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2017 ISSUE 2 INSIDE! Great offers art books on for beginners
2017 ISSUE 2
INSIDE!
Great offers
art books
on
for beginners

3 drawing exercises for you to try!

books on for beginners 3 drawing exercises for you to try! START RT EASY FIRST STEPS
books on for beginners 3 drawing exercises for you to try! START RT EASY FIRST STEPS
books on for beginners 3 drawing exercises for you to try! START RT EASY FIRST STEPS

START

RT

for beginners 3 drawing exercises for you to try! START RT EASY FIRST STEPS IN DRAWING

EASY FIRST STEPS IN DRAWING AND PAINTING

Draw&paint with our top tutors!

IN DRAWING AND PAINTING Draw&paint with our top tutors! DEVELOP composition and colour skills as you

DEVELOP

composition and colour skills as you paint a harbour scene

composition and colour skills as you paint a harbour scene WATERCOLOUR MADE EASY TRY ACRYLICS! l
composition and colour skills as you paint a harbour scene WATERCOLOUR MADE EASY TRY ACRYLICS! l
composition and colour skills as you paint a harbour scene WATERCOLOUR MADE EASY TRY ACRYLICS! l
composition and colour skills as you paint a harbour scene WATERCOLOUR MADE EASY TRY ACRYLICS! l
composition and colour skills as you paint a harbour scene WATERCOLOUR MADE EASY TRY ACRYLICS! l
composition and colour skills as you paint a harbour scene WATERCOLOUR MADE EASY TRY ACRYLICS! l
composition and colour skills as you paint a harbour scene WATERCOLOUR MADE EASY TRY ACRYLICS! l
composition and colour skills as you paint a harbour scene WATERCOLOUR MADE EASY TRY ACRYLICS! l

WATERCOLOUR MADE EASY

skills as you paint a harbour scene WATERCOLOUR MADE EASY TRY ACRYLICS! l Practise basic techniques
TRY ACRYLICS!
TRY ACRYLICS!
l Practise basic techniques l Experiment with colour l Follow step-by-step demonstrations
l
Practise basic techniques
l
Experiment with colour
l
Follow step-by-step demonstrations
with colour l Follow step-by-step demonstrations The perfect medium for painting flowers w w w .

The perfect medium for painting flowers

demonstrations The perfect medium for painting flowers w w w . p a i n t

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START RT CONTENTS Welcome to the second of three 24-page instalments of StartArt in 2017,

START

RT

START RT CONTENTS Welcome to the second of three 24-page instalments of StartArt in 2017, published

CONTENTS

Welcome to the second of three 24-page instalments of StartArt in 2017, published in association with Leisure Painter and The Artist magazines

5 Drawing

Try three warm-up exercises to help you see and draw a simple still life, glass objects and a sleepy puppy from life, by Jon Stich

Publisher Dr Sally Bulgin

Editor

Ingrid Lyon

8
8

Advertising sales Anna-Marie Brown Telephone 01778 392048 Email annamarieb@warnersgroup.co.uk

Subscriptions Telephone 01580 763315/763673

Designer

Sarah Poole

All material copyrighted: reproduction forbidden without permission. Views expressed are not necessarily those of the publisher.

StartArt is published by TAPC (The Artists’ Publishing Company Ltd), Caxton House, 63/65 High Street, Tenterden, Kent TN30 6BD Telephone 01580 763673/763315 Email info@tapc.co.uk

www.painters-online.co.uk the online home of Leisure Painter, The Artist and StartArt magazines

Printed by Warners Group Publications PLC, The Maltings, West Street, Bourne, Lincolnshire PE10 9PH

Cover
Cover

Hazel Lale Boat Scene Build your colour confidence as you follow Hazel step by step on pages 17 to 21

as you follow Hazel step by step on pages 17 to 21 START RT 5 8

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5

8 Beginners’ guide to acrylics

Develop your skills as you learn about equipment and techniques then paint a striking hibiscus flower step by step with Elena Parashko

12 Watercolour

Practise useful watercolour techniques, including wet in wet and thirsty brush, while you produce a colourful crab with Alison Fennell

17 Colour confidence

How to work out your composition, decide on colours and paint a boat scene in watercolour with Hazel Lale

22 Subscribe to

Leisure Painter and The Artist

Your first five issues for £5 when you take out a subscription to either of our practical art magazines

12

a subscription to either of our practical art magazines 12 SPECIAL OFFERS ON practical art books
SPECIAL OFFERS ON practical art books (page 4) How to subscribe to Leisure Painter and
SPECIAL
OFFERS
ON
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How to subscribe to
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and The Artist
(pages 22-23)

17

TUTORS

Elena Parashko

A regular contributor to

Leisure Painter, Elena offers

a variety of painting

courses and workshops in Australia, as well as retreats in Tuscany and Fiji and online tuition. Visit www.elenaparashko.com

Alison Fennell

Another regular contributor to Leisure Painter and

based in Wales, Alison teaches watercolour workshops, specialising in painting animals. Visit www.eastwitching.com for details

Hazel Lale

A contributor to The Artist, Hazel offers drawing and painting workshops in acrylics and watercolour, and one-to-one lessons from her Sheffield studio. Visit www.hazellale.co.uk

Jon Stich

Jon teaches illustration and figure drawing in California, USA. Find out more by visiting www.jonstich.com

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The online home of and magazines of Save on all the £2 featured books and

The online home of and

The online home of and magazines of Save on all the £2 featured books and enjoy
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START RT Drawing practice Here are three warm-up exercises for you to try, by Jon

START

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Drawing practice

Here are three warm-up exercises for you to try, by Jon Stich

are three warm-up exercises for you to try, by Jon Stich F or those who want

F or those who want to learn to draw, but stuck for how to get started, the following three pages show you how to turn everyday

objects that fill your home into subjects for your sketchbooks - allowing you to work on your drawing skills at any moment of the day.

Seeing shapes

Sometimes when figuring out the composition of a still life, it’s best to think in ways that are outside the box, so to speak. Rather than zeroing in on each object, try to focus on the overall shape they create, or the negative space around them.Try thinking of this as an exercise in which the objects you’re sketching are blocking projection of light, so the only thing you see is their silhouette.

Grab several

objects from your drawing area and lay them out on a clean surface in a random fashion, with each object overlapping another, so that you’re creating one giant shape.

another, so that you’re creating one giant shape.  Instead of  Make these beginning lines

Instead of

Make these beginning lines fairly

You can use the negative space created by these shapes to help draw this mug at a credible angle. Note where the lines from the handle meet up with the pen, and how the negative space between the handle and the mug is much more shrunken because of our vantage point.

looking at the objects themselves, look for the giant shape surrounding them.This is known as ‘negative space’ and is a different way of looking at your composition.

sketchy, and then build into more specific values and shapes as you go.Try this exercise with other still lifes and landscapes, attempting each time to see the shapes as opposed to all of the more specific details.

the shapes as opposed to all of the more specific details.  By studying that silhouette-like
the shapes as opposed to all of the more specific details.  By studying that silhouette-like

By studying that silhouette-like

shape, you can simplify the composition into a series of circles for the mug and tape roll, rectangles for the phone and pen, and an ‘X’ for the scissors.

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5

CLEAR GLASS Glassware The toughest aspect of drawing glassware is, without a doubt, the element

CLEAR GLASS

Glassware

The toughest aspect of drawing glassware is, without a doubt, the element of transparency. How do you illustrate something if you can see directly through it? What you need to remember is that even the most crystal-clear glass has characteristics which allow us to know that we are looking through it, such as distorted shapes, continued contour edges and blurry edges. The key is to focus on simple shapes first.

STACKED GLASSES

Drawing transparent objects stacked within other transparent objects presents particular challenges. It’s important to notice all the lines, but not to lose sight of why the lines are there – namely to indicate the base of each individual glass and its angle in relation to the glass in which it sits.

and its angle in relation to the glass in which it sits. The values get darker
and its angle in relation to the glass in which it sits. The values get darker

The values get darker as you move down – you can see the darker bottoms of two other pint glasses inside the bottom one

Begin by using a very fine line to trace the shape of the object. Once you’ve done that, look for areas that are evidently concave or convex within the glass. Note where the glass dips down into the stem, and then the stem morphs into the base; these curving tones reveal the shape, density and flow of the glass.

This champagne flute begins with a very thin cylinder leading to a similar-shaped ellipse for the base and top

Make sure you add a little more value to show the girth of the glass where it meets the stem. This helps to show its width

glass where it meets the stem. This helps to show its width Demonstration 1 Cut glass

Demonstration 1 Cut glass

Don’t get overwhelmed with detail: start off with shapes similar to the clear wine glasses, and then create the detail with values instead of straight contour lines.

the detail with values instead of straight contour lines. Stage 3 Everything will come together once
the detail with values instead of straight contour lines. Stage 3 Everything will come together once

Stage 3

Everything will come together once you get those really dark values in. The depth of value helps to make this glass look clean, clear and shiny.

Stage 1

Start with not only the shape of the glass, but also a quick study of the glass’s design. Notice where the light is coming from, and how that affects the shadows. Rather than draw the diamond shapes out, only render the area in shadow.

Stage 2

Next, add some more of those shadows on the side of the glass, and in some of the cut-glass design details.

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START RT Demonstration 2 What do dogs dream of? Sketching from life can present many

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Demonstration 2 What do dogs dream of?

Sketching from life can present many challenges, one of them being that your subject may change over time, thereby putting a lot of importance on how long it takes you to render. A sleepy puppy will keep relatively still, but in order to create a drawing that feels solid, you need to grasp a lot of the key shapes early on.

Stage 1
Stage 1
you need to grasp a lot of the key shapes early on. Stage 1 Add information

Add information to the bed and dog at the same time, so that the pup seems more grounded.

Stage 2

Introduce some of the shapes for the ears, nose and eyes. It’s okay to create rounded-out shapes with loose lines to help you make the form feel more fluid. Flesh out the shapes for the legs, and make sure that the dog looks anatomically possible – you should try to have an understanding of where the legs and hips attach and fold inwards. Add some detail to the bed, too.

Try to really see the most basic shapes of the dog. I began with a sideways ‘J’ that is positioned inside a clamshell shape for the bed.The tips of the ‘J’ have a couple of sharp wave shapes coming off for the head and legs.

Look for common shapes in the dog’s body to make things simple from the outset.

in the dog’s body to make things simple from the outset. Stage 3 Add in some

Stage 3

Add in some of the values. Don’t worry about all the subtle differences – just focus on the areas that are definitely dark or definitely light. Work on the pattern of the dog’s fur, and then add some of the slightly darker areas around the head near the bed cushion. Add in some of the value to the bed, too.

These exercises were adapted from Sketch Your Stuff: 200 Things to Draw and How to Draw Them by Jon Stich (Search Press, 2016, £9.99).Turn back to page 4 for special offers on practical art books from our bookshop at www.painters-online.co.uk

art books from our bookshop at www.painters-online.co.uk Shade parts of the dog’s fur and bed, but

Shade parts of the dog’s fur and bed, but only work with a couple of values.

dog’s fur and bed, but only work with a couple of values. Define darker lines with

Define darker lines with harder edges, and add some more quick marks for details in the fur and cushion.

some more quick marks for details in the fur and cushion. Stage 4 Give more depth

Stage 4

Give more depth to the darker values, and add more detail and final touches. The darker patches of fur need some even darker value to help show the dog’s anatomy, and the head needs some darker lines to help the eyes and nose pop out more. I also added some value to the cushion to help indicate the direction of the light source.

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8

Beginners’ guide to

acrylics

Build your confidence as you paint a striking hibiscus flower with Elena Parashko

A crylic paint is a versatile medium that is odourless, fast drying, washes

out in water and accepts the addition of other mediums to change its

consistency from runny (like watercolour) to thick (like oil paint). The

following is a list of the basic equipment needed to start and some useful tips for painting with acrylics. Then follow me to paint a colourful hibiscus flower in five easy steps (over the page).

Your eight

basic colours

YOUR EQUIPMENT

Paint

There is a huge range of colours available in acrylic paints, but you don’t need them all. In fact, it is better to work with a limited number of basic colours and mix variations from these core colours, as this will ensure harmony in your painting. I recommend eight basic colours to beginners (see left). When looking for these colours in an art shop, don’t be confused when you notice that different brands often call almost the same colour by different names, such as cadmium yellow light and lemon yellow. With this basic set of paints, you can mix a variety of other colours. You can create various shades of green with different combinations of blues and yellows. Orange can be made with a mixture of red and yellow, and violet can be mixed from blue and red. A lovely dark is made with a mixture of ultramarine blue and burnt sienna – the more burnt sienna in the mix the more chocolaty the result, the more ultramarine blue in the mix, the more charcoal the result will be. Experiment with colour mixing to see what’s possible. However, there are some shades that can’t be mixed so, as you begin to paint more subjects, you may need to add a colour or two to your stock as the need arises. For example, if you are painting oceans, then phthalo green is a useful colour to have.the page). Your eight basic colours YOUR EQUIPMENT Paint Titanium white Burnt sienna Ultramarine blue Cobalt the page). Your eight basic colours YOUR EQUIPMENT Paint Titanium white Burnt sienna Ultramarine blue Cobalt the page). Your eight basic colours YOUR EQUIPMENT Paint Titanium white Burnt sienna Ultramarine blue Cobalt the page). Your eight basic colours YOUR EQUIPMENT Paint Titanium white Burnt sienna Ultramarine blue Cobalt the page). Your eight basic colours YOUR EQUIPMENT Paint Titanium white Burnt sienna Ultramarine blue Cobalt the page). Your eight basic colours YOUR EQUIPMENT Paint Titanium white Burnt sienna Ultramarine blue Cobalt the page). Your eight basic colours YOUR EQUIPMENT Paint Titanium white Burnt sienna Ultramarine blue Cobalt the page). Your eight basic colours YOUR EQUIPMENT Paint Titanium white Burnt sienna Ultramarine blue Cobalt

Titanium

white

Burnt

sienna

Ultramarine

blue

Cobalt

blue

Cadmium

yellow

medium

Cadmium

yellow light

(or lemon

yellow)

Cadmium

red

(or scarlet)

Alizarin

crimson

(or lemon yellow) Cadmium red (or scarlet) Alizarin crimson  Palettes for acrylics watercolour palette with

Palettes for acrylics

watercolour palette with compartments, wooden palette, plastic palette

Palette

As acrylic paint comes

in tubes, jars or bottles,

you need a convenient surface on which to place small amounts.

There is the choice of

a disposable palette

(from left to right): Disposable,

(where you tear off and throw away used sheets), a wooden palette, a sheet of

perspex or plastic, a ceramic plate or a stay-wet palette (see how to make your own in the following tips section). I find the best palettes for acrylics are those that have large flat surfaces to mix on rather than small compartments, and those that are easy to clean, as dried acrylic paint can be difficult to remove.

Palette knife

Palette knives come in

a variety of shapes and

sizes in metal and plastic, and can be used for painting as

well as mixing paint. It

is better to mix paint

with a palette knife than a brush, as the point allows you to be more precise in how

much of each colour

you pick up. It also saves your brushes from becoming clogged with paint.

Support

A support just means the surface on which you paint.

Acrylics can be painted onto canvas, paper, wood or board.

If using paper, make sure it is thick watercolour paper so it

using paper, make sure it is thick watercolour paper so it  Palette knives for acrylic

Palette knives

for acrylic painting

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Your basic acrylic painting equipment

Your basic acrylic painting equipment  Brushes for acrylic painting (from left to right): Flat, filbert,

Brushes for

acrylic painting (from left to right):

Flat, filbert, large Round, small Round (or liner)

doesn’t buckle with the moisture and, if using wood or board, prepare the surface with gesso first.The easiest option is to use a prepared canvas from an art shop.

Brushes

Acrylic paint can be applied with a brush, palette knife or any other tool you are creative enough to use. The basic brushes that are most useful for acrylic painting are made from hog hair bristles or stiff synthetic bristles, as these have enough strength and spring to push the paint around on a canvas. Avoid using soft watercolour brushes as you will struggle to get good paint

coverage. Brushes also come in a variety of shapes. Start your collection with a few flat brushes in a small, medium and large size. A flat brush is the most common. It creates a broad stroke and fills space quickly. Another useful brush is the filbert. Its curved top makes it excellent for painting clouds and clumps of vegetation. Large Round brushes are useful for dabbing and dotting, and very small ones (also called liners) produce fine detail.

A jar of water

Water is not added to acrylic paint and is used to wash brushes only. Do not wet the brush before picking up acrylic paint and always dry brushes thoroughly when washing between colours. If you want to thin or increase the transparency of acrylic paint, it is better to add painting medium rather than diluting with water, as this may cause the paint binder to no longer hold pigments together, resulting in uneven colour or paint that easily lifts from the surface.

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easily lifts from the surface. www.painters-online.co.uk START RT Tips for painting with acrylics Acrylic paint

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Tips for painting with acrylics

Acrylic paint dries darker

To compensate for this quality, when mixing colours make them a bit lighter on the palette than you intend for the painting. This characteristic also makes it tricky to remix and match colours exactly. It is far better to mix more colour than you think you will need then, if any touch ups are required, you can use the leftover original colour rather than mixing a slightly mismatching colour, which makes it obvious that areas have been patched.

Acrylic paint dries quickly

This quality has advantages as well as disadvantages. If you make a mistake, it is good to know you only have to wait a short period of time for the paint to dry and you can paint over it. A disadvantage is that sometimes the paint will dry faster than you want on the palette, making it unusable, as well as on the canvas, which prevents blending. There are a few methods you can use to slow this fast drying time down:

1 Add a few drops of retarder medium to the paint and mix thoroughly with a palette knife before beginning to paint. Be careful not to add too much retarder or it will overly dilute paint consistency.

2 Once you have mixed a colour on the palette,

scoop the paint into a compact pile. If acrylic paint is spread out thinly with a large surface area, it will dry more quickly.

3 When making smooth blends of colour over a large

area of canvas, there is a danger that acrylic paint will start to dry before it can be completely blended. To overcome this problem, use a large brush to apply a thin layer of clear painting medium over the entire canvas before painting. Only use enough medium to dampen the canvas slightly. Mix all paint colours in advance so no time is wasted in getting the next colour ready then paint onto canvas as normal, blending as quickly as possible.

4 When not using certain colours, cover that part of

the palette with Clingfilm. It is contact with air that dries out acrylic paint. Only uncover sections of paint as needed.

out acrylic paint. Only uncover sections of paint as needed.  Make a stay-wet palette by

Make a stay-wet palette by placing a damp

sponge in the bottom of a sealable plastic container with short sides. Place a disposable palette sheet on top of the sponge, apply paint to this as normal and seal the lid when not in use.

SUMMER 2017

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10

Demonstration Beyond Paradise

One of the highlights of my annual painting retreat in Fiji is the tropical vegetation and beautiful flowers. My favourite is the hibiscus, which comes in a fantastic array of colour combinations, with some flowers the size of dinner plates. This hibiscus (right), which was growing outside my hut, was the perfect subject for a painting. Before we begin, here are three top tips to bear in mind when painting flowers:

1 If you want to make a realistic painting of flowers (rather

than a loose interpretation), make sure you are accurate in the number of petals and stamens you depict.This hibiscus has a huge number of stamens, but some flowers are characterised by five or seven only. Plants are identified by these distinguishing features.

2 Begin by painting the least conspicuous petal and work

your way up to the most prominent petal. This gives you an

opportunity to practise your technique and ensure the colours are right before you tackle the focal point and the most noticeable part of the painting.

3 Make sure brushstrokes follow the direction of veins and

crinkles in the petals and leaves.

Your reference photograph: A single hibiscus flower

 Your reference photograph: A single hibiscus flower Step 1 1 Draw the outline of the

Step 1

1 Draw the outline of the hibiscus and main crinkles of the petals onto canvas using willow charcoal.

With a large flat brush, paint the background with a very dark purple that almost looks black. Mix this background colour from alizarin crimson and ultramarine blue mixed with a small amount of burnt sienna.

2

blue mixed with a small amount of burnt sienna. 2 Step 2 With a medium-sized flat

Step 2

blue mixed with a small amount of burnt sienna. 2 Step 2 With a medium-sized flat

With a medium-sized flat brush, paint each petal one at a time. Begin with an underpainting of alizarin crimson at the base of the petal then add cadmium yellow light darkened with a little of the background colour on the outer half.

You will need… l Surface Stretched canvas 24 x 24in. (61 x 61cm) Cadmium red
You will need…
l
Surface
Stretched canvas
24 x 24in. (61 x 61cm)
Cadmium red
Titanium white
l
Brushes
l
Acrylics
Ultramarine blue
Alizarin crimson
Burnt sienna
Cadmium yellow light
Flats Nos. 10, 4 & 2
Liner No. 1
l
Miscellaneous
Willow charcoal
Gloss varnish
No. 1 l Miscellaneous Willow charcoal Gloss varnish Step 3 1 Make a pink mid-tone for

Step 3

1 Make a pink

mid-tone for the

crimson edge of

the lower part of the petal by mixing cadmium red and titanium white.

2 Use some of the

background colour for the shadow at the base of the petal.

3 Mix cadmium yellow light and titanium white to create a mid-tone. Lighten some of this mix with more titanium white to create a highlight. Use these two tones to paint the top half of the petal by shaping the crinkles and curves.

4 Paint the pattern of fine white stripes radiating through

the centre of the petal using a small liner brush.

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START RT Step 4 Repeat the same process for each of the five petals. There
START RT Step 4 Repeat the same process for each of the five petals. There

START

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Step 4

Repeat the same process for each of the five petals. There are two methods for this stage. First, you can choose to underpaint the whole flower first to eliminate all the white canvas then work on adding mid-tones and highlight layers to all the petals at the same time, but it is easy to lose your drawing in the process. However, as I was not completing the painting in one sitting, I decided to work on one petal at a time, bringing each to completion before moving on to the next one.

Step 5

1 Paint the central pistil, stamens and pollen with colours already used for the petals. Make orange by mixing cadmium red with cadmium yellow light.

2 When the painting is completely dry, give it two coats of gloss varnish.

is completely dry, give it two coats of gloss varnish.  The finished painting Beyond Paradise

The finished painting

Beyond Paradise, acrylic, 24 x 24in. (61 x 61cm)

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Turn back to page 3 for information about Elena and how to contact her.

SUMMER 2017

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11

A jaunty and bright crab inspired me to pick up my brush. I Watercolour Practise
A jaunty and bright crab inspired me to pick up my brush. I Watercolour Practise

A jaunty and bright

crab inspired me to

pick up my brush. I

Watercolour

Practise useful techniques, including wet in wet and thirsty brush, as you paint along with Alison Fennell

and thirsty brush, as you paint along with Alison Fennell YOUR MATERIALS Paper Watercolour paper comes

YOUR MATERIALS

Paper

Watercolour paper comes in different weights – 90lb, 140lb and 300lb are the most common – and textures – Hot- pressed (smooth), cold-pressed (also called NOT, which is textured), and Rough.They are generally made from cotton or wood pulp. Cotton paper is the best, as it withstands repeated washes, heavy brushwork and allows wonderful paint flow, but it is expensive. Wood pulp is also good and popular with beginners as it is cheaper. The surface I used for the following demonstration was I Love Art 140lb (300gsm) cold-pressed paper, which I stretched (see StartArt1, page 5, on how to stretch paper).

Paint

Watercolour generally comes in tubes (moist paint, which is the consistency of cream) or pans (small rectangular blocks of hard paint).Tubes are moist and are squirted into a palette. It’s best to have a lidded palette for this and a few times a week spray a fine mist of water over your tube paints to keep them moist.They are easily loaded onto your brush for doing big, bold washes. Pans are smaller and not so suited for use with large brushes, as you can pick

up colours from adjacent pans. A box of pan or half-pan paints is especially practical to use outside, as it is portable and light, and the paint won’t run. You can see the I Love Art colours I used for the demonstration on page 14.

Brushes

The main categories of brushes are Round, flat, filbert, Rigger, wash and Hake, which are made from animal or synthetic

KEEPING A SKETCHBOOK

Simply doodling and drawing freely in a sketchbook is a great way to find your own voice as an artist. It allows you just to be yourself with nobody judging – the key is to value the process of observing and not the end result. Every time you observe and draw you are greatly improving your ability to see, decipher, simplify and render. Drawing what catches your eye and not correcting your (perceived) mistakes will allow your interests and ideas to manifest on the paper, which can be the source of unique and personal subjects for future works.

loved how the angular jointed legs contrasted with the rugged oval shape of his body (see above) so in this tutorial I will work with you through initial dilute and loose washes on to more pigmented and detailed paint application to fully capture that crab charisma! You’ll learn about the different strengths of paint, try out wet into wet, and use lifting and blending all

within a controlled area. The legs and body will be painted using a wet-into-wet technique.Then using the thirsty brush technique you will lift highlights to suggest shine on the smooth claws and body.You will add shadows, both wet into wet and wet on dry, using the moist-brush technique to soften shadow edges and create contrast and form. Finally, you will add a few accents to make the crab come alive. Before applying washes you will wet each claw, leg and the main body

with clear water and allow it to sink in

to the point where there is still a faintly

visible glisten of moisture. To see this, try holding the paper to the window or

a light.This degree of moisture I call

‘satin’. This is the perfect time to add the first washes. If you add them when the paper is running with water, there

is no control, but if you wait too long

and the paper becomes only damp, it will be too dry and painting into it will give you unsightly watermarks. I painted this demonstration using

GreatArt’s I Love Art materials.This range is excellent value for money, and perfect for the beginner in watercolour, as you can experiment and really ‘splash out’ with your paints without spending a fortune. Find out more by visiting www.greatart.co.uk or visit the GreatArt superstore in London E2.

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A pigmented mix A d i l u t e w a s h MIXING

A pigmented mix

A dilute wash

MIXING CONSISTENCIES

With watercolour, making the dilution of mixes is key

1 A pigmented mix needs much more paint than water.The mix needs to be slightly viscose and creamy.

2 A dilute wash requires more water than paint. It is quite runny and milky in consistency.

fibres. It is important always to wet your brushes thoroughly before picking up paint. A mere dip in a jug of water is often not enough to saturate the hairs at the core of the brush. Just tap the brush gently on the base of your water jug and you will see trapped air bubbles in the hairs dispersing. Now your brush is ready to take up paint. Never leave your brushes standing in

a water jug or you will bend the shape

and ruin the point. When not in use, lay them flat.

Water

I recommend using two plastic pint jugs

of water when you paint. Empty them

and refill the minute they start to look a little dirty, as you want your watercolours to be fresh and clean. You could use one jug as your dirtiest rinsing jug then one as your dipping jug.

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START

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TECHNIQUES

Practise the following techniques before painting the crab study over the page.

Wet into wet (for very soft-edged passages of colour)

Wet into wet is a very popular way of using watercolour.This technique gives us beautifully soft and dreamy skies, vegetation and seas. Wet the paper with clean water and let it soak in for about 30 to 60 seconds until it shows a faint moisture sheen. Mix up a dilute wash of colour and apply it to the moistened area.The result will be a soft-edged passage of colour, which will continue to spread and bleed until the moisture has disappeared. In this state you can tip your board to help the colour flow in a particular direction. Once you lay it flat, it will stay more or less in place. You can also lift out highlights using the thirsty brush technique when the paper is in this state (right).

Thirsty brush (for lifting out colour)

To create a thirsty brush, simply wet a watercolour brush thoroughly in clean water then dry it with a flannel to blot out as much moisture as possible. I find that tissues or kitchen roll are not sufficient to do this. Now you have a brush that is ready to absorb colour and moisture. Press and drag it in an area where you want to lift colour and you will see it lifting off to reveal the white of the paper below. Remember that some staining colours are harder to lift. Rinse the brush well to get rid of the pigment you just lifted then wipe your brush and repeat as necessary.

Moist brush (for softening a hard edge)

When you paint a stroke of watercolour on dry paper or over a dried area of paint you will always make a hard edge. If you want to soften the edge, thoroughly wet a watercolour brush then flick it very hard to shake off the excess droplets and keep that brush to hand. Do not wipe it on a cloth or that small amount of moisture will be lost. After you have painted the mark, immediately use the pre-moistened brush to paint along the edge you want to soften. Keep the brush at a low angle to the paper so as much of the brush is flat on the paper, and use small rotating movements as you travel down the edge. Do not go too deeply into the painted area – just stay at the outermost point.

movements as you travel down the edge. Do not go too deeply into the painted area
movements as you travel down the edge. Do not go too deeply into the painted area
into the painted area – just stay at the outermost point. www.painters-online.co.uk Before drawing my crab
into the painted area – just stay at the outermost point. www.painters-online.co.uk Before drawing my crab
into the painted area – just stay at the outermost point. www.painters-online.co.uk Before drawing my crab

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Before drawing my crab for this tutorial I picked out a few crab photos that I had, laid them randomly in front of me and just drew. I allowed myself to draw quickly and badly at first and focused on what interested me about the crabs. I loved their awkward, angular jointed legs, their fierce and pointy black tipped claws – so I allowed myself the luxury of just drawing them.Then I slowed down and drew the claws on their own as mini-studies, which allowed me to understand their shapes and angles; this was deeply absorbing. How often do we have the chance to drop out of the everyday into our own world of quiet attention? Sketching allows you to do that easily. Keep sketchbooks and you will have a place to explore your loves, ideas, curiosity and feelings, which are all grist to the artist’s mill!

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13

Demonstration Crab Study

Demonstration Crab Study Step 1 Draw or trace the crab outline onto the watercolour paper. Stretched

Step 1

Draw or trace the crab outline onto the watercolour paper. Stretched paper will work best, as it won’t buckle when you start adding dilute washes.

as it won’t buckle when you start adding dilute washes. 14 Step 2 In this step

14

as it won’t buckle when you start adding dilute washes. 14 Step 2 In this step

Step 2

In this step you will paint the two large claws at the front using the wet- in-wet technique.

1 Wet the two claws with clean water and allow the paper to become satin.This is very

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SUMMER 2017

the paper to become satin.This is very Start Art SUMMER 2017 important. Do not paint when

important. Do not paint when there is too much surface water nor when it is damp and there is no moisture sheen.

2 Drop in a dilute wash of lemon yellow and yellow ochre.

2 Drop in a dilute wash of lemon yellow and yellow ochre. 3 Immediately paint a

3 Immediately paint a more pigmented mix of vermilion and burnt sienna around the edges of the claw segments and let this bleed slightly into the yellow wash.

You will need… All from GreatArt’s I Love Art range l Surface 140lb watercolour paper,
You will need…
All from GreatArt’s I Love Art range
l
Surface
140lb watercolour paper,
11x 15in. (30x 40cm)
l
Watercolour
See colours, below
l
Brushes
Synthetic Round brushes,
Nos. 10, 5, 3 & 1
l
Miscellaneous
HB graphite pencil
Tissues and a flannel for wiping
spills and jug of clean water

Colours used

Lemon yellowfor wiping spills and jug of clean water Colours used Yellow ochre Burnt sienna Vermilion Carmine

Yellow ochrespills and jug of clean water Colours used Lemon yellow Burnt sienna Vermilion Carmine French ultramarine

Burnt siennajug of clean water Colours used Lemon yellow Yellow ochre Vermilion Carmine French ultramarine blue Prussian

Vermilionwater Colours used Lemon yellow Yellow ochre Burnt sienna Carmine French ultramarine blue Prussian blue Sap

Carmineused Lemon yellow Yellow ochre Burnt sienna Vermilion French ultramarine blue Prussian blue Sap green Step

Lemon yellow Yellow ochre Burnt sienna Vermilion Carmine French ultramarine blue Prussian blue Sap green Step

French

ultramarine blue

Prussian blueochre Burnt sienna Vermilion Carmine French ultramarine blue Sap green Step 3 Whilst still moist, drag

Sap greenVermilion Carmine French ultramarine blue Prussian blue Step 3 Whilst still moist, drag out a highlight

Carmine French ultramarine blue Prussian blue Sap green Step 3 Whilst still moist, drag out a

Step 3

Whilst still moist, drag out a highlight on the claw using the thirsty brush technique. You may need to repeat this a few times if the paint seeps back in.

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Step 4

1 Wet the legs with clean water and allow to become satin. Paint a dilute mix of lemon yellow and yellow ochre to the first two and quickly add a dilute mix of Prussian blue to

their topsides and let it bleed into the yellow

mix.

2 Quickly add a more pigmented mix of vermilion and burnt sienna to the bottom side of the legs and to the joints.

3 For the second two legs paint a dilute mix of Prussian blue, yellow ochre and lemon yellow then quickly add a more pigmented mix of Prussian blue and a speck of burnt sienna to

the undersides and the joints of the legs.

burnt sienna to the undersides and the joints of the legs. Step 5 1 Wet the
burnt sienna to the undersides and the joints of the legs. Step 5 1 Wet the

Step 5

1 Wet the remaining legs as in the steps above and drop in a dilute mix of Prussian blue and French ultramarine blue then quickly add a more pigmented mix of French ultramarine blue and carmine to the joints and outer rims of the legs.

2 Using the thirsty brush technique, quickly lift

out a few highlights on these larger back legs.

Step 6

1 Wet the entire shell shape with clean water and leave it to become satin. Add a dilute wash of yellow ochre and lemon yellow to the left-hand third of the area.

2 Next paint a dilute wash of French ultramarine and sap green with a speck of burnt sienna to the remaining two thirds of the shell. Pick the painting up and tilt it gently

back and forth to achieve a lovely soft blend. Try to keep some of the yellow showing on

the left, as this is the sunlit side.

3 While this area is still moist use a thirsty brush to lift out a ragged line across the crab’s shell. Apply a more pigmented

mix of French ultramarine blue

and sap green with a speck of carmine to the right-hand side to create a darker area for contrast and let some of that paint go over onto the crab’s

right-hand legs.

4 Now let your crab dry completely.You can speed this up by using a hairdryer – just hold the dryer about a foot away from your painting.

just hold the dryer about a foot away from your painting. www.painters-online.co.uk S U M M

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Step 7 1 Using a dark mix of French ultramarine blue, sap green and carmine,

Step 7

1 Using a dark mix of French ultramarine blue, sap green and carmine, use a small brush to place a few dark strokes in some of the joints in the crab’s claws and legs.

in some of the joints in the crab’s claws and legs. START RT 2 With a

START

RT

some of the joints in the crab’s claws and legs. START RT 2 With a clean

2 With a clean moist brush immediately soften the edges on some of those marks to blend the colour away.This makes some final sharp accents that give life to your crab by contrasting with all the soft veils of colour you previously applied.

with all the soft veils of colour you previously applied.  The finished study Crab ,

The finished study

Crab , I Love Art watercolour, 11 x 15in. (30 x 40cm)

16

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Turn back to page 3 for information about Alison and how to contact her.

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START RT Colour confidence How to work out your composition, decide on colours and paint

START

RT

Colour confidence

How to work out your composition, decide on colours and paint a boat scene in watercolour, with Hazel Lale

I t can be tempting to attempt complex compositions

overflowing with multiple colours and shapes, but

sometimes it is the simplest of scenes that result in

the most exciting paintings. Drawing too much can take away your enthusiasm for painting as you begin

to feel constrained, while adding too little information can make painting feel stressful as you are constantly looking for helpful guidance. This step-by-step demonstration shows how to strike the balance between complexity and over-simplicity.

 Stage 1 You will need… Tip l Watercolour paper: 640gsm (300lb) Rough surface, 22
 Stage 1
You will need…
Tip
l
Watercolour paper:
640gsm (300lb)
Rough surface, 22 x 30in.
(56 x 76cm)
l
Watercolour paints:
Try squinting at the
scene in front of you to
reduce the detail you
can see as you sketch.
This will often help cut out
extraneous shapes, lines
and colours to make
composition easier.
cobalt turquoise light, Winsor lemon, brown madder, Winsor red, Bengal rose (gouache), Winsor blue (red
cobalt turquoise light,
Winsor lemon, brown
madder, Winsor red,
Bengal rose (gouache),
Winsor blue (red shade),
Winsor violet
l
4B pencil and eraser
l
Sketchbook
l
Brushes:
50mm (2in.) synthetic flat,
No. 10 Round

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Explore the shapes with a 4B pencil to make a number of sketches. Use these to help decide on the composition you want to pursue.

Stage 2

Once you have made a decision, draw the initial sketch at full size and adjust the details until you are happy.

Colours used

 
Colours used   Winsor Brown Winsor Bengal rose Winsor Winsor blue Cobalt lemon madder red
Colours used   Winsor Brown Winsor Bengal rose Winsor Winsor blue Cobalt lemon madder red
Colours used   Winsor Brown Winsor Bengal rose Winsor Winsor blue Cobalt lemon madder red
Colours used   Winsor Brown Winsor Bengal rose Winsor Winsor blue Cobalt lemon madder red
Colours used   Winsor Brown Winsor Bengal rose Winsor Winsor blue Cobalt lemon madder red
Colours used   Winsor Brown Winsor Bengal rose Winsor Winsor blue Cobalt lemon madder red
Colours used   Winsor Brown Winsor Bengal rose Winsor Winsor blue Cobalt lemon madder red

Winsor

Brown

Winsor

Bengal rose

Winsor

Winsor blue

Cobalt

lemon

madder

red

(gouache)

violet

(red shade)

turquoise light

 

SUMMERR 2017

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17

 Stage 3 Make some colour runs to try out different colour schemes and to
 Stage 3 Make some colour runs to try out different colour schemes and to

Stage 3

Make some colour runs to try out different colour schemes and to familiarise yourself with the structure of the piece.

and to familiarise yourself with the structure of the piece.  Stage 5 Make your final

Stage 5

Make your final sketch using a 4B pencil, using the earlier preparatory work for reference, adjusting the complexity with help from the colour run.

18

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SUMMER 2017

with help from the colour run. 18 Start Art SUMMER 2017  Stage 4 Make a

Stage 4

Make a large colour run to try out your favourite colour scheme on a full-size copy of the sketch. Pay attention to see which areas you find you need more guidance, and which seem over-detailed.

find you need more guidance, and which seem over-detailed.  Stage 6 Use the 2in. flat

Stage 6

Use the 2in. flat brush to paint the foreground sand areas and building with dilute Bengal rose. Use the corner of the brush to work around the figures.

Use the corner of the brush to work around the figures.  Stage 7 Add Winsor

Stage 7

Add Winsor violet and Winsor blue (red shade) to the mix and paint the sky with broad horizontal strokes.

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 Stage 8 Continue mapping out the colours, adding Winsor blue (red shade) on the

Stage 8

Continue mapping out the colours, adding Winsor blue (red shade) on the boat and figures. Change to a No. 10 Round brush for finer details such as the window.

a No. 10 Round brush for finer details such as the window.  Stage 10 Use

Stage 10

Use a mix of Winsor violet and Winsor blue (red shade) for the dark shadow on the building. Add brown madder for variety then allow the painting to dry before continuing.

variety then allow the painting to dry before continuing.  Stage 12 Paint the sky with

Stage 12

Paint the sky with Winsor blue (red shade) and add Winsor violet wet in wet. Dilute the mix and reinforce the boat.

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the mix and reinforce the boat. www.painters-online.co.uk  Stage 9 Add brown madder wet-in-wet to the

Stage 9

Add brown madder wet-in-wet to the distance, swapping between the 2in. flat and No. 10 Round brushes.

swapping between the 2in. flat and No. 10 Round brushes.  Stage 11 Add another layer

Stage 11

Add another layer of Bengal rose over the sand using the 2in. brush, introducing brown madder, Winsor lemon and a hint of Winsor red wet in wet.

madder, Winsor lemon and a hint of Winsor red wet in wet.  Stage 13 Add

Stage 13

Add some touches of Winsor lemon to the foreground area.

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19

 Stage 14 Deepen the shading on the boat using the No. 10 Round brush

Stage 14

Deepen the shading on the boat using the No. 10 Round brush to apply a mix of Winsor blue (red shade) with a little brown madder. Do the same on the left-hand building with Winsor red and cobalt turquoise, and on the boat’s hull with a mix of brown madder with cobalt blue.

boat’s hull with a mix of brown madder with cobalt blue. 21  Stage 16 Add

21

Stage 16

Add cobalt turquoise light to the remaining white areas of the boat and add a streak across the ground level at the figures’ feet.

Stage 17

Develop the dark areas across the painting by overlaying areas of shadow with further layers and touches of the base colours: Winsor blue (red shade) in the sky, Bengal rose and Winsor red in the sand, cobalt blue and Winsor blue (red shade) on the boat, and brown madder and Winsor blue on the figures. Allow the painting to dry before continuing.

the figures. Allow the painting to dry before continuing. Start Art SUMMER 2017  Stage 18

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SUMMER 2017

Stage 18

Paint in the mast using brown madder, applying the paint using the point of the No. 10 Round brush, then draw the lines of the rigging with Winsor blue (red shade).

Stage 19

Add any final details to the boat and figures using the mixes on the palette and the No. 10 Round.

using the mixes on the palette and the No. 10 Round.  Stage 15 Develop the

Stage 15

Develop the boat and paint the figures using cobalt turquoise light, Winsor blue (red shade), Winsor violet and brown madder, applying the paint with the No. 10 Round brush.

(red shade), Winsor violet and brown madder, applying the paint with the No. 10 Round brush.
(red shade), Winsor violet and brown madder, applying the paint with the No. 10 Round brush.

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START RT  The finished painting Boat Scene , watercolour, 22 x 30in. (56 x

START

RT

START RT  The finished painting Boat Scene , watercolour, 22 x 30in. (56 x 76cm)

The finished painting

Boat Scene, watercolour, 22 x30in. (56 x 76cm)

painting Boat Scene , watercolour, 22 x 30in. (56 x 76cm) SUMMER 2017 Start Art This

SUMMER 2017

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This demonstration was adapted from Vibrant Watercolours:

How to Paint with Drama and Intensity by Hazel Lale (Search Press, 2017, £14.99). See page 4 for special offers on practical art books from our bookshop.

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