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Reading and Speaking INTERMEDIATE Units 8–10 T ruants 1 Re ad the list of punishments.
Reading and Speaking

Reading and Speaking

Reading and Speaking INTERMEDIATE Units 8–10 T ruants 1 Re ad the list of punishments. Look

INTERMEDIATE

Units 8–10

Truants

1 Read the list of punishments. Look up any new words in a dictionary.

capital punishmentlist of punishments. Look up any new words in a dictionary. c ommunity service a fine

community service ommunity service

a finewords in a dictionary. capital punishment c ommunity service imprisonment probation Pu t the punishments in

imprisonmenta dictionary. capital punishment c ommunity service a fine probation Pu t the punishments in order

capital punishment c ommunity service a fine imprisonment probation Pu t the punishments in order from

probation

Put the punishments in order from least to most severe.

2 What are suitable punishments for:

driving too fast?

• killing another person?

• keeping a library book for six months?

3 Read the article and circle the correct answers.

1 The article is about a national / family problem.

2 The children never / rarely went to school.

3 The mother was / children were punished.

• stealing from shops?

4 Choose the best answers.

1 Why was Mrs Amos sent to prison?

a Her children never went to school.

b Her children often missed school.

c She didn’t look after her children.

2 Mrs Amos

the warning letters.

a might have answered

b

c should have answered

can’t have read

3 The children …

a played truant together.

b rarely played truant.

c both played truant.

4 Emma says they … have been punished.

a might

b can’t

c should

5 The children say they … go to school in the future.

a will

b should

c might

6 The children lived with Mrs Amos’s …

a sisters.

b

c family.

parents.

7 When Mr Amos’s mother died, she didn’t …

a make the children go to school.

b want the children to go to school.

c cook or clean the house.

8 The children will now go to school because they …

a want to get a good education.

b don’t want to go to prison.

c don’t want their mother to go to prison.

Vocabulary

5 Match the words and phrases in A with the meanings in B.

A

B

1 a sentence

a

to make someone think clearly

2 numerous

b

to learn from an experience

3 to bring to (his) senses

c

not stopped by something

4 in spite of

d

a student who stays away from school without permission

5 to teach (someone) a lesson

e

to avoid going to school or working (informal)

6 to skive

f

young criminals

7 delinquents

g

punishment given by a court of law

8 a truant

h

lots of

What do you think?

6 Discuss these questions in groups.

• Who is responsible if a teenager doesn’t go to school?

• What is a suitable punishment for truancy?

Should parents be punished for things their children do?

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Reading and Speaking

Reading and Speaking

Reading and Speaking I N T E R M E D I A T E Units
Reading and Speaking I N T E R M E D I A T E Units

INTERMEDIATE

Units 8–10

Truants

‘Prison worked’

says truants’ mother

A WOMAN who was sent to prison because her children didn’t go to school, said yesterday that she deserved her prison sentence. Patricia Amos was freed from prison last week after her sentence was reduced from 60 to 28 days. She told reporters that the experience had brought her to her senses and that she would make sure that her children went to school in the future. Her two children, Emma, 15, and Jackie, 13, had a very bad attendance record at their school in Oxfordshire, and in spite of numerous warning letters and being ordered to appear in court, Mrs Amos allowed her children to stay at home. After spending time in prison Mrs Amos said that the

experience had taught her a lesson. ‘Everybody deserves their education and I was denying my children their rights through my own stupidity and ignorance … It has brought me to my senses.’ The court heard that Emma was at school 29% of the time. Her sister Jackie had an attendance rate of 34%. The children have been living with relatives since their mother was went to prison. Speaking to reporters for the first time, Jackie said: ‘I was upset and I was angry at the sentence. I will stay in school from now on.’ Emma added: ‘Prison can’t have been nice for my mum. I had the most time off and I felt it was all my fault. The court could have punished me instead.

Now mum’s coming home, I won’t skive off school ever again.’ Mrs Amos said that that everything was all right with the family until her mother died. ‘She did everything for us. After she died, I tried to make the kids go to school but they weren’t interested. I didn’t want to argue with them so I let them do what they wanted. If they refuse to go in the future, I’ll drive them there myself.’ Mrs Amos said that her children aren’t bad and are certainly not delinquents. And there is one thing that will ensure it does not happen again. She explained: ‘The children know that if they play truant again, I will go to prison. None of us want that.’

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