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<title> Shid Bunan [or Munan] (16031676)</title>
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<p align="left"><strong><font color="#ff8040" size="3" face="Verdana, Arial,
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<p align="center"> <img width="269" height="187"
src="https://terebess.hu/zen/mesterek/bunan.jpg" alt="Patriarchal Zen Lineage
The Living Word. Lineage Zen or patriarchal Zen is a special transmission of
the Living Word, or Logos, outside doctrinal teachings and concepts from
mind to mind, which has been reexamined and polished by lineage masters for over
2,500 years and will continue for untold generations. Buddhas, Indian Masters
and Chinese Zen Patriarchs Face to face, a thousand miles away. Korean and
Japanese Zen Masters When chickens are cold, they go up into the trees;
when ducks are cold, they go down into the water.SHIDOBUNAN ZENJI 71
(Rinzai "> </p>
<p align="center"><font size="5" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">

Shid Bunan [or Munan] (16031676)</font></p>


<p align="center">&nbsp;</p>
<p><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><strong>Works</strong></font></p>
<p><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> Sokushinki
(On the mind, 1670) </font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The Eastern
Buddhist, New Series. 1970, NS03-2, Shid Munan, <em>Sokushin-ki, </em>Trans. by
Kobori Shaku &amp; Norman A. Waddell, pp. 89-118.<br>
The Eastern Buddhist, New Series. 1971, NS04-1, Shid Munan, <em>Sokushin-ki
</em> (2), Trans. by Kobori Shaku &amp; Norman A. Waddell, pp. 116-123.<br>
The Eastern Buddhist, New Series. 1971, NS04-2, Shid Munan, <em>Sokushin-ki
</em> (concluded), Trans. by Kobori Shaku &amp; Norman A. Waddell, pp.
119-127.</font></p>
Pgina 1
bunan.txt
</blockquote>
<p><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">

Jishki (On self-nature, 1672)</font></p>


<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The Eastern
Buddhist, New Series. 1975, NS03-1, Shid Munan, <em>Jish-ki, </em>Trans. by
Kusumita Priscella Pedersen, pp. 96-132. </font></p>
</blockquote>
<p><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">
Bunan zenji dka sh (1844) </font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
</font></p>
</blockquote>
<p align="center">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="left"> <font size="2"><strong><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif" size="5"><a name="a" id="a"></a></font><font size="2" face="Verdana,
Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><img src="https://terebess.hu/zen/angol.gif"
width="36" height="25" border="0"></font></strong></font></p>
<p align="left"><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">PDF:
<strong><a href="ShidoMunan.pdf" target="_blank">The Biography of Shid Munan
Zenji</a> </strong></font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><br>
(Kaisan
Shid Munan Anju Zenji anroku)<br>
Compiled by
Fufu-anju Enji (Trei Enji, 1721-1792) <br>
With an Introduction by Kobori Shaku <br>
Trans. by Kobori Shaku &amp; Norman A. Waddell<br>
<em>The Eastern Buddhist, </em>New Series. 1970, NS03-1, pp. 122-138.
</font></p>
<p align="left">&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">SHIDO
MUNAN<br>
</font></strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><font size="2">Richard Bryan McDaniel: <em>Zen Masters of Japan. The
Second Step East.</em> Rutland, Vermont: Tuttle Publishing,
2013.</font></font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">One of the
temples for which Gudo had responsibility was located at Sekigahara, where the
battle had taken place that established the primacy of the Tokugawa Clan. When
Gudo was in the region, he stayed at a local inn and there he took an interest
in the innkeepers son. The boy was being trained in the family business but
showed intellectual promise above his station. Locally, he was known as the
Kana-writing boy because of his skill in the cursive form of the Japanese
syllabic script.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When he was
fourteen years old, the boy accompanied his father to the old capital, Kyoto.
Along the way, they passed through regions that had been devastated during the
recent civil conflicts. These sights left a lasting impression on the boy, and,
Pgina 2
bunan.txt
when he was in Kyoto, he made contact with Master Gudo and took up a lay
practice of Zen.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">In the Rinzai
system, students were first taught susokkan, counting the breaths. When they
achieved some degree of concentration, they were instructed to focus on the
breath without counting. And, finally, when the student was deemed ready, the
teacher would assign him a koan. The koan Gudo gave to the innkeepers son was
taken from the poem written by the Chinese Sixth Patriarch, Huineng: from the
beginning not a thing exists. [cf. Zen Masters of China, Chapter
Three]</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Before he could
complete his Zen training, the young man had to return to Sekigahara to take up
his duties at the family inn. Whenever Gudo was in the area he would check on
the boys progress. A number of decades passed in this manner. The boy grew to
adulthood, married, and became his fathers successor as inn-keeper. Over time,
he fell away from his practice of Zen and acquired a taste for sake and
gambling.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Around the year
1656, Gudo was once more in the region and stopped at the inn to see how his
former student was doing. When he arrived, he was greeted by the innkeepers
wife who told the Zen master that her husband was out. She invited him to come
in to wait for him, and, as the two sat together, they fell into easy
conversation, during the course of which the wife confided that her husband had
taken to drinking in recent years.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When he
drinks, she said, he can become abusive. He also gambles when he has too much
to drink, and he always loses. Really, there are times when I think my children
and I would be better off without him. But hes my husbandwhat can I
do?</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Let me see
what I can do, Gudo suggested. Its late. You retire, and Ill wait for your
husband. But before you leave, would you please bring me a bottle of your best
sake and two cups.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The woman did
as Gudo asked. Then she gathered her children together, and they retired to the
sleeping quarters. Gudo remained in the main room of the inn, seated in
meditation. Around midnight, the innkeeper returned home in a drunken-state and
was embarrassed to find his teacher there. Gudo did not reprimand him for his
behavior and, in fact, indicated the bottle of sake set out on a table. Gudo
invited the innkeeper to share a cup with him, to which the man readily agreed.
The two had several cups of wine, chatting idly, and eventually the innkeeper
fell asleep on the floor.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When he woke
the next morning, he found Gudo still seated in meditation before the family
shrine.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">You are
awake, Gudo noted. And it is time for me to return to the capital.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The man was a
little hung-over and humiliated that his teacher had seen him in such a
disreputable condition. He mumbled a reply.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">As Gudo tied
his sandals, he remarked, You know, human life is brief and all things pass
Pgina 3
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away. When you spend your time drinking and gambling, you have no time for other
things that may be much more important. Besides which, you bring sorrow to your
family and those who depend upon you.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The innkeeper
broke into tears and admitted that he had known for some time he needed to
change his behavior. He swore an oath to do so, starting that very day, and, as
a sign of gratitude, he asked Gudo to allow him to carry his bags on the first
stage of his journey. Gudo agreed and the two set off. When they had gone a fair
distance, Gudo told the man he should return home. But the man asked to be
allowed to accompany the Zen master a little further. Eventually they arrived at
the next village, and, once again Gudo offered to take up his own bags. The man
said he was willing to accompany Gudo a bit further.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The next time
Gudo offered to take up his bags, the man shook his head, Ill go with you all
the way to Edo.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Once they came
to the city, the man had his head shaved and entered monastic life at the age of
52. Gudo gave him the name Shido Munan, a phrase found in Xinxin Ming of the
third Chinese Patriarch, Jianzhi Sengcan. [cf. Zen Masters of China, Chapter
Two] The first line of the poem, in Japanese, reads The Perfect Way (shido) has
no difficulties (munan).</font></p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">After he
achieved awakening, Munan underwent a radical change of life-style. He did not,
however, become active in the Rinzai hierarchy. Like his master, Gudo, he
recognized that the tradition was stagnating. The career and political
aspirations of monks made up a large part of the problem. Even monks who had
achieved awakening were subject to ambitions. The koan training system had been
compromised; correct answers could be purchased from older monks; some monks
discovered they had a knack for coming up with appropriate answers without
necessarily having insight. In addition, temple schools often drew students more
interested in developing skills in literature or the arts than in Zen
training.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Traditionally,
the emphasis in Rinzai training had been on the attainment of awakening, but
Munan recognized that while awakening was important, it was not an end in
itself. Rather he saw it as an aid that helped the monk reform his character.
Awakening, he asserted, was relatively easy to attain. Practicing the way of the
Buddha, on the other hand, was difficult, especially for one who had not seen
into his true nature.</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Even though a
man leaves his home and lives simply with his three robes and a bowl on a rock
under a tree, he still cannot be called a true Buddhist priest. . . . Yet if he
does wish earnestly to become a true priest, he will realize that he has many
desires and is possessed of a body which is endowed with eighty-four thousand
evils, of which the cardinal five are sexual desire, cupidity, birth-and-death,
jealousy, and desire for fame. These evils are the way of the world. They are by
no means easy to overcome. Day and night, by means of enlightenment [awakening],
you should set yourself to eliminating them one after another, thus purifying
yourself. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Munan provided
an example to others of the change in life he expected Zen practitioners to
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attain. He was a close friend of and mentor to Suzuki Shosan, who shared his
opinions on many topics. Munan lived frugally in a hermitage with few physical
comforts and gathered a small group of disciples around him who were able to
emulate his ascetic lifestyle. Of these, only one would be designated his
heirDokyo Etan.</font></p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
</blockquote>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Munan
Zenji </font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><br>
<a href="http://zennist.typepad.com/zenfiles/2008/09/munan-zenji.html"
target="_blank">http://zennist.typepad.com/zenfiles/2008/09/munan-zenji.html</a>
</font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Japanese Zen
master Shido Munan was born in 1603 and died in 1676. Munan was highly venerated
by Zen master Hakuin Zenji (16851768) who was the teacher of Hakuin's teacher,
Shoju Etan. Of all the Japanese Zen masters, Munan had an extraordinary grasp of
Mind. It stands to reason because he spent a long time on the path not being
merely content following form, or words and letters, but understanding that
seeing Mind and cultivating it is of the greatest importance. Like all of the
best Zennists, Munan fully understood the importance of Mind in Buddhism (not to
be confused with mind which is in a constant state of disturbance owing to the
perturbations of carnal existence).
</font>
</p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">For Munan, in a
nutshell, Mind is Buddha in which one fully awakens (bodhi) to their fundamental
or original Mind (the primordial undisturbed Mind) which verifies itself as only
it can. Thus, one goes from a state of corporeal sleep to awakening to Mind upon
which all things are based. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Munan
understood that real practice meant getting rid of the obstructions that prevent
us from knowing the original Mind in its own natural state, undisturbed. He also
realized that even after we have attained an initial glimpse of Mind (satori),
we still have to practice, continually, removing as much of the remaining
obstructions as possible. Accordingly, Munan said: </font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">If you can
really get to see your original Mind, you must regard it as if you were raising
an infant. In whatever you do such as walking, standing, sitting, lying down, be
aware of Mind so that everything is illuminated by it, so that nothing of the
seven consciousnesses (vijnana) soils it. If you can keep him [the new born
Mind] clear and distinct, it is like an infant growing up becoming equal with
the father. </font></p>
</blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Raising this
special infant means paying attention to it more and morenot the desires of the
body. Munan regarded the body as the cause of delusion, and satori as seeing the
Mind as being fundamentally free of the body. We may draw from this that the
Pgina 5
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more we practice, correctly, the more the original Mind should become outshining
so that the body becomes less and less of a burden for us. In this way, we see
the truth of birth and death which only affect the bodynever the original Mind.
Indeed, the original Mind is empty, unborn, and bodiless.</font> </p>
</blockquote>
<p align="left">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="left">&nbsp; </p>
<p align="left"><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><font size="2"><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial,
Helvetica, sans-serif">Shid Bunan<br>
Waka poems <br>
</font></strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">
<font size="2">Translated by Lucien Stryk &amp; Takashi Ikemoto, <br>
In: <em>ZEN: Poems, Prayers, Sermons, Anecdotes, Interviews, </em><br>
Anchor Books, Doubleday &amp; Co., Inc., Garden City, New York, 1963, p.
15.</font></font></font></font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>The
moons the same old moon,<br>
The flowers exactly as they were,<br>
Yet Ive become the thingness <br>
Of all the things I see!</strong></font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">*</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When
youre both alive and dead,<br>
Thoroughly dead to yourself,<br>
How superb<br>
The smallest pleasure!</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><br>
</p>
<p><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"> <br>
PDF: <a href="A%20history%20of%20Zen%20Buddhism.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>A
History of Zen Buddhism</strong></a> </font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial,
Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
by </font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Heinrich
Dumoulin, S.J. (1905-1995) </font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial,
Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
tr. by Paul Peachey<br>
Pantheon Books, 1963, p. 232. </font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Bunan
(1603-1676), a disciple of the Abbot <a href="../hakuin/hakuin20.html#a"
target="_blank">Gud</a> (d. 1661) <br>
of Myshinji, from whose line of descent Hakuin was to come <br>
two generations later, spent his declining years at the hermitage <br>
of Shidoan.'? He loved the people and warned them against a <br>
practice which, concerned only with personal enlightenment, <br>
seeks out the solitude of mountain fastnesses and looks down <br>
Pgina 6
bunan.txt
on people in the world. Such bonzes are &quot;the greatest evil in <br>
heaven and on earth. They pass through the world without do- <br>
ing any useful work and are thus great thieves.&quot; He summa- <br>
rized his understanding of Zen in the following terms: </font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>Man
builds a house and lives in it, while the Buddha dwells in <br>
his body. The householder resides constantly in the house, and <br>
the Buddha resides in the heart of man. If through compassion <br>
things and deeds become easy, the heart becomes clear, and <br>
when the heart is clear thc Buddha appears. If you wish to clarify <br>
your heart, sit in meditation and approach to the Perfected One. <br>
In meditation turn over the evil saps of your body to the Per- <br>
fected One. If you do this, you will surely become a Buddha. <br>
. . . The enlightened one follows nature whether in walking or <br>
standing, in sitting or reclining. </strong></font></p>
</blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Bunan wrote in
the fluent Japanese <em>kana</em> style and composed <br>
well-known koan in the thirty-one syllables of Japanese poetics. <br>
A collection of &quot;<em>dharma</em>-words&quot; from his pen has been pre-
<br>
served. </font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">There
are names,<br>
Such as Buddha, God, or Heavenly Way:<br>
But they all point to the mind<br>
Which is nothingness.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">...<br>
<br>
Live always<br>
With the mind of total nothingness,<br>
And the evils that come to you<br>
Will dissipate completely.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong>...</strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Not
doing zazen, <br>
Is no other than zazen itself; <br>
When you truly know this, <br>
You are not separate <br>
From the way of Buddha.</font></strong><br>
</p>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p align="left"><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><font size="2"><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial,
Helvetica, sans-serif">Sayings of Zen Master Bunan</font></strong><br>
Translated by Thomas F. Cleary</font><strong> <br>
Pgina 7
bunan.txt
</strong><font size="2">In: <em>The Original Face: An Anthology of Rinzai
Zen</em>, Grove Press, 1978. pp. 99-108.</font></font></p>
<blockquote>
<p align="left"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><strong>People see others in terms of themselves. The vision of <br>
fools is dreadful. If there is ambition in oneself, one will <br>
see others on the basis of that frame of mind. He who <br>
lusts looks with lust. Unless one is a sage, seeing is <br>
dangerous. Even though there are people on the great <br>
way, people who can see and know are rare. What a <br>
waste. A wise man discerns the potential of others, <br>
though they may not be equal to him, and makes use of <br>
their level of understanding.</strong></font></p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">...</font></strong></p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">To acquiesce to the teaching of enlightenment, as it <br>
is, directly abandon all things, merge with the body of <br>
thusness and experience peerless peace and bliss, is no <br>
more than a matter of whether or not you think of the <br>
body. Although there are people who think this teach- <br>
ing is true, it's hard to find someone who strives to <br>
make it his own. </font></strong></p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">...</font></strong></p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">It is easy to keep things at a distance; it is hard to be <br>
naturally beyond them. </font></strong></p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">...</font></strong></p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">There are no mountains to enter outside of mind, <br>
making the unknown your hiding place.</font></strong></p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">...</font></strong></p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">While deluded, one is used by this body; when <br>
enlightened, one uses this body. </font></strong></p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">...<br>
</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>
Asked of the supreme vehicle, Bunan said, </em></font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">To
let the body be free and not to cling to anything.<br>
For this reason it is a great matter; thus it is a rare thing <br>
in this age. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Whether man or woman, you should first make <br>
them see reality, and have them sit in meditation for <br>
that; when their seeing of reality is complete, then you <br>
Pgina 8
bunan.txt
should teach them to respond to any event. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When
virtually enlightened, have them preserve <br>
that, so that bad thoughts do not arise; if they nurture <br>
this for a long time, they will become people of the way.
</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When
virtually enlightened, if you teach them that <br>
all things are it, most people will turn bad. Those who <br>
only preserve enlightenment mostly are trapped in <br>
sitting meditation and become devotees of discipline. <br>
Whether it's good or bad to expound the great way <br>
immediately depends on who you're talking to. You <br>
must teach with understanding, not misunderstanding. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">You
should always act with kindness and compas- <br>
sion. People think that kindness and compassion mean <br>
doing things, but actually giving people things is the <br>
foremost kindness and compassion. Never to do or say <br>
what is painful to others is kindness and compassion. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When
you do things which are unpleasant and <br>
painful to others, even if you have a mountain of <br>
treasure it will eventually be ruined. There is no doubt <br>
about this. Thus, working diligently, there comes to be <br>
no Buddha, no teaching; though living you are not here,<br>
neither do you die, you don't remain in this world or go <br>
to the next world-having become like empty space, you <br>
don't even think of empty space. There is no body, <br>
nothing at allthere is no thought of nothingness or of <br>
being. </font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">O
my body,<br>
Used to being used at will,<br>
Since there is no using body or me. </font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Fire
is something that burns; water is something that <br>
wets; a buddha is someone who practices compassion. <br>
Teaching people to be kind and compassionate to <br>
others means imitating the Buddha. If you just practice <br>
compassion, you will certainly become good . The basis <br>
of compassion is purity of the mind. Purity of the mind <br>
is &quot;not a single thing.&quot; &quot;Not a single thing&quot; means
<br>
nothing at all; it is beyond the reach of speech, beyond <br>
affirmation and negation. If there is any affirmation or <br>
negation in your heart, it will be obstructed by that <br>
affirmation and negation; if there is no affirmation or <br>
negation, then heaven and earth are one. If there is <br>
something, it separates you from heaven-this you <br>
Pgina 9
bunan.txt
should well understand. </font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The
mind which knows nothing <br>
Is a Buddha<br>
By a different name. </font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Since
you will surely eventually die, you should set <br>
your mind diligently on the way of enlightenment.<br>
There is no enlightened Buddha outside your own <br>
heart; always keep a pure and clean mind and heart.<br>
When thoughts of your own body come up, as long as <br>
such bad thoughts are always there, this life is but a <br>
little while and you will fall into a hell and suffer <br>
forever and ever; but even leaving that aside, in this life <br>
you will suffer in many ways. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When
the heart is pure and compassionate, there is <br>
no Buddha outside of this. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Once
you have been greatly enlightened, there is no <br>
great enlightenment; when praying, there is no prayer; <br>
when rejoicing, there is no one to rejoice. Living, there <br>
is nothing living; dying, there is nothing that dies; there <br>
is nothing existent or nonexistent. Though you have <br>
physical form, you have no form; beyond being and <br>
nonbeing, you let existence and nonexistence be, be- <br>
yond affirmation and negation, you let right and wrong <br>
be </font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">While deluded, <br>
It is things that are things; <br>
When enlightened, <br>
You leave things to their thingness. </font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><em>Things People Are Always Wrong About: </em></font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Hating to be fooled by others while liking to be fooled <br>
by oneself. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Knowing others die but not realizing one's own death.
</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Discriminating others' right and wrong while not acting <br>
properly oneself. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
Pgina 10
bunan.txt
sans-serif">Suffering from want and not knowing how to avoid it.
</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Thinking that original nothingness is nothing. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Setting up something in the way of enlightenment.
</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Unless you enter the way of enlightenment, you cannot <br>
preserve your body. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">There
are those who perform memorial services without <br>
respecting the Buddha in their own bodies. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Considering enlightenment to be the teaching of the <br>
Buddha-those who are enlightened are rare. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Not
knowing how to overturn bad impulses. </font></strong></p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><em><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">
Bunan's Regulations for Disciples </font></em></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">A
monk is the greatest evil on earth; he goes through <br>
the world without labor-he is a great thief. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When
the fruits of discipline and practice are <br>
fulfilled and one may he a teacher of others, he is a <br>
precious jewel in the world. There are innumerable <br>
teachers of the ways of the world, but teachers of the <br>
Great Way are rare. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Do
not use unwisely even a piece of paper or half a <br>
penny. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Be
constantly austere with the body, and do not do <br>
things for the sake of the body. The enemy of Dharma <br>
and Buddha is the body. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Look
upon accepting things from others as like <br>
poison. When you have completely realized the great<br>
way, then you should accept those things which people <br>
hold dear; this is because it helps those people. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">During the period of practice and effort, should you <br>
be beaten and trampled by others, you should rejoice <br>
that the effects of the deeds you yourself produced in <br>
the past are being exhausted. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When
master Joshu was asked if a dog has en- <br>
lightened nature or not, he said No. If you can really <br>
Pgina 11
bunan.txt
understand this No, you will surely be free from doubts <br>
about anything in or out of this world. For example, <br>
when you first enter, you shatter being and nothingness. <br>
Having shattered being and nothingness, if you nurture <br>
it energetically, you break through the body. Having <br>
broken through the body, if you work hard, you break <br>
through the mind. Having broken through body and <br>
mind, the original mind appears. When you reach that, <br>
then there is no doubt about what the world-honored <br>
Buddha taught: there are hells; there are heavens; there <br>
are enlightened ones and devils, hungry ghosts and <br>
animals; there is retribution. You will have no doubts at <br>
all about the scriptures. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">As
for fundamental nothingness, when for example <br>
they sit and meditate people think that control of body <br>
and mind is the basis of &quot;not a single thing,&quot; but they <br>
are all wrong. &quot;Originally not a single thing exists&quot; <br>
refers to the absolute nonexistence of &quot;body&quot; and <br>
&quot;mind.&quot; When you reach here, paradises and hells <br>
spoken of by the Buddha are certain; hungry ghosts and <br>
animals certainly exist. Those who don't reach here talk <br>
in various ways to become well' known, but since it <br>
doesn't come from truth, their words and actions are <br>
not in accord. </font></strong></p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><em><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">
Bunan used to say to his group, </font></em></font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">There
is no special principle in the study of the way; <br>
it's only necessary to see and hear directly. Directly <br>
seeing, there is no seeing; directly hearing, there is no <br>
hearing. You must fuse inside and outside into one solid <br>
thoroughly peaceful state before you can do this. </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Although you people are buddhas right now, yet you <br>
don't realize it. If you know you go against the buddhas <br>
and patriarchs, if you don't know you revolve in the <br>
routine of birth and death. At this point, if you don't <br>
have the transcendental eye, how can you attain reali- <br>
zation? </font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Knowing the fundamental, <br>
Detached from myriad things; <br>
Who knows that which is outside words, <br>
Which the Buddhas and Patriarchs didn't transmit?</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
Pgina 12
bunan.txt
sans-serif">Although our school considers enlightenment [sa- <br>
tori] in particular to be fundamental, that doesn't <br>
necessarily mean that once you're enlightened you stop <br>
there. It is necessary only to practice according to reality <br>
and complete the way. According to reality means <br>
knowing the fundamental mind as it really is; practice<br>
means getting rid of obstructions caused by habitual <br>
actions by means of true insight and knowledge. <br>
Awakening to the way is comparatively easy; accom- <br>
plishment of practical application is what is considered <br>
most difficult. That is why the great teacher <br>
Bodhidharma said that those who know the way are <br>
many, whereas those who carry out the way are few. <br>
You simply must wield the jewel sword of the adaman- <br>
tine sovereignty of wisdom and kill this self. When this <br>
self is destroyed, you cannot fail to reach the realm of <br>
great liberation and great freedom naturally.</font></strong></p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">If you can really get to see your fundamental mind, <br>
you must treat it as though you were raising an infant. <br>
Walking, standing, sitting, lying down, illuminate <br>
everything everywhere with awareness, not letting him <br>
be dirtied by the seven consciousnesses. If you can keep <br>
him dear and distinct, it is like the baby's gradually <br>
growing up until he's equal to his father-calmness and <br>
wisdom dear and penetrating, your function will be <br>
equal to that of the buddhas and patriarchs. How can <br>
such a great matter be considered idle? Now the reason <br>
that we consider human life best is for no other reason <br>
than being means to realize true liberation in this <br>
lifetime. However, if you seek profit and support, <br>
considering these the ultimate truth, in every moment <br>
of thought used by delusive ideas, vainly ending your <br>
life, at the time of death nothing you can do will be any <br>
use. The Buddha came into the world to guide those on <br>
the paths of illusion, directly pointed to the fundamen- <br>
tal mind, letting them leave behind birth, death, and <br>
myriad things. While this body clearly exists, clearly <br>
realizing this body doesn't exist, while there are clearly <br>
seeing, hearing, discernment and knowledge, clearly <br>
realizing there are no seeing hearing discernment or <br>
knowledge-this is called the effect of true investigation; <br>
how could it be easy? </font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When
you go near fire, you are warm; when you go <br>
near water, you are cool; and when you go near people <br>
imbued with the way, they naturally make your mind <br>
die and conceptions dissolve, causing all wrong <br>
thoughts to cease. This is called the spiritual effect of <br>
complete virtue. You all call yourselves people of the <br>
way as soon as you enter the gate. Really, you should be<br>
ashamed.</font></strong></p>
Pgina 13
bunan.txt
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
<p align="left">&nbsp; </p>
<p align="left">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="left"><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"> Shid Bunan (16031676)</font></strong><font size="2"
face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
in <em>Japanese Philosophy: a sourcebook</em><br>
edited by James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis, John C. Maraldo<br>
University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, 2011. pp. 190-194. </font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">A Zen master in
the Myshin-ji lineage of the Rinzai School, Shid<br>
Bunan (or Munan) is best known for his teaching that the best approach to
Zen<br>
would be to die while you are alive and then try to remain that way for
the rest of<br>
your life. One of Bunans disciples became the master of Hakuin, and thus
the germ<br>
of Hakuins notion of the great death of the self originated with Bunan.
Grow-<br>
ing up in present-day Gifu prefecture, when a Zen monk named <a
href="../hakuin/hakuin20.html#a" target="_blank">Gud Tshoku</a> briefly<br>
stayed with his family, he was so impressed that in walking with the monk to
see<br>
him off, the boy ended up following him all the way to the big city of Edo,
where he<br>
was ordained and given the name Bunan, meaning no problem. Bunan
attained<br>
enlightenment at age forty-seven, according to one record, and built a small
temple<br>
for himself in the Azabu district of Edo, now one of the wealthiest
neighborhoods in<br>
Tokyo. Afterwards his reputation grew and he became spiritual advisor to a
number<br>
of daimy. Bunan appears in a number of stories from that time, for example,
one<br>
of refusing a lords invitation by sending a note back that consisted of
nothing more<br>
than a splotch of ink made with a rice cake.</font></p>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
Pgina 14
bunan.txt
sans-serif">[Mark L. Blum]</font></p>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">This
Very Mind is Buddha</font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><br>
Shid Bunan 1670, 5, 91027, (89, 93112)</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>The
reason death is abhorred is that it is not known. People them-<br>
selves are the buddha, yet they do not know it. If they know it, they are far
from<br>
the buddha-mind; if they do not know it, they are deluded. I have composed<br>
the following verses:</strong></font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When
you penetrate the fundamental origin<br>
You go beyond all phenomena.<br>
Who knows the realm beyond all words<br>
Which the buddhas and patriarchs could not transmit?</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">If
people know birth-and-death, it will be the seed of a false mind. Even<br>
though I may be censured for having done so, I leave these trifling words
scat-<br>
tered here, in the hope they may be of help to the young and
uninitiated.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The
<em>nenbutsu </em>is a sharp sword, good for cutting off ones karma. But
you<br>
should never think of yourself as becoming buddha, for not becoming
buddha<br>
is buddha.</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When
ones karma is exhausted,<br>
There is nothing at all.<br>
To this, for expediency,<br>
We give the name buddha.</font></strong></p>
Pgina 15
bunan.txt
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The
teachings of Buddhism are greatly in error. How much more in error it<br>
is to learn them. See directly. Hear directly. In direct seeing there is no
seer. In<br>
direct hearing there is no hearer.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">To a
certain person I said, As for the buddha-dharma, people today are<br>
perplexed, and seek buddha outside of themselves. For example, in the
term<br>
wondrous existence, wondrous is original nothingness and existence is
where<br>
nothingness moves or operates. Nothingness can never be manifested
without<br>
being, which is why they are combined. One is known according to the right
or<br>
wrong of the dharma by which one lives. When one has insight into ones
own<br>
nature in all ones behavior in everyday life, and uses ones body in
accordance<br>
with this nature, then we may speak of the
buddha-dharma.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">People
say that enlightenment is difficult. It is neither difficult nor easy;<br>
nothing whatsoever can attach to it. It stands apart from the right and
wrong<br>
of things, while at the same time corresponding to them. It lives in desires
and<br>
it is apart from them; it dies and does not die; it lives and does not live;
it sees<br>
and does not see; it hears and does not hear; it moves and does not move;
it<br>
seeks things and does not seek them; it sins and does not sin. It is under
the<br>
domination of causality, and it is not. Ordinary people cannot reach it, and
even<br>
bodhisattvas cannot actualize it. Therefore, it is called
buddha.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">While
one is deluded, one is used by ones body. When one gains awakening,<br>
one uses ones body.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The
teaching of Buddha is, after all nothing, yet how foolish the human<br>
mind of man is (to interpret it in various ways). There is nobody in the
world<br>
who is not deluded by fame. It is understandable that people get lost in
sexual<br>
desire or the acquisition of wealth, but if they become aware that even
Pgina 16
bunan.txt
those<br>
things are in vain, what then is fame? If you single-mindedly follow the
path of<br>
the Buddha, other things will be settled one way or another. It is worthless
to<br>
cling to fame.</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">A
persons delusion by fame<br>
Is the greatest folly in the world.<br>
People should be as those<br>
Who know not even their own name.</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">One
usually sees others in the light of ones own standards. The way a foolish<br>
person sees is very dangerous; because of ones greediness one sees others
as<br>
greedy. A sensual person sees others as sensuous. It is dangerous for anyone
but<br>
a sage to judge others. Even if there were a person who followed the great
Way<br>
of the Buddha, few would recognize such a one correctly. As a consequence
of<br>
this, the great Way is degenerating.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">A wise
person handles others using keen insight into their natures, and<br>
makes what they have in their minds operate usefully, even though their
natures<br>
are quite different. Then they will come to work properly. One who leads
others<br>
should keep these things in mind.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">It is
easy to live consciously apart from worldly affairs. To live without con-<br>
sciousness apart from worldly affairs is difficult to
achieve.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">For
instance, fire burns things, and water makes them wet. But fire is not con-<br>
scious of burning things, nor is water conscious of wetting them. A buddha
has<br>
compassion for all beings and is not conscious of that
compassion.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The
person who tries to enter the great Way without having seen a true mas-<br>
ter will suffer from sexual desire and cupidity. Such a one will be greatly
in error.<br>
One who wishes to live in the great Way should consider that the
defilement<br>
that permeates all existence is produced wholly by ones own body. One has
to<br>
have a keen insight into what is common, not only to heaven and earth, but
Pgina 17
bunan.txt
to<br>
the past, present, and future as well. Having seen this, if one keeps the
oneness<br>
of this within, there is no doubt that such a one will be freed naturally
from the<br>
karma of the body and will become pure.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">A
certain person asked me, What is the way of Mahayana, the Great<br>
Vehicle? I said, In the Great Vehicle, you are upright, and there is
nothing to<br>
observe.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Then,
it was asked, what is the way of the ultimate vehicle? I said, In the<br>
ultimate vehicle, you do as you will, and there is nothing to observe. It is
a won-<br>
derful thing, and it is very rare in this world.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">I said
to my disciples: When you labor over kan, why do you indulge in<br>
so many difficult things? All things you do are your seeing directly,
hearing<br>
directly.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Master
Rinzai said, There is a follower of the Way who listens to the dharma<br>
and depends upon nothing. If you have awakened to this non-dependence,<br>
there is no buddha to be obtained. Huineng, the sixth patriarch,
attained<br>
<em>satori</em> upon hearing the words of the Diamond Sutra which say,
Awaken the<br>
mind without fixing it anywhere.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Everything has a time for ripeness. For instance, as a child, one
learns the<br>
alphabet. Then, as an adult in the busy world, there is nothing one is
unable to<br>
write about, even about things of China. This is the ripening of the
alphabet.<br>
People who practice Buddhism will suffer pain while they are washing the<br>
defilements from their bodies; but after they have cleansed themselves
and<br>
become buddha, they no longer feel any suffering.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">So it
is with compassion. While one is acting compassionately, one is aware of<br>
his compassion. When compassion has ripened, one is not aware of his
compas-<br>
sion. When one is compassionate and unaware of it, one is
buddha.</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Since
all compassion<br>
Is the work of bodhisattvas,<br>
Pgina 18
bunan.txt
How can misfortune<br>
Befall a bodhisattva?</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">There
is nothing more ignorant than a human being. While walking, sitting, or<br>
lying, people suffer pain and sadness, mourn the past, fear the uncertain
future,<br>
envy others, and consider things from their own point of view alone. Thus
they<br>
are bound in sadness by the affairs of the world. Their life in this world
is spent<br>
in worthless pursuits. Yet in the worlds to come, no matter how they may
suffer<br>
from pain in their successive lives, they will be unable to rid themselves
of them.<br>
Indeed, the human being is possessed of deep delusions.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">A
priest is said to be one who possesses a solid appearance (having long prac-<br>
ticed zazen). His external aspect and his inner being have become
completely<br>
one. He is, after all, like a dead man revived. A dead man wants nothing;
he<br>
needs neither to flatter nor hate any person. Having attained the great Way,
he<br>
naturally sees the right and wrong in others, and is able to lead them to
the Way<br>
of Buddha. This is a priest.</font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">To one
who asked me how to practice the great Way in everyday life, I
said:</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Ordinary people are themselves buddhas. Buddhas and ordinary people
are<br>
originally one. Therefore, one who knows is an ordinary man, and one
who<br>
knows not is a buddha.</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">To
someone who practices <em>nenbutsu:</em></font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Unless you recite the name,<br>
There is neither you nor buddha.<br>
Pgina 19
bunan.txt
That is it<br>
<em>Namu-Amida-Butsu.</em></font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">To a
priest who preaches the dharma:</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When
it has totally perished,<br>
You are nothing but nothingness itself<br>
Then you may teach others.</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">On the
Buddhist lifes abhorrence of knowledge:</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">You
should remember,<br>
Knowledge stems<br>
From the various evils of others,<br>
And your own evils as well.</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">On
Rinzai:</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">You
became a monk<br>
A commandment-breaker monk<br>
Because you killed the buddhas<br>
And the patriarchs.</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Grass,
trees, land, and state, all are to become buddhas.</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">There
are no grasses or trees;<br>
There is no land, no state;<br>
Still more,<br>
There is no buddha.</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong></p>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">To a
person suffering from lifes troubles:</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Consider everything you do<br>
As the practice of the Way of the buddha,<br>
And your sufferings will disappear.</font></strong></p>
</blockquote>
Pgina 20
bunan.txt
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">On
teaching the Way:</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Do
not be deluded<br>
By the word Way;<br>
Know it is but the acts<br>
You perform day and night.</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">[Kobori
Shaku, Norman Waddell]</font></p>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">From the
<em>Mumonkan</em>, Case 37: </font></strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial,
Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
<a
href="http://moosiszenjourneys.org/joshus-oak-tree/">http://moosiszenjourneys.or
g/joshus-oak-tree/ </a></font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>A monk
asked Joshu in all earnestness. What is the meaning of the patriarch's coming
from the west?<br>
</em></font><em><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">Joshu said, The oak tree there in the garden. </font></em></p>
</blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">There is a
wonderful story about this koan. Shido Bunan Zenji was travelling along the
Tokaido road from Kyoto to Edo. He was being followed by a robber who put up at
the same inn as Shido, planning to rob him during the night. The thief opened
the door and peeked in. To his astonishment, what he saw there in the room was a
garden with an oak tree in it. Suddenly, he heard a voice exclaim, Who's
there? The tree transformed into Shido sitting in meditation. The thief was so
stunned that he apologized and asked to learn about this amazing technique that
allowed him to change into an oak tree. The teacher taught him to do zazen and
gave him a koan. In time, the man changed and lived an honest life.
</font></p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>Zengo
90</strong><br>
</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Zengo: Shid
bunan yuiken kenjaku<br>
Pgina 21
bunan.txt
Translation: The Supreme Way knows no difficulties, only avoid picking and
choosing. <br>
Source: Shinjinmei (Faith-Mind Maxim). </font></p>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">From <br>
Kusumoto Bun'y (1907-1995) <br>
Zengo nyumon <br>
Tokyo: Daihrin-kaku Co. Ltd., 1982<br>
An Introduction to Zen Words and Phrases<br>
Translated by Michael D. Ruymar (Michael Sru Ruymar)</font></p>
</blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">This is an old
and well-known Zengo taken from the first two lines of the <br>
Shinjinmei composed by Sengcan (d. 606), the Third Patriarch of Zen in
China. The <br>
Shinjinmei is a poem comprised of 146 lines of four-word verse presented in
a sonorous <br>
style that well expresses the essence of Zen, while those two lines in
particular provide <br>
the essence of the Shinjinmei. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Student-teacher
dialogues with Master Zhaozhou (778-897) that include these two <br>
lines appear in both The Record of Zhaozhou and The Blue Cliff Record (cases
2, 57, 58 <br>
&amp; 59). Otherwise famous for his Mukan, Zhaozhou was so especially fond of
the phrase <br>
shid bunan that he adopted the Buddhist name Shidan, and greeted his
callers with it. <br>
Of those who achieved Great Enlightenment from the shid bunan kan was Zen
Master <br>
Shid Bunan (1603-1676), the Dharma heir of Zen Master <a
href="../hakuin/hakuin20.html#a" target="_blank">Gud Tshoku</a>, three time
<br>
resident and chief abbott of the Myshin-ji Temple. Taking the tonsure, he
changed his <br>
name to Bunan, and late in life followed Zhaozhou by calling his home
Shidan, or, Shid<br>
Hermitage, where he passed his remaining years. In that way, the phrase
shid bunan <br>
holds something that draws the mind of Zen practitioners. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Shid refers to
the Supreme Ultimate Universal Way, the highest Truth, the <br>
Buddhist Path, the Buddha Mind, the Buddha-nature, Self-nature and
Dharma-nature. <br>
Bunan means that which is without difficulties. The Way is near, said
Menzi, meaning <br>
the Supreme Way is not something far away at a great height, but is within
the closest <br>
reach of our daily lives, and is not difficult to attain. Also, yuiken
kenjaku is to be read <br>
tada kenjaku o kirau, where kenjaku is to choose, (erabu) or to prefer
Pgina 22
bunan.txt
(yorikonomi), <br>
that is, to pick and choose, (shushu sentaku). To avoid (kirau) picking
and choosing <br>
means that it is not good to adopt a dualistic perspective of yes versus
no, good versus <br>
bad, and like versus dislike. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The mind of
the Shinjinmei: Faith-Mind Maxim is the alpha and omega of <br>
existence, also referred to as the Buddha Mind, Buddha-nature, True
Thusness, and Self-<br>
nature. Originally unborn, undying, formless and unstruck, it is that
spiritually illumined <br>
Absolute Existence which can neither be known nor seen. It is due to our
dualistic, <br>
discriminating intellect that picks and prefers (eri-konomi) that we are
unable to awaken <br>
to the mind that forms the root of this existence, or master the Supreme
Way. If we cut off <br>
this relativistic consciousness and establish ourselves in Absolute
awareness, it is easy to <br>
master the Supreme Way (i.e. Buddha Mind or Buddha-nature). In that way, as
in <br>
expressions like both forgotten and cutting off both heads (Zengo 6),
emptying <br>
opposites of their opposition is a precondition to awakening to the Mind of
the Buddha, <br>
ones True Self.<br>
</font></p>
</blockquote>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><br>
</p>
<p><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Shid
Bunan has the following poem []:
</font></strong></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>Live by
becoming completely and utterly dead; <br>
then, doing as one pleases is [always] good.</strong></font></p>
</blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">In <em>Living by
Zen </em> (1950, 1972: p. 124) Suzuki gives the following English translation:
</font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>While
living, be a dead man, thoroughly dead; <br>
Whatever you do, then, as you will, is always good. </strong></font></p>
</blockquote>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Zen
Master Shid Bunan (d. 1676)</font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial,
Pgina 23
bunan.txt
Helvetica, sans-serif"></font></strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial,
Helvetica, sans-serif"> <br>
in </font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><a href="ShibayamaZenkei.html" target="_blank">Shibayama Zenkei</a>
(1894-1974), A Flower Does Not Talk: Zen essays (Tokyo and Vermont: Charles E.
Tuttle Company, 1972) at 46</font></p>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>Die
while alive, and be completely dead,<br>
Then do whatever you will, all is good.</strong></font></p>
</blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Shibayama
explained that the aim of Zen training is to die while alive, that is, to
actually become the self of no-mind, and no-form, and then to revive as the True
Self of no-mind and no-form. </font></p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Shid
Bunan Zenji </font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"></font></strong><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><br>
by

<a href="KounYamada.html" target="_blank">Yamada Kun</a>


(1907-1989)</font></p>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<blockquote>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">And there
is really a person who hates the word Buddha. His name is Shid Bunan Zenji. As
you might know, he was the teacher of Shju Rjin, who was the master of Hakuin
Zenji. I consider Shid Bunan Zenji to be a truly outstanding person. Shid
Bunan Zenji was originally the innkeeper of a watering place along the Tokaido
Road at that time. He became a student of the Zen master Gud Osh. </font></p>
<p align="center"><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"> <img width="281" height="640"
src="https://terebess.hu/zen/mesterek/GudoToshoku1.jpg"> <br>
</font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">
<a href="GudoToshoku.html" target="_blank">Gud Tshoku</a> (15771661) <br>
<br>
1648 </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">This Gud
Osh traveled back and forth several times between Kyoto and Edo (present-day
Tokyo) along this highway and evidently stayed at this inn a number of times. As
a result, Shid Bunan began to receive the instruction of Gud Osh and
eventually devoted himself to authentic practice. He decided to become a monk.
Up to then he had devoted himself to carousing, to the extent that the family
became quite disgusted with him. When I ask myself why he was carousing so much,
I can surmise that he wanted everyone to think that he was no longer required at
the inn, so that he would then be free to become a monk. Once when Gud Zenji
was traveling from Kyoto to Tokyo, he stayed overnight at the inn. The two men
Pgina 24
bunan.txt
talked until deep in the night. The next morning Gud Zenji continued on his
way. Shortly after that, the master of the inn left home, never to return again.
He went to Tokyo and practiced in a little hut-like dwelling. This was probably
his continued practice after realizing enlightenment. As time went on, word got
around that a very special person was living in the vicinity. Shju Rjin wanted
to meet a true Zen master and traveled to Tokyo with that intention. I'm not
sure if Shid Bunan already called his hermitage Shidan starting around that
time, but at any rate Shju Rjin visited him in his dwelling. When he paid a
visit, he found Shid Bunan Zenji sitting in a ramshackle dwelling on worn-out
tatami matting. But one look was enough for him to confirm that he had met his
true teacher. This really speaks well for Shju Rjin. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Shid Bunan
Zenji was definitely not a learned man, but he nevertheless wrote truly
outstanding waka poems. Also outstanding are his dka or songs of the way. You
would all do well to give them a perusal, if you have a chance. I have been
looking over just the ones consisting of four lines. Many of them warn us
against being duped by the concept of Buddha (hotoke-sama). Here is an example:
Even if you fall head first into Avici hell, don't ever think of becoming a
Buddha (sakashima ni abijigoku e otsurutomo hotoke ni naru to sara ni omouna).
The Avici hell is the most gruesome of the traditional eight hells of
Buddhism. This is truly outstanding. Shid Bunan Zenji doesn't mince words. I
believe such penetrating individuals are rare in the Rinzai School. I personally
believe he is a match for Dgen Zenji when it comes to his profound state of
consciousness. Here is another verse of his: No matter what, no different from
an ordinary person, Buddhas and patriarchs are great devils (nanigoto mo bonjin
ni kawaru koto nashi busso to iu mo daima nari keri). He uses the word devils
to indicate concepts. Here is yet another verse: What is Buddha? Fools have
started saying it, and people are deluded by something without a name (hotoke
to wa nani baka na yatsu ga iisomete na mo naki mono ni mayoi koso sure). Who is
it that started saying Buddha? What fools they are! The real thing is nothing at
all. It is because they attach a name like Buddha to it that they are all
deluded. He has clearly realized his true self. Here is yet another verse: When
I hear someone asking what Buddha is, I feel like my ears have been dirtied
(hotoke wa to tazunuru koe wo kiku toki wa mimi no kegagaruru kokochi koso
sure). Here is a Japanese who can compose such poems. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">This is the
time to take a second look at Shid Bunan Zenji. He is of a different sort than
Hakuin Zenji, we might say. He is different in character. Hakuin Zenji was a
genius, especially when it came to literary gifts to compose texts and poems.
Shid Bunan Zenji could be said to have been completely lacking in such breeding
and culture. There are almost no difficult statements in his writings. For
example, with him there is no taint or trace of having read such works as the
Blue Cliff Record, Gateless Gate or Book of Equanimity. When it comes to Shju
Rjin, we can clearly detect the traces of his having read the Blue Cliff
Record. A copy of that work could be found in the hermitage Shjuan where he
resided. As for Hakuin Zenji, there were many literary remains in the form of
his voluminous writings. In that sense he was an inimitable genius.
Nevertheless, I believe he needs to undergo further inspection when it comes to
his enlightened dharma eye. This is not the time or occasion for me to speak in
detail about this matter, and I feel that I that I must delve myself more deeply
into the matter. Let me just say here that I hold Shid Bunan Zenji in great
esteem. His spirit is expressed well in these first words of today's
Pgina 25
bunan.txt
Introduction: Becoming a buddha, becoming a patriarch: This is nothing but
wearing dirty names and is therefore to be abhorred. This is how it is when you
have reached the true fact. It won't do to become attached to ideas or names.
</font><br>
</p>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
<p>&nbsp; </p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
</font></p>
<blockquote><blockquote>&nbsp;</blockquote>
</blockquote>

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