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ALL GAMING ALL THE WORLD
ALL GAMING
ALL THE WORLD

SPONSORED BY

ALL GAMING ALL THE WORLD SPONSORED BY EYES ON THE PRIZE The latest gaming resort security
ALL GAMING ALL THE WORLD SPONSORED BY EYES ON THE PRIZE The latest gaming resort security
ALL GAMING ALL THE WORLD SPONSORED BY EYES ON THE PRIZE The latest gaming resort security

EYES ON THE PRIZE

The latest gaming resort security and surveillance trends

CONTENTS

CONTENTS COVER STORY COLUMNS 4 Casinos Look Beyond Surveillance By Paul Doocey, Casino Journal SPONSOR CONTRIBUTIONS

COVER STORY

COLUMNS

4 Casinos Look Beyond Surveillance By Paul Doocey, Casino Journal

SPONSOR CONTRIBUTIONS

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American Public University Systems

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Cognitec

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iView Systems

FEATURES

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Applying Consistency to Complexity in Resort Security By Claire Meyer, Security Magazine

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Eye on Information By Paul Doocey, Casino Journal

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Developing Low-Profile Surveillance for High-Profile Security By Claire Meyer, Security Magazine

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Streamlining Guard Tours with Technology By Claire Meyer, Security Magazine

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The Growing and Changing Role of Casino Surveillance By Derk Boss, DJ Boss Associates

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Bolster your Casino Cyber Security By Chard Pinson, Stroz Friedberg & Jason Smolanoff, CISO Advisory & Investigations

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Preparing Operators for Internal Fraud & Theft with Surveillance By Derk Boss, DJ Boss Associates

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Published by Casino Journal, October 2016. Copyright © 2016, BNP Media. All Rights Reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or used in any manner, except as permitted by the U.S. Copyright Act, without the express written permission of the pub- lisher. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information presented in this book. However, BNP Media does not guarantee its accuracy. Any error brought to the attention of the editor will be corrected in a future edition.

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Any error brought to the attention of the editor will be corrected in a future edition.

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FROM THE EDITOR

FROM THE EDITOR C asino resorts are under constant threat from individuals looking to scam money
FROM THE EDITOR C asino resorts are under constant threat from individuals looking to scam money

C asino resorts are under constant threat from individuals looking to scam money off unsuspecting players, employees and operators through cheating, robbery, identity theft, false damages and a host of other nefarious means. Fortunately, there are cut-

ting-edge products and applications coming to the fore that can make the casino enterprise more secure. There are also industry experts who are more than happy to share their insight and knowledge on how to make gaming resorts safer. Articles involving the latest security and surveillance product applications and best practice advice from experienced executives regu- larly grace the pages of Casino Journal and Security Magazine, and have been gathered into this eBook for easy reference and reading. Enjoy!

Paul Doocey Editor Casino Journal dooceyp@bnpmedia.com

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reading. Enjoy! Paul Doocey Editor Casino Journal dooceyp@bnpmedia.com BACK TO CONTENTS 3 CASINOJOURNAL.COM NEXT ARTICLE

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COVER STORY

COVER STORY CASINOS LOOK BEYOND SURVEILLANCE Surveillance technology is only one of many products and practices

CASINOS LOOK BEYOND SURVEILLANCE

Surveillance technology is only one of many products and practices casinos should employ to better detect and prevent increasingly sophisticated gaming scams and cheats

BY PAUL DOOCEY, CASINO JOURNAL

D arrin Hoke, vice president of operational protection for L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles, agreed with his surveillance staff that there was something

very odd about the way a Mississippi Stud poker player was handling his cards. The player in question was moving his hand under the table as cards were dealt, and then pressing two right hand fingers against these cards as he was looking at them. Finally, he was betting in a way that did not make sense with the face cards he was receiving, and he was winning steadily with this strategy. To Hoke and the experienced surveillance team at L’Auberge, these actions pointed to someone who was likely marking the value of individual playing cards on their backs

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with a light adhesive or colored ink in a pattern that only they can detect, an illegal practice commonly referred to as “daub- ing.” Unfortunately, this individual left the property before they fully realized what he was doing, but from the surveil- lance tape they were able to capture his image and send a warning about him to area casinos. Shortly thereafter, this same player showed up at the L’Auberge sister property in Baton Rouge, where he was once again playing Mississippi Stud and exhibit the same card handling behavior. This time the surveillance department had a chance to switch their cameras to a UV setting that usually detects the inks and substance used in daubing. The cameras revealed nothing unusual.

UV setting that usually detects the inks and substance used in daubing. The cameras revealed nothing

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COVER STORY

Despite this setback, L’Auberge felt it had enough evidence to pull this player out of the game and confront him. They searched him and found a cell phone, cash, chips and a con- tact lens case. The player voluntarily gave his winnings back to L’Auberge and casino officials, lacking proof of cheating, de- cided to let him go. The playing cards used in the game were bagged for further inspection. While examining the cards the next day, someone decided to try viewing them through the infrared filter of a surveil- lance camera. What they found were a plethora of daubing marks. When they viewed the game felt under the same lens, the sport occupied by the player was also covered with notice- able smudges and fingerprints. The player had been marking the cards with invisible luminous ink. The only mystery that remained was how he was able to view these marks since the ink he used was invisible to the naked eye. The answer came when he eventually showed up to play a Mississippi Stud game at Mohegan Sun in Connecticut. By this time, casinos throughout the U.S. were on alert for him, and when facial recognition software spotted him playing a card game at a Delaware casino, neighboring gaming facilities were warned. A Mohegan Sun surveillance officer eventually spotted him at a table game, cut to an infrared filter and taped

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filter and taped BACK TO CONTENTS 5 CASINOJOURNAL.COM him daubing the cards. During questioning, someone noticed

him daubing the cards. During questioning, someone noticed he was wearing contact lenses and eyeglasses. He admitted that the lenses were infrared and allowed him to read the markings he left on the cards. “Unfortunately these invisible inks and color matching lenses are readily available online, so you can expect more such scams in the future,” said Hoke to a gathering of security pro- fessionals at the Global Gaming Expo (G2E) conference in Las Vegas. “The good news is there are tools like security cameras already inside your operations that can help you detect this. A lot of you already have IP systems; you should also have some kind of mechanism that allows you to toggle back and forth with cut filters. Then it’s just the simple process of scanning table layouts in the various filters to see if there is a problem. “It is important to understand there are a lot of technolo- gies and procedures out there that will have you looking at casino security in a different way.” Indeed, few would argue that surveillance cameras remain the front line of defense at most gaming properties, and are al- ways instrumental in uncovering and protecting the enterprise against cheats. But it’s becoming increasingly apparent that more than just a cutting-edge camera system is needed to com- bat increasingly sophisticated gaming scams and criminals. In

a cutting-edge camera system is needed to com- bat increasingly sophisticated gaming scams and criminals. In

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COVER STORY

COVER STORY BACK TO CONTENTS 6 CASINOJOURNAL.COM fact, camera surveillance is of limited value in one

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COVER STORY BACK TO CONTENTS 6 CASINOJOURNAL.COM fact, camera surveillance is of limited value in one

fact, camera surveillance is of limited value in one of the latest gaming scams growing in popularity across the country.

CHIPPING AWAY

Officials at the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City realized there was a problem at their 2014 Winter Poker Open when a mid-tournament chip inventory revealed something strange—there was a lot more money in the game that there should have been. A close examination of the chips revealed some were counterfeit, evidently introduced into the tourna- ment by one of the players. The event was immediately can- celled and an investigation launched by the Borgata and the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement. A week later at neighboring Harrah’s Resort & Casino, maintenance workers responding to a plumbing issue found someone had tried to flush $2.7 million in Borgata chips down a room toilet. The chips were counterfeit and it was quickly ascertained that a player from the tournament had been stay- ing in the room. In fact, the man was the day two chip leader before busting out. It was later determined that he had intro- duced more than $1 million in bad chips into the game. Unfortunately for casino operators, counterfeit chip scams are on the rise. Hanover, Md.-based Maryland Live! Casino was

for casino operators, counterfeit chip scams are on the rise. Hanover, Md.-based Maryland Live! Casino was

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COVER STORY

actually hit twice in 2014. One scheme involved a couple that had altered $1 chips from West Virginia casinos to look like the black $100 chips used at Maryland Live!. They were able to exchange the fake chips for real ones of lesser denomina- tions at Maryland Live! tables, which they then cashed out at the cashiers cage. The fakes were discovered and investigators used surveillance footage to trace them back to the couple, who were identified and arrested. The second counterfeit chip case was far more alarming and potentially problematical. It too involved $100 Maryland Live! casino chips. However, instead of doctoring the chips himself, this time the scammer went online and purchased $150,000 counterfeit, look-alike chips for a reported $12,000. Eventually, $4,000 of the chips were passed before the cheat was discovered. Forensic surveillance once again uncovered the people using the chips and a search of their home and nearby property found $115,000 in counterfeit Maryland Live! chips dumped and floating in a local lake. “It was never really all that hard to counterfeit table game chips,” Hoke said. “Anyone with an arts and crafts back- ground can probably do it. But now people can just go on- line, search for offshore manufacturers who are willing to make casino chips, give the specifications and style they are

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and style they are BACK TO CONTENTS 7 CASINOJOURNAL.COM looking for, and get as many as

looking for, and get as many as they want sent to them. And now we also have 3D printer technology to consider. I can’t imagine it would be all that tough to make a credible coun- terfeit chip using a 3D printer.” Hoke believes the best way to prevent counterfeit chip crime is to be proactive. To start, properties should purchase chips with modern security features such as UV coding and microprinting. He also proposes regular chip inventories, with the understanding that whole denominations of chips be re- placed once a certain percentage of counterfeits are detected. Finally, he suggests table and cage staff be specially trained to spot and recognize counterfeits. “The key to preventing [counterfeit chip crime] is to real- ize where they are likely to be passed and have staff in those areas trained to identify them,” Hoke said.

SORTING OUT A PROBLEM

Training and following established procedures is also key in preventing another growing table game concern—players who use card sorts to gain an advantage over the house and fellow players on certain games. Card or edge sorting involves players who are using a defect in card design to gain an illegal edge, according to casinos. Ide-

involves players who are using a defect in card design to gain an illegal edge, according

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COVER STORY

ally, playing cards should all have the same identical pattern on the back. But sometimes during the production process, cards are miss-cut and the pattern on the back of cards is slightly different for different denominations. Some card players are observant enough to notice these off patterns, and if the cards are placed a certain way, can determine a range of denomina- tions the card may be without seeing the face. This is especially helpful in games such as baccarat, were a small range of single cards (6, 7, 8, and 9) are more desirable than others. However, in order for this advantage to work, at some time during a game the player needs to convince the dealer to turn cards in a certain way, whether they are winners or not, in or- der to discern and interpret the faulty edge pattern. On paper, this should make the crime easy to prevent. “Look at recent sort issues and they all have a common de- nominator—a high-limit player requests cards be exposed and turned over in a very specific manner,” Hoke said. “And we do it, despite the fact we have rules in place telling us not to, because they are such a great customer. This is a mistake that is made consistently because we cater to the high roller and that high roller, at least in my estimation, can cause the most damage to your operation. Think about what a high roller can do if they are on a good streak, but then we also allow them to

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we also allow them to BACK TO CONTENTS 8 CASINOJOURNAL.COM change some of the rules of

change some of the rules of the game… and now let’s see how much damage can be done.” Besides adhering to rules, Hoke believes sorts scams can be disarmed by better card security and inspection. Dealers need to make sure it’s not an off-pattern deck before the game begins. Operators should look into cards with fade designs that avoid pushing patterns to the edge, and only do business with playing card vendors that vouch for quality control during the production process.

INTERFERENCE CALL

Flaws in equipment can lead to security vulnerabilities in a whole host of table games. The same can be said for slot ma- chines as well. On paper, slot machines would appear to be a much more secure device than table games, especially considering the me- chanical and linked nature of the devices which would seem to make any crime against them easy to detect and prevent. But historically, this has not been the case. Monkey Paws and Light Wands have been used to fool video slots in the past. And now a new generation of slot cheat is looking take advantage through the use of electronic communication devices that can interfere with the function on the machine.

through the use of electronic communication devices that can interfere with the function on the machine.

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COVER STORY

“We have to realize that there are people out there who spend their days looking for ways to get into the slot machine,” Hoke said. “I’m relatively confident that the machine program is safe. It is the peripheral devices I have a worry with—all these other things that now go on a slot that we are not fa- miliar with and that can create the environment needed for a cheater to take advantage.” To underscore this point, the FBI recently uncovered and indicted a team of Russian slot cheats who hit 10 casinos in Missouri California and Illinois. The group targeted a specific type and model of machine and, by allegedly communicating

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allegedly communicating BACK TO CONTENTS 9 CASINOJOURNAL.COM with the machine using a communication device linked to

with the machine using a communication device linked to a foreign server, “allowed the defendants to predict the behavior of the…games and obtain winnings from the games that far exceeded what would be expected from fair play.” What worries Hoke is that these slot scammers have been coming to the U.S. since 2012 and have only been dis- covered now. “It underscores an important thing,” Hoke added. “We don’t know enough about slots from a surveillance and game protection perspective that can prevent some of these newer threats from happening. And that is scary.”

protection perspective that can prevent some of these newer threats from happening. And that is scary.”
protection perspective that can prevent some of these newer threats from happening. And that is scary.”

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SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION

SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION WORKPLACE VIOLENCE: IT’S MORE COMMON THAN YOU THINK Addressing the growing threat of workplace

WORKPLACE VIOLENCE:

SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION WORKPLACE VIOLENCE: IT’S MORE COMMON THAN YOU THINK Addressing the growing threat of workplace

IT’S MORE COMMON THAN YOU THINK

Addressing the growing threat of workplace violence

W orkplace violence incidents have tripled in the last decade, and it’s now the fastest-growing cat- egory of murder in the U.S. It’s also the second

leading cause of death for women in the workplace (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016). In fact, the rates of murder and other violent incidents have intensified to the point that the U.S. Department of Justice declared the workplace as one of the most dangerous places to be. It’s an escalating concern for employees and employers nationwide, with many cases going unreported. According to OSHA, 2 million workers in America are victims of workplace violence each year.

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ACTIVE SHOOTER INCIDENTS RISING

An active shooter represents one of the worst examples of workplace violence. The years 2013 to 2015 saw the worst rate of deaths due to active shooters in a two-year span. From 2000 to 2015, over 1,000 active shooter casualties occurred in the workplace. According to an analysis by CNN, the U.S. accounted for 31 percent of all public mass shootings between 1966 and 2012 in the world, despite the U.S. only having five percent of the world’s population. Active shooter incidents have tripled in the last eight years, with an event occurring in the U.S. once every three

shooter incidents have tripled in the last eight years, with an event occurring in the U.S.

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weeks. Alarmingly, you are 18 times more likely to encoun- ter workplace violence and an active shooter situation than a fire.

WHAT ARE THE FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE RAMIFICATIONS OF WORKPLACE VIOLENCE?

No amount of training, security guards, and warnings can totally eliminate the chance of an active shooter launching an attack. No employers are 100 percent immune from this phe- nomenon, nor can they totally prevent it — and the financial costs are staggering. Workplace violence researchers assess that the cost to American business ranges from $6 billion to $36 billion each year (FBI, 2011). According to the Workplace Violence Research Institute, neglectful hiring and negligent employee retention out-of- court disbursements due to workplace violence lawsuits aver- aged more than $500,000. Jury rulings in these cases averaged $3 million (2012). Workers compensation policies usually omit coverage for acts of lethal force or the threat of lethal force. You need sepa- rate coverage to shelter you against the aftermath of work- place violence.

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work- place violence. BACK TO CONTENTS 12 CASINOJOURNAL.COM One option is active shooter insurance. This coverage

One option is active shooter insurance. This coverage is provides additional financial security for businesses. While each policy is different, they may reimburse busi- ness income expenses, security consultants, medical services, rehabilitation costs, independent security guards, employee counseling, public image management, and wages for victim employees and replacement employees. They may also impart death benefits to families or other beneficiaries of employees.

WHAT SHOULD COMPANIES DO TO BE BETTER PREPARED FOR WORKPLACE VIOLENCE?

Despite the escalating numbers associated to violence in the workplace (according to a report issued by the National Institute for the Prevention of Workplace Violence), the aver- age spend on workplace violence prevention by organizations is $4.50 per employee annually. There is opportunity for im- provement with regard to workplace violence training, prepa- ration, and prevention. Employers can adopt these effective steps to lessen the risk of violence in their work environment and safeguard the lives of their staff:

Identify workplace risk and vulnerability factors. Organi-

and safeguard the lives of their staff: Identify workplace risk and vulnerability factors. Organi- NEXT ARTICLE

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SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION

zations should perform a realistic and comprehensive risk as- sessment to identify the security vulnerabilities of the business and facilities to an active shooter event. Use security controls. These safeguards may include coded card keys and employee photo ID badges for access to secure areas; camera surveillance systems, on-site guard services; and other appropriate security measures such as metal detectors. Foster a culture of respect and trust amongst work- ers and between employees and management. Companies must eradicate a bad culture of bullying or harassment by creating a zero-tolerance workplace violence policy. The policy should be plainly worded and specify how the em- ployer classifies workplace violence, the conduct the policy prohibits, methods for reporting violations, and how these reports will be investigated. Develop a workplace violence prevention program. This program can stand alone or it can be integrated into your in- jury and illness prevention program. Regardless, it’s essential that all employees (to include managers and supervisors) be familiar with the company policy and program. Provide regular workplace violence prevention training. Simply put, it’s every employer’s duty of care to protect and

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of care to protect and BACK TO CONTENTS 13 CASINOJOURNAL.COM safeguard their employees by training them

safeguard their employees by training them to respond ap- propriately to active shooters. Seventy percent of active shooter incidents occur in businesses versus campuses. Training con- ducted before such an incident actually occurs will help to bol- ster prevention protocols at your workplace. Regular performance of active shooter drills. Drills should be established and conducted in such a way so as not to fright- en or alarm employees. They should have an education focus and be designed to aid employees in retaining information that may save lives.

PREPAREDNESS RESOURCES

Department of Homeland Security Pocket Card:

Department of Homeland Security Booklet:

Department of Homeland Security Poster:

Online Training Course in Multi-Hazard Crisis Safety, developed in exclusive coop- eration with the FBINAA NEXT
Online Training Course in Multi-Hazard Crisis Safety, developed in exclusive coop- eration with the FBINAA NEXT

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

DeAnn Wandler is responsible for American Public University System’s Center for Applied Learning (CAL) within the government contracting, finance, and insurance industries. She is also the product manager for CAL’s Active Shooter ACTION™ Online Training Course in Multi-Hazard Crisis Safety, which was developed in exclusive cooperation with the FBINAA. Prior to joining APUS, DeAnn served as vice president of admissions operations, overseeing the strategic direction and management of 24 career-college campuses throughout the United States. She has more than 15 years of increasingly responsible and successful experience in all areas of higher education, including vice president of eduction outreach, vice president of enrollment and director of admissions. Her background includes positions at University of Phoenix, Grantham University, and Vatterott Educational Centers. DeAnn currently serves on the National Contract Management Association (NCMA) Board of Advisors. She has served as vice president of educational standards on the Greater Kansas City Association of the United States Army (AUSA) and sat on the Board of Directors for the Kansas City Executive Women International (EWI). DeAnn Wandler can be reached via T 571-358-3109 | E dwandler@apus.edu.

The American Public University System (APUS) Center for Applied Learning (CAL) provides a wide range of online training and educational solutions to help public and private organizations attain their workforce development and performance goals. To learn more, visit: www.apus.edu/CAL

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www.apus.edu/CAL BACK TO CONTENTS 14 CASINOJOURNAL.COM BIBLIOGRAPHY “Corporate Liability: Sharing The Blame for

BIBLIOGRAPHY “Corporate Liability: Sharing The Blame for Workplace Vio- lence.” Corporate Liability: Sharing The Blame for Work- place Violence. Workplace Violence Research Institute, 2012. Web. 12 Aug. 2016. Hart, Jay. “Saving Lives with a Test: Active Shooter Response Training for Employees.” Security. BNP Media, June 2016. Web. 28 Aug. 2016. Romano, Stephen J., M.A., Micòl E. Levi-Minzi, M.A., M.S., Eugene A. Rugala, and Vincent B. Van Hasselt, Ph.D. “Workplace Violence Prevention.” FBI. Law Enforcement Bulletin, Jan. 2011. Web. 9 Aug. 2016. “Table 3. Fatal Occupational Injuries by Occupation and Selected Event or Exposure, 2014.” U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 15 July 2016. Web. 22 Aug. 2016. “WorkplaceViolence911.” National Institute for the Prevention of Workplace Violence. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Aug. 2016.

National Institute for the Prevention of Workplace Violence. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Aug. 2016. NEXT ARTICLE

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SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION

SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION COGNITEC’S FACE RECOGNITION TECHNOLOGY SUPPORTS SEARCHES IN VIDEO FOOTAGE AND REAL-TIME
SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION COGNITEC’S FACE RECOGNITION TECHNOLOGY SUPPORTS SEARCHES IN VIDEO FOOTAGE AND REAL-TIME

COGNITEC’S FACE RECOGNITION TECHNOLOGY SUPPORTS SEARCHES IN VIDEO FOOTAGE AND REAL-TIME SURVEILLANCE

T he video screening and analytics technology from Cognitec, FaceVACS-VideoScan, now allows users to perform complex searches and analyses on persons

appearing in real-time camera streams and video footage. The latest product release introduced a user-friendly inter- face to quickly import sets of recorded video and then carry out detailed investigations. For example, security and law en- forcement agents can upload the video files of a specific loca- tion at a specific time to find possible participants in or wit- nesses to a crime. Users can find a person that was previously enrolled in an image database or search for an unknown person and find their appearances in multiple videos. Person searches can also make

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use of filters that specify age ranges, gender and ethnicity. For real-time surveillance applications, FaceVACS-Vid- eoScan applies Cognitec’s premier face recognition technology to compare faces to image databases and instantly find known individuals. Casinos can detect and prevent unwanted behavior in much faster and more efficient ways, as operators can track individuals in real time, or receive alerts on mobile devices to act within the immediate vicinity of a suspect. On the other hand, the software can identify high rollers, members or authorized individuals in real time. Positive au- thentication can alert personnel to provide special treatment or allow access to restricted areas. FaceVACS-VideoScan also employs leading-edge face recog-

treatment or allow access to restricted areas. FaceVACS-VideoScan also employs leading-edge face recog- NEXT ARTICLE

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SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION

nition technology to analyze the count, flow, demographics and behavior of people visible in video streams. Surpassing traditional video surveillance systems, the technology detects and extracts people’s faces in live video streams or video foot- age and uses anonymous facial analysis to count individuals, generate demographical information, track people movement in time and space, detect frequent visitors and crowds, and much more. For example, operators can receive an alarm if too many people gather in a specific area and measure waiting times to direct traffic. The analysis of traffic patterns and demographi- cal statistics can provide businesses with precise visitor data to make interior design, advertising placement, staffing and other operational decisions. Since the technology can analyze a face for gender, age and ethnicity as people approach a camera, it can trigger the dis- play of a targeted message on a digital sign or other advertis- ing/message devices. Last year, Cognitec introduced a highly specialized IP video camera with built-in face detection and tracking technology

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tracking technology BACK TO CONTENTS 16 CASINOJOURNAL.COM as a component of its FaceVACS-VideoScan product, therefore

as a component of its FaceVACS-VideoScan product, therefore eliminating the need to identify and source suitable cameras. The FaceVACS-VideoScan C5 camera provides optimal image quality for real-time face recognition, even under challeng- ing conditions, while requiring low computing hardware and bandwidth resources. Cognitec will demonstrate the product once again at the World Game Protection Conference in Las Vegas on February 21-23, 2017. Cognitec develops market-leading face recognition technol- ogy and applications for industry customers and government agencies around the world. In various independent evaluation tests, our FaceVACS® software has proven to be the premier technology available on the market. Cognitec’s portfolio in- cludes products for facial database search, video screening and analytics, border control, ICAO compliant photo capturing and facial image quality assessment.

photo capturing and facial image quality assessment. MORE INFORMATION AND CONTACT: www.cognitec.com |

MORE INFORMATION AND CONTACT:

www.cognitec.com | info@cognitec.com Phone: +1-781-616-0600

assessment. MORE INFORMATION AND CONTACT: www.cognitec.com | info@cognitec.com Phone: +1-781-616-0600 NEXT ARTICLE

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SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION

SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION THE ITRAK PLATFORM STREAMLINES REPORTING & RISK MANAGEMENT FOR CASINO RESORTS S ecurity,
SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION THE ITRAK PLATFORM STREAMLINES REPORTING & RISK MANAGEMENT FOR CASINO RESORTS S ecurity,
SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION THE ITRAK PLATFORM STREAMLINES REPORTING & RISK MANAGEMENT FOR CASINO RESORTS S ecurity,
SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION THE ITRAK PLATFORM STREAMLINES REPORTING & RISK MANAGEMENT FOR CASINO RESORTS S ecurity,

THE ITRAK PLATFORM STREAMLINES REPORTING & RISK MANAGEMENT FOR CASINO RESORTS

S ecurity, surveillance and responsible gaming opera- tions rely on timely and accurate information, and high technology gaming environments are faced with

handling and processing vast amounts of both real-time and recorded video information from hundreds of cameras. iView Systems’ security management reporting solu- tion optimizes the way you report and manage incidents by strengthening security measures by mitigating risk and li- ability through analysis and reporting of evidence, activities or events; providing a complete audit trail for accountability, compliance & enforcement. The iTrak® incident reporting and risk management soft- ware platform provides a snap-shot of real-time incident and

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subject information, which expedites and improves the inci-

dent reporting and notification process, with the ability to in- stantaneously share incident and exclusion information within the network of properties by easily identifying and tracking persons of interest. By combining a casinos existing auditing, incident report- ing, investigation workload, and the task of identifying self- excluded patrons and other undesirables becomes highly de- manding. iView’s experience with gaming operations provides logi- cal, proactive security layers which include:

Security Reporting

Surveillance Reporting

logi- cal, proactive security layers which include: • Security Reporting • Surveillance Reporting NEXT ARTICLE

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SPONSOR CONTRIBUTION

Case Management

ID Recognition

Player Risk Analysis and Identification

Personnel Management & Dispatch

Business Intelligence

Mobile Guard Patrol

Detailed Investigations

Facial Recognition

License Plate Recognition

Responsible Gaming & Reporting

Compliance Reporting (AML, etc.)

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Reporting (AML, etc.) BACK TO CONTENTS 20 CASINOJOURNAL.COM • Suspicious Transaction Reporting • Patron Trespass

Suspicious Transaction Reporting

Patron Trespass Management

Patron/Activity Monitoring, Alerting and Custom Notification

System Interfacing

To streamline everyday tasks quickly and satisfy reporting requirements with an easy to use interface and intelligent busi- ness logic to simplify the end user experience, contact iView Systems or visit www.iviewsystems.com.

busi- ness logic to simplify the end user experience, contact iView Systems or visit www.iviewsystems.com .
busi- ness logic to simplify the end user experience, contact iView Systems or visit www.iviewsystems.com .

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FEATURE

FEATURE APPLYING CONSISTENCY TO COMPLEXITY IN RESORT SECURITY For MGM Resorts, having renowned gaming properties

APPLYING CONSISTENCY TO COMPLEXITY IN RESORT SECURITY

For MGM Resorts, having renowned gaming properties throughout the U.S. and the world means having to broaden its risk awareness

BY CLAIRE MEYER, SECURITY MAGAZINE

T he Las Vegas Strip, despite being just 4.2 miles in length, is a massive economic center for the state of Nevada, and a tourism mecca, drawing more than 40

million visitors each year. This also paints it as a target for crime – anything from petty theft to more nefarious plots. In July 2007, the Southern Nevada Counter-Terrorism Cen- ter was formed. This 24/7 fusion center – a public-private partnership between local, state and federal law enforcement as well as local stakeholders in the area, including casinos and resorts – strives to keep residents, tourists, businesses and in- frastructure safe. The fusion center collects data and analyzes crime trends, and it also acts as a base of operations for resorts and law enforcement to collaborate and share information on

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day-to-day matter and during large-scale events, such as city- wide celebrations on New Year’s Eve. However, this partnership cannot be expected to serve each resort’s unique needs fully, and resorts cannot rely on the public-private partnership alone to gather actionable intel- ligence… which is where MGM Resorts’ Intel Ops Center and new Corporate Watch Center come into play. According to MGM Resorts’ Executive Director of Corpo- rate Security, Tom Lozich, each resort is practically a minia- ture city, with many complex events and operations being simultaneously managed. On the Las Vegas Strip alone, MGM Resorts has 10 major resorts, including MGM Grand, Bellagio and ARIA. The enterprise also has properties outside of Ne-

10 major resorts, including MGM Grand, Bellagio and ARIA. The enterprise also has properties outside of

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vada, including properties in Detroit, Mississippi and Macau, China. New resorts are currently being built in Maryland, Massachusetts and Macau. In years past, the main source of revenue for these proper- ties had been casino-based profits, and the business was cen- tered around the casino accordingly. However, Lozich says, in order to remain competitive in a growing market, enterprises

order to remain competitive in a growing market, enterprises MGM Grand is one of 10 MGM

MGM Grand is one of 10 MGM Resort properties on the Las Vegas Strip, all of which coordinate security through the company’s Intel Ops and Corporate Watch centers.

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Watch centers. BACK TO CONTENTS 22 CASINOJOURNAL.COM moved toward being entertainment spaces, not just gambling

moved toward being entertainment spaces, not just gambling businesses. An MGM Resort is a hospitality company, an en- tertainment company, a convention center, a shopping and dining destination and a casino, all rolled into one complex enterprise. On any given day, the resorts’ security teams may be managing security for a convention, a UFC prizefight, a high-profile concert, 10 casinos, hotels and the protection of thousands of guests. Because of this complexity, consistency was absolutely imperative. The Corporate Watch Center – now operating 24/7 – is functioning as an in-house fusion center. Because each MGM property is so different, both in clientele and operations, the Watch Center is a single-stop service station for resort person- nel (security or otherwise) to report suspicious activity, gain insight into trends and connect with corporate resources. Law enforcement also knows that they can reach out to the Watch Center for information instead of having to chase down the appropriate security contact at each resort. A dedicated staff of investigators at the Watch Center mon- itors the properties and even street views around MGM prop- erties, and they gather suspicious activity reporting through the robust “See Something, Say Something” initiative in Las Vegas. They vet that information with the fusion center and

Something, Say Something” initiative in Las Vegas. They vet that information with the fusion center and

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follow up with law enforcement or security personnel for incident resolution. While the Watch Center’s establishment was strongly sup- ported by security-minded executives, Lozich said that MGM Resorts’ security is based around “top-down support and bot- tom-up sustainability.” “Our ‘See Something, Say Something’ messaging is still non- stop for our employees,” he adds. “At the line level, those are the employees who can make or break anything that happens.” Maintaining an open channel of communication for employees and visitors to report suspicious incidents or other events up through security and into the Watch Center is vital to the resorts’ intelligence gathering efforts and mindful leadership. “The Watch Center’s goal is to support and assist proper- ties’ vice presidents and directors of security, and we have a de-centralized approach,” Lozich said. “Our security vice pres- idents report directly to the property presidents. The property presidents are like the captains of a ship, and security is a big factor for them. We’re here to assist them in gathering data, long-term reports and critical analysis, and being that link be- tween the fusion center and our properties. “We’re also a one-stop-shop for public safety and law en- forcement, when they have enquiries. The information turn-

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The information turn- BACK TO CONTENTS 23 CASINOJOURNAL.COM around time is much shorter when you have

around time is much shorter when you have one answer point instead of trying to reach out to all of our 10 properties when trying to gather information. “Knowledge is power. Information is power,” adds Lozich. From this information, the fusion center can then share threat intelligence or reports of suspicious activity to other re- sorts and stakeholders in the Las Vegas area. “In one regard, we look at the others on the Strip as com- petitors, but from our standpoint, from the security stand- point, they’re partners. We want to look at how we can gather information, analyze information, for any risks or threats and to disseminate that information not only up to the fusion cen- ter but out to our other resort partners. We do know that pre- vention is job number one,” Lozich said, but if a response is needed, having as much detailed, collected information as pos- sible enables a faster, more effective reaction. In addition to local threats, the Watch Center is on alert for any activity around the world that could potentially impact an MGM Resorts property. “We’re a global company, and we have to be mindful of the security risks in the world that could impact not only our ability to function but (our ability) to protect our guests. The Watch Center enables us to maintain visibility in those areas and try to

ability) to protect our guests. The Watch Center enables us to maintain visibility in those areas

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look at some of those threats or crises that are occurring. They may seem innocuous or may not be of concern now, but we’re looking ahead to see if they could be of concern later.” This plays out in the security awareness operations on New Year’s Eve, Lozich said. For that holiday, MGM Resorts activates a separate Intel Ops Center that is dedicated to the Strip itself. It takes the white noise of all of the data that flows in (surveillance, reports from employees or law en- forcement, crowd management) and determines what is ac- tionable, suspicious or deliverable, and pushes that intelli- gence out to the resorts. For example, if a show isn’t opening its doors on time, there may be a crowd management prob- lem outside, and the theater and security personnel would be notified so they could monitor the situation more closely and find solutions. Local, state and federal law enforcement partners are embedded in the Intel Ops center for the eve- ning, as are representatives from each property and resort partners on the Strip.

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partners on the Strip. BACK TO CONTENTS 24 CASINOJOURNAL.COM At the Corporate Watch Center, investigators and

At the Corporate Watch Center, investigators and law en- forcement are taking a more global approach, tracking New Year’s Eve events throughout the world. As the ball drops in New York City, for example, what incidents are happening that could impact Las Vegas? Would inclement weather in South Asia impact what could happen in the Macau resort’s festivities? Generally, how could outside events impact MGM properties? The casino, entertainment, event and hospitality industries have a unique intersection in resorts, and each resort is unique in and of itself. Having this centralized reporting and analysis center, however, forms a unifying link and resource for MGM Resorts’ ongoing security efforts. “(The Watch Center) applies consistency,” said Lozich. “What we try to do from a company standpoint is apply consis- tent standards to all of our properties. We have to. That becomes even more critical with the complexity of our resorts… Our job is to support and assist security officers and management at each location, and we do that every day.”

job is to support and assist security officers and management at each location, and we do
job is to support and assist security officers and management at each location, and we do

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EYE ON INFORMATION

FEATURE EYE ON INFORMATION Advances in imaging technology and systems interoperability are transforming the functionality

Advances in imaging technology and systems interoperability are transforming the functionality and use of casino surveillance cameras

BY PAUL DOOCEY, CASINO JOURNAL

S urveillance systems within casinos are designed, in part, to deter cheating, theft and other crimes from taking place on the gaming floor and throughout the

entire casino resort. But to accomplish this goal, security prod- uct and system designers, engineers and producers have had to “borrow” technological advancements in surveillance from other industries and adapt them for casino use. “As surveillance technology evolves in other industries such as broadcasting, computing and retail, we take advantage of those improvements and apply them to the casino space,” said Robert Prady, CPP, PSP, CHS, field sales engineer for Axis Communications and member of the ASIS Gaming and Wager- ing Council. “Surveillance technology has grown by leaps and

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bounds over the past decade. IT people now come to security sessions, which shows you how far the marriage between se- curity and technology has come over the past 10 years. For years, convergence was the buzzword you always heard. Well, now we are converged at least when it comes to IT; computer technology is firmly entrenched in our industry.” Prady’s observations were part of a session he gave at 2015 Global Gaming Expo that explored emerging trends in casino surveillance. During that discussion, he described two emerging technology trends that are having and will have an important impact on casino surveillance products, systems and strategies—the Internet of Things (IoT) and Big Data analytics.

casino surveillance products, systems and strategies—the Internet of Things (IoT) and Big Data analytics. NEXT ARTICLE

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As defined by Wikipedia, IoT is the network of physical objects, devices, vehicles, buildings and other items which are embedded with electronics, software, sensors and network con- nectivity, which enables these objects to collect and exchange data. From a surveillance perspective, IoT entails the placement of Internet and network connectivity into cameras and record- ing/storage systems. “In the past, a surveillance camera was simply a camera,” Prady said. “It linked to the VCR or DVD and performed a simple recording function. Now these cameras are being linked to each other and to other devices and systems throughout the casino. This connectivity makes the cameras and recording systems more intelligent, and that opens up a lot more possibilities for us.” Indeed, thanks to IoT, Prady envisions a future where, po- tentially, some surveillance personnel and investigators can work from home and still provide quality protection. This technology also clears the way for creation of centralized sur- veillance offices that can handle the surveillance needs of multiple casinos wherever they are located in the U.S. “You can also have one casino perform surveillance on a number of other casinos,” Prady said. “You can centralize your sur- veillance operations in one location and can monitor several other locations.”

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other locations.” BACK TO CONTENTS 26 CASINOJOURNAL.COM Technology is now available that allows surveillance cameras

Technology is now available that allows surveillance cameras to better recognize and identify visitor faces.

As surveillance product developers and users contemplate an IoT future, they also have to grapple with another potentially dis- ruptive technology: Big Data, which is a broad term for data sets so large or complex that traditional data processing applications are inadequate, according to Wikipedia. Challenges with Big Data include analysis, capture, data curation, search, sharing, storage, transfer, visualization, querying and information privacy. Prady describes the current combination of surveillance and Big Data as an “information firehose,” in which a lot of data can be collected and disseminated, but very little of it is

firehose,” in which a lot of data can be collected and disseminated, but very little of

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instantly usable. However as Big Data evolves and its link to IoT becomes stronger, he sees it playing a transformative role in how security and surveillance systems are viewed throughout the entire casino resort enterprise. “You hear the term ‘necessary evil’ a lot when it comes to surveillance systems,” Prady said. “As Big Data and IoT tech- nology expands, I believe surveillance systems will start to be viewed as an asset instead of just a cost center. Surveillance will become an information collecting asset that can mine data and share the results with marketing, management and other de- partments within the gaming resort. Everyone will benefit as security and customer service improves and loss goes down.”

PICTURE THIS

Of course, this Big Data and IoT transformation of security departments could not take place without the ongoing techno- logical improvements to the central components of all surveil- lance systems—the cameras. Simply stated, surveillance cameras are now “intelligent,” thanks in large part to the integration of computer technology into the devices. “Today’s IP camera is es- sentially a computer that is set in the ceiling,” Prady said. “Not only can it process information and transmit it throughout the network, it can also accept programs and run advanced analyt-

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run advanced analyt- BACK TO CONTENTS 27 CASINOJOURNAL.COM ics. It used to be that all the

ics. It used to be that all the analytics of surveillance information has to take place in the server; now, with the right program, it can take place on the edge in the camera itself.” The modern surveillance camera can indeed perform a lot of functions that would have been considered miraculous just a few years ago. These include:

Wide dynamic range technology—Many surveillance cam- eras now contain wide dynamic range capabilities that greatly improve picture images. These cameras can take over- or under- exposed images, compress them, map them at the frame or pixel level and create a new picture that is sharper and easier to view. Auto-tracking PTZ—By incorporating auto-tracking pan, tilt and zoom (PTZ) in camera, surveillance staffs now have the ability to follow a single patron throughout the property. The technology is also being adapted to better monitor game play, with programs that let the camera actually track and count table game play by recognizing the pips on cards. Freedom of placement—It used to be that internal surveil- lance cameras could only be placed in ceilings or on walls. But thanks to divided camera technology pioneered by the ATM industry, smaller sensors linked to nearby camera units allow for the placement of very small cameras in a variety of places, such as the alligator rail on a table game or security bar within

very small cameras in a variety of places, such as the alligator rail on a table

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a casino cage. “This allows us to take the cameras out of the

ceiling and place them just about anywhere,” Prady said. Heat mapping—A program that can be installed in newer surveillance cameras creates a heat map of the entire casino

that can be used to determine usage and traffic patterns. This information can be shared with other casino departments to determine which areas of the casino are most popular during

a certain time period, which can help with employee staffing

and marketing campaigns. “Heat mapping is really helpful to casino management and marketing departments,” Prady said. “It provides a myriad of information that can be used to im- prove operations.” License plate recognition—Some outdoor surveillance cameras can now read and record the license plates of arriving and departing cars. From a property protection standpoint, this

ensures the right car is returned to the right person if the valet is used and the condition of the car when it arrived in case there is

a complaint about damage. License plate reading technology can

also be used as a marketing tool—when the license plate of an important customer is read, a notice can go through to the ca- sino host and property front desk alerting them of their arrival. People Counting—Surveillance cameras can now be programmed with an app that allows them to count the

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them to count the BACK TO CONTENTS 28 CASINOJOURNAL.COM number of people entering the facility, as

number of people entering the facility, as well as track when they came in and the general direction of traffic. This information can be put into a database to determine visita- tion against time of day and other information that can help marketing departments. Facial recognition—Technology is now available that allows surveillance cameras to better recognize and identify visitor fac- es. This is obviously helpful from a protection standpoint—if the camera recognizes someone that is on a “black list,” security personal can be notified and the person tracked. The system can also be programmed to notice someone on a “white list,” im- portant customers that warrant contact from a casino host. Wearable surveillance—Police departments across the country are equipping officers with wearable surveillance cameras to help combat claims of brutality and other improper conduct. Chances are these devices will migrate toward casino security personnel for similar reasons. Indeed, there is already technology in place that allows casino personnel to use the camera function on a smart phone to record interactions with casino guests to the property’s security system. “Wearable cameras are just one of many surveillance tech- nologies that are evolving and will likely play a greater role in casino operations going forward,” Prady said.

that are evolving and will likely play a greater role in casino operations going forward,” Prady
that are evolving and will likely play a greater role in casino operations going forward,” Prady

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FEATURE DEVELOPING LOW-PROFILE SURVEILLANCE FOR HIGH-PROFILE SECURITY In the continually moving environment of a casino,

DEVELOPING LOW-PROFILE SURVEILLANCE FOR HIGH-PROFILE SECURITY

In the continually moving environment of a casino, adding covert surveillance tools proves an unobtrusive way to get unobstructed images

BY CLAIRE MEYER, SECURITY MAGAZINE

I t’s not Spy vs. Spy; it’s good security.

Despite the installation on numerous ceiling-mounted

surveillance cameras, important details can still be missed.

If a person is wearing a ball cap, or looking down at his phone, ceiling-height cameras might be unable to provide the positive identification needed for investigations. According to John Underwood, manager of surveillance technology for Cherokee Nation Entertainment, which in- cludes the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Tulsa, Okla., among their 10 casino properties, the goal is to get the right surveil- lance coverage without disturbing visitors’ experience. In this, he turned to more covert surveillance tools. “For a long time, this was taboo with operational man-

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agement in the environment we’re in – casino and gaming. Cameras can be seen as a necessary evil – those black domes hanging on the ceiling – and you start talking about bringing cameras down to eye level, you start having issues about get- ting the most cooperation, and that’s understandable,” Under- wood said. “We’re trying to make sure we do this in the most seemly fashion, not being a distraction, hanging black dome cameras on the wall to look like a black eye on the design of the building. We wanted to do this in a way that won’t disturb anyone or take away from the experience being marketed, but we can do our due diligence in gathering all the information possible, whether that’s for data mining with analytics or for video investigations – internal loss prevention or law enforce-

for data mining with analytics or for video investigations – internal loss prevention or law enforce-

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FEATURE ment – I’m able to deploy more tools to be more effective.” There are three

ment – I’m able to deploy more tools to be more effective.”

There are three main areas of focus for covert surveillance installations around the casino, Underwood said.

in the casino, so he prefers ATM cameras activated on movement, so they provide another eye-level point of view for situational awareness, not limited to footage during the time of the transaction.

DOORFRAMES/ENTRY POINTS: Adding eye-level

surveillance at these choke points for incoming and exiting traffic enable security personnel to maintain more accurate awareness of who is entering the establishment and when.

CASHIER STATIONS: Pin- hole cameras or other discreet tools at these locations enable security personnel to verify identities to help either pre-

Underwood also adds more discreet surveillance tools in less-trafficked areas such as stair- wells. There is an expectation of surveillance in elevators, he says, so potential bad actors duck into stair- wells or other lesser used areas for illicit acts. “Yes, by having overt surveil- lance in busy areas, you will deter (bad actors) to a point, but if you have something covert in (lesser-

to a point, but if you have something covert in (lesser- Tulsa, Okla.-based Hard Rock Hotel

Tulsa, Okla.-based Hard Rock Hotel and Casino uses

vent or investigate ID, tax, or check fraud, as well as to get

a better image of the visitor’s face as he or she interacts with the cashier.

convert products to augment its surveillance coverage with the goal of making resort guests safer and more secure. Photo courtesy of the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino

used) places, you may actually cap- ture the incident rather than having

to assume that something may have just happened, because you’re being a bit more discreet.” Underwood was inspired by an analytics program at the Dallas Cowboys Stadium, which utilizes video analytics to deter- mine which advertisements are most effective and eye-catching to visitors, to find items around the casino that would draw the

ATMs: While ATMs often have covert cameras installed, many are only activated during a transaction, both for efficient searching and to save on storage. However, for Underwood, many ATMs are near heavy-traffic areas

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storage. However, for Underwood, many ATMs are near heavy-traffic areas BACK TO CONTENTS 30 CASINOJOURNAL.COM NEXT

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eye and install surveillance there. He works with the market- ing department for the casino to get fixtures or signage to add a discreet, covert camera so that when visitors look at the display or sign, the security team also gets a clear image of their faces. “If we have a guy who wants to come in with sunglasses on and pass a counterfeit check… now he’s got his low-brim baseball cap on or cowboy hat, and I’m now no longer ob- structed by those,” said Underwood. “I’ve been able to provide to law enforcement agencies or those at other casinos or other companies tangible data and intelligence to help these people be caught, prosecuted or at least be able to ensure that we can work on the next stage of the investigation when they arrive. There’s no longer the question mark of ‘is this the right guy or not?’ Now I’m seeing past the brim of that ball cap because I’m no longer looking from the 24-foot ceiling trying to get the right angle to see him sitting down – I’m seeing directly into his face.” Also, in working with law enforcement agencies, “we’ve become the go-to for any type of video intelligence,” Underwood adds.

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Underwood adds. BACK TO CONTENTS 31 CASINOJOURNAL.COM With so many cameras in play, however, challenges do

With so many cameras in play, however, challenges do

arise. Underwood and his internal team test potential cameras and tools against a number of parameters and situations. De- vices that they do adopt and use must:

Be non-intrusive;

Provide a proper image, despite interference from con- tinuous motion and lights from slot machines, bar ven- ues and employees, and smoke; and

Offer options to ease storage burdens, such as H.264 or H.265 compression standards, Zipstream technology, lowering frame rates or being able to turn off or avoid certain high-storage features, such as wide dynamic range. “With covert (surveillance), I’m not always seeing inci- dents in most of those areas, I’m gathering information. I’m providing other tangible features of quality video or quality still shots to provide over to the investigative side and help to identify somebody,” Underwood said.

still shots to provide over to the investigative side and help to identify somebody,” Underwood said.
still shots to provide over to the investigative side and help to identify somebody,” Underwood said.

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FEATURE STREAMLINING GUARD TOURS WITH TECHNOLOGY A security officer is often one of the most expensive

STREAMLINING GUARD TOURS WITH TECHNOLOGY

A security officer is often one of the most expensive and necessary tools in a security leader’s arsenal, but new technology is helping to maximize the investment

BY CLAIRE MEYER,, SECURITY MAGAZINE

W hen Mark Paige first entered the security in 1984, all security officers’ reports were hand-written, with a lack of standardized forms and tedious

storage solutions. Now, as the director of security for Red Rock Resort in Las Vegas, Paige can take advantage of technology- based reporting, complete with easy document searching and compiling, trend analysis and real-time reporting. For example, manual reports are time-consuming, per- forming an audit can take several weeks, and if a case in litiga- tion requires a document of all slip-and-fall cases in the resort for the past three to five years? That could take an administra- tor days. Now, all Paige needs to do is hit a button to collect report histories.

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“In an increasingly technology-driven world, ‘security of- ficer’ is really a skilled position,” said Paige. In a variety of enterprises, officers can be responsible for monitoring surveil- lance, access control systems and alarms, as well as physically patrolling locations. For telecommunications company TELUS in Canada, Dana Adams, CPP, CISSP, director of security, said integrating tech- nology and the services of its own security resources and a contract guard force through Securitas is the key to successful physical security. TELUS needs to secure large office buildings and events as well as hundreds of remote sites and many thou- sands of miles of infrastructure. “The default is to say we should place a guard there, but

and many thou- sands of miles of infrastructure. “The default is to say we should place

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that’s not feasible at a remote site or along all our infrastruc- ture. It’s also not feasible to secure a large office building with guards alone,” said Adams. “If you don’t leverage your security efforts with technology, you’re going to fail.” In larger buildings, in addition to using security cameras, alarms, and video analytics TELUS makes use of systems such as Vision to electronically acknowledge guard rounds and track in- cidents that a guard must respond to. At smaller sites and along our critical infrastructure, TELUS makes use of creative solutions such as security camera surveillance and alarmed doors, enhanc- ing the security of classic target-hardened physical structures through active monitoring by trained security professionals. “It’s too easy to dump too many duties on the guards with their boots on the ground,” such as asking them to patrol too many areas, as well as perform value-add functions such as equipment checks, maintenance and other odd jobs, he said. Technology helps TELUS streamline their operations while optimizing security by eliminating busy-work and keeping guards focused on the important services only a professional on the ground can provide. “Better technology and better training mean a better re- sponse. Moving forward, companies are going to demand a better-trained, tech-savvy guard force,” adds Adams.

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force,” adds Adams. BACK TO CONTENTS 33 CASINOJOURNAL.COM At the Red Rock Resort and Casino in

At the Red Rock Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, security officers use their Android-based guard tracking devices to check in throughout the facility, note incidents, attach photographs to reports and more, providing accountability and insight for the enterprise.

incidents, attach photographs to reports and more, providing accountability and insight for the enterprise. NEXT ARTICLE

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And now, security-supplementing technology is moving outside the command center and into the hands of security of- ficers. Guard tour tracking and tools can help enterprises better audit and monitor security officers’ efficiency and actions, as well as gain insight into incidents as they occur. Some solutions even enable security dispatchers or enterprise security leaders to request more information from the security officer reporting an incident while it is occurring, reducing the need to wait for a full debriefing after an event to gain insight and adjust procedures. Bill Strother, CPP, is the director of corporate security for Weingarten Realty, a commercial and retail property manage- ment company with properties in 21 states. While not every property has security through Weingarten, those that do most- ly utilize G4S’s security officer force as well as Secure Trax guard tour management tools and Insight GPS tracking. The system helps Strother and other property stakehold- ers better understand what happens at the properties in a real-time basis. The tools can also be used to alert officers to be aware of different things, such as BOLO alerts, updated directives and more. Security officers can use the tool to complete incident re- ports from the field, cutting down on report time and en- abling officers to add more contextual information. Strother’s

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Strother’s BACK TO CONTENTS 34 CASINOJOURNAL.COM team can program the tour management devices to ask ad-

team can program the tour management devices to ask ad- ditional questions specific to an issue to prompt the officer to add more relevant data. A water leak might warrant a simple “information-only” report, while a trip and fall might need more context (what was the person doing, was it an employee or a customer, what were the results, etc). “This system is a living, breathing organism, and it chang- es with the needs of the client,” said Strother. “Daily activity paper logs are gone; officers can complete documents elec- tronically, and they can be checked and followed up on more quickly. We use these systems together to maintain awareness and determine needed action.” There are also auditable trails that accompany each report. If a supervisor sends a request for response, there is a record. As the security officer moves to respond, his or her GPS coor- dinates can be attached to that report. As the response is sent back with photos, video or just text, all of that is stored. Hav- ing these records electronically available means that Strother and his team can be more agile in creating an appropriate to show stakeholders where the challenging areas are. At Red Rock Resort, the iView Systems security officer tracking system (Tour Trax) enables Paige to better perform risk assessments, as the system can accurately show where

system (Tour Trax) enables Paige to better perform risk assessments, as the system can accurately show

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there have been issues in the past, such as trouble spots for slip and fall incidents. This helps to improve the accountability for the resort, as the reporting program provides insight into these trends and can help demonstrate improvement. Guard tracking tools can also provide proof of presence at locations that are difficult to track without the help of technol- ogy, such as multi-level parking garages. At the resort, secu- rity officers use their tracking tool to scan different RF chips on each level, which can also be used to send new directives through, such as to check lighting on the third floor or to re- spond to a lost-looking customer on the second. If an officer does not check in at all of his or her loca- tions in the time allotted, an tour alarm is sent to supervi- sion through email or on the system dashboard. The dis- patcher can make a note of the reason why the tour was incomplete (perhaps there was an incident that required the officer’s time), or can investigate. “The system also has GPS

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system also has GPS BACK TO CONTENTS 35 CASINOJOURNAL.COM capability, so if an officer is not

capability, so if an officer is not responding for whatever reason, such as a medical condition or injury and cannot communicate, the GPS on Tour Trax will give you the of- ficer’s location,” Paige said. “This system has not reduced our security staff,” he adds. “It simply makes the officers’ jobs easier to manage.” The iView system features a number of modules that help provide value to the resort as a whole, not just the security function. For example, as of January 2016, Red Rock Resort is using this system to also track internal maintenance tasks, such as sweep records to track when areas such as restaurants or re- strooms were last attended or cleaned and by whom. The team member goes into the area and uses his or her Android-based device to note that they are there, and they use a dynamic tour system to check their completed tasks off of a customized ac- tion list, which is stored in the system, and then they scan out of the area when they’re done.

ac- tion list, which is stored in the system, and then they scan out of the
ac- tion list, which is stored in the system, and then they scan out of the

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COLUMN THE GROWING AND CHANGING ROLE OF CASINO SURVEILLANCE BY DERK BOSS, DJ BOSS ASSOCIATES N
COLUMN THE GROWING AND CHANGING ROLE OF CASINO SURVEILLANCE BY DERK BOSS, DJ BOSS ASSOCIATES N

THE GROWING AND CHANGING ROLE OF CASINO SURVEILLANCE

BY DERK BOSS, DJ BOSS ASSOCIATES

N ot too long ago, surveillance departments spent al- most all of their time watching table games. We looked for cheaters, advantage players, and

thieves working inside and outside the pit. That was the work- ing model for almost all surveillance rooms, and it worked then. That was a different world. Today, our world is changing. In earlier, and some would say better, times, our gaming world would not be affected by what was happening outside of it. The dice would continue to roll, the cards would hit the felt, and the wheel would contin- ue to turn, no matter what happened outside in the real world. That’s no longer true, and probably hasn’t been for a long time. We just didn’t know it.

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What changed? We now have to be concerned about what is happening around the world, and how that may affect our guests, employees, and our property. It’s no longer all about card cheats and small-time criminals. It’s about ensuring that our employees and guests are not attacked or shot. We never really had to worry about that before. We are in the midst of a continuing threat environment that should change how we approach the security of our properties. I think a real sign of the times is the recent decision by Disneyland and other major theme parks to add security mea- sures, including metal detectors and bag checks. Disneyland and Disney World have long been recognized by security pro- fessionals and the general public as safe places to take your

have long been recognized by security pro- fessionals and the general public as safe places to

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family. I’m sure that they will continue to be so. But it is in- teresting to note that they did feel that it was time to enhance their security in order to protect their guests and employees. I think we in gaming need to start thinking the same way. It is a different world with different security challenges. We don’t have to look far for examples of our new world. We’ve had the terrorist attacks in Paris, and then in San Bernardi- no, Calif. In Las Vegas, a few days before Christmas, a homeless young woman ran over thirty-six people on the Strip, killing one and critically injuring others. Why? I don’t know, and nei- ther does anyone else at this point. And it’s not the first time that someone has attacked our tourists or employees, or that they became victims of someone who had an ax to grind and didn’t care who they hurt. Today, security and surveillance teams must be constantly prepared for a critical event or emergency, such as an active shooter, workplace violence, or someone who just de- cides that they’re going to use whatever they have at hand to hurt people. This has become a continuing saga, and unfortunately it isn’t going away for a while, if it ever does. Surveillance isn’t trained for that. Maybe they should be. How can our surveillance and security departments pre- vent any of these events or scams from happening, and if they do happen, what can they do about it?

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can they do about it? BACK TO CONTENTS 37 CASINOJOURNAL.COM First, surveillance (and security) should be

First, surveillance (and security) should be constantly look- ing for suspicious individuals or unusual circumstances any- where on the property. Again, it’s not just gaming that we have to worry about anymore. We should patrol all areas in order to protect the property as a whole. We need to be on the lookout for dangerous individuals and situations, and do our best to respond appropriately. Secondly, I think it is important to understand that we must be prepared for any of these events to occur. It’s certainly been demonstrated that they can occur. For example, our secu- rity and surveillance teams must be prepared to immediately react properly to an active shooter. It is, sadly, an event that we may have to handle one day. Our duty and responsibility in that situation is to help our guests and employees find safety. We should also be able to provide first aid to those who may be injured. Remember, the police will respond as fast as they can, but they will, on average, be seven to 10 minutes out. And when they get there, their first job is to engage the shooter. Emergency medical personnel will not enter your property until it is secure. Knowing that, our security and surveillance teams should be prepared to work together to locate, aid, hide, or evacuate guests and employees to safety. This requires an emergency plan to be in place, executives and staff thoroughly

and employees to safety. This requires an emergency plan to be in place, executives and staff

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trained, as well as regular drills for all personnel. We must do this now, not during an actual event. It will be too late. Traditionally, the surveillance department watches the money, and the security department takes care of all other se- curity issues and concerns. It is time to change that model. Surveillance must be included in emergency planning and re- sponse. The surveillance department brings considerable ex- pertise, skill and the necessary ability to see all areas of the property at once, providing real-time information to security, law enforcement and other first responders. Security and surveillance working together can quickly identify potential threats, and apply appropriate countermea- sures to prevent a critical event from taking place. Should such

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place. Should such BACK TO CONTENTS 38 CASINOJOURNAL.COM an event occur, security and surveillance can work

an event occur, security and surveillance can work together to assist guests and employees, and provide intelligence to law enforcement when it is most needed during the crisis. Our world has changed, and so has protecting our casi- no property. Surveillance (and security) must adapt to these changes. Make it part of your surveillance program to consid- er, plan and prepare for today’s security challenges. You won’t be sorry that you did.

security challenges. You won’t be sorry that you did. Derk Boss, principal of DJ Boss Associates

Derk Boss, principal of DJ Boss Associates and a Raving Consulting partner, is an author, instructor and speaker specializing in the fields of surveillance training and methodology, gaming protection, loss prevention and the detection of internal and external theft and fraud. He is an adjunct instructor for the International Gaming Institute at University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

He is an adjunct instructor for the International Gaming Institute at University of Nevada, Las Vegas

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COLUMN BOLSTER YOUR CASINO CYBER SECURITY BY CHAD PINSON & JASON SMOLANOFF T he gaming industry
COLUMN BOLSTER YOUR CASINO CYBER SECURITY BY CHAD PINSON & JASON SMOLANOFF T he gaming industry
COLUMN BOLSTER YOUR CASINO CYBER SECURITY BY CHAD PINSON & JASON SMOLANOFF T he gaming industry

BOLSTER YOUR CASINO CYBER SECURITY

BY CHAD PINSON & JASON SMOLANOFF

T he gaming industry has long been known for its Fort

Knox-level security. But casinos and online gaming

operators are clear targets of cyber attackers, and the

extensive, best-in-class preventative security measures of years past only go so far. A gaming operation could spend a billion dollars to deter an attack, but without effective internal defenses and a compre- hensive, well-rehearsed plan outlining clear attack remediation and recovery steps, operators will find themselves exposed and unprepared when an incident occurs. This new reality means leaders in the gaming industry must adopt a philosophy that we call “assumption of incident.” Casi- nos can no longer hope to achieve flawless cyber security across

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their sprawling network perimeters. It’s a sad truth: enterprise networks must be considered semi-permeable. Operators must be ready to respond to an attack. Some security experts call this notion “assumption of breach,” but this only captures incidents of improper access to confidential data. Assumption of incident reflects the various other risks facing gaming businesses, includ- ing gameplay hacks, theft of electronic funds, money launder- ing, and cyber attacks that knock online gaming operations of- fline or cause full-on business disruption. Gaming industry security programs must be based on the assumption that cyber incidents of all kinds can and will oc- cur, and that companies must be prepared to fight, survive and recover. Optimizing cyber defenses, while being ready to

companies must be prepared to fight, survive and recover. Optimizing cyber defenses, while being ready to

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respond to and recover from an incident, is better known as “cyber resilience.” In practice, this means hunting for signs of intrusion, per- forming rapid damage mitigation and rehearsing plans for a quick rebound. At the heart is a dedication to resilience, be- cause the games must go on, the money must be safe and the players must have confidence in the game and the house. Below are the three key pieces of advice for a realistic, bud- get-friendly and effective cyber resilience program for casinos in today’s “when-not-if” environment:

Know your greatest risks. It all begins with knowledge. You have to address your greatest risks first and budget the greatest proportion of resources to these areas. Your first in- clination may be to think about slot machines, chips or cash and accounts on hand. Yes, these are valuable assets that need to be protected, powered on and uncompromised. But what if table games were forced to close, too? What if the data casi- nos possess on players and patrons were compromised? In a cyber risk assessment, appropriate questions include: Is game- play code stored securely? How is the personal information of players protected in the gaming environment, and networks of the hotel, retail operations and restaurants? Are there internal network barriers that prevent an intruder from pivoting from

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from pivoting from BACK TO CONTENTS 40 CASINOJOURNAL.COM his place of entry into your digital vault?

his place of entry into your digital vault? Company leader- ship, legal counsel, compliance executives, IT/human resourc- es professionals and security experts must work together to identify where sensitive and regulated data is stored and make sure these systems are tightly controlled in accordance with the current threat environment and business needs. Have a plan for disasters. In a data breach scenario, seconds matter. This is not the time to figure out who to call, what to say and how to avoid additional damage. Writing and practicing an incident response plan gives a gaming organization the power to act immediately in case of an attack. Often this includes iden- tifying a team of first responders. The same multi-disciplinary group that worked together to identify valuable data should be involved, plus public relations executives. For gaming compa- nies particular care should be placed on PR, third-party assis- tance and getting the business back up and running. Public relations and crisis management professionals should be an integral part of the incident response plan, ready to be- gin providing counsel immediately following the discovery of an incident. For casinos, reputation is everything. To attract and keep players, customers must believe games are free from tampering and that the money in play and in their accounts is safe and secure. Competition is tight and trust is a major factor.

the money in play and in their accounts is safe and secure. Competition is tight and

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Outside legal and technical counsel are particularly valu- able in the highly regulated gaming industry. If you wait until thegaming commission is headed your way or a lawsuit is filed to bring them on board, it’s too late. That’s because one of the primary advantages of engaging third-parties is the opportuni- ty to extend legal privilege to an investigation as it’s happening. Business continuity considerations include planning for the immediate and professional preservation of data to avoid any additional losses, having copies of essential data stored else- where, back-up power supplies and back-up servers. Create a culture of resilience. People are security’s weak- est link. Just clicking on the wrong e-mail or accessing a critical system from an insecure Wi-Fi network can set off a chain of disasters. Cyber security has to become central to core business operations and practiced throughout the enterprise—it cannot be dependent upon a single tool or the IT group. Therefore, ca- sino leadership must evangelize and incentivize security through- out the company. Leadership must take what they’ve learned in the risk assessment and use the incident response team to create strong, multidisciplinary security policies that complement exist- ing operations and culture. Many of our clients create a security committee, with a multidisciplinary composition similar to the one described earlier, who meet on a quarterly basis to review

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basis to review BACK TO CONTENTS 41 CASINOJOURNAL.COM security issues, consider security policy and practice and

security issues, consider security policy and practice and prepare updates for the board. They meet more often if an issue arises. The gaming industry has the attention of cyber criminals. Like retailers, a casino holds payment transaction information related to buying chips, hotel rooms, and food. Like a bank, it manages the storage and transmission of vast amounts of money. Like a cryptocurrency operation, online gaming businesses may offer the possibility of anonymous transactions through the use of chips. These risks could lead to paralyzing cyber incidents, and no one has the budget to guarantee cyber-attack prevention. The best answer to these challenges lies in accepting that at some point, failure is inevitable. Prepare the board of directors, the CEO and all levels of your company’s operations for it. Scream it from the hilltops… the worst can happen, and there’s no doubt something bad will. The time to prepare is now. Ignoring the inevitable will only ensure more serious consequences when it occurs.

will only ensure more serious consequences when it occurs. Chad Pinson is managing director and head

Chad Pinson is managing director and head of office for cyber security, investigations and risk management firm Stroz Friedberg’s Dallas office. He can be reached at www.strozfriedberg.com.

Jason Smolanoff is the president of CISO Advisory & Investigations, an information security, risk management and investigative firm providing outsourced chief information security officer services. He can be reached at www.cisoadvisory.com.

outsourced chief information security officer services. He can be reached at www.cisoadvisory.com . NEXT ARTICLE

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COLUMN PREPARING OPERATORS FOR INTERNAL FRAUD AND THEFT WITH SURVEILLANCE BY DERK BOSS, DJ BOSS ASSOCIATES
COLUMN PREPARING OPERATORS FOR INTERNAL FRAUD AND THEFT WITH SURVEILLANCE BY DERK BOSS, DJ BOSS ASSOCIATES

PREPARING OPERATORS FOR INTERNAL FRAUD AND THEFT WITH SURVEILLANCE

BY DERK BOSS, DJ BOSS ASSOCIATES

T he nightclub is packed and the music is loud and pulsating. Bartenders are making drinks and slinging beers as

fast as they can. One bartender grabs a wad of cash from a cus- tomer, takes it over to his register, enters the transaction, looks around to see if anyone is watching, voids the sale and places the cash into his toke bucket. The bartender’s been stealing for several weeks and doesn’t expect to get caught. He knows surveillance rarely watches the club, and even if they did, they would never figure out what he’s doing. He smiles thinking about how much money he’ll have at the end of his shift. He’s still smiling when secu- rity grabs him and marches him away.

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Unfortunately for him, surveillance did watch the club and did figure out what he was doing. In surveillance, we often talk about training our agents to protect the property. Knowing how a scam operates is very important for its detection. This means that a lot of our focus is preparing our staff to know what to look for. I think it is im- portant that we continue to do this, but I think it’s even more important that we place ourselves in a position to detect the scam quickly. Let me explain what I mean. Nowadays, there is a lot of criminal activity occurring in casinos. There is, of course, the traditional cheating at gaming. In addition, we now must be concerned with losses that can occur (and do) in any of

cheating at gaming. In addition, we now must be concerned with losses that can occur (and

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a property’s departments or venues. If that is so, then the

way we must operate is to find ways to put our surveillance personnel in a position to detect them. If you think about it,

almost every scam that’s caught is usually reported by a guest or employee, or is caught by accident. Unfortunately, most scams are caught too late to prevent the loss of thousands of dollars. We just get there too late. We need to do more besides knowing how a scam works. There are so many new scams or variations of old ones that we can never know all of them. Surveillance must operate in such a fashion that we are able to place ourselves where it

is likely we’ll detect the activity, regardless of how well the

scam is hidden. That’s not as hard as it sounds. What I’m saying is that in- stead of randomly moving surveillance cameras in the hopes that we’ll see something suspicious, we use tripwires and data analysis to drive the surveillance team to where they need to be, and allow them to focus their considerable ability and re- sources on a particular issue or concern. Here’s an example. In table games and slots, we will have players win. Most of them are not going to win very much, and what they do win will be legitimate. They are not of concern. The winners who win a lot, who are unknown to

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who are unknown to BACK TO CONTENTS 43 CASINOJOURNAL.COM the property, or who play suspiciously, we

the property, or who play suspiciously, we must look at to ensure that their win is legitimate. Surveillance must get to those players and stop them, if necessary, before they beat us for too much money. This is an operational issue that can be resolved quickly. I just make it standard operating procedure that surveillance must be notified (via a tripwire) when a player wins a certain amount and require that surveillance perform a thorough review and evaluation to ensure that the play is normal. We evaluate the player at a lower amount to detect suspicious activity in order to prevent it from becom- ing a larger amount. In today’s gaming world, with the myriad scams and internal frauds that continuously occur, surveillance must use their operational procedures to isolate, identify and fo- cus on those issues requiring their attention. Focusing on getting into a position to detect those issues allows surveil- lance to operate proactively and detect losses quickly wher- ever they occur.

proactively and detect losses quickly wher- ever they occur. Derk Boss, principal of DJ Boss Associates

Derk Boss, principal of DJ Boss Associates and a Raving Consulting partner, is an author, instructor and speaker specializing in the fields of surveillance training and methodology, gaming protection, loss prevention and the detection of internal and external theft and fraud.

methodology, gaming protection, loss prevention and the detection of internal and external theft and fraud. NEXT

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