer Venalainen, Toronto District School Board with more force) and show that they also perform better
Young Children (M4YC) project; an initiative taking place
throughout the province of Ontario that aims to better
on the related pre/post tests. Learning analytics using Factors supporting childrens early,
The recent explosion of research into number sense the the data from a laser puzzle game (Quantum Spectre)
understand and improve early years (K Gr.3) mathematics
ability to rapidly apprehend and compare quantitieshas were able to distinguish errors consistent with science informal science learning
learning and instruction. Central to this initiative is Sat., Sept. 17, 1:35pm3:30pm: Seymour Room
been driven by the observation that performance on misunderstandings from errors consistent with puzzle
collaboration amongst math educators, researchers,
number sense tasks predicts math achievement scores. mechanics misunderstandings. Students who exhibited
teachers, principals, and school-board numeracy consultants.
At the brain level, both numerical and mathematical more science misunderstandings also showed less Chair: Angela Nyhout
Key features of the PD model are discussed, with an
processing activate the intraparietal sulcus, suggesting gains on the related pre/post assessments. These Speakers: Gabrielle Strouse, University of South Dakota; Haley
emphasis on the importance of embedding research within
a common neural pathway underpins this relationship. types of analyses of game-based learning behaviors Vlach, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Maria Marcus, Loyola
and as part of everyday classroom practice. In the second
Moreover, these results raise the tantalizing possibility that are consistent with implicit science knowledge (or University Chicago; Vaunam Vendakasalam, University of Toronto
presentation, we share the effects of PD implementation
that training number sense skills could improve math misunderstandings) provide the bas is of multimodal Discussant: Chriss Boggert, University of Toronto
on childrens learning. In comparison to active control
performance. This symposium reports on emerging research with Landmark College.
classrooms, children in the experimental classrooms have
demonstrated significant pre-post gains in spatial reasoning, research aimed at testing this proposal and understanding Teaching children scientific concepts in the early years is
the mechanisms underlying the relationship between Ibrahim Dahlstrom-Hakki from Landmark College
geometry, and basic number skills and numeration. The role recognized as a worthwhile endeavour by most researchers
number sense and math achievement. It also connects will discuss how they are working with EdGE, MIT,
of psychological science in the design of the intervention and educators. Recently, a large-scale, longitudinal study
directly to educational practice by exploring the effects and FunAtomic to build a multimodal lab and data
is discussed, namely, the decision to focus on developing found that childrens science knowledge at kindergarten
of distinct number sense programs on the acquisition of architecture that integrates eye-tracking models of player
childrens spatial reasoning skills as an integral part early entry was a strong predictor of the later science
mathematical knowledge. The first presentation, building attention, physiological measures of engagement and
mathematics instruction. Finally, in the third presentation, achievement gap observed in eighth grade (Morgan,
on successful training programs in adults, will examine the arousal, and neurological indicators of working memory
teachers and a numeracy coach share their experiences Farkas, Hillemeier, & Maczuga, 2016). These results
effects of training approximate addition and subtraction along with learning analytics that identify patterns of
implementing the PD model in their own classrooms and underscore the importance of early science-promoting
on symbolic math skills in preschool-aged children. game play activities that are associated with STEM
schools. We will also hear about their experiences working experiences to increase interest and knowledge, especially
The second presentation examines the effectiveness learning. This system is designed to be used in the
with researchers and applying research findings to practice. in at-risk groups.
of a preschool suite of games exercising non-symbolic, wild and to synchronize the data streams to within
The symposium will end with a discussion on both the
numerical and spatial reasoning in fostering poor childrens milliseconds for use in action-oriented video games. This
strengths and shortcomings of the PD model in its capacity In the current symposium, developmental and educational
readiness for learning primary school mathematics. The tight synchronization is required to correlate fixations and
to fulfill the central goals of Mind, Brain, and Education. psychologists will describe experimental work on early,
final presentation will examine the behavioral and neural saccades from eye-tracking data with clicks from an action
informal science-promoting experiences. This field is,
effects of a number sense training aimed at mapping game. In Summer 2016 we will begin integration of a
Presentation 1: by nature, interdisciplinary, but could benefit from even
number symbols to their non-symbolic quantities. research-grade EEG into the system.
Math for Young Children: Introducing a Classroom-based Professional more collaboration between psychologists, educators,
Development Model that Integrates Research and Practice sociologists, policy-makers, museum curators, and
Jan L. Plass (NYU) and Bruce D. Homer (CUNY GC) of
media industry. Following the presentations, Christine
the CREATE lab will discuss their research designing and
Boggert, Vice Principal at the Dr. Eric Jackman Institute
using brain training games that target different sub-
of Child Study Laboratory School, will act as a discussant,
skills of executive functions (a set of cognitive processes
considering the work from the perspective of an educator.
involved in the control of behavior) such as updating,
16 International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 17

In the first talk, Venkadasalam, Nyhout, & Ganea present MBE perspectives on the learning of by the use of a number line task adapted to indirectly The interdependence of brain and
a recent set of studies investigating the features of picture test fraction comparison. Finally, the third presentation
books that best promote early science learning. Examining fractions and their magnitude will discuss data from an intervention study examining cognitive development in social
four- and five-year-olds learning of various physical science Sat., Sept. 17, 1:35pm3:30pm: Stevenson Room how playing a fraction game based on circular vs. number context, and implications for
concepts (gravity, buoyancy, and motion) from different line representations of fractions may affect students education
picture book genres (informational, realistic fiction, and Chair: David Gmez, University of Chile understanding of fraction magnitude.
Sat., Sept. 17, 1:35pm3:30pm: Churchill Ballroom A
fantasy books), they demonstrate that children show Speakers: David Gmez; Edward Hubbard University of
significant learning of the target concepts from picture Wisconsin-Madison; Lisa Fazio, Vanderbilt University
books, and books that are more realistic are best at Fadeout and persistence of Chair: Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, University of
Southern California
promoting learning. Fractions and rational numbers constitute an important the effects of early childhood Speakers: Amy Finn, University of Toronto; Ping C. Mamiya,
milestone in the middle school mathematics curriculum,
In the second talk, Strouse & Ganea describe their work as they often represent students first experience with a
educational interventions: Problems University of Washington
investigating whether electronic touchscreen books number system beyond the natural numbers. Highlighting and possible solutions Discussant: Mary Helen Immordino-Yang
may mimic the beneficial effects of adult questioning their relevance, recent research has linked achievement Sat., Sept. 17, 1:35pm3:30pm: Churchill Ballroom B
during reading. Children were read an electronic book in learning fractions with future math achievement in Unlike the predominant conceptions from a few decades
about camouflage in 3 conditions, which varied how advanced math topics such as algebra (Booth & Newton, back, brain development is currently understood to
Chair: Drew Bailey, University of California, Irvine
prompts were provided: 1) read by the book, 2) read by 2012; Siegler et al., 2012). However, the transition from be an active, dynamic process involving complex
a researcher, or 3) extra-textual prompts provided by the Speakers: Drew Bailey and Greg Duncan, University of
natural numbers to fractions and rationals poses great interactions between a persons biological and genetic
researcher. Overall, all conditions supported childrens California, Irvine; John Protzko, University of California, predispositions, cognitive opportunities and social
difficulty for many students. A problem often observed
learning about camouflage. However, low vocabulary Santa Barbara environment. This symposium explores three examples
in research and practice is the lack of understanding that
children scored poorly when the book read itself, and fractions have an associated magnitude that depends Discussant: Douglas Clements, University of Denver of research at the nexus of brain, cognitive, and social
low executive function children scored poorly when not on the absolute magnitudes of their components development. (1) Amy Finn will discuss how core
prompts were not written into the text. Reasons for (numerator and denominator), but on their relative Interventions targeted at childrens early cognitive or memory-related systems change across development,
these interactions, such as the added social cue supports magnitudes. This leads students to make common academic skills, even when initially successful, often and the implications for learning certain aspects of
provided by adults and the need for task-switching mistakes, such as claiming that 18/27 < 18/30 because show quickly disappearing impacts. We will discuss the language. In particular, she will characterize the functional
between reading and conversation will be discussed. 27 < 30 (Pearn & Stephens, 2004), that 7/8 + 12/13 is conditions under which fadeout and persistence have development of working memory systems in the brain,
approximately 19 or 21 (Carpenter, 1981), or that 5/6 = been observed (Duncan and Protzko) and evaluate the and discuss research on how age is associated with
In the third talk, Marcus, Uttal, & Haden address how 7/8 because each has one left (Clarke & Roche, 2009). evidence for plausible hypotheses of why fadeout occurs qualitative differences in the neural structures recruited.
parent-child conversations during hands-on activities These examples demonstrate that many students lack basic (Protzko and Bailey). Each speaker will discuss the sets of She will end by discussing how social context might
in museum exhibits can foster childrens understanding intuitions about fraction magnitude, an issue important for conditions including the malleability and fundamentality influence language development by shifting how
of science and engineering. They have observed more MBE research. Some researchers (e.g. Gallistel & Gelman, of targeted skills, capacities, or beliefs, and childrens working memory systems are recruited during language
than 125 families with 4-8 year old children in a building 1992; Gelman, 2015) have argued that, in opposition to developmental trajectories under counterfactual learning. (2) Ping Mamiya will discuss how individuals
construction exhibit within the Chicago Childrens Museum. natural numbers and the approximate number system conditions under which persistence may be most brain and genetic features interactively influence
Providing families with brief instructions about a key located in parietal cortex in humans, fractions have no likely. Finally, to further the objectives of IMBES, we will second language learning through dopamine/serotonin-
engineering concept prior to building in the exhibit leads mental/brain systems available to support their learning, focus on how more effective communication within and mediated modulation of prefrontal executive functions.
to hands-on activities that reflect engineering and science but recent MBE research has proved this belief wrong (for a between researchers and practitioners in the fields of Specifically, her talk will explore how an individuals brain
practice, and to increased parent talk about STEM. review, see Lewis, Matthews, & Hubbard, 2016). From the cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, and structural properties are related to the amount of second
perspective of practice, it is also essential to comprehend education will be necessary to make accurate predictions language immersion he/she receives, and how this
In the final talk, Vlach and Noll offer a caveat. Their how different representations and contexts for fractions about which interventions will be most persistent relationship varies by genetic variations. (3) Mary Helen
experiments examined whether and how adults change affect students thinking. In particular, number lines (Clements and Bailey). Immordino-Yang will discuss her research on how social
their explanations when talking to children vs. adults seem to provide an optimal context to highlight fraction and cultural experience shape the neural processing of
about science. The results demonstrate that adults are not magnitude, and current MBE research is also exploring the social-emotional feelings in adolescents, and how these
particularly adept at modifying explanations and often effect of using them to this aim. socialized neural processing patterns relate to real-
include information that could deter childrens science world social cognition. She will share findings from her
learning (e.g., magical information). These findings suggest In this symposium, three researchers will present recent cross-cultural studies of admiration and compassion in
that childrens early linguistic environment is not reaching findings and perspectives about the learning of fractions Beijing and Los Angeles, and from ongoing cross-cultural,
its potential to support science learning. from different standpoints in the MBE continuum. The first longitudinal studies of low-SES American adolescents
presentation will focus on the Ratio Processing System, from immigrant families living in neighborhoods with
a recently discovered neural system that might provide high levels of community violence. The symposium will
an intuitive basis for understanding ratio magnitudes conclude with a panel discussion facilitated by Mary
and provide a scaffold for the learning of fractions. The Helen Immordino-Yang on the implications of social
second presentation will show what a brief fraction context for neural development and learning, and
comparison questionnaire can reveal about students recommendations for educational practice.
strategies, as well as how these strategies are modulated
18 International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 19

Posters 12. MIND, BRAIN,


AND EDUCATION FOR
17. AN
OBSERVATIONAL
20. SIMULATING
CLASSROOM
24. TAKING ATTENTION
BACK TO SCHOOL:
SOCIAL JUSTICE PRESCHOOL MEASURE DYNAMICS USING MULTISENSORY
Bibinaz Pirayesh, Loyola OF MINDFULNESS: AGENT-BASED CONTEXTS REVEAL
Friday, September 16
1. WEIGHING THE 5. THE NEURAL 8. EVALUATING
Marymount University CONCEPTUALIZATION, MODELING EFFECTS OF EXPERIENCE
COST AND BENEFIT OF DIFFERENCES THE EFFECTS OF DEVELOPMENT AND Zhengsi Chang, Michael ON ATTENTION
TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT AND SIMILARITIES MINDFULNESS 13. WHAT CAN PSYCHOMETRIC Connell and Marc ALLOCATION
CURRENT STIMULATION BETWEEN CHILDREN PRACTICES IN COGNITIVE PROPERTIES Schwartz, University of Pawel J. Matusz,
ON DIFFERENT WITH AND WITHOUT CHILDREN USING NEUROSCIENCE TELL Almut Zieher and Texas at Arlington University Hospital Centre
READING SUBSKILLS LEARNING DISORDERS EEG MEASURES OF EDUCATION ABOUT Matthew Lemberger- University of Lausanne;
Jessica Younger, University DURING ARITHMETIC ATTENTION AND LEARNING FROM Truelove, University of New 21. SCIENCE AND Rebecca Merkley,
of Texas at Austin; Melissa Lien Peters, Hans Op de SALIVARY MEASURES EXTERNAL FEEDBACK? Mexico MATHS REASONING University of Western Ontario
Randazzo-Wagner, Beeck and Bert De Smedt, OF STRESS A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND INHIBITORY and Gaia Scerif, University
Teachers College, Columbia KU Leuven Trey Avery, Teachers
OF THE LITERATURE 18. MATH TRAINING CONTROL IN of Oxford
University and James College, Columbia
Jan-Sbastien Dion and LEADS TO MORE ADOLESCENCE: AN
Booth, University of Texas 6. CHILDRENS University; Meriah
Grardo Restrepo, EFFICIENT BRAIN FMRI STUDY 25. NEW METHOD
at Austin REASONING WHEN DeJoseph, NYU and Karen
Universit de Sherbrooke NETWORKS: AN Annie Brookman, Birkbeck, FOR CALCULATING
COMPARING Froud, Teachers College,
ACTIVATION University of London; INDIVIDUAL
2. A NEUROSCIENTIFIC FRACTIONS IN Columbia University
14. EDUCATOR LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATE Andy Tolmie, UCL Institute SUBITIZING RANGE
REVIEW OF THE A NUMBER LINE PERCEPTIONS AND (ALE) META-ANALYSIS of Education; Denis Tali Leibovich and Daniel
NEURAL BASES CONTEXT 9. MATH ANXIETY
RESOURCES OF Hengshuang Liu, James Mareschal and Iroise Ansari, University of Western
FOR THE MULTIPLE David Gomez, University MODERATES THE NEUROSCIENCE B. Hale and Annabel Dumontheil, Birkbeck, Ontario
INTELLIGENCES of Chile; Ken Bertels RELATION BETWEEN Lauren Vega ONeil, S.H. Chen, Nanyang University of London
Branton Shearer, MI and Wim Van Dooren, APPROXIMATE University of Oregon Technological University 26. NATIVE LANGUAGE
Research and Consulting, Inc. University of Leuven NUMBER ACUITY AND *Poster will be presented by 22. A COLORFUL NEIGHBORHOOD
MATH PERFORMANCE 15. INTEGRATING Annabel S.H. Chen ADVANTAGE IN INFLUENCES
3. NEUROMYTHS 7. CORRELATIONS Emily Braham and Melissa
PARTIAL VIEWPOINTS ICONIC MEMORY PRODUCTION OF
AND INSTRUCTIONAL AMONG COGNITIVE Libertus, University of
OF SPACE: ARRAY 19. KEEP IT SIMPLE, Radhika Gosavi and NEWLY-LEARNED
PRACTICES SUPPORTS FOR Pittsburgh
STABILITY SUPPORTS SILLY! THE EARLY Edward Hubbard, WORDS
Alexandra Murtaugh, ANALOGIES IN FLEXIBILITY ENVIRONMENT University of Wisconsin- Gabriela Meade,
Johns Hopkins University WESTERN AND EAST 10. THE INTEGRATION
Corinne Holmes and Nora REPRESENTS SIMPLE, Madison Katherine Midgley and
ASIAN MATHEMATICS BETWEEN NON- Newcombe, Temple REPETITIVE, CONTEXT- Phillip Holcomb, San Diego
4. TODDLERS CLASSROOMS SYMBOLIC AND University INDEPENDENT 23. SHINING LIGHT State University
UNDERSTANDING OF Bryan Matlen, WestEd; SYMBOLIC NUMBERS LEARNING ON THE BRAIN BASES
REGULAR POLYGONS Lindsey Richland, AND ITS RELATION TO 16. GENDER AND OPPORTUNITIES OF DIVISION AND 27. EXECUTIVE
Joanna Zambrzycka, University of Chicago; MATH ABILITY SES DIFFERENCES IN Nicole A. Sugden and MATHEMATICAL FUNCTION AND
OISE, University of Toronto; Osnat Zur, WestEd; Nina Ruizhe Liu, Allison Liu,
SUBCOMPONENTS OF Margaret C. Moulson, COMPETENCE VOCABULARY SKILLS
Samantha Makosz, Simms, Emily Lyons and Christian Schunn, Julie
EXECUTIVE FUNCTION Ryerson University Alexa Ellis, Xiaosu MEDIATE EFFECTS
Joanne Lee and Donna Alanna OBrien, University Fiez and Melissa Libertus,
IN KINDERGARTEN Hu, Melanie Armstrong, OF PARENTING AND
Kotsopoulos, Wilfrid of Chicago University of Pittsburgh
AND FIRST GRADE Jennifer Bullen, Craig POVERTY-RELATED
Laurier University
Sammy Ahmed, Ying Smith, Pamela Davis-Kean RISK ON EARLY
11. THE DEVELOPMENT
Wang and Frederick and Ioulia Kovelman, SCHOOL OUTCOMES
OF FORMAL Morrison, University of University of Michigan Stephen Braren,
OPERATIONS: THE CASE Michigan Rosemarie Perry and
OF ADULT POPULATION Clancy Blair, New York
Ghada Jabareen, Tel Aviv
University
University
20 International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 21

Saturday, September 17
28. INDIVIDUAL 32. GENOME-WIDE 36. EXECUTIVE 38. ANXIOUS 41. LINEAR 43. NOVICES NEURAL 44. BRAIN BASIS
DIFFERENCES ANALYSIS OF RAPID FUNCTIONS ATTENTION: MATH MEASUREMENT CORRELATES OF OF LANGUAGE
IN SPATIAL AUTOMATIZED DEVELOPMENT IN ANXIETY PREDICTS MEDIATES ERROR-CORRECTION PROFICIENCY IN
REPRESENTATIONS OF NAMING IN HISPANIC PRESCHOOLERS AMYGDALA THE RELATION IN MECHANICS BILINGUAL CHILDREN
FRACTIONS RELATE TO AND AFRICAN FROM DIFFERENT REACTIVITY TO BETWEEN MENTAL Lorie-Marlne Brault Rebecca Marks, University
BASIC MATH ABILITIES AMERICANS SOCIOECONOMIC MATHEMATICAL TRANSFORMATION Foisy, Patrice Potvin, of Michigan, Zhichao Xia,
BUT NOT ALGEBRA Dongnhu Truong, Andrew BACKGROUNDS IN STIMULI AND NUMBER LINE Martin Riopel, Genevive Supriya Munsh, University
Elizabeth Toomarian and Adams, Mellissa DeMille URUGUAY Rachel Pizzie and ESTIMATION IN YOUNG Allaire-Duquette, Lucian of California, San Francisco;
Edward Hubbard, and Jeffrey Gruen, Yale Veronica Nin, Facultad David Kraemer, CHILDREN Nenciovici and Steve Yuuko Uchikoshi, University
University of Wisconsin- School of Medicine de Psicologia; Hernan Dartmouth College Noora Hamdan, Lillian Masson, Universit du of California, Davis; Ioulia
Madison Delgado-Vivas, Universidad Ham and Elizabeth Qubec Montral Kovelman, University of
33. THE RELATION de la Republica, Uruguay; 39. CAN INSIGHT Gunderson, Temple Michigan and Fumiko
29. THE MECHANISM BETWEEN NUMERICAL Andrea Goldin, Universidad BE INDUCED? University Hoeft, University of
OF LEARNING, ESTIMATION Torcuato di Tella, Argentina; SUBLIMINAL TRIGGERS California, San Francisco
MEMORY AND THE FLEXIBILITY AND Diego Fernandez-Slezak AND NEURAL 42. IS INHIBITION
DEVELOPMENT (A MATHEMATICAL and Laouen Belloli, CHARACTERISTICS OF INVOLVED IN 45. BRAIN
UNIFIED THEORY OF COMPETENCE Universidad de Buenos Aires, INSIGHT OVERCOMING RESPONSES TO
LEARNING) Darren Yeo, Eric Wilkey Argentina and Alejandra Miriam Reiner and Amit THE INTUITIVE COUNTERINTUITIVE
Nageswar Chekuri, and Gavin Price, Peabody Carboni, Universidad de la Rosen, Technion, Israel CONCEPTION SCIENTIFIC
Woodbury University College, Vanderbilt University Republica, Uruguay Institute of Technology MOVING THINGS ARE STATEMENTS
ALIVE AT ALL AGES? IN STUDENTS
30. MORE IS NOT 34. THE EFFICACY OF 37. THE INFLUENCE OF 40. THE NEURAL Jrmie Blanchette SHOWING HIGH
ALWAYS BETTER: NEUROFEEDBACK NON-NUMERIC VISUAL CORRELATES OF Sarrasin, Universit du AND LOW SCIENCE
HIGH WORKING TRAINING IN BUILDING PARAMETERS ON AUDITORY AND Qubec Montral; COMPETENCE
MEMORY HINDERS LEARNING SKILLS AND PERFORMANCE AND VISUAL SYMBOLIC Emmanuel Ahr, Paris Genevieve Allaire-
PERFORMANCE ON WORK HABITS NEURAL ACTIVATION NUMBER PROCESSING: Descartes University Duquette, Universit du
AN APPROXIMATE Jason Krell, Patrick PATTERNS DURING INVESTIGATIONS WITH - University Caen Basse- Qubec Montral; Michel
SYMBOLIC Dolecki and Anderson NONSYMBOLIC FMRI ADAPTATION Normandie; Lorie-Marlne Blanger, Universit du
CALCULATION TASK Todd, The Study Academy NUMBER COMPARISON Stephan Vogel, University Brault Foisy, Universit du Qubec Rimouski; Roland
Conner Black, Jennifer Eric D. Wilkey, and Jordan of Graz; Celia Goffin Qubec Montral; Patrice H. Grabner, University of
Brandley and Elizabeth 35. SPATIAL C. Barone, Vanderbilt and Ian Lyons, University Potvin, Universit du Graz and Steve Masson,
Gunderson, Temple PREDICTORS OF University; Michele M. M. of Western Ontario; Qubec Montral; Olivier Universit du Qubec
University NUMBER LINE Mazzocco, University of Joshua Bohnenberger, Houd, Paris Descartes Montral
PERFORMANCE: Minnesota; Stephan E. Georg-August-University University - University Caen
31. MENTAL ROTATION A CASE FOR Vogel, University of Graz, Goettingen; Karl Basse-Normandie - Institut 46. EMOTIONAL
AND VERBAL NON-SYMBOLIC Austria and Gavin R. Price, Koschutnig, University of Universitaire de France; STIMULI IMPROVE
CONFOUNDING: PROPORTIONAL Peabody College, Vanderbilt Graz; Gernot Reishofer, Grgoire Borst, Paris CHILDRENS
COMPARING THE REASONING University Medical University of Descartes University COUNTING
RELATIONS OF Lindsey Hildebrand, Graz; Roland Grabner, - University Caen Basse- Karina Hamamouche,
DIFFERENT MENTAL Audrey Wrobel and Educational Neuroscience/ Normandie and Steve Jenna Taylor and Sara
ROTATION TASKS TO Elizabeth Gunderson, Institut of Psychology, Masson, Universit du Cordes, Boston College
EARLY ARITHMETIC Temple University University of Graz and Qubec Montral
CALCULATION Daniel Ansari, University of
Ying Lin, Riley Brown Western Ontario
and Elizabeth Gunderson,
Temple University
22 International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 23

47. THE IMPACT 51. STRATEGY 55. ADOLESCENTS Harvard Graduate School of 63. THE ROLE OF 66. GAZE PATTERNS 70. ADOLESCENTS Emily Hollenbeck,
OF PLAYWRITING ADAPTATION REASONING ABOUT Education ARTICULATORY PROVIDE MECHANISTIC EMPATHIC REACTIONS Northwestern University;
FRAMED BY COGNITIVE IN A FRACTION THE COMMUNITY SUPPRESSION INSIGHTS INTO TO OTHERS TRIUMPH David Kraemer, Dartmouth
NEUROSCIENCE ON THE COMPARISON TASK VIOLENCE THEY HAVE 59. EYE MOVEMENTS ON SPELLING LEARNING OUTCOMES OVER ADVERSITY ARE University and Adam
NARRATIVE WRITING AN EYE-TRACKING WITNESSED PREDICTS REVEAL CHANGING COMPETENCES IN Belen Guerra-Carrillo, POSITIVELY RELATED Green, Georgetown
SKILLS OF CHRONICALLY STUDY SUBSEQUENT STRATEGIES FOR ADOLESCENTS WITH Martha Bawn and Silvia TO CONNECTIVITY University
ILL STUDENTS Alison T. Miller, Singley EMPATHIC EMOTIONAL ANALOGICAL READING DIFFICULTIES Bunge, University of AT REST BETWEEN
Rebekah Carlile and Marc University of California, RESPONDING TO REASONING OVER Gisella Decarli, University of California at Berkeley THE DEFAULT MODE 73. SYMBOLIC
Schwartz , University of Berkeley; Jeffrey A. OTHERS TRUE DEVELOPMENT Trento (Italy); Cesare NETWORK AND THE MATHEMATICS
Texas at Arlington Crawford, Johns Hopkins EXPERIENCES Ariel Starr, Michael Cornoldi, University of 67. REASONING ANTERIOR INSULA LANGUAGE LITERACY
University and Silvia A. Vivian Rotenstein, Rebecca Vendetti and Silvia Bunge, Padua (Italy) ABOUT EDUCATIONAL Rebecca Gotlieb and CONVENTIONAL
48. BRAINWAVES: Bunge, University of Gotlieb, Shelby Alsup, Xiao- UC Berkeley NEUROETHICS Xiao-Fei Yang, University DECISION TASK:
AN EEG-BASED California, Berkeley Fei Yang, and Mary Helen 64. THE MITIGATING Astrid Schmied, Sashank of Southern California; A TOOL FOR
NEUROSCIENCE Immordino-Yang, University 60. WHAT TEACHERS IN EFFECTS OF EARLY Varma, Soo-hyun Im, Shawn Rhoads, University of INVESTIGATING THE
CURRICULUM AND 52. CAN WE IDENTIFY of Southern California ISRAEL KNOW AND FAIL IDENTIFICATION Katrina Schleisman, Purav California at Davis; Rodrigo INTERSECTION OF
TEACHER TRAINING BRAIN ANATOMY TO KNOW ABOUT THE AND TIMELY Patel and Janet Dubinsky, Riveros Miranda and Mary LITERACY AND MATH
PROGRAM FOR HIGH FROM NEURAL 56. PERSISTENT LOW BRAIN INTERVENTION ON University of Minnesota Helen Immordino-Yang, COGNITION
SCHOOLS ACTIVITY? PERFORMANCE IS Judy Kohan-Mass, The YOUNG CHILDRENS University of Southern Marcia Gail Headley,
Ido Davidesco and Suzanne Audrey Doualot, Universit HARD TO EXPLAIN: Hebrew University of FOUNDATIONAL 68. CAN ADULTS WITH California University of Cincinnati
Dikker, New York University du Qubec Montral and EXAMINING ACADEMIC Jerusalem NUMERICAL SKILLS DYSLEXIA GENERALIZE
Sylvain Baillet, McGill TRAJECTORIES ACROSS Stefanie De Jesus and ACROSS A PHONEME 71. CULTURAL 74. USING
49. APPLICATIONS University THE K-1 TRANSITION 61. NEURAL BASIS Samuel Zheng, Toronto CATEGORY? IDENTITY, SELF- KNOWLEDGE
OF NEUROSCIENCE Adrienne Woods, Benjamin OF NEWLY LEARNED District School Board; Priya Mitra, Tufts University REFLECTION AND THE MAPPING TO
TO LESSON 53. A COMPARISON OF Katz and Frederick WORDS IN SPANISH L1 Daniel Ansari, University of and Phillip Holcomb, Tufts ROLE OF FUTURE COMMUNICATE
DEVELOPMENT THE ROLES OF DIGITAL Morrison, University of AND ENGLISH L2 Western Ontario; Ian Lyons, University, San Diego State SELF: QUALITATIVE LEARNING SCIENCE
Vicki Hinesley, University AND PRINT MEDIA IN Michigan Roberto Ferreira, Georgetown University and University AND QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH
of Texas-Arlington; Janet CHILDRENS SUBJECTIVE Universidad Catolica Stephanie Bugden, University ANALYSES OF Aubrey Francisco and
Dubinsky, University of WELL-BEING 57. EARLY VARIABILITY de la Santisima of Pennsylvania 69. IMPACT OF AN ONGOING, Kelsey Gross, Digital
Minnesota; Zhengsi Chang Gabrielle Strouse, IN SOCIO-PRAGMATIC Concepcion THE LISTENING LONGITUDINAL, Promise
and Marc Schwartz, Daniel Mourlam and Lisa WORD LEARNING 65. EVALUATING THE ENVIRONMENT UPON K-8 SCHOOL
University of Texas-Arlington Newland, University of SKILLS AS A POTENTIAL 62. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COGNITIVE TASK INTERVENTION 75. VIRTUAL/
South Dakota CONTRIBUTOR TO THE HETEROGENEITY A COGNITIVE PLAY PERFORMANCE Laura Jane Linck, Rosarian AUGMENTED REALITY,
50. ALERTING CUES VOCABULARY GAP OF ESTIMATION INTERVENTION FOR Debbie Cockerham, Academy EEG AND LEARNING:
ENHANCE THE 54. SENTENCE-LEVEL Meghan Kainz, Lauren PROCESSES: AN FMRI LOW SES FAMILIES University of North Texas; A POTENTIAL
SUBITIZING PROCESS PROSODY SENSITIVITY Billingsley and Amy INVESTIGATION Heather T. Anderson, Zhengsi Chang, University 72. SPATIAL THINKING FRAMEWORK FOR
Yarden Gliksman, Ben- AND READING SKILLS: Booth, University of Sarit Ashkenazi, The University of California, of Texas at Dallas; Lin IN THE HIGH SCHOOL NEUROEDUCATION
Gurion University of the ERPS AND INDIVIDUAL Texas Hebrew University Berkeley; Nell Robinson, Lin and Mike Schellen, CLASSROOM: RESEARCH AN
Negev; Noam Weinbach, DIFFERENCES of Jerusalem; Yarden Childhaven; Jason Gortney, University of North Texas COGNITIVE AND EXAMPLE OF EVENT-
Stanford University and Cyrille Magne and Melissa 58. THE FUNCTIONAL Gliksman and Avishai Childrens Home Society NEURAL EFFECTS RELATED CHANGES
Avishai Henik, Ben-Gurion Brock, Middle Tennessee NEURAL OVERLAP Henik, Ben-Gurion University Washington and Silvia OF THE GEOSPATIAL IN NEURAL-BASED
University of the Negev State University BETWEEN ARITHMETIC of the Negev Beer-Sheva A. Bunge, University of SEMESTER MENTAL LOAD
AND PHONOLOGICAL California, Berkeley Emily Peterson, Georgetown Miriam Reiner, Technion
PROCESSING IN University; Robert Kolvoord, Israel Institute of Technology;
CHILDREN: A META- James Madison University; Stanford, Biological Science
ANALYSIS David Uttal, Northwestern
Courtney Pollack, Vanderbilt University; Dan Goldman,
University; Nicole C. Ashby, Georgetown University;
24 International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 25

76. THE GAP BETWEEN


IMPLICIT AND EXPLICIT
79. AN INTERACTIVE
POSTER DESIGNED TO
Chen and Vinod Menon,
Stanford University
86. BEHAVIOURAL
AND NEUROIMAGING
2016 IMBES Awards
KNOWLEDGE IN CONNECT & CREATE A EVIDENCE OF REDUCED
PHYSICS EVIDENCE MODEL OF A SHARED 83. APPLYING MIND VERBAL WORKING
FROM EVENT RELATED VISION OF MBE BRAIN EDUCATION MEMORY IN CHILDREN The International Mind, Brain and Education Society
NEURAL ACTIVATIONS PRINCIPLES AND WITH DYSLEXIA
Abigail Larrison, SelfDesign
INSTRUCTIONAL
Early Career Awards
Miriam Reiner, Technion Graduate Institute Fu Yu Kwok, Sharon S.N.
Israel Institute of Technology, GUIDELINES TO A Chan and Beth OBrien, Dr. Roi Cohen Kadosh
Stanford, Biological 80. THE NEURAL BASIS GROUP LEARNING Nanyang Technological PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, UK

Science; Lulu Gera, OF SYMBOLIC, NON- EXPERIENCE University; Stacey K.H. Tay,
Dr. Kou Murayama
Technion Israel Institute of SYMBOLIC, AND CROSS IN PRESCHOOL National University Hospital, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF READING, UK
Technology FORMAT COMPARISON CLASSROOMS National University of
IN CHILDREN IDENTIFYING A Singapore; Wei Tang
77. CULTURAL IDENTITY, WITH PERSISTENT PROMISING PRACTICE Chang, Singapore Bioimaging
EMOTIONAL HOME DEVELOPMENTAL Judy Helm, Best Practices Consortium (SBIC) and The International Mind, Brain and Education Society
LIFE, AND VAGAL TONE DYSCALUCLIA Inc.; Pamela Scranton and Annabel S.H. Chen, Nanyang
ADDITIVELY INFLUENCE Stephanie Bugden, Karen Coyle, UPC Discovery Technological University
Translation Award
BICULTURAL University of Pennsylvania Preschool *Poster will be presented by
Dr. Adele Diamond
IMMIGRANT and Daniel Ansari, University Annabel S.H. Chen PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA
ADOLESCENTS of Western Ontario 84. MATH TALK
EMOTIONAL VARIABILITY IN 87. MENTAL HEALTH
EXPRESSIVENESS 81. SURVEY PRESCHOOL THROUGH A NEURO-
Amy Zhao, Xiao-Fei OF TEACHERS CLASSROOMS: THE EDUCATION LENS Awards for Exemplifying the Mission of the
ROLE OF TEACHERS
Yang, Rebecca Gotlieb, KNOWLEDGE OF AND
ABILITIES AND BELIEFS
Ellyn Lucas Arwood,
International Mind, Brain and Education Society
Manuel Santana and Mary ATTITUDES TOWARDS Chris Merideth and Carole
Helen Immordino-Yang, INCLUSION OF Emily Braham and Melissa Kaulitz, University of Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning
University of Southern NEUROSCIENCE IN THE Libertus, University of Portland POTOMAC, MARYLAND, USA
California CLASSROOM Pittsburgh
Dr. Glenn Whitman
Shilpa Mistry and Jodi
DIRECTOR
78. INTRINSIC Tommerdahl, University of 85. THE RELATIVE
FUNCTIONAL Texas at Arlington; Kellen IMPORTANCE OF Dr. Ian Kelleher
HEAD OF RESEARCH
CONNECTIVITY OF Gandy, Baylor College of EXECUTIVE FUNCTION
THE DEFAULT MODE Medicine and Evguenia COMPONENTS
Child Haven
NETWORK PREDICTS Malaia, Netherlands Institute ON ACADEMIC
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, USA
THE PURPOSEFULNESS for Advanced Study ACHIEVEMENT IN
OF YOUTHS INTENDED YOUNG CHILDREN. Nell Robinson
PARENTING SKILLS PROGRAM MANAGER
ADULT LIVES 82. A RAPID ALGORITHM Sammy Ahmed, Ying
Rodrigo Riveros Miranda, FOR SCREENING TOOLS Wang and Frederick
Research and Learning Center
Xiao-Fei Yang and Rebecca VALIDATED WITH Morrison, University
FORT WORTH, TEXAS, USA
Gotlieb, University of CHILDRENS COGNITIVE of Michigan
Southern California; Erik ARITHMETIC
Dr. Marc Schwartz
Jahner, University of Arron Metcalfe, Sunnybrook PROFESSOR, DIRECTOR OF THE SW CENTER FOR MIND, BRAIN AND EDUCATION
California at Riverside and Research Institute, University THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON

Mary Helen Immordino- of Toronto; Christian Debbie Cockerham


Yang, University of Southern Battista, Jonathan Nicholas, MANAGING DIRECTOR, MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND HISTORY, FORT WORTH, TX
California Samantha Mitsven, Lang
26 International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference International Mind, Brain and Education Society Conference 27

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