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TEST PATTERN

LISTENING SECTION:
understand main ideas and specific factual information
recognize the opinions, attitudes and purpose of a speaker
follow the development of an argument

Pattern:
* Clips played only once.
* Time provided at beginning of each section to go through the questions.
*Questions are grouped in each section.
No: of questions: 40 Time:30 minutes + 10 minutes to transfer answers

Four Sections

Conversation between two people set


Informal Dialogue in an everyday social situation, e.g. a
i. SECTION 1
conversation in an accommodation
agency
Monologue set in an everyday social
situation, e.g. a speech about local
Informal monologue
ii. SECTION 2 facilities or a talk about the
arrangements for meals during a
conference.
Conversation between up to four
people set in an educational or training
Formal dialogue context, e.g. a university tutor and a
iii. SECTION 3
student discussing an assignment, or a
group of students planning a research
project.
Formal monologue Monologue on an academic subject,
iv. SECTION 4
e.g. a university lecture.
Question Types:
1. Words or Numbers as answers: Form-filling, Note Completion, Table completion, Sentence
Completion, Summary Completion, Flow Chart.
2. Choose for a list of options and write a letter: Labeling a Diagram/ Plan / Map, Multiple
choices, Matching, Classification.
Lesson 1: Orienting yourself to the text: Who/where/why about Speakers (SECTION 1)
INFORMAL DIALOGUE: 2 PEOPLE CONVERSATION
Question Types
1. FORM FILLING: Factual information including numbers.
a. No of words needed for answer.
b. Read Title to understand the topic.
c. Anticipate the required answer.
2. NOTE COMPLTETION: complete some notes.
a. No of words needed for answer.
b. Use the vocabulary in the existing text to keep track of the blanks.
c. Anticipate the required answer.

Lesson 2: Listening for Specific Information: Predict Missing word/Type of word (SECTION 1)
Question Types
1. TABLE COMPLTETION: Factual information including numbers.
a. Look at words in task/Title to guess the topic.
b. Understand who the speakers are.
c. Study table, anticipate missing words
d. Note Row and column headings
e. Anticipate the required answer.
f. Note the order of the Questions

2. SENTENCE COMPLETITION:
a. GRAMMARTICALLY CORRECT ANSWERS.
b. No of words needed for answer.
c. Read Title to understand the topic.
d. Anticipate the required answer/ TYPE OF WORD, NUMBER OF WORD.
Lesson 3: Identifying Details: figuring out descriptions and directions (SECTION 2)
Question Types
1. LABELLING A DIAGRAM:
a. TYPE 1: Complete labels on diagram with words from recording.
b. TYPE 2: Match options in a box to points numbered on the diagram.
c. TYPE 3: Match points numbered on diagram to items or descriptions.
2. Factual information including numbers.
a. Look at words in task/Title to guess the topic.
b. Understand who the speakers are.
c. Study table, anticipate missing words
d. Note Row and column headings
e. Anticipate the required answer.
f. Note the order of the Questions

3. SENTENCE COMPLETITION:
a. GRAMMARTICALLY CORRECT ANSWERS.
b. No of words needed for answer.
c. Read Title to understand the topic.
d. Anticipate the required answer/ TYPE OF WORD, NUMBER OF WORD.
IELTS Academic Writing Task 1: The Complete Guide
20 minutes to write at least 150 words for Writing Task 1

How to Read IELTS Writing Task 1 Questions:


1. Read the summary and titles first.
Instructions include a short summary sentence in the instructions.
Visuals usually have a title. Read these things first because they give you a good overview of what is contained
in the visual(s).
useful to you in the first paragraph of your response where you need to introduce the visuals (see the
template below for more details).
2. Take note of categories / units.
Next, take note of the types of information contained on the visual(s).
To get a high band score, you must provide accurate descriptions of this information.
Ask yourself questions like these as you take in the data:
- Do your visuals involve time? Is time presented in hours, days, weeks, months, etc?
- Do your visuals show trends? In general, what are the trends? Increases, decreases, fluctuating, etc?
- Do the visuals show a sequence of events? Steps in a process?
- Do the visuals categorize different types of things?
- Are numbers presented in hundreds, thousands, millions, percentages, decimals?
- Etc.
3. Find an interesting angle on the data.
Report main features of the visual(s). You have to select which information to include and, importantly, which to
leave out.
For example, lets imagine youre looking at a chart that shows a list of 5 different TV shows. These shows are
ranked by their popularity among 5 different age groups. Here are some possible angles:
- Which shows are most popular/least popular among all age groups?
- Which shows got more popular as viewer age increased/decreased?
- Which shows were only popular in the middle-aged group?
The angles you take should be the things that seem most interesting or striking to you as you look at the visual(s).

IELTS Writing Task 1 Template Overview:


Paragraph 1: Introduce the visuals (1-2 sentences).
Paragraph 2: Summarize the visuals.
Paragraphs 3 and (sometimes) 4: Use data/details to highlight a key feature of the visual(s).
Optional: Concluding sentence
IELTS Academic Writing Task 2: The Complete Guide

Formal five-paragraph essay in 40 minutes- 250 words.


Points: Task 2 counts more towards your Writing band score
Task 1 = 1/3rd of your score
Task 2 = 2/3rds of your score
Word count minimums: Task 2 is longer
Task 1 = 150 word minimum
Task 2 = 250 word minimum
Planning your response: Task 2 questions require more thought
Task 1 = transfer of information from a visual into writing

QUESTION TYPES:
Basic IELTS Task 2 Writing Template Structure
Sample IELTS Task 2 Essay
Lets take a look at an example essay containing each of the Task 2 paragraphs described above.

Some parents may worry that pushing their children towards a particular career could be harmful.
While I agree it is unwise to predetermine a childs profession, parents should still offer guidance through
open communication.
Young people need freedom to make choices, especially when it comes to their careers. Even parents
who agree with this idea may still feel some anxiety about it. Ultimately, most parents hope their children will
be financially secure. Deep down some parents may also want their children to choose prestigious careers, or
jobs that will impact society in some way. These wishes are normal and not necessarily harmful. Yet, it can be
problematic if these desires turn into firm expectations. In such cases, the main motivation for a child
becomes fear of disappointing her parents. It can lead to resentment if she spends her life doing something
she doesnt enjoy. With freedom to explore, by contrast, she can take ownership of her career decisions and
develop internal motivation to reach her goals.
Yet, offering a child freedom does not imply that parents should be absent. To the contrary, parents
should strive to foster open communication about career decisions. If a childs aspirations do not line up with
his parents wishes, he may fear that approaching them could lead to judgement and confrontation. However,
if he feels that his parents will listen carefully and maintain an open attitude, he may let down his guard and
welcome their feedback. When this happens, parents can provide guidance and, importantly, even critiques of
their childs plans. In this way, open communication creates opportunities for young people to benefit from
their parents wisdom and experience.
In conclusion, even though parents should avoid pressuring their children to follow specific career
paths, they should not abandon the discussion. Parents should strive to create an environment where they can
offer caring guidance through open communication.

Solution to a Problem Essays


Paragraph One (Introduction)
Sentence One: A hook. This is an interesting sentence that introduces the topic without stating your main
point. Example: "The problem of ______ has emerged as one of the most significant problems facing
humans in the twenty-first century."
Sentence Two: A transition. Example: "In the following essay I will discuss some of the biggest problems
associated with _______, before suggesting a possible solutions."
Paragraph Two (Body)
One sentence which states the biggest problem. Example: "The main problem related to ____ is ______.
One sentence which provides more detail about this problem.
One sentence which states the consequences of this problem.
A specific example of this problem that might happen in the real world.
Paragraph Three (Body)
One sentence which states the best solution to this problem. Example: "In my opinion, the best way to
overcome ______ is to _____.
One sentence which provides more information about this solution.
Two sentences which give an example of how this solution can be applied in a real-world situation
Paragraph Four (conclusion)
A one sentence restatement of the problem and solution
A "clincher," which is an interesting personal comment on the topic.

Opinion Essays (Agree/Disagree)


Paragraph One (Introduction)
Sentence One: A hook. This is an interesting sentence that introduces the topic without stating your main
point. Example: "Censorship of the media has emerged as one of the most discussed issues of the modern
era."
Sentence Two: Your main idea. Example: "I strongly agree that it is never appropriate for the government
to engage in media censorship."
Sentence Three: A transition. Example: "I feel this way for two main reasons, which I will explore in the
following essay."
Paragraph Two (Body)
A topic sentence that clearly states your first main reason.
One or two general sentences about this reason
A real-world example of this reason.
A conclusion (paraphrase your main point).
Paragraph Three (Body)
A topic sentence that clearly states your second main reason.
One or two general sentences about this reason.
A transition Example: "My personal experience is a good example of this."
A personal example from your life which illustrates your point (one or two sentences)
Paragraph Four (conclusion)
A one sentence restatement of your point. Example: "In conclusion, I strongly believe..."
A paraphrase of your reasons. Example: "This is because REASON ONE and REASON TWO."

Discussing Both Views Essays (Compare and Contrast)


Paragraph One (Introduction)
Sentence One: A hook. This is an interesting sentence that introduces the topic without stating your main
point. Example: "The question of gender based schooling has emerged as one of the most discussed issues
of the modern era."
Sentence Two: Summarize the opposing viewpoints. Example: "Some people believe ______, while others
feel that ______.
Sentence Three: A transition. Example: "In this essay I will explore both points of view and state my
opinions of each."
Paragraph Two (Body)
A one sentence statement of the first opinion. Example: "Many people feel strongly that _________.
One or two sentences that provide more information about this opinion.
One sentence that states your opinion on this. Example: "I am of the opinion that this belief is faulty."
One sentence that describes why you feel this way.
An example from your life that supports your opinion. One or two sentences.
Paragraph Three (Body)
A one sentence statement of the second opinion. Example: "On the other hand, others feel just as strongly
that _________."
One or two sentences that provide more information about this opinion.
One sentence that states your opinion on this. Example: "I am of the opinion that this belief is quite
correct."
One sentence that describes why you feel this way.
An example from your life that supports your opinion. One or two sentences.
Paragraph Four (conclusion)
A description of the debate. Example: "In conclusion, both views regarding _____ have their merits."
A paraphrase of your opinion. Example: "However, as a result of my life experience, I strongly believe that
____."

Advantages and Disadvantages Essays (Compare and Contrast)


Paragraph One (Introduction)
Sentence One: A hook. This is an interesting sentence that introduces the topic without stating your main
point. Example: "These days, more and more students are choosing to enroll in universities."
Sentence Two: A transition. Example: "In this essay I will explore the advantages and disadvantages of
_____ before giving my opinion on the issue."

Paragraph Two (Body)


A one sentence statement of the first advantage. Example: "One of the most cited advantages of _______ is
______.
One or two sentences that provide more information about this advantage.
One or two sentences that talk about a possible real-world (or something from your own life) example of this
advantage in action.
Paragraph Three (Body)
A one sentence statement of the first advantage. Example: "One of the most cited advantages of _______ is
______.
One or two sentences that provide more information about this advantage.
One or two sentences that talk about a possible real-world (or something from your own life) example of this
advantage in action.
Paragraph Four (conclusion)
A summary of the advantages and disadvantages. Example: "In conclusion, the main advantage of _____ is
____, while the primary disadvantage is ______."
A statement of your opinion. Example: "In light of the above, my personal belief is ________."