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AUGUST 2013 Beer Travel Inside Trippy Beer Portland, Central Oregon, Southern Oregon, Coast and Gorge
AUGUST 2013 Beer Travel Inside Trippy Beer Portland, Central Oregon, Southern Oregon, Coast and Gorge
AUGUST 2013 Beer Travel Inside Trippy Beer Portland, Central Oregon, Southern Oregon, Coast and Gorge

AUGUST 2013

AUGUST 2013 Beer Travel Inside Trippy Beer Portland, Central Oregon, Southern Oregon, Coast and Gorge breweries
AUGUST 2013 Beer Travel Inside Trippy Beer Portland, Central Oregon, Southern Oregon, Coast and Gorge breweries
AUGUST 2013 Beer Travel Inside Trippy Beer Portland, Central Oregon, Southern Oregon, Coast and Gorge breweries
AUGUST 2013 Beer Travel Inside Trippy Beer Portland, Central Oregon, Southern Oregon, Coast and Gorge breweries
AUGUST 2013 Beer Travel Inside Trippy Beer Portland, Central Oregon, Southern Oregon, Coast and Gorge breweries

Beer

Travel

Inside

Trippy Beer

Portland, Central Oregon, Southern Oregon, Coast and Gorge breweries

Session Beers!

Seven Oregon Favorites

Dessert & Beer

Worthy’s Sweet Pairing

PUBLISHER/EDITOR Gail Oberst CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Michael Cairns BEER CHAMPION Will Oberst-Cairns SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR

PUBLISHER/EDITOR

Gail Oberst

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

Michael Cairns

BEER CHAMPION

Will Oberst-Cairns

SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR

Kate Jaffer

WRITERS

Emily Engdahl Chris Jennings Mark Linder Daryl Welch Sean Sullivan Anthony St. Clair Brian Yaeger

PHOTOS

Staff

CARTOON

Mitch Scheele

AD SALES

Ned Long

Jennifer Oberst

Jeff Olson

PRODUCTION ART

Cheryl McLean

DISTRIBUTION

Michael Cairns Oregon Lithoprint, Inc.

PRINTING

Oregon Lithoprint, Inc.

The Oregon Beer Growler is published 12 times per year by an Oregon family-owned LLC. The publication is free and available at locations throughout Oregon where craft beer is sold. Subscriptions are available for $25 per year. Editorial contributions are welcome and will be published at the discretion of the editor. The editor reserves the right to edit all content in this publication for accuracy. The Oregon Beer Growler will try its hardest to prevent mistakes and will gladly correct typographical and other errors to the extent of a credit or cor- rected insertion of the portion of the article or advertisement that was incorrect as a result of OBG’s error.

Correspondence may be sent to:

Oregon Beer Growler, P.O. Box 547, Independence, OR 97351 Phone: 503-837-0617 E-mail: gailoberst@oregonbeergrowler.com Web: www.oregonbeergrowler.com Facebook: Oregon Beer Growler Twitter: @oregongrowler

ON THE COVER

WHITNEY BURNSIDE is a brewer at Pelican Brewery in Pacifc City. A story about Oregon coast breweries is on pages 18-19. A feature story about Whitney will appear in the September issue.

Photo by DAVID SHERMAN www.facebook.com/ukuleledavad

AUGUST 2013

by DAVID SHERMAN www.facebook.com/ukuleledavad AUGUST 2013 Issue No. 014 What’s inside 12 19 CONTENTS OREGON’S

Issue No. 014

What’s inside

12
12
19
19

CONTENTS

OREGON’S MICROBE

04

CELEBRATIONS!

05

HIKE, BIKE, CRAWL

06

BEER TRAVEL: METRO

07

BEER TRAVEL: PORTLAND

08

BEER TRAVEL: EUGENE

09

BREW BITES

10

CENTRAL OREGON BEER FESTS

11

BEER TRAVEL: WILLAMETTE VALLEY

12

PERFECT PINTS SESSION BEERS

14

HOMEBREW HINTS

15

BUSINESS IS BREWING

16

GREEN BEER

17

BEER TRAVEL: SOUTH COAST

18

BEER TRAVEL: NORTH COAST

19

BEER

EDUCATION

. 20

BEER TRAVEL: THE GORGE

21

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

22

21
21
06
06
10
10

THE GROWL

Travel for Oregon Beer

Our annual travel edition is always the most challenging because there are almost 150 breweries

in the state – each with its own unique charms.

We just can’t write about them all in one 24-page edition. But we hope this edition, which provides suggestions from Oregon beer writers, gives you a good start.

For the beer traveler who likes to plan, there are other resources for fnding your way around Oregon’s breweries. Oregon Brewer’s Guild has just revamped its website, which now includes an interactive map that divides the state into seven

regions and lists every brewery in each region. Check it out at www.oregoncraftbeer.org/breweries. I also highly recommend you carry with you at all times at least two copies of the 2013 “Brew-Ha!” guide, a handy fold-out map of Oregon breweries and events that is available at the brewery or bar near you, statewide. We consult our guide regularly for addresses, hours, and other general information. As you travel, you’ll also run across a variety

of informative information and guide books about

Oregon beers. Without listing every good book, I’ll

just suggest you look at the writer’s credentials and be sure he or she is from the Northwest. You’ll get

a more in-depth take on beer from people who live

and drink here. And my last suggestion is to take a guided tour –

On foot, by bike, on a hay bale, in a boat, in a van or

a bus – nearly every region of Oregon has its own

a van or a bus – nearly every region of Oregon has its own tours, and

tours, and some – Bend, Portland, Corvallis-Albany and the North Coast – have their own “brew trails.” Oregon’s Chambers of Commerce and Visitors Centers are excellent resources for beer touring. At TravelOregon.com, you can create your own itinerary based on the breweries you’d like to see and the region you are visiting. Awesome. Also, as this is the Oregon Beer Growler’s 14th monthly edition, and every edition is packed with insider tidbits about Oregon beers and breweries, check out our online editions and blog entries at www.oregonbeergrowler.com. We’re always adding timeless stories of interest to travelers there, as well as time-sensitive updates at our Facebook page. A few more travel tips from a veteran Oregon beer tourist: Always take a cooler and a couple of glass, plastic, metal or ceramic growlers with you wherever you travel. You will want to take home with you all of the delicious beers you experience on the way through Oregon, and not all of them are in bottles or cans. The cooler is to keep your beers at an even temperature to preserve freshness. I’ll see you on the road!

---- Gail Oberst

to preserve freshness. I’ll see you on the road! - - - - Gail Oberst AUGUST
to preserve freshness. I’ll see you on the road! - - - - Gail Oberst AUGUST

OREGON BEER NEWS

PHOTO BY WILL OBERST CAIRNS
PHOTO BY WILL OBERST CAIRNS

Oregon’s Gov. John Kitzhaber displays the resolution approved by the Legislature naming ale yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisia, Oregon’s offcial microbe, Left to right behind him is Kurt Widmer, Matt Swihart, Sen.Floyd Prozanski of Eugene, Ian Croxall, Lee Radke, Rob Widmer and Tom Gall.

Ale Yeast is Oregon’s Microbe

BY GAIL OBERST

Of the Oregon Beer Growler

A historic moment: In April, Oregon became

n

the frst state with an offcial microbe and

June, Gov. John Kitzhaber posed for

pictures with the offcial resolution. To crown the deed, Kitzhaber shook hands, made a tongue-in- cheek comment about how glad he was that his administration could take credit for this legislation and talked beer for a few minutes with the

in

attending brewers. Ignoring critics who suggest this was a waste of the Legislature’s resources, the action applauds

an industry that, despite the fagging economy, has added jobs, new construction, tax dollars, hope

and fun to Oregon’s fnancial future. The ale yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisia, is not the only yeast fermenting success in Oregon, but it certainly is a major player. Brian Butenschoen of Oregon Brewers Guild in June announced that in 2012, Oregon brewers increased production by 11%, adding 900

2012, Oregon brewers increased production by 11%, adding 900 jobs in the process. He estimated that

jobs in the process. He estimated that the brewing industry contributes $2.83 billion to the state’s economy, providing direct and indirect employment to about 29,000 people. As of June, Oregon could claim 137 brewing companies operating 174 brewing facilities in 59 cities, Butenschoen said. Oregonians, by the way, consumed about 2.79 million barrels of beer, 17 percent of which was produced here. However, about 47 percent of the draft beer made in Oregon was consumed here in 2012 -- an increase of 12.8 percent over 2011. The Oregon microbe bill was sponsored by Rep. Mark Johnson, R-Hood River, where breweries are popping up like bubbles in homebrew. Johnson got the idea from Gresham frefghter and homebrewer Tom Gall, who joined professional brewers attending the ceremonial signing in Salem. Although Oregon is the frst to have a microbe, it’s legislative attention to the details of brewing are not unusual. In 2011, wine and agricultural science experts supported Oregon legislation recognizing Jory as the state’s offcial soil. Although Jory is a fne, red medium for Christmas trees, it is best known as the ideal soil series for Pinot noir, the fnicky grape for which Oregon wines are famous.

BREW BRIEFS

NEW MCMINNVILLE BREWERY TO OPEN

Mark Vickery, Golden Valley’s former brewer, said plans are underway to open Grain Station Brew Works in McMinnville’s historic Granary District. Vickery had plans to open the brewpub this month. In addition to a Kickstarter campaign that ended in July, Vickery’s project is getting help from Kelly McDonald. McDonald is the general manager of the complex of barns, grain eleva- tors and warehouses adjacent to McMinnville’s downtown that have been gentrifed into unique local farm markets and craft shops. Now there will be a brewery, Vickery says. Before coming to McMinnville’s Golden Valley, Vickery was a Deschutes brewer. He brings 25 years of brewing experience to the project. “Our name comes from the property we sit on, which used to be a grain station back in the late 1800s. In fact, you can see the old grain elevator from where our beer garden is going in,” said Vickery last month. The brewery will be Oregon’s frst “Commu- nity Supported” brewery, a term usually applied to farms and gardens that refers to a dedication to buying local ingredients from farmers and producers.

FALLING SKY DELI OPENs IN EUGENE

The new Falling Sky Delicatessen opened in July at 790 Blair Blvd. in the Eugene Brew- ing District. Featuring house-cured meats, the deli expands the food options available for the popular brewpub, headquartered at Oak Alley in downtown Eugene. Co-owner Jason Carriere said the expansion had happened earlier than planned, but the demand was there and the right space had become available. The food menu highlights the house charcuterie, with ingredients and other foods sourced from local producers whenever possi- ble. The pastrami on rye sandwich is expected to be a popular favorite. Guests can sit in booths near the front of the deli, fnd space at the 90-ft. communal table that runs the length of the building, or get some fresh air in the covered patio out back. Stay- ing true to Falling Sky’s family-friendly setup, the patio also features a sandbox for children (though adults can enjoy a game of darts inside). In addition to house sausages, pastrami, pates and other charcuterie, the open kitchen at the new deli will also see production of pickles, sodas and other foods available at both loca- tions. Falling Sky beers continue to be brewed at the Oak Alley location, and guest taps are also available. “Our kitchen is open,” says co-owner Rob Cohen, “because we have nothing to hide Everything is fresh.”

BREW BRIEFS, Continued on Page 16

CELEBRATE

Summer Celebrations Heat Up in Oregon

PHOTO BY WILL OBERST CAIRNS
PHOTO BY WILL OBERST CAIRNS

Revelers at Bend’s Brewfest last year came to taste Central Oregon and other beers. This year, they’ll have even more to celebrate. Central Oregon now has at least 20 breweries. More info is on Page 11.

Bite of Oregon Aug. 9-11

The 30th-annual Bite of Oregon is Aug. 9-11 with new features added to beer and wine gardens. More than 50,000 people are expected to attend the event at Portland’s Tom McCall Waterfront Park. Chef Gabe Rucker of Portland’s Le Pigeon and Little Bird Bistro is among headliners. Also new this year: the Oregon Craft Beer Gardens is expanding, featuring more than 30 kinds of craft beers and continuous music and entertainment. Oregon’s Bountiful Table, featuring foods prepared by Oregon Department of Agriculture Commissions chefs, will give attendees the opportunity to meet the rancher, farmer, or fsherman who grew, raised or caught the item they are enjoying. The event raises money for Oregon’s Special Olympics athletes. Hours are 11 a.m. Aug. 9 and 10, and at 10 a.m. Aug. 11. For information, visit www.biteoforegon.com.

Bend Brewfest Aug. 15-17

Bend Brewfest celebrates 10 years at the Les Schwab Amphitheater in the Old Mill District August 15-17. Event organizers say more than 60 breweries will pour more than 140 craft beers over the course of the three-day festival. This year’s festival will also feature an expanded selection of limited-release “X-Tap” beers from participating breweries and will feature releases from three cider houses, two meaderies and a winery. Proceeds from the fest beneft the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon, and Neighbor Impact. Admission is free, but tasters must purchase a Brewfest mug with beer tokens for $12. In addition to Central Oregon breweries, the Bend

Brewfest includes dozens of craft-brewers from elsewhere in Oregon and the U.S. bringing creations ranging from popular IPAs to German Radlers. A complete list of breweries and beverages can be found at www.bendbrewfest.com. The festival will also feature three cider houses, two meaderies, and a winery. The Bend Brewfest will need more than 1,000 volunteers during the event – no experience needed, according to Chelsea Woodmansee, Volunteer

Coordinator. Volunteers can sign up at the website. The Brewfest hours are 3-11 p.m. Thursday and Friday, and noon to 11 p.m. on Saturday (children and pets are welcome until 7 p.m. each day).

Little Woody on Aug. 30-31

Bend’s party never stops, and for the ffth year, the Little Woody Barrel Aged Brew and Whiskey Fest will draw brew-lovers from far and wide. The craft beer fest is Aug. 30-31, 5 to 10 p.m. Friday, and noon to 10 p.m. Saturday. This festival celebrates on the historic practice of aging beer in oaken casks, techniques which have been revitalized in recent years in the U.S. Appropriately, the festival takes place at the Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend. Entrance is $15 for a glass and 10 tokens. More information at www.woodybeer.com/little.

September Promises More Festival Fun Statewide

The babies are back in school and it’s time for the adults to party. September’s festivals in Astoria, Independence and Hood River feature Oregon’s beers along with contests and activities that celebrate the agriculture and fun of brewing. At least 40 craft brews will be on tap at the Gold Beach Brew & Art fest from noon to 10 p.m. Sept. 7. The fest is at the Event Center on the Beach, 29392 Ellensburg Ave., at the Curry County Fairgrounds in Gold Beach. Festivities begin at noon. Supplementing the brews: food vendors, live music on two stages, a classic car show, artisan crafts, and an art show. For details, visit www.

artisan crafts, and an art show. For details, visit www. goldbeachbrewfest.org. The Pacifc Northwest Brew Cup

goldbeachbrewfest.org. The Pacifc Northwest Brew Cup, an outdoor festival Sept. 27-29 in Astoria, features a fght among about 40 breweries to have the frst keg to blow. The winner of the coveted people’s choice cup gets bragging rights during the festival organized by the Astoria Downtown Historic District Association. Live music, bands, food and local merchandise are all part of the fun. The Independence Hop and Heritage Festival Sept. 28 will feature as part of its activities a Fresh Harvest Hopyard brewfest on Main at C Street. Fresh or wet-hopped beers will be the focus of at least 40 craft beers at this festival inside a festival. The larger festival includes music, activities for the family, food and craft booths, and other features online: www.independencehopandheritage.com. Another famous fresh hop celebration is the same day, Sept. 28, in Hood River. More than 20 craft breweries will be pouring in this beautiful downtown in The Gorge, from noon to 9 p.m. Thousands attend this hop-lover’s party which also features local foods, arts and crafts and line-up of live music. Buy tickets in advance at http://hoodriver. org/events-festivals/chamber-events/hops-fest.

CALENDAR See Page 22

org/events-festivals/chamber-events/hops-fest. CALENDAR See Page 22 AUGUST 2013 | OREGON BEER GROWLER 5

TRAVEL

Hike, Bike or Crawl Your Way to Oregon Beers

BY EMILY ENGDAHL

For the Oregon Beer Growler

historical importance not only for Oregon beer but for the city of Portland as well. There are many iconic breweries in the area, as well as many smaller locations trying new and exciting things. We include information about the Lovejoy Columns, the Benson Bubblers, the Park Blocks, and many other Portland icons. More than landmarks, we focus on the creation of the city itself, and the people who were important in that creation, like John Couch, Henry Weinhard, and Francis Pettygrove.” There’s a wide variety on the tour: Deschutes Brewing, Pints Urban Taproom, and Rogue Public House. “This is a really excellent tour for folks hoping to introduce friends and family to Portland and gain an appreciation for Oregon beer.” Ripley continues, “We’re considering a “Walk the Dog” tour in South East Portland, where folks would be invited to bring their friendly four-legged friends along to some other wonderful breweries across the river as we learn about some other important things in the history of our city. A tour featuring man’s two best friends-- beer and dogs! What could be better?” The walking tours are designed to offer visitors and locals alike the chance to stretch their legs while enjoying great craft beer and learning more

PHOTO BY EMILY ENGDAHL
PHOTO BY EMILY ENGDAHL

Ride the PDX PediCab through the brewery blocks in Portland for a fun alternative beer tour.

H ere in Oregon, we love our beer, and while

many Oregonians are smart enough to avoid

drinking and driving, there are times when

the usual public transit options for safe imbibing create more of a headache than too many pints of an Imperial IPA on a hot day. Sometimes, in order

to fully appreciate the beauty of our vast brewery

choices, you have to get out and experience beer on

a whole new level. Looking for alternatives to the tried and true light rail, bus, trolley, or tour bus? These local options have the zest and zip to give you a pep in your step (or a push in your pedal). Create your own pub and brewery crawl, enjoy the fruits of your uphill labors with a pint after a breathtaking hike, cruise your way to victory (malts) on a wheeled adventure, or appreciate the local architecture and history with attentive walking tour guides. Brewvana’s primary walking tour guide, Margot Ripley shared what she loves most about the new walking tours, and some fresh ideas for upcoming adventures with Brewvana! The current walking tour is based in NW Portland, explains Ripley, “which has enormous

based in NW Portland, explains Ripley, “which has enormous about the Pearl District of Portland. Starting

about the Pearl District of Portland. Starting at Deschutes Brewery Portland Public House with a full six-sampler tray offering a combination of classic and seasonal beers and Tasting 101, the tour then proceeds to Pints Brewing. There the tour will get a behind the scenes look at 3.5 barrel brewing system accompanied by a sampling of their beers. The last stop of the tour is Rogue Distillery & Public house for appetizers, more beer and trivia, with the winner taking home a BREWVANA trucker hat. Tickets are $49/person and include behind the scenes tours, all beer and food, pretzel necklace, tasting journal, Pilsner glass and historical notes about the Pearl District. Space is limited and reservations must be made in advance. Tours will run 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. To register visit www. experiencebrewvana.com/tours. Hikes & Pints - Brothers Keith and Dan Vandervort trek to the tops of craggy peaks, delivering beer enthusiasts to new heights, and rewarding them with stops at breweries like Double Mountain or Pfriem in Hood River. You’ll never feel as though you deserve that beer more than after hauling yourself up the side of a mountain beside these two inveterate hikers. Interjecting a healthy dose of humor and down to earth naturalist knowledge into their tours, you’ll enjoy fantastic scenery on any of their several hiking options. Want to stay in town or create a bespoke tour? Take advantage of the Portland Pub and Brewery tour, or work with them to create a one of a kind chartered tour personalized just for you and your friends. Visit www.hikesandpints.com for more information, to book a hke, or create your own tour! BrewCycle - Want to have fun getting some exercise, laugh with friends and visit some amazing stops in Portland to enjoy iconic treats, sights, and delicious beer? BrewCycle currently has 3 multi

rider cycles, and can accommodate parties as large as 41 guests! Choose from one of two current tours: the Portland Weird Ride includes transportation on the

BrewCycle, a chilling tour and history breakdown in the famous Shanghai Tunnels, a delectable pairing

of pizza and craft beer in the haunted Old Town

Pizza location featuring Old Town Brewing Co., and

a scrumptious dessert from Portland’s own Voodoo

Donuts. The Portland Weird Ride is $50/seat. The second option is a BrewPub Crawl, where you will fnd transportation on the BrewCycle to 3 different Portland brew pubs (two options are available). The BrewPub Crawl is $25/seat Fri & Sat, $20/seat Sun-Thu. Visit www.brewcycleportland.com for more information. PDX Pedicab - Witness Portland’s Old Brewery Blocks transformed into today’s chic and trendy Pearl District. Experience the abundance of top- notch local breweries in the area, while riding in the comfort of the PDX Pedicab. Sample local seasonal beers and partake in some old favorites via pedicab, visiting Bridgeport, Rogue, and Tug Boat Breweries. At each brewery, you will learn about each establishment’s unique brewing process, as well as the history behind each one. Learn why Oregon produces some of the best brews nationwide and

bring your out of town visitors to our beautiful state

to fall in love with Oregon’s beers. What better

way to experience classic This is no drink-&-run experience; 45 minutes at each location, sampling local seasonal specials and receiving discounted pricing on select items for your imbibing pleasure. Information can be found at www.pdxpedicab.com

Portland Beer Crawl - PortlandBeer.Org -- Mastermind Matt Wiater and his crew have created

TOURS, Continued on Page 7

Metro Area: Engdahl’s Favorites

Emily Engdahl , created Oregon Beer Country, joined Women Enjoying Beer as the Event Development

Emily Engdahl, created Oregon Beer Country, joined Women Enjoying Beer as the Event Development Coordinator and is now a published beer writer and resident Beer Geek at Milwaukie Rules!

East and West, Metro Brews Best

BY EMILY ENGDAHL

For the Oregon Beer Growler

Breakside Taproom & Brewery, 5821 SE International Way, Milwaukie. Restaurant & Pub Brewery, 20 NE Dekum St., Portland, www. breakside.com Always innovative, the crew at Breakside continue to push the envelope and have fun while brewing delectable, unique beers. While their IPA and Pilsner are picture perfect, umami profles of savory stouts containing duck and seaweed, respectively, break the taste barriers for even the most diehard beer fan. Breakside’s India Golden Ale is one of my all time personal favorites, and the tap selection at the Milwaukie location, coupled with minimal crowds make it a contender for best new tap room in my book. The food is always stellar, staff is friendly and knowledgeable, and the beer is consistently delicious.

Base Camp, 930 SE Oak St., Portland. http://basecampbrewingco.com/ Tucked away in an unassuming building not far from Portland’s Eastside Industrial area, the relatively new Base Camp is home to the S’more Stout, served with a toasted marshmallow. Food is available from on site food carts (the falafel option pleases this writer), and the ambiance is old-school REI, when climbers and mountains met in the middle with a minimal amount of fuff and fancy gear. The minimalist Zen beer vibe is a welcome respite from some of Portland’s oft loud and crowded hangouts.

Migration, 2828 NE Glisan St., Portland http://migrationbrewing.com. The patio at Migration is one of the best in Portland. Fantastic people watching abounds, and regular Timbers nights couple with Bingo, and an all day happy hour for rock climbing enthusiasts from The Circuit Bouldering Gym. Co-owner Colin Rath’s dedication to community projects and resource building make Migration a mover and shaker in the Portland scene, all while brewing a solid lineup of quaffable beers. Try the Lupulin IPA for a well balanced partner to any of the menu items.

PHOTO BY GAIL OBERST
PHOTO BY GAIL OBERST

Guests enjoy Breakside brews at the new taproom and brewery in Milwaukie. The original brewery is in NE Portland.

Vertigo, 21420 NW Nicholas Ct. Suite D-7 Hillsboro. http://www.vertigobrew.com/ Out in what native Portlanders believe are the wilds of Hillsboro, a beacon emerges from the uncharted territory west of the Willamette. Co-owners and brewers Mike Haines and Mike Kinion hit the ground running on their well placed nano-brewery, and have been trying to keep pace with demand ever since. Home to a taproom where patrons are encouraged to bring picnic dinners

and board games, Vertigo is a welcome haven for beer lovers left out of the Portland zip codes. The Arctic Blast Vanilla Porter is a tasty adult treat, refreshment tantamount to our oft forgotten chocolate pudding popsicle.

Widmer, 955 N Russell St., Portland http://widmerbrothers.com/ The iconic Gasthaus and brewery belonging to the Widmer Brothers casts a protective cloak

belonging to the Widmer Brothers casts a protective cloak TRAVEL across Portland’s craft beer history. A

TRAVEL

across Portland’s craft beer history. A fxture in Oregon’s beer scene since 1984, Kurt and Rob Widmer now steer one of the largest beer ships in our region. Home to the historically signifcant Hefeweizen, Widmer continues to support craft beer culture in all facets, bringing camaraderie to beer lovers in every corner of our state and class to their lineup of offerings. Always consistent, collaborations with the likes of Cigar City out of Tampa keep Widmer fresh. Try the Marionberry Gose on tap with a blackened steak or spinach salad and experience out of the box favor that will tickle your tastebuds.

out of the box favor that will tickle your tastebuds. TOURS, From Page 6 the ultimate

TOURS, From Page 6

the ultimate beer crawl tool. Log on to their website, where you can create a walking tour of your very own, 100% tailor made to suit your tastes and mood. Want to create a tour within a certain area? Visit breweries of a certain ilk? Show off your favorite breweries to your out of town guests? This crawl creator does it all, with easy navigation and mapping features powered by GoogleMaps. http:// www.portlandbeer.org/breweries/crawls for more information or to create your own!

www.portlandbeer.org/breweries/crawls for more information or to create your own! AUGUST 2013 | OREGON BEER GROWLER 7

TRAVEL

HOME BREW HINTS

Yaeger’s Portland Brews

BY BRIAN YAEGER

For the Oregon Beer Growler

I f you visited a brewery a week in Portland, it’d

take you over a year to check out every brewpub

and tasting room, so the idea of hitting ‘em all in

monumental about this brewpub, but that’s just it for the jeans’n’T-shirt (and fannel) crowd. Inside, it’s spacious, all wooden and down-to-earth. The walls are bedecked with paintings of Labradors both black and yellow, as well as thumbtack boards pinned to the hilt with customers’ pooches. The real

one visit is ridiculous. To explore a good variety of

tail-wagger here is the back patio where this public

what Beervana has to offer, start with these fve that conveniently fow like a fve-mile river of suds alongside the Willamette River.

Hopworks Urban Brewery, 2944 S.E. Powell. BikeBar, 3947 N Williams Ave. HopworksBeer.com Hopworks Urban Brewery, known colloquially

house transforms into a public doghouse when the weather’s nice. It’s a place where Fido and Fif get to socialize as their masters play Battleship or any of the board games available inside. It’s probably best that the dart boards are on the opposite end of the game room and dog area. Solid core and seasonal beers abound and Super Dog is a big, fuffy IPA with

as HUB, enjoys a hyper-loyal following. It starts

a

wet nose and offers lots to love, especially for fans

with delicious and organic beers; HUB Lager and

of

grapefruity hops and ample malt body.

Hopworks IPA are the fagships but you’ll fnd that abundant hops work their way into a sturdy lineup of offerings (if you see Abominable Winter Ale or Galactic Imperial Red available, drink up). Add tasty pizzas to the mix and that’d be enough. That it’s

Cascade Barrel House, 939 SE Belmont St., CascadeBrewingBarrelHouse.com The Belgian side of the Raccoon Lodge, er, make that the “Northwest Sour” side, has been

exceptionally bike-friendly (check out the canopy of bike frames over the bar or the electricity- generating stationary bikes parked outside Hopworks BikeBar located on North Williams) and family-friendly (it does resemble a kindergarten upstairs) only adds to their fan base. Founding owner and brewmaster Christian Ettinger says, “I came at this from a long career in brewing. I viewed getting into the restaurant world as a

giving sour beer fans sanctuary since 2010 with long-standing treasures such as Bourbonic Plague and Vlad the Imp Aler as well as perpetually new treats often embellished with a wide variety of fruits (see Tangerine Dream, Figaro, and my personal favorite, Noyaux that has a raspberry component but is marked by its use of apricot pit meat, yes, the nutty innards of said stonefruit). Patrons are invited every Tuesday for a tapping of a live barrel

way of creating a dynamic experience where you

of

sour ale, where folks up at the bar may receive

could put forth food that you’re proud of, service that you think is remarkable, and controlling the environment. I took the design and aesthetic as seriously as the beer.”

what is affectionately known as a “sour shower.” The beers are world class, the new kitchen specials are intriguing vittles, and even if you just want to quaff a non-challenging but steady pale ale, the beer garden up front is the place to do it.

Lucky Labrador, 915 SE Hawthorne Blvd., LuckyLab.com On the surface there’s nothing mind-blowingly

On the surface there’s nothing mind-blowingly Headlines, Deadlines August 10 is the deadline to get your

Headlines, Deadlines

August 10 is the deadline to get your news and advertising into the September issue of the Oregon Beer Growler. See page 2 for contact information.

PHOTO BY GAIL OBERST
PHOTO BY GAIL OBERST

Cascade Barrel House on Belmont specializes in Northwest sour beers. Try the Burbonic Plague, or Vlad the Imp Aler.

Brian Yaeger is a Portland-based beer writer working on his second book following “Red, White, and Brew:

An American Beer Odyssey.” He runs Inn Beervana Bed & Beer in PDX.

second book following “Red, White, and Brew: An American Beer Odyssey.” He runs Inn Beervana Bed

Burnside Brewing, 701 E. Burnside, BurnsideBrewCo.com The star in any brewpub should always be the beer. That’s why it’s called a brewpub and not a pubbrew. Not to take away from Burnside’s fantastic lineup of brews, but this is one of the few pubs where the food menu takes center stage. The iconic staple is a starter called the Cohiba, duck conft rolled in collard greens in the shape of a cigar and actually served on a handsome ashtray replete ashes (malt) for dipping. The burger—it’s seared in duck fat. As for those beers to pair it all with, yes the IPA is tasty but where else are you going to fnd an award-winning wheat beer made with apricots and chili peppers? There are always innovative

seasonal offerings, which applies to both the beer menu and the food one. Not that they’ll stop you from simply enjoying several pints of the Lime Kolsch on the front patio.

Upright Brewing, 240 N. Broadway, UprightBrewing.com This weekends-only tasting room (also open before Blazers’ homestands) began as a straightforward farmhouse slanting brewery (albeit shoehorned into the basement of the Leftbank Building) with four core beers as has taken its affnity for jazz to some next level stuff by improvising dozens of rare beers—often riffed as part of the Sole Composition series. Any ingredient from peaches to oysters can take a solo. Pop downstairs into the tasting room to see, taste, and listen to where the magic happens (there’s often live blues). Part bunker, part beer cave, sit’n’sip among the casks—spent wine, bourbon, or maybe even gin barrels—where your future beers are maturing. Then again, the not-at-all Belgian style Engleberg Pilsner is great and won’t scare off those not ready to dip their toes, well, tongues, into “weird” beers.

scare off those not ready to dip their toes, well, tongues, into “weird” beers. 8 OREGON

OREGON BEER NEWS

Eugene Brewing District

Eugene Beer Writer Suggests a Crawl Through the Whitaker Area

BY ANTHONY ST. CLAIR

For the Oregon Beer Growler

L ike mushrooms after rain, a Brewing

District has sprung up in Eugene’s Whitaker

Neighborhood. With four area craft breweries

now pouring in “the Whit”, plus options for food and beverage everywhere you look, it’s time to take a walking tour of the Eugene Brewing District.

Ninkasi Tasting Room, 272 Van Buren St. www. ninkasibrewing.com/visit We’re starting our pub crawl at Ninkasi for two

reasons: Oregon’s 4th-largest brewery is the frst

of the four breweries to locate here. Plus, if you’re

driving or biking, Ninkasi is the best place to fnd street parking in the area. If you’ve come with an appetite, you’ll usually fnd

a food cart outside the Tasting Room entrance (but fear not, you’ll have plenty of chances to eat your

fll). Head inside for the swank interior and a pint

of Radiant Northwest Pale Ale, Ninkasi’s summer

seasonal release. You’ll also fnd outdoor seating (rain or shine), old favorites like Total Domination IPA and other special releases—some of which you

won’t fnd anywhere else. Need a sweet treat after leaving Ninkasi? Snag

a frozen yogurt from the Vanilla Jill’s location on

Blair, right behind Ninkasi, for the next stage of our

journey.

Hop Valley Tasting Room & Brewery, 990 W. 1st Ave. www.hopvalleybrewing.com From Ninkasi, turn left, walk to 1st Avenue and

turn right. This won’t be the prettiest part of the tour, but press on. The coffee-brown exterior wood and bright, fresh-hop green tones of Hop Valley’s new Tasting Room and Production Brewery make it all worthwhile. The off-street raised deck seems to take you

to a different world, with plenty of seating for solo

sipping or group gatherings. Inside, enjoy your pint

of Double-D Blonde Ale or 541 American Lager at the

bar. Or, go next door to the separate dining room, where a large glass window gives you a pint’s- eye-view to the massive steel tanks of Hop Valley’s brewing operation. While there, reward your walk with a varied food menu based off favorites from Hop Valley’s original Springfeld brewpub.

Oakshire Public House, 207 Madison St., oakbrew. com/brewery/public-house Tongue relishing all those hoppy fnishes, we continue our tour—with one quick diversion. From Hop Valley, turn right onto 1st Avenue. Have your pints and sample trays inspired you to make your own beer? At 1st and Monroe, head to the yellow building that is the home of Home Fermenter Center (www.homefermenter.com). For over 25 years, Jim Stockton has provided advice, ingredients and gear for homebrewers at all levels. He stocks supplies for making beer, wine, cheese, soda and other fermented foods and beverages.

New brewing kit in hand, turn right down 1st Avenue and go one more block. Turn right at Madison. On the left you’ll soon see the bright windows and warm woodwork of the Oakshire Public House, which opened in May. You’ll fnd your favorite Oakshire beers on tap, such as Overcast Espresso Stout and Watershed IPA, as well as seasonal releases and single-batch beers. Food carts also set up outside the pub.

Falling Sky Delicatessen, 790 Blair Blvd. fallingskybrewing.com/deli After turning left from Oakshire and crossing the railroad tracks, you’ll turn right onto W. 4th Avenue. Let your full belly digest while walking this quiet, tree-lined residential street. But don’t be lulled into a false sense of security, for our tour now brings you to the temptation of distraction. Soon you will arrive at Blair Boulevard, the epicenter of the Whit. The options will dazzle you, and the aromas will entice you: the music and grub at Sam Bond’s Garage. The timeless Tiny’s Tavern. The tangy sweet barbecue aromas wafting from Papa’s Soul Food. You will be tempted to stay here, but you will persevere. For once you turn left onto Blair, you are

Anthony St. Clair has been writing about good food, craft beer, travel and homebrew- ing

Anthony St. Clair has been writing about good food, craft beer, travel and homebrew- ing since 2004. He is based in Eugene,

only a couple of blocks away from the true prize:

house-cured hot pastrami on fresh-baked rye with

a cold pint of Falling Sky Bare Hands Northwest

Bitter. Open as of mid-July and self-described as what happens when an East Coast delicatessen meets a Northwest brewpub, the Falling Sky Delicatessen is the newest member of the Eugene Brewing District. Falling Sky Deli pours beers from their Oak Alley Brewpub, while also making house-baked bagels and breads, plus house-cured pastrami, corned beef and smoked chicken. Settle in at the covered beer garden, or make new friends at the 90-ft. indoor communal table.

The Rest of the Whit Are your thirst—and your wanderlust—still

pulling at you? Back on the streets of the Whit, discover more treasures from this ever-funky Eugene neighborhood. Options abound: dessert

at Sweet Life, iconoclastic sushi at Mame, a neat

dessert at Sweet Life, iconoclastic sushi at Mame, a neat TRAVEL single-malt at Izakaya Meiji, the

TRAVEL

single-malt at Izakaya Meiji, the incomparable chef’s special at Pizza Research Institute. Or maybe you’ll return to your favorite brewery location for another pint. Whatever you decide, you’ve now walked the Eugene Brewing District—and you know all the better where you’ll start next time.

Touring Beyond “The Whit”

Not into the Whit? Fear not. Here are 7 more places to have a good beer and a good meal in the Eugene/Springfeld area. The Bier Stein. The Eugene favorite recently moved to a larger location, expanding their seating and taps in the process. 1591 Willamette St., Eugene. (541) 485-BIER. www.thebierstein.com The Cannery. Located in The Bier Stein’s former home, this new gastropub highlights local food. Twenty taps pour beers from Oregon and the West. 345 E 11th Ave., Eugene. (541) 345-5435. www. theeugenecannery.com Sizzle Pie. The funky Portland pizzeria recently brought their mix of veggie, omnivore, classic and imaginative pizzas to a new location in the heart of Eugene. 910 Willamette St., Eugene. (541) 683-7437. www.sizzlepie.com The Barn Light. By day, this humble cafe serves

EUGENE AREA, Continued on Page 20

The Barn Light. By day, this humble cafe serves EUGENE AREA, Continued on Page 20 AUGUST

BREW BITES

Stout Crème Brulee

Worthy Brewing, Bend Chef: Mike Harrison Beer Pairing: Lights Out Stout

INGREDIENTS

7

oz egg yolks

2

oz sugar

8

oz Lights Out Stout

16 oz Heavy Cream

INSTRUCTIONS

• Scald all ingredients except egg yolks in sauce pan •Take off heat and temper into egg yolks •Strain if needed •Pour into molds and bake on a sheet pan water bath at 325 F for

45 minutes or until frm

•Refrigerate •To serve, sprinkle with granu- lated sugar and caramelize sugar with torch.

Servings: 4-6 depending on mold used

sugar with torch. Servings: 4-6 depending on mold used Chad Kennedy and Mike Harrison tip their

Chad Kennedy and Mike Harrison tip their glasses to Worthy Brewing, which opened in February.

PHOTOS BY WILL OBERST-CAIRNS
PHOTOS BY WILL OBERST-CAIRNS

Worthy’s Stout Creme Brulee, and its Oregon Berry Trife can be made with seasonal and local ingredients. For more recipes, visit www.oregonbeergrowler.com/brew-bites.html

Worthy High Dessert Desserts

Bend’s New Brewery Offers Delicious Sweets to be Paired with its Beer

BY WILL OBERST-CAIRNS

Of the Oregon Beer Growler

I like beer. I like food. I like beer and food. Worthy Brewing, in Bend, makes beer and food. I like Worthy Brewing. Worthy is one of Bend’s newest

breweries, fronted by a restaurant and brewpub. Mike Harrison, the executive chef at Worthy, spent all morning slaving over a hot stove so that I could have seasonally appropriate dishes of deserts paired with brews that are perfect for a sunny Central Oregon day. From the picnic table where I sat, I could see the grounds of Worthy were in fne form for lawn games and gardening hops on trellises. Through the windows I could see the tasting room flled with busy servers and happy patrons. The brewmaster President (Chad) Kennedy, sits beside me and sips slowly on a well-crafted kolsch that is reminiscent of southern Germany and grassy knolls. The desserts presented here are made from scratch at Worthy with local organic ingredients when possible. The fresh ingredients pair well with beer for dessert. Before me was the Farm Out Saison paired with berry and anglaise triffe and the

Worthy Brewing

(a) 495 N.E. Bellevue Dr., Bend

Chef: Mike Harrison Master Brewer: Chad Kennedy

(w) www.worthybrewing.com

Look for Worthy’s beers in cans!

Lights Out Stout with Stout Crème Brulee. The beers both work great for summer so Mike wanted to pair the beers with dishes that both include the beers as ingredients and compliment the favor profles of the dish. The Lights Out Stout is brewed with many of the same ingredients in the recipe. In addition to the Crème Brulee, the stout is also a great beer to drink with Worthy’s Shroom pizza or Reuben sandwich, and it also makes a great stout foat by adding a scoop of ice cream. The Farm Out Saison paired here with the trife is also good with Worthy’s Pear Pizza, Caesar Salad and Bananas Foster.

Oregon Berry Trife

Worthy Brewing, Bend Chef: Mike Harrison Beer Pairing: Farm Out Saison

INGREDIENTS

Oregon Berry Trife: 4-6 servings

7oz egg yolks 2oz sugar 8oz Farm Out Saison 16oz Heavy Cream

1 cup blueberries

1 cup raspberries

1 cup strawberries (quartered) Garnish

INSTRUCTIONS

•Scald all ingredients except egg yolks and berries in sauce pan •Pull off heat and temper mixture with egg yolks •Place mixture in mixing bowl over ice and whisk until cold and sauce has thickened •To Plate, pour 4 oz of sauce in bottom of serving glass and top with berries and garnish

Servings: 4 to 6

BEER NOTES

Lights Out Stout -- 7.7% ABV, 30 IBUs Brewed with premium 2-row, rolled oats, dehusked black malt, chocolate malt with Nugget, Cascade & Santiam hops, Oregon grown and patient-pel- leted by Indie Hops. Oats, milk sugar and Madagascar vanilla beans added

Farm Out Saison -- 7.3% ABV, 22 IBUs Malt: Belgian Pilsner, Hops: Sterling.

TRAVEL

Bend in August: Breweries, Fests and Tours

BY MARK LINDNER

For the Oregon Beer Growler

B end is a great place to visit or live any time of the year. But if I had to pick a favorite time to be here it would be August because that

is when we have two excellent beer festivals--one large, one “little”. It doesn’t hurt that they were our welcome to Bend and its incredible craft beer scene last year. At the large end, the 10th Annual Bend Brewfest will take place Thursday-Saturday, August 15-17 and will feature more than 60 breweries pouring over 140 craft beers, along with three cider houses, two meaderies, and one winery. It takes place at the Les Schwab Ampitheater with plenty of free parking available in the area. Proceeds beneft Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon. This year there is also an expanded X-Tap selection of special, low production experimental beers. The Brewtality Tent gives the festival goer a chance to relax for a bit and meet the brewers. Admission is free. For tasting, a commemorative mug and 4 tokens are available for $12 with extra tokens sold in packs of 5 at $1 per token. Beer is one token per pour, except for X-Tap beers which

MARK LINDNER is currently a part-time librarian, full-time beer nerd, blogs at Bend Beer Librarian,

MARK LINDNER is currently a part-time librarian, full-time beer nerd, blogs at Bend Beer Librarian, and also collaborates for Beer me Bend!, a guide to the local craft beer scene in Bend. Send him a tweet @ bythebbl

are usually 2-3 tokens. Food vendors will be on site. The event is cash only but ATMs will be available on site. Children and pets are welcome until 7 pm. Hours are 3-11 pm Thursday-Friday and noon-11 pm Saturday. Les Schwab Amphitheater is located on the banks of the Deschutes River in the Old Mill District of Bend. Check the website (www.bendbrewfest. com) for more information, such as brewery and beer line-up, sponsors, FAQ and to sign up to volunteer. At the “little” end is The 5th Annual Little Woody Barrel Aged Brew and Whiskey Fest. It will be held Friday-Saturday, August 30-31, and it takes place

be held Friday-Saturday, August 30-31, and it takes place next to the Des Chutes Historical Museum

next to the Des Chutes Historical Museum in downtown Bend. Hours are Friday 5to 10 p.m. and Saturday noon to 10 p.m. Please note that the Little Woody is a 21 and over event. There are 19 breweries scheduled so far, several of which are not local to Bend or the region. There will also be a wide selection of small batch American bourbons and ryes, which are still to be announced. Basic entry which includes a commemorative glass is $7, while a tasting package which includes glass, entry and 10 tokens is available for $15 (a $2 saving). Tokens are $1 each and tastes cost 2-5 tokens each. More information is available at http://www.woodybeer. com/little/. The Little Woody is in easy walking distance of several of Bend’s breweries and public houses. Like many brewfests these rely on volunteers to make the magic happen. Both of these fests reward their volunteers with entry, tasting mugs, tokens and a t-shirt. Volunteer sign-up forms are available on the respective websites. My wife and I already have our opening slot for the Bend Brewfest reserved again this year. We hope to see you at one or both of these great beer fests which help defne summer in Bend.

The Bend Ale Trail:

Tour Suggestions are Online

BY KAT BALISDELL

For the Oregon Beer Growler

I begin my day at Visit Bend! located conveniently within walking distance to all the downtown pubs. Sure, there’s a video of folks skiing and fshing on the big screen but there is no underestimating the presence of the breweries here. One whole aisle is dedicated to brochures and glassware of the local brew crew and two full walls are bedecked with Ale Trail supplies from T-Shirts to Growlers, from buttons to koozies. Of course the Silipint is displayed, this will be my prize should I succeed in my Ale Trail challenge. I grab the massive fold out trail brochure from the kiosk that I’ll fnd at all the trail stops on my journey. These kiosks have QR code and I can check in using my Bend Ale Trail app that I downloaded (available on both Iphone and Android platforms) or go the old fashioned route and carry

BEND, Continued on Page 20

platforms) or go the old fashioned route and carry BEND, Continued on Page 20 AUGUST 2013
platforms) or go the old fashioned route and carry BEND, Continued on Page 20 AUGUST 2013

Willamette Valley

Gail Chooses Her Favorite Breweries Close to Home

BY GAIL OBERST

Of the Oregon Beer Growler

N ewberg, McMinnville, Salem, Independence,

Silverton, Corvallis – is there a small town

in the Willamette Valley that doesn’t have

a brewery? I don’t think so. Don’t feel sorry for

me because I live in the mid-Willamette Valley. Despite my 50-mile distance from Brewvana, my opportunities for beer touring are multiple. Following are a few of my favorite breweries to visit within 30 miles of my home in Independence, but there are certainly more. Check out the Oregon Brewers’ Guild map for more suggestions,

oregoncraftbeer.org/breweries/willamettevalley, or visit www.oregonbeergrowler.com to see where our writers have already been. Or, visit any of the Albany-Corvallis breweries

to pick up the Mid-Valley Sip Trip brochure, which

has a great map of 10 breweries, distilleries, cider houses and meaderies in that area.

Rogue Hopyard, 3590 Wigrich Rd., Independence I’m not only mentioning this because it’s the brewpub closest to my house, but also because it’s

a fun, farmy place to visit for the whole family. This time of year you can sit in the yard and watch the

cornhole players, watch the turkeys strut past, have

a bite to eat from the food cart, take a class in bee-

keeping or soap-making, and drink the latest Rogue brew, all in the shadow of the hopfelds. Two years ago, Rogue fred up a nanobrewery in the farm building behind the tasting room and patio, a stone’s throw from the Willamette River, so those beers, and others from Rogue, are on tap, in addition to

their bottled beer. This is a great country place for

a family outing, especially in the summer and fall, when the tours are each weekend. It’s open seven days a week.

Golden Valley, 980 NE 4th St., McMinnville

McMinnville’s Golden Valley Brewing was the frst

in a rising tide of west-side breweries including

Heater Allen (McMinnville), Long Brewing (Newberg), Fire Mountain Brewhouse (Carlton), Chehalem Valley Brewing (Newberg) and the soon-to-open Grain Station Brew Works (McMinnville). Golden Valley’s Peter Kircher has set the bar high. His classy Craftsman-style pub and his dedication to local foods (from his own farm) and fresh beer ingredients lead the way for the other boutique breweries in the region. My suggestion? I love Golden Valley’s Chehalem Mountain IPA and their Third Street Wheat to wash back their sausage and cheese plate. Sausages are from their own livestock, fed on spent grains from GV’s brews. After touring this region, fall into bed at McMenamin’s Hotel Oregon in McMinnville, one of my favorite haunts in this area.

Seven Brides, 990 N. 1st St., Silverton – Silverton’s hometown brewery – the ‘brides’ refer to the owners’ seven daughters – is a fabulous place to stop after hiking the nearby Silver Falls State Park, touring the Oregon Gardens, visiting the city’s great art galleries and shops, or whooping it up at

the Homer Davenport Days Aug. 2-4. Here’s my suggestion: Call the Oregon Garden Resort and make your overnight reservation, then take in one or two of the above activities, stop off at Seven Brides afterward to either fll your growler or have a few pints at the saloon then fall into the fabulously comfortable beds at the resort. After breakfast in the morning, tour the gardens, go back to Seven Brides for beer and lunch and then take in another activity. This really is a sweet town. My favorite brews are Frankenlou’s IPA, Drunkle, and the Black Cat Porter.

Gilgamesh, 2065 Madrona Ave. S.E., Salem – The Salem area’s beer culture has gone from 0 to 60 in just a few short years, jumpstarted by The Ram, which is a chain but brews in Salem, and Pale Horse, with its popular Hillbilly Blonde, and super- fueled by Gilgamesh, a local family-owned brewery. Last year, the Radkes turned their brewing and wood-crafting acumen into a successful brewpub, moving from their tiny Turner home into an industrial park “Campus” funhouse. The woody and warm freside Gilgamesh brewpub has attracted Salem’s hoards – I’ve never been there on slow day. I like their Vader CDA, but their Mamba, with its tangerine and rye favors, is also nice. I always order the Baja Chipotle fsh tacos but I should branch out a bit – they have a wide selection of dinner and lunch entrees and small plates, and an outside patio.

Santiam Brewing, 2544 19th St. S.E., Salem – Several homebrewers and self-proclaimed beer geeks pooled their resources last year and set up shop in and industrial park not too far from

WILLAMETTE, Continued on Page 13

L A M E T T E , C o n t i n u e
L A M E T T E , C o n t i n u e
L A M E T T E , C o n t i n u e

Craft Breweries Thrive In Oregon’s Rural Towns

WILLAMETTE, From Page 12

Gilgamesh. Within months they had expanded to include a tasting room open seven afternoons a week. There are always at least 10 various brews on tap, but this brewery is emerging as a cask ale specialist, thanks in no small part to English brewer, Ian Croxall. You’ll always fnd at least four “beer engines” connected to a frkin.

Block 15, 300 SW Jefferson Corvallis There are two sides to Block 15 – the two-level casual food and drink brewpub side, and the Les Caves side, a small fne-dining atmosphere with beer and food pairing as its main attraction. Both sides feature Block 15’s great beers and display an almost fanatic dedication to local products in their cuisine. The Block 15 side has at least a dozen of its own beers on tap, from cask ales to IPAs. Les Caves also offers a variety of other Oregon beers on tap and in bottles or cans. What do I suggest? A local salad for lunch at Block 15, and for dinner, an entrée at Les Caves with Afton Field Farms chicken or pork, all nicely paired with an Oregon beer.

Flat Tail Sports Pub and Brewery, 202 SW First St., Corvallis Where do Oregon State University students (over 21 of course) take their parents when Ma or Pa visits them at school? Flat Tail, of course, for several reasons: By day, this brewpub looks downright mild. There’s a beer here for every taste -- from sours to gruits to ales and kolsches – and the Beaver memorabilia and big screen televisions

all provide enough distraction to blur parental

squawking. By night, this can be a crowded haven

of youngish cruisers looking for a $3 pint and an

oyster shooter or a frickle (fried pickle chips) to top off a long day of “studies.”

A few others in Corvallis-Albany

Oregon Trail Brewing, 341 S.W. Second St., is the oldest, and possibly the smallest brewery in Corvallis (not counting homebrewers’ garages).

It is connected to the Old World Deli, where I had

eaten lunch for years before realizing there was

a brewery in back! Brewery is open noon 5 p.m. Monday – Friday. Sky High Brewing, 160 NW Jackson St.,

Corvallis, is now completing its top story restaurant, but the brewery and the cozy tasting room (food service available) overlooking the brewery is open, serving great beer. Always good is the Linus Pauling Peace ale and the Big Air XX IPA. Interesting

is the Monk’s Mana, a Belgian honey Tripel brewed

with local honey and Crosby Hop Farm hops. Mazama Brewing, 33930 S.E. Eastgate Circle, Corvallis, opened this year with a focus on Belgian- style brews. A great stop for those who also want

to try cider and mead, in the same complex.

Calapooia Brewing Co., 140 Hill St. N.E., Albany. On any given Sunday at 4 p.m. you are likely to fnd me and my posse getting down with the bluesmeisters at Calapooia’s weekly blues jam. I will most likely have a RIPArian IPA in front of me, and at least one of my buddies will be quaffng the chili beer, for which this brewery is famous.

of my buddies will be quaffng the chili beer, for which this brewery is famous. AUGUST
of my buddies will be quaffng the chili beer, for which this brewery is famous. AUGUST
of my buddies will be quaffng the chili beer, for which this brewery is famous. AUGUST

PHOTO BY GAIL OBERST

PERFECT PINTS

Consumers Choose 7 Oregon Session Brews

Horse Brass Pub Hosts Oregon Beer Growler’s Monthly Blind Beer Tasting

BY GAIL OBERST

Of the Oregon Beer Growler

O regon’s session beers are many, and true to the Northwest form, are also a bit higher in alcohol than the English ales that bred

the name. The informal category “session” was prompted by a World War I law that limited drinking to two “sessions:” 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 7 to 11 p.m., aimed at keeping production workers relatively sober. As a result, popular beers for those sessions were those that a person could drink continuously without getting super drunk – usually about 3 or 4 percent ABV (alcohol by volume). The law stayed on the books until 1988! Fast forward to Horse Brass in 2013, an English- style pub in the Belmont district of Portland. Here among photos of the pub’s founder, Don Younger, we tasted Oregon session beers that ranged in ABV from 4.0% up to 6%. Not only are ABVs generally higher, but also the variety of beers brewers dubbed as “sessionable” was extensive. Among those we tasted were pale ales, IPAs, ISAs, a Kolsch and a few blondes. Oregon “sessions,” it appears, are either shorter, or happier. Here are the seven “session” beers chosen by Horse Brass clients from among those contributed by Oregon brewers. They are listed in reverse alphabetical order.

Silver Moon GetSum Pale Ale, Bend 5.6 % ABV, 44 IBUs This summer seasonal includes Chinook, Centennial, and Citra hops to give it a giant grapefruit, This summer seasonal includes Chinook, Centennial, and Citra hops to give it a giant grapefruit, pine, and tropical fruit favor while maintaining a moderate bitterness, with medium body and a dry fnish, according to Silver Moon’s description. “Smooth and easy to drink,” said one taster. “Smells wonderful,” said another. “A perfect way to start the afternoon. I enjoy the favor that stays on the tongue,” a third taster said. “Just a good summertime beer,” summed up a fourth.

Ninkasi Radiant, Eugene 6% ABV, 40 IBUs Earthy and foral hops balance this award- winning Northwest-style pale ale, with a touch of Earthy and foral hops balance this award- winning Northwest-style pale ale, with a touch of Crystal and Vienna malts for favor. The smooth malt character is balanced by elegant hop bitterness, the perfect complement to a glorious summer day, according to Ninkasi’s commercial description. Our consumer tasters agreed with the professional judges: “A good drink for after work,” said one taster. “I’m going to eat it with some French fries,” decided another. “This is easy to drink, and it’s not too light,” mused another.

easy to drink, and it’s not too light,” mused another. Session beers in Oregon may be
easy to drink, and it’s not too light,” mused another. Session beers in Oregon may be

Session beers in Oregon may be a little bit higher in alcohol than English session beers, but the idea is the same: What could you drink over and over in a “session?”

Long Brewery Linda’s Lager, Newberg 4% ABV, 12 IBUs This European-style summer seasonal lager has a light straw color with a tight lacy white This European-style summer seasonal lager has a light straw color with a tight lacy white head, subtle lime citrus and foral aroma with soft hop spice, according to Paul Long’s description of the beer that bears his wife’s name. Champagne-like qualities with refreshing carbonation, clean, crisp and dry with a delicately balanced, slightly tart fnish, said Paul. “Sunshine highway,” described one taster. “Just the way a lager should taste,” said another. “Absolutely love it! So crisp and refreshing. I’m going to stock up on this one immediately,” enthused another. “Sunshine, patios and this beer.” Why am I inside drinking this beer?” queried one.

Hopworks Organic Lager, Portland 5.1% ABV, 32 IBUs “Our German-style pilsner is all malt, all the time,” according to Hopwork’s website description of “Our German-style pilsner is all malt, all the time,” according to Hopwork’s website description of this beer. “Spicy and herbal notes from Organic Perle and Hallertau hops balance the delicate honey favor from organic 2-row and light caramel malts. This golden lager is dry and refreshing with surprising

depth of character.” Tasters chimed in with praises:

“This could make a salty dog smile a toothless grin,” said one. “Light but tasty,” said another. “Drinkable and fresh,” described a taster. “My favorite beer so far. I could drink this one for hours, and probably days.”

Full Sail Session Lager, Hood River 5.1% ABV, 18 IBUs Full Sail describes it thus: This all-malt pre- Prohibition style lager is favorful, refreshing, and Full Sail describes it thus: This all-malt pre- Prohibition style lager is favorful, refreshing, and has a touch of that import-style taste. It comes in a stubby, 11-oz bottle like your grandpa used to buy. It was named World’s Best Premium Lager at the World Beer Awards and is the winner of a slew of other shiny trophies. Oregon Beer Growler consumers gave it a thumbs-up. “Easy to drink and uncomplicated.” “Your basic beer,” said another. “Refreshing! I could drink this all afternoon!” “Tasty,” and “Perfect for summer,” were among other comments.

Deschutes River Ale, Bend 4% ABV, 28 IBUs Deschutes offcials describe this golden or blonde Deschutes offcials describe this golden or blonde

ale as “A session beer with craft soul.” It is clean and refreshing enough for a long haul, but has plenty of interesting features including hop aroma (Cascade, Crystal and Nugget) and malt heft (Pale, Munich, Carapils and Crystal). Consumers loved it. “Like running barefoot through the grass,” said one. “Light and crisp enough to drink on my deck all day,” said another. Several called it a “good summer beer.” One person suggested that this would be a great beer to introduce to friends who are stuck on Bud Light or Miller.

introduce to friends who are stuck on Bud Light or Miller. Bend Brewing Metolius Golden Ale,

Bend Brewing Metolius Golden Ale, Bend 5.4% ABV This golden ale that has been pleasing Bend drinkers for 15 years closely approximates a lager in its crisp, dry palate, low hop aroma, light body and light malt sweetness. The fnish is very clean with a lingering subtle fruitiness, according to its commercial description. “Nice!” and “Drinkable!” were two brief descriptions from consumer tasters. “Solid and enjoyable, anytime,” said another. “Sunshine in my mouth,” said a taster. “Oh golden waves of grain!” exclaimed one.

Oktoberfest Gutbier (All-grain)

A ProMash Recipe Report BJCP Style and Style Guidelines

 

03-B European Amber Lager, Oktoberfest/Maerzen

 

Min OG: 1.050

Max OG: 1.056

 

Min IBU:

 

20

Max IBU:

28

Min Clr:

7

Max Clr:

14 Color in SRM, Lovibond

 

Recipe Specifcs Batch Size (Gal):

5

Wort Size (Gal):

5

Total Grain (Lbs):

10

Anticipated OG: 1.055 Anticipated SRM: 9.1

Plato:

13.69

Anticipated IBU:

24.1

Brewhouse Effciency: 75 %

 

Wort Boil Time:

60 Minutes

Grain/Extract/Sugar

 

%

Amount

Name

 

Origin

Potential SRM

 

65

6.5 lbs.

Pilsener

 

Germany

1.038

2

10

1 lb

 

Munich Malt I

Germany

1.037

6

15

1.5 lbs.

CaraVienne Malt

Belgium

1.034

22

10

1

lb

CaraRed

 

Germany

1.035

20

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon

 

Hops

Amount

 

Name

Form

Alpha IBU Boil Time

1 oz.

Spalter Spalt

 

Whole

4.75

20.7 60 min.

 

1 oz.

Spalter Spalt

Whole

4.75

3.4

5 min.

Yeast White Labs WLP820 Octoberfest - Marzen

 

Oktoberfest Gutbier (Extract)

 

03-B European Amber Lager, Oktoberfest/Maerzen

Min OG: 1.050

Max OG: 1.056

 

Min IBU:

 

20

Max IBU:

28

Min Clr:

7

Max Clr:

14 Color in SRM, Lovibond

 

Recipe Specifcs Batch Size (Gal): 5

Wort Size (Gal): 5

 

Total Extract (Lbs): 9.0 Anticipated OG: 1.057 Anticipated SRM: 9.3

Plato: 14.13

Anticipated IBU:

23.9

Wort Boil Time: 60

Minutes

Grain/Extract/Sugar

%

Amount

Name

 

Origin

Potential SRM

 

61.1

5.50 lbs.

Briess LME- Pilsen

USA

1.035

2

16.7

1.50 lbs.

CaraVienne Malt

Belgium

1.034

22

11.1

1 lb

 

Briess LME - Munich

USA

1.030

8

11.1

1 lb

CaraRed

 

Germany

1.035

20

Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon

 

Hops

Amount

 

Name

Form

Alpha IBU Boil Time

1 oz.

Spalter Spalt

 

Whole

4.75

20.5 60 min.

 

1 oz.

Spalter Spalt

Whole

4.75

3.4

5 min.

Yeast White Labs WLP820 Octoberfest - Marzen

 
Yeast White Labs WLP820 Octoberfest - Marzen   Brew On! As of July 1 this year,

Brew On!

As of July 1 this year, homebrewers can legally brew in every state in the U.S., thanks to recent Mississippi and Alabama laws that lifted homebrew bans. Prohibition made homebrewing illegal in 1919 in the U.S. Homebrewing’s prohibition was federally repealed in 1978. Most states, including Oregon, followed suit and updated homebrew laws since the federal action, but some states withheld approval. The American Homebrewers Association estimates there are more than a million homebrewers in the U.S.

HOMEBREW HINTS

The Wide, Wide World of Homebrewing

Expand Your Brewing Recipes And Ingredients This Year

BY CHRIS JENNINGS

For the Oregon Beer Growler

B eing a home brewer is not just a cheap way to drink a tasty beverage. It is having access into the vast world of beer. Having the capability to

brew beer styles that are regionally based in foreign lands or recipes that are thousands of years old are

just some of the ways to explore in our own home breweries. Shopping at a bottle shop and trying to fnd something new and exciting to try instead of the same IPA or porter is a great way to expand our beer knowledge. Branching out from our comfort zones is the only way to grow our brewing abilities and see the world through beer.

Now for Something Completely Different Brewing a new beer style is one thing but fnding a recipe is another process all together. There is of course the internet with an endless supply of opinions and ideas, which can be overwhelming. Books are a great resources and not just brewing books some older cookbooks also had home wine and beer-making recipes. Searching without direction can make things even more complicated, so having a starting point by picking a country, a region, or even a beer color and base your searches around these criteria

a beer color and base your searches around these criteria CHRIS JENNINGS and his family own

CHRIS JENNINGS and his family own Brew Brothers Homebrew Products in Hillsboro. E-mail him at amishbiermann@ gmail.com

CHRIS JENNINGS and his family own Brew Brothers Homebrew Products in Hillsboro. E-mail him at amishbiermann@

will help with the search process. Then begin to hone the results you get into categories by fnding overlapping themes. Once you have 5 recipes or ideas of recipes with similar ingredients and processes, build your own recipe based on your brewing abilities and what you have access to as far as ingredients and equipment. Recipes from thousands of years ago might talk about allowing the fermentation to sit out uncovered or even using some kind of strange container to begin fermentation. There is no reason these traditions

can’t be brought in the 21st century. We want to taste the world, not the past. There are reasons that we home brew the way that we do today and it

is because our home brewing brothers and sisters

of the past fgured out ways to make brewing better.

Exotic Places Though we can search the internet and the

library for days, there are other ways to search for

a new tasty brew to enjoy. Heading to a bottle shop

and wandering in the import section is a great way

to gather information. Even if all you do is make a

list of beer styles you have never heard of or have

been eager to try. Buying them all and tasting them would be a fun learning experience, while taking notes of course, but we are here to brew so using these names as a starting point for our research may be more benefcial. Asking your other brewing friends or the people at your local home brew shop

is another great way to gather information you

HOMEBREW, Continued on Page 23

shop is another great way to gather information you HOMEBREW, Continued on Page 23 AUGUST 2013

BUSINESS IS BREWING

BUSINESS IS BREWING Tourists: Sell Service BY DARYL WELCH For the Oregon Beer Growler L et’s

Tourists: Sell Service

BY DARYL WELCH

For the Oregon Beer Growler

L et’s face it, Oregon is beer country and tourism

opportunities abound - adding up to $9.2

billion to Oregon’s economy. How do you take

advantage of these tourism opportunities, while also serving the local community? Local residents who have not visited your location can and should be viewed as “local tourists”. Recent estimates (by the U.S. Census Bureau and Google) show that only 50% of businesses today actually have a website. Of the half that do have a website, my experience shows that the site speaks more about the company or the owners of the company than it does about the benefts your customer will derive from doing business with you. The frst step in attracting prospects and customers then, is actually having a Domain Name and getting a website tied to that Domain. You don’t need a large, fancy website. You do however need a site that answers some basic questions that your potential customers might be asking. Do you have what I’m looking for? What are the benefts that I’ll gain from doing business with you? Where are you? What are your hours? How do I get ahold of you? Why should I choose you? People use the Internet today to search for

solutions to their problems. As a tourist, “What are we going to do in the location that we are staying?” We’re not visiting your city to just lay around the motel room watching daytime TV.

DARYL WELCH is the owner of Affordable Web Technology (www. affordablewebtechnol - ogy.com) in Portland.

DARYL WELCH is the owner of Affordable Web Technology (www.

affordablewebtechnol-

ogy.com) in Portland. His clients gain more prospects, profts, and productivity through utilization of Internet technologies.

We’re in Beer Country. If you have multiple services - have one web page for each service. In other words, if you discuss brewery tours, tasting fights, and restaurant facilities all on the same page, it makes it impossible for Google and BING to fgure out what that page is really about. Pages that are confusing to the search engines don’t get served as relevant results to searchers. Everybody in the beer industry believes that they are unique from everybody else. That’s great! Your site should differentiate you in a unique way from your competition. This is where you can talk about yourself or your company a bit. But, even at that, if you can fnd a way to word your uniqueness in a way that benefts your customers - all the better! After reading your web pages, I should be able to envision myself experiencing everything you have to offer and I really want to share that with the rest of my friends. After all, I like great beer my friends must also like great beer If you can get me talking to my friends about your great beer - that’s the ultimate goal. Make it easy for your customers to become your advocates. Your website will promote your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. As a customer who has actually found you (and your website), I can now share you as easily as sending my friends a link to your site. They can start an experience with you as easily as clicking the link, and in-turn can share what they fnd with their friends. There are 169 brewing facilities alone in 61 cities in Oregon. The craft beer industry produced over 1.2 million barrels in 2012 and the total economic impact from the beer industry on Oregon’s economy was $2.4 billion dollars. Get your piece of the action by starting with a Domain Name and a website so you too can get found on today’s travel-guide - the Internet.

For information, e-mail Marcus Reed, mreed@ cosgravelaw.com BUSINESS IS BREWING IS WRITTEN BY B.I.N.G. Members

For information, e-mail Marcus Reed, mreed@ cosgravelaw.com

BUSINESS IS BREWING IS WRITTEN BY B.I.N.G. Members of this beverage industry support group meet each second Wednesday in the Portland area. Info at: bingoregon. wordpress.com

in the Portland area. Info at: bingoregon. wordpress.com Headlines, Deadlines August 10 is the deadline to

Headlines, Deadlines

August 10 is the deadline to get your news and advertising into the September issue of the Oregon Beer Growler. See page 2 for contact information.

BREW BRIEFS, From Page 4

See page 2 for contact information. BREW BRIEFS, From Page 4 SILVER MOON HAS NEW OWNERS

SILVER MOON HAS NEW OWNERS

Silver Moon Brewing, 24 Greenwood Ave, Bend, has two new owners and a new brew- master. New owners Matt Barrett and James Watt took the helm last month, bringing with them Stuart Long, former brewer at the Lost Abbey and Port Brewing in San Diego. Founder Tyler Reichart established the brew- ery and pub 13 years ago, at a time when Bend Brewing and Deschutes were the only games in town. Today, the Central Oregon market has boomed to more than 20 breweries. The two new owners bring new business skills to the table. Matt Barrett owns Snap Fitness in Bend; James Watt owns Cycle Pub, Bend’s “party bike” business. The two say they are remodeling the bar, and for starters, have replaced the dusty disco ball with colorful stage lights. The legendary pool table is going out out in furry of raffe tickets.

STANDING STONE RAISING CHICKENS

Standing Stone Brewing, of Ashland, is now in the free-range chicken business. The brew- ery and restaurant now has a licensed poultry operation to supply farm-fresh chicken to its customers, according to Rachel Konig, spokes- person for the operation. The chickens, not to mention the cattle and lambs, are fed spent grains from the brewery. The restaurant also composts all its food prod- ucts, and as a result, earned kudos as one of Oregon’s Best Green Businesses by the Oregon Business Magazine. Co-owner Alex Amarotico manages the farm and processing facility about a mile from the restaurant. The company aims at raising nearly 5,000 chickens a year to supply the needs of the restaurant. Chicks are fed organic feed and then graze in a pasture on the 265-acre ranch. Free-range birds require about 13 weeks to mature, com- pared to 6 weeks for factory chickens. Standing Stone’s farm has been raising live- stock for its restaurant since 2011.

Standing Stone’s farm has been raising live- stock for its restaurant since 2011. 16 OREGON BEER
Advocate Green at Your Favorite Brewery MICHAEL CAIRNS, a retired ecologist, is the Growler’s Chief

Advocate Green at Your Favorite Brewery

MICHAEL CAIRNS, a retired ecologist, is the Growler’s Chief Operating Offcer. His monthly column features

MICHAEL CAIRNS, a retired ecologist, is the Growler’s Chief Operating Offcer. His monthly column features the efforts of breweries and associ- ated organizations to make and sell beer sustainably.

Applaud Your Watering Holes For Green Efforts

BY MICHAEL CAIRNS

Of the Oregon Beer Growler

P ast Green Beer columns have covered some

of the innovative building and production

practices that various Oregon craft breweries

use to create light environmental footprints on our land, air and water resources. This month’s Oregon Beer Growler’s emphasis on beer tourism gives us all an opportunity to think about sustainability at the breweries and brewpubs we visit as we travel

around the Beaver State.

If you recycle everything possible in your home,

you use compact fuorescent bulbs, you buy natural,

grass-fed beef, and you maybe even capture rain water for reuse in your garden, then why not expect your brewery owners to do the same?

A few of the following practices are used by

most of Oregon’s craft breweries, most of them are used by several brewers, and all of them are used by a select few of the most sustainable craft beer companies in Oregon. When you’re out and about in Oregon, you might want to look around and ask yourselves how breweries are stacking up. I would start off with asking whether a brewery is certifed organic by Oregon Tilth or another organization empowered to do certifcation. A follow-up question is if a brewery produces one or more organic beers on a regular basis.

Water How many gallons of water are used per gallon of beer produced? Eight is an average, and some use fewer than fve gallons of water per gallon of beer. Do you see low-fow toilets, faucets and dishwashers in restrooms and kitchens? Does the brewery collect, store and reuse rainfall?

Energy

Are chillers and appliances labeled as EPA Energy Stars? Does the brewery use LED and CFL lighting?

Is the brewery enrolled in a “Clean Wind”, or

similar energy program?

Waste Is spent grain and hops sold or given to local farmers for livestock feed? What percentage of other waste is recycled? A few Oregon breweries recycle more than 80% of their waste.

Transportation Do employees bike, walk, carpool or use public transportation, and are they rewarded for doing so?

Food Does the brewpub use naturally grown meat and

so? Food Does the brewpub use naturally grown meat and organic coffee? Do you see recycled
so? Food Does the brewpub use naturally grown meat and organic coffee? Do you see recycled

organic coffee? Do you see recycled and compostable napkins, cups, take-out containers and utensils?

Offsets Does the brewery purchase BPA water offsets? How many tons of CO2 equivalents are used by the brewery – what is its carbon footprint? Does the brewery buy carbon offset credits, such as Clear Sky, from their utility company? We can answer some of these questions by just looking around when we travel to various craft beer producers. Some will require that we ask questions of the owners and brewers on-site. But encourage your favorite brewer by asking those questions. It may inspire change.

encourage your favorite brewer by asking those questions. It may inspire change. AUGUST 2013 | OREGON
South Coast: New Breweries Add to Line-up BY SEAN SULLIVAN For the Oregon Beer Growler

South Coast: New Breweries Add to Line-up

BY SEAN SULLIVAN

For the Oregon Beer Growler

A s Oregon’s craft beer craze continues to spread, so do the options for road trips. Winding highways with views of the Pacifc

Ocean lead to the towns of Gold Beach and Brookings, which are home to three new breweries. But the seed of this new craft beer community began in a modest, roadside tap room. “When we moved here eleven years ago it was a beer desert,” says Chetco Brewing’s owner Michael Fredrick. “What really started it was Vista Pub and Raymond.”

Vista Pub

In downtown Brookings Raymond Ross and his father Bill serve big, messy burgers in the tradition of the families original Island Vista restaurant, but also offer a large variety of microbrews on tap which has included local breweries Chetco and Arch Rock. Prior to Vista Pub opening their doors

Chetco and Arch Rock. Prior to Vista Pub opening their doors Above, Dave Faires and Nathan
Chetco and Arch Rock. Prior to Vista Pub opening their doors Above, Dave Faires and Nathan

Above, Dave Faires and Nathan Heath opened Tight Line, Brooking’s only city limits brewery. Below, Larry Brennan and his wife Marjie, and Kristin and James Smith opened Arch Rock Brewing in Gold Beach.

two and half years ago craft beer had little or no foothold on Oregon’s Southern coast. “I feel like I was the frst out of the gate,” Raymond says, “and showed it would work.” A small stage hosts local musicians, art decorates the walls, Vista Pub has the vibe of a big city speak easy blended with the warm friendliness of a coastal town. No one seems to be in a hurry here, smiles come naturally and the food arrives in large portions. Raymond adds that a real craft beer community has developed in this region. As an example he tells of Arch Rock’s master brewer lending out equipment to help another start up brewery.

Arch Rock Brewing

Located in Gold Beach, Oregon, about 30 miles North of Brookings, Arch Rock earned a gold

about 30 miles North of Brookings, Arch Rock earned a gold medal this year from the
about 30 miles North of Brookings, Arch Rock earned a gold medal this year from the

medal this year from the North American Brewer’s Association for their State of Jefferson Porter. The

brewery doubles as a tasting room, where locals and tourists can sample the beers, fll their growlers or pick up “Arch Rock” merchandise. Head Brewer James Smith and his wife Kristin both left Grand Teton Brewing in Idaho to team up with owners Larry Brennan and his wife Marjie. James has also worked at Uinta Brewing in Utah and his experience shows up in the favors of the beers he brews on the 15 barrel system. The Gold Beach Lager delivers a light, crisp taste that makes it perfect for hot summer days, while their Pistol River Pale Ale brings all the hop favors that have defned Pacifc Northwest IPAs with only

a

fraction of that style’s bitterness. Yet it manages

to

present as a dry beer with very little malt

sweetness. Look for Arch Rock beers on tap in pubs from Brookings to Florence and coming soon to the Rogue Valley.

Tight Line Brewing

Dave Faires and his son-in-law Nathan Heath have the only brewery located within Brooking’s city limits. Their beer will be on tap again soon at the Black Trumpet Bistro, which is located directly above the brewery. Their initial batches sold out quickly, which has left both men optimistic. “People come to Oregon just to tour breweries,” Nathan says. “And if they come up the coast we’ll be the frst one they hit.” Although Dave has been brewing beer since the 80s, his venture with his son-in-law began in 2009

in his daughter’s kitchen, but quickly was relocated

to the garage when she kicked them out.

Their signature beers will be the RIP Pale Ale and the Dog Hair Porter. The latter is a smooth, dark beer with roasted malt favor upfront that transitions to toasted caramal tones with very little bitterness in the aftertaste. Very drinkable!

Chetco Brewing

Two and half miles up North Bank Road, looking out over the river, Chetco Brewing offcially opened April 19 of this year and already has beer on tap at Vista Pub, Ray’s growler fll station, Port of Brooking’s Harbor, The Black Trumpet and the Farmer’s Market. Eight years ago Michael Frederick’s wife Alex bought him a homebrewing kit. The hobby became such a passion that he now grows eleven variations

of hops.

“They’re beautiful plants,” he says. Michael says they try to be community friendly and environment friendly. “We’re a mom and pop thing,” he says. “We grow our own raspberries. We’re running on a borrowed system.” He says on a brewing day he will brew two 40

gallon batches using the equipment lent to him by James Smith from Arch Rock. Michael adds that he

is building a refrigerated trailer because he sees

wider distribution is the brewery;s future, including

a partnership with friends in Portland.

North Coast Getaways

PHOTO BY GAIL OBERST
PHOTO BY GAIL OBERST

You can watch the ships ply the Columbia River from the deck of Rogue’s Astoria Public House.

Breweries and Seascape Beauty Abound Between Astoria and Newport

BY GAIL OBERST

Of the Oregon Beer Growler

H ere’s my favorite fantasy: I lift up the corner

of the desk, watch these papers and cards

and electronic gadgets crash to foor, slip out

the back door before anyone notices, jump on the highway west until it ends, and throw myself on the frst beach I fnd. After an hour of running through

waves and chasing seagulls, I work up a thirst for an Oregon brew. What’s close? Depending on where I land on the coast, I’ll probably be at one of these breweries between Astoria and Newport:

Rogue’s Public House, 100 39th Street, Astoria, – There’s no brewery at this Rogue, but it is a super cool place to hang out on a sunny, stormy or any afternoon, and by hang out, I mean you are literally

or any afternoon, and by hang out, I mean you are literally hanging out over the

hanging out over the lower Columbia River, close enough to hear the ships go by. Fort George Brewery, 1483 Duane Street, Astoria

– You hunt for their eclectic brews wherever you

go, so why not stop in at heaven’s headquarters, located between the historic downtown and the waterfront. There you’ll discover that Fort George makes more than just a delicious Vortex IPA: Stouts, lagers, wits, doppelbocks, pumpkin and coffee and spruce favors, and Belgian beers all await your tongue. This summer Fort George opened a top foor restaurant with a killer view of the waterfront and a full line-up of wood-fred pizzas. Don’t like wide, open spaces? Try the tiny freside pub next to the brewery. Seaside Brewing Company, 851 Broadway St., Seaside – This year-old brewery right on Highway 101’s thoroughfare through town is expanding to a 15-barrel system. But even before the expansion, this brewery was the wave to catch: fresh seafood

snacks, lunches and dinners paired with their own and other local brews boosted its popularity. Now that the new brewing system is installed, who knows how far they’ll go? Stop by and check it out, if only to see how nicely they’ve fxed up this historic building. Pelican Pub & Brewery, 33180 Cape Kiwanda Dr., Pacifc City – There’s a lot to say about this place, but we thought the picture on the cover was worth

a million words. In this tiny coastal town, you can

eat, sleep to the sounds of waves, shop up a storm, and drink great beer. How could it get better? Pelican is expanding to Tillamook, that’s how! Read more about that, this issue. McMenamins Lighthouse Brewpub, 4157 N.W. Highway 101, Lincoln City – There are several coastal McMenamins on the map, including the new Gearhart Hotel, where you can stay the night, but Lincoln City’s Lighthouse is its only coastal

brewery, established in 1986, one of the frst in the company. If you read this in time to make the Aug. 17 Lighthouse Brewfest, you may be able to view the Mighty Beer Atom as it emerges from the creative mind of a McMenamins employee. Rusty Truck Brewery, 4649 SW Highway 101, Lincoln City – The brewery is actually behind the sprawling event bar, Roadhouse 101, where you enjoy

a quiet lunch with your beer by day, and by night,

rock your pints off to likes of (this month) Sonny

Hess, Renee Hill, Tommy Tutone, Janiva Magness, Phamous Phaces, and more. All that, about 10 Rusty Truck brews on tap, crazy beach and roadhouse

about 10 Rusty Truck brews on tap, crazy beach and roadhouse decor and a surf, turf,

decor and a surf, turf, barbecue and pizza menu that doesn’t quit. How do they do it? Rogue Brewery & Pub, Newport – There are two great places to have a Rogue beer in Newport: At Brewer’s on the Bay, 2320 OSU Drive, you can tour the brewery and then have a pint while watching the fshing boats come in. The original Rogue Public House, 748 SW Bay Blvd., is across from the brewery on the northern bayfront. There, the famous bathtub picture of Mo Nieme, the late-great founder of Mo’s Restaurants, hangs in a place of honor near the bar. Although I’ve spent an hour or two at the original Public House, my favorite seat is at the brewery bar. Go through the giant tank at the front door, past the brewery, through the gift shop and up the stairs. Turn left and sit in the tall chairs in front of the windows, watch the boats bob in the basin, and dream of being a pirate. Because Rogue makes so many good beers, and they are all available at the brewery, get a taster tray before committing.

and they are all available at the brewery, get a taster tray before committing. AUGUST 2013
and they are all available at the brewery, get a taster tray before committing. AUGUST 2013

EDUCATION

Expand Skills at OSU or COCC

COCC offers Pro Certifcate

C entral Oregon Community College is joining

a growing number of Oregon colleges and

universities aiming to educate the state’s

professional brewing community. The Bend-based college will begin in 2014 offering classes that lead to a General Certifcate in Brewing. Beginning in 2014, the course includes on-line and self-study and weekend classroom sessions with guest speakers and hands-on tours. The course prepares students for the Institute of Brewing and Distilling General Certifcate in Brewing, an internationally recognized industry exam, according to Nancy Jumper, program manager. The course and the exam are geared for students who may already be working in the brewing industry, but have little or no formal academic or technical qualifcation. The certifcate is the frst formal step in furthering one’s professional development in brewing. Courses begin in January 2014 and continue through April 2014. Registration is online now for one of two informational sessions, at www.cocc.edu/ ContinuingEd/CraftBrewExamPrep/, or by calling 541- 383-7270. The free information sessions are set for Thursday, from 6 to 7:30 p.m., Nov. 7; and Tuesday, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Dec. 10. Both of the free sessions are at Central Oregon Community College, 1027 N.W. Trenton Ave., in Bend. The certifcate course is estimated to cost $1,850,

in Bend. The certifcate course is estimated to cost $1,850, which includes online lessons, study materials,

which includes online lessons, study materials, class sessions, tours and the exam fee.

study materials, class sessions, tours and the exam fee. Students at COCC’s brewing course are prepared

Students at COCC’s brewing course are prepared to take the professional exam for the certifcate in brewing. At OSU, workshops help new businesses and brewery professionals.

OSU Workshops Aim to Help Brewery Start-ups

R egistration is open through Aug. 26 for a Craft Brewery Start-up workshop offered through

Oregon State University’s Professional and Noncredit Education programs. This workshop has other benefts: Ninkasi will offer one participant a paid internship at its Eugene brewery. The brewery start-up workshop runs from Sept. 9-13 and takes place at OSU’s Cascade campus in Bend. The course will help students create a business plan, develop capital and business infrastructure, determine how to market and grow your brewery and discover relevant business laws necessary for brewery owners to know. Students will learn from business and brewing professionals including Ninkasi Brewing, whose staff will lead several interactive and engaging sessions that will advance the understanding

and engaging sessions that will advance the understanding of brewing industry trends and local brewing opportunities.

of brewing industry trends and local brewing opportunities. After evaluating student’s business plans, course instructors will select the best plan and award the winning participant a one- to two-week paid internship at Ninkasi’s brewery, along with Ninkasi merchandise and beer.

The workshop will offer an onsite learning environment in Bend, up-and-coming mecca of craft brewing in Oregon’s High Desert, and it will connect participants with other entrepreneurs to develop industry networks. Registration includes a catered breakfast and lunch each day as well as a beer sensory testing session led by Ninkasi brewers. On the fnal day of the workshop, students will spend time with a panel of craft brewery professionals who will share information and answer questions about their craft brewery business processes and culture. Cost for the workshop is $1,175 plus a $50 non- refundable registration fee. Register now or get more information at https://

pne.oregonstate.edu/catalog/craft-brewery-startup-

workshop. The course is one of several offered at OSU’s campuses in Portland, Bend and Corvallis aimed at expanding skills among brew industry professionals. Sensory Analysis and a Brewing Analytics course series were offered this summer and will be offered again in 2014.

were offered this summer and will be offered again in 2014. EUGENE AREA, From Page 9

EUGENE AREA, From Page 9

an amazing cup of coffee. By night, people pile in for beer, wine, cocktails and events. 924 Willamette St., Eugene. (458) 205-8914. thebarnlightbar.com Plank Town Brewing. Seeking to be a new public meeting spot for a revitalized downtown Springfeld, this brewpub is the brainchild of Bart Caridio, of Sam Bond’s Garage and Axe & Fiddle fame. 346 Main St., Springfeld. (541) 746-1890. www. planktownbrewing.com Hot Mama’s Wings. Wings and beer need we say more? Voted Eugene Weekly’s 2nd Best New Restaurant 2011-2012, Hot Mama’s features 6 rotating beers, deep-fried desserts and 14 different wing sauces. 420 W 13th Ave., Eugene. (541) 653-9999. www.hotmamaswings.com

W 13th Ave., Eugene. (541) 653-9999. www.hotmamaswings.com BEND, From Page 11 my pamphlet with me and

BEND, From Page 11

my pamphlet with me and get stamps from each stop. Nine total, and I’ve added two extras to my list. Before hitting the trail I chat with Tawna Fenske communications manager for Visit Bend! and ask her what makes this Ale Trail so special. “There is an unquenchable thirst for beer and beer tourism in this area. People love to learn about beer and to sample it.” Visit Bend! has poured what Tawna calls the “beer community’s spirit of camaraderie” into the three-year-old Ale Trail and they have prepared me well for my journey. To see Growler’s visit to Central Oregon, visit the blog at www.oregonbeergrowler.com. The updated Ale Trail map is at http://www.visitbend.com/Bend_ Oregon_Map/Maps/Bend-Ale-Trail-Map/

Columbia Gorge: Brew Breeze

Waterfalls, Mountains, Rivers and Beer -- It’s all at the Gorge

BY GAIL OBERST

Of the Oregon Beer Growler

I s it ever a bad time to visit Oregon’s Columbia

River Gorge breweries? If there is, I haven’t found

it. The incredible Multnomah, Latourell, Horsetail

and White River falls are as fantastic to hike in February as they are in October. The wind blows down the gorge almost 365 days a year making all

of the wind sports a year-round adventure to both

watch or join. The fshing’s always good and the food and wine are world-class. But enough of this beautiful stuff. After a hard

day of taking in the sights, all you need to know

is that some of that beautiful water goes into this

region’s beer.

Fresh Hop Beer Fest Sept. 28 Perhaps the hoppiest time this year is Sept. 28, when fresh-hopped beer from more than two dozen breweries will be on tap at the Hood River Hops Fest. This event from noon to 9 p.m. takes up the downtown blocks between 5th and 7th streets at Cascade and Columbia streets. Thousands attend this hop-lover’s party which also features local foods, arts and crafts and line-up of live music. Buy tickets in advance at http://hoodriver.org/ events-festivals/chamber-events/hops-fest. For those of us who’d rather visit the breweries

any time of the year, here are my favorite spots on the Oregon side of the Gorge (with a footnote that there are also several on the Washington side, just

a bridge away).

Double Mountain, 8 Fourth St, Hood River, www.doublemountainbrewery.com If you haven’t been to Double Mountain in the past two years, you haven’t been to Double Mountain. It has expanded its taproom and food

service area, added brewery capacity, a bottling line, etcetera. My favorites (and I am not alone) are any

of the “Lava” beers, and I especially love their wet/

fresh hop series, usually released in late September and not prone to gathering dust on the shelves. This

is a great place to eat a meal at lunch or dinner, but

many nights in the summer, there’s live music from

Northwest acts, from Terry Robb to Ark Life. Check out the website for a full rundown of events and seasonal beers. This brewery always has dozens of brews to try – from light Belgians to black Dublin- style stouts. Owner

Full Sail Brewery, 506 Columbia St., Hood River www.fullsailbrewing.com This is the mother of all Gorge breweries, established by Irene Firmat and brewmaster Jamie Emmerson in 1987, and turned over to its employees in 1999. Although this hugely successful brewery is now found in more than 30 states from coast to coast, there’s nothing like having a beer at the Hood River Full Sail pub and tasting room while watching the kiteboarders and sailboarders skim across the Columbia River below. I am always thirsty for Full Sail’s award-winning Session Ale, but if you’re at the brewery, you should try any or all of the experimental, seasonal or Brewer’s Share series, some of which are only available on tap in Hood River or at their Portland Riverplace pub. I’ve tasted all of the Brewer’s Share series and been impressed by the innovation from the wider brewing staff and by the kindness connected to these beers that beneft community organizations.

Pfriem Family Brewers, 707 Portway Ave., Suite 101, Hood River. www.pfriembeer.com Pfriem Family Brewers (the ‘P’ is silent) splashed onto the Hood River scene last year with an emphasis on Northwest and Belgian-style beers, a brave move by brewer Josh Pfriem, backed by his family and friends. Josh Priefm is a former brewer for Chuckanut Brewery & Kitchen in Bellingham, Wash., and for Full Sail, but his determination to open a brewery has made us all very happy. Pfriem’s tasting room has long family-style tables set right in the brewery and it is just across the road from a popular boarding (sail and kite) launch park on the Columbia River, so you are likely to share space with wet and happy boarders. Pfriem’s beers are constantly rotating, but they include at least one wit, a Belgian Strong Ale, a Belgian Strong Blonde, a blonde IPA, a regular IPA and a number of others depending on the mood of the brewer. I’ve

number of others depending on the mood of the brewer. I’ve Logsdon Farmhouse Ales are actually

Logsdon Farmhouse Ales are actually brewed in a farmhouse a few miles south of Hood River.

TRAVEL

in a farmhouse a few miles south of Hood River. TRAVEL Full Sail’s tasting room next

Full Sail’s tasting room next to the brewery overlooks the Columbia River in Hood River

never had a bad beer here, so I suggest you start with a taster tray, and if you are unfamiliar with Belgian-style beers, ask questions.

Big Horse Brew Pub, 115 W. State St., Hood River www.bighorsebrewpub.com Big Horse Brew Pub is another must-see brew stop in Hood River – if not for the beer then certainly for the food and the view. The climb to the hillside, top-story restaurant, past a faux falls and garden, is enough of a test of your worthiness to sit and enjoy the scenery on the second-foor deck, or from the wide windows on the top foor. The small brewery takes up the bottom level. For lunch or dinner, try pairing everything from justice fries to beef tender au poive with a variety of brews you’ll not fnd anywhere else. My favorites were the Pale Rider IPA, good anytime, and the MacStallion Scotch Export is especially good with the decadent sea salt/bacon chocolate chip cookie.

Logsdon Farmhouse Ales, 4785 Booth Hill Road, Hood River. www.farmhousebeer.com Solera Brewery and Logsdon Farmhouse Ales have very little in common outside of this: You won’t be sorry you visited these two picturesque breweries located a few miles south of Hood River via Highway 35 – the road to Mt. Hood. Logsdon’s brewing team applies its expertise to making organic ales in the Flemish/Belgian style in a real picture-pretty red farmhouse. Some of its ingredients are grown right on the farm’s 10 acres. Last year, this two-year-old brewery won a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival for its Seizoen Bretta. I’m not surprised – it was one of the more expensive beers I ever purchased with my own hard-earned dollars, and worth every penny. The other purchase was the other Seizoen, also delicious. David Logsdon kindly gave me a bottle of the Kili Wit, which was also delicious, prompting me to purchase the Seizoens. I suggest you visit the farmhouse and see how much you’d be willing to spend on beer. You may raise the bar for this brewery.

Solera Brewery, 4945 Baseline Dr., Parkdale www.solerabrewery.com Just up the road from the rather reclusive

Logsdon is the somewhat more social Solera Brewery, in beautiful downtown Parkdale. It’s street- side and patio concerts draw tourists and townfolk alike to sing and dance away summer nights. What’s more, this place has the best view of Mt. Hood a beer drinker could ask for without being actually on the mountain. During the few times I’ve returned from skiing via Highway 35, I’d always admired the historic-looking building that is now flled with a brewery that has something for everyone:

IPAs, a smoked porter, farmhouse blends and a saison or two, and a few unusual beers like the French Tickler, a Grisette-style ale. They also serve beers from other breweries including Logsdon, Laurelwood, The Commons, Upright and Fort George.

Logsdon, Laurelwood, The Commons, Upright and Fort George. Climb the stairs to Big Horse Brewing and

Climb the stairs to Big Horse Brewing and Horsefeathers.

EVENTS CALENDAR

SUNDAYS

 

WEDNESDAYS

 

FIRST FRIDAYS

 

Saraveza’s 4th Annual IIPA Fest

 

Saraveza Bottle Shop & Tavern | All Day

Homebrew Class

 

BeerRadio

 

Live Music

 

(a)

1004 N. Killingsworth, Portland

 

Uptown Market

|

2 p.m.

 

Ginger Johnson | 5 p.m.

 

Bend Brewing Co | 6:30 p.m.

(w)

www saraveza.com

(a)

6620 SW Scholls Ferry Rd, Beaverton

(a)

kskq.org

(a)

1019 NW Brooks Street, Bend

 

(w)

http://www.uptownmarketpdx.com

(p)

515-450-7757

AUG. 15

Blues Jam

 

(w)

www.womenenjoyingbeer.com

SATURDAYS

 
 

Calapooia Brewery

|

4 p.m.

 

Deschutes Street Fair

(a)

(p)

140 Hill St. N.E., Albany

541-928-1931

 

Brew Night

Raen Brew

|

5:30 to 7 p.m.

(a)

2560 19th St. S.E., Salem

Beer O’Clock

Lisa Morrison

|

3 p.m.

(a)

Deschutes Brewery Portland Pub | 5-8 p.m

210 N.W 11th St Portland

,

(w)

www.calapooiabrewing.com

(a)

Various Radio Stations

(w)

www.deschutesbrewery.com

(p)

503-391-5100

(w)

beergoddess.com/beer_o_clock

 

MONDAYS

 

(w)

http://raenbrew.com

Brewery Tours

 

AUG. 15-17

Miser Mondays

Lompoc Oaks Bottom Brewery

|

All day

(a)

621 SE Bybee, Portland

(w)

www.lompocbrewing.com

TUESDAYS

Tap it Tuesdays

Cascade Barrel House

(a)

(p)

(w)

6 p.m.

939 S.E. Belmont, Portland

503-265-8603

cascadebrewingbarrelhouse.com

|

Bingo

Migration

|

7 p.m.

(a)

2828 N.E. Glisan St., Portland

(w)

www.migrationbrewing.com

Taco Tuesdays

Ninkasi

|

6 p.m.

SECOND WEDNESDAYS

Beer Geek Night

Ventis Cafe + Taphouse

|

4 to 9 p.m.

(a)

2840 Commercial St. S.E., Salem

(p)

503-391-5100

(w)

www.ventiscafe.com

THURSDAYS

Brews and Boulders

Migration Brewing

|

All Day

(a)

2828 N.E. Glisan, Portland

(w)

www.migrationbrewing.com

(p)

503-206-5221

Live Music

Independence Hops & Barrel | 7 p.m.

(a)

250 S. Main St., Independence

(p)

503-837-0935

(a)

272 Van Buren St., Eugene

(w)

www.ninkasibrewing.com

FRIDAYS

Ladies Night

Live Music

Broken Top Bottle Shop

|

6 p.m.

Oakshire Brewery

|

4 p.m.

(a)

1740 NW Pence Lane, Bend

(a)

207 Madison Street, Eugene

(w)

www.btbsbend.com

(w)

www.oakbrew.com

Trivia Night

(p)

541-688-4555

 

Yeasty Beasty

| 7:30 p.m.

Beer Tastings

(a)

167 Main St., Monmouth

Newport Ave. Market | 3:30 p.m.

(w)

www.yeastybeasty.com

(a) 1121 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend

WEDNESDAYS

Brewers Night

Laurelwood Brewery | 6 p.m.

(a)

5115 N.E. Sandy, Portland

(p)

503-282-0622

(w)

www.laurelwoodbrewpub.com

(w) www.newportavemarket.com

FIRST FRIDAYS

Free Beer Tasting

Beer Den

|

5 p.m.

(a)

38905 Proctor Blvd., Sandy

(p)

503-668-5002

BridgePort

|

1 and 3 p.m.

(a)

1313 NW Northrup St., Portland

(w)

www.bridgeportbrew.com

AUG. 3

Barrel-Age Beer Fest

Bailey’s Taproom | All Day

(a)

213 S.W. Broadway, Portland

(w)

www.baileystaproom.com

Milwaukie First Friday

Breakside Beer Garden | 5 to 9 p.m.

Bend Brewfest

Old Mill District | See Pg. 6

(a) Les Schwab Ampitheater, Bend

$) $12

(w) www.bendbrewfest.com

AUG. 16-17

Westmoreland/Sellwood Brewfest

Portland U Brew & Pub | 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

(a)

6236 S.E. Milwaukie Ave., Portland

(w)

www.portlandubrewandpub.com

(a)

Main Street, Milwaukie

(w)

www.frstfridaymilwaukie.com

AUG. 17

Bones and Brews

Green Dragon | Noon to 9 p.m.

(a)

928 S.E. 9th Ave., Portland

(w)

www.rogue.com/event

Lighthouse Brewfest

McMenamins Lighthouse Brewpub | 2 p.m.

(a) 4157 N. Highway 101, Lincoln City

[$) Free

 

(w)

www.mcmenamins.com

AUG. 3-4

(p)

541-9947238

Bones & Brew Fest

 

Rogue Distillery and Pub | All Day

AUG. 24-25

(a)

N.W. 13th & Flanders, Portland

Lager Fest

(w)

www.rogue.com/events

White Owl Social Club | All Day

 

(a)

S.E 8th & Main streets

AUG. 9-11

(w)

https://www.facebook.com/WhiteOwlSocialClub

The Bite of Oregon

Various Breweries | All Day

(a)

Tom McCall Waterfront Park, Portland

(w)

www.biteoforegon.com

AUG. 10

Brothers Day

Widmer Brothers Brewing | 5-8 p.m

(a) 929 N. Russell St., Portland

(w) www.widmerbrothers.com

Great American Nanofest

Green Dragon | Noon

(a) 928 S.E. 9th Ave., Portland

(w) www.rogue.com/events

AUG. 30-31

Little Woody

Des Chutes History Museum | 5 to 10 p.m.

(a)

129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend

(w)

www.thelittlewoody.com

MORE DETAILS ABOUT THE ABOVE EVENTS ON PAGE 5, AND ON OUR CALENDAR AT WWW.OREGONBEERGROWLER.COM

CALENDAR, Continued on Page 23

Calendar, From Page 22 SEPTEMBER 6

Oregon Brews & BBQs

The Granary District | 4 to 10 p.m.

(a)

845 N.E. Fifth St., McMinnville

(w)

http://www.oregonbrewsandbbq.com

SEPT. 20

Boot Scoot-N-Brew

Willamette Heritage | 4 p.m. to Midnight

(a) 1313 Mill St. S.E., Salem

[$) $15/$20

(p) 503-588-6303

SEPTEMBER 21

Biketoberfest

Hopworks Urban Brewery | All Day

(a)

2944 SE Powell Blvd, Portland

(w)

www.hopworksbeer.com

SEPTEMBER 27-28

Septoberfest

Seven Brides | All Day

(a) 990 N. 1st St., Silverton

(w)

www.sevenbridesbrewing.com

SEPTEMBER 28

Fresh Hop Fest

Many Breweries | Noon to 9 p.m.

(a)

6th Street, Hood River

(w)

hoodriver.org/events-festivals/chamber-events/

hops-fest.

Fresh Harvest Hopyard Brew Fest

Many Breweries | 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

(a) Main Street, Independence

(w)

independencehopandheritage.com

Main Street, Independence (w) independencehopandheritage.com HOMEBREW, From Page 15 might even get a great recipe from

HOMEBREW, From Page 15

might even get a great recipe from someone else. That helps you get to brewing the beer and not spending a lot of time on research. Seeing the world through beer is just as exciting as trying the Thai restaurant for the frst time. The only difference is you get to do the cooking and decide how authentic you want to be. The best part is getting ideas and doing anything you want with them. You are creating your own world beer tour in your home brewery.

EVENTS CALENDAR
EVENTS CALENDAR