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Maximizing motor life through condition monitoring NICOLE DYESS Director of Client Solutions www.motorsatwork.com ©

Maximizing motor life through condition monitoring

Maximizing motor life through condition monitoring NICOLE DYESS Director of Client Solutions www.motorsatwork.com ©

NICOLE DYESS

Director of Client Solutions

www.motorsatwork.com

Motors fail — it’s a fact of life that’s nearly as certain as death and taxes.

Until now, preventing motor failure required early retirement — i.e., repairing or replacing your rotating equipment on a schedule possibly years before it would fail. Fortunately, the declining cost of sensors and sub-meters, together with the growing big data industry, have made condition monitoring increasingly accurate and affordable. The net result: condition monitoring can decrease your motor operations and maintenance (O&M) expenses by up to 25%. 1

This white paper describes how condition monitoring detects motor-damaging situations and uses that information to maximize the life of your rotating equipment: First we describe how motors fail; then, we outline how these failure modes help us to detect declining motor health. The third condition monitoring and the Industrial Internet of Things will lead to truly predictive maintenance within 10 years.

will lead to truly predictive maintenance within 10 years. 19% of preventive maintenance activities are completely

19%

of preventive maintenance

activities are completely

unnecessary 2

maintenance activities are completely unnecessary 2 45% of preventive maintenance efforts are ineffective at

45%

of preventive maintenance

efforts are ineffective at

reducing downtime 5

25% of interval-based preventive maintenance activities occur too late 3 65% of predictive maintenance signals
25% of interval-based preventive maintenance activities occur too late 3 65% of predictive maintenance signals

25%

of interval-based

preventive maintenance

activities occur too late 3

preventive maintenance activities occur too late 3 65% of predictive maintenance signals go unnoticed by
preventive maintenance activities occur too late 3 65% of predictive maintenance signals go unnoticed by
preventive maintenance activities occur too late 3 65% of predictive maintenance signals go unnoticed by

65%

of predictive maintenance

signals go unnoticed by

maintenance staff 6

maintenance staff 6
signals go unnoticed by maintenance staff 6 30% of interval-based preventive maintenance activities

30%

of interval-based preventive

maintenance activities occur

too frequently 4

preventive maintenance activities occur too frequently 4 82% of assets would have lower risk of failure

82%

of assets would have lower

risk of failure with

condition-based monitoring 7

FIGURE 1 The high cost of preventive (PM) — versus condition-based and predictive — maintenance. Condition-based maintenance reduces your maintenance expenses by eliminating unnecessary maintenance activities and helping your maintenance staff work smarter.

WHY MOTORS FAIL

In the 1970s, Nowlan and Heap characterized asset failure patterns into six general models; then, the researchers categorized these failure curves as either age-related (Types A, E, & F) or “random” (not age-related; Types B, C, & D) [Figure 2]. 8

“Random” Failures

Probability Probability of failure of failure B. Infant mortality Time Probability Probability of failure of
Probability
Probability
of failure
of failure
B.
Infant mortality
Time
Probability
Probability
of failure
of failure
C.
Initial break-in
Time
Probability
Probability
of failure
of failure
D. Random
Time

Age-Related Failures

A. Wear out Time E. Bathtub Time F. Fatigue Time
A. Wear out
Time
E. Bathtub
Time
F. Fatigue
Time

FIGURE 2

9 While better manufacturing practices have reduced the number of “random” failures and increased the share of age-related failures since the 1970s, age-related degradation still causes a minority (18%) of equipment failures [Figure 3]. 10

100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

B Age- Random related failures failures C 82% 18% D
B
Age-
Random
related
failures
failures
C
82%
18%
D

100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

FIGURE 3 Researchers in the 1960s and 1970s characterized asset failure patterns and recognized that few failures occur due to asset age.

Motors follow a similar pattern to other asset classes, with only 10% of failures attributable to age-related

degradation