Sei sulla pagina 1di 20

©2011 Barry Liesch

ch10 Sus Chords—Ways to Incorporate

1

Chapter 10

Sus Chords—Ways to Incorporate

20 pages

51 examples

Why study and use sus chords? Sus chords have a broad application to both contemporary and traditional worship styles. They provide a needed colorful alternative

to the standard dominant seventh which occur frequently in hymn and chorus cadences.

They are valuable in creating segues and in effecting modulations in the free-flowing

praise format. They are eminently playable on both guitars and keyboards.

OUTLINE

REPERTOIRE

What is a Sus Chord?

Great is Thy Faithfulness

Sus Possibilities in Half & Full Cadences

Seek Ye First

The Sus9

Holy, Holy, Holy

Sus 9 in Half Cadences

O Worship the King

Sus9 in Full Cadences

The Power of Your Love

A

Simpler Way: "Four Over Five" (IV/5)

Infant Jesus, Infant Lowly

Non Cadential Sus Chords on iii and vi

I Love You , Lord

Non Cadential Sus9 and IV/5

God is So Good

Try it! Modernize the Harmonies

Blessed Assurance

Change the Bass Note

Praise the Savior Ye Who Know Him

The Importance of Transposition

Amazing Grace

What is a Sus Chord?

What is a sus chord? It's different from a major triad. A C major triad, for example, has a root (C), a third (E), and a fifth (G).

Example 10.1

C

&

l

w

w

w

_

Csus

&

l

w w

w

_

C

4

Csus

Csus

4

C

&

˙ ˙

˙

l

˙

_

˙ _ ˙
˙
_
˙
 

On the other hand, a sus chord has no third. It substitutes a fourth for the third. A Csus chord is comprised of a root (C), a fourth (F), and a fifth (G).

The name "sus" is short for "suspended," because in earlier classical music a sus sound was considered to be dissonant and needed resolution. So in the music of J. S. Bach, for example, the F in the Csus (below) would invariably resolve by step to the E of the C major chord. Some alternative symbols for the sus are also indicated above.

©2011 Barry Liesch

ch10 Sus Chords—Ways to Incorporate

2

Example 10.2 Assignment: Write the Designated Chord

b B b b b Dsus D Asus A Fsus F Gsus G B sus
b
B b
b
b
Dsus
D
Asus
A
Fsus
F
Gsus
G
B sus
E sus
E
˙
˙
&
!
!
˙
˙
˙
˙
˙
˙
!
!
! b˙
!
b ˙
_
b ˙
_
Example 10.3 The Sus Inverted
˙
˙
˙
˙
˙
˙
˙
˙
˙ ˙
˙
˙ ˙
˙
˙
˙
&
˙
l
˙ ˙
˙ ˙ ˙ l
l
!
_
˙
_
˙
Example 10.4 The Sus through the Cycle (Up a 4th, Down a 5 th )
b œ
œ
œ
œ
_
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ b œ
œ
œ
4
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
b
œ œ
4
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
l &
œ œ
œ œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
l
œ
œ
l
b
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
_
œ
_
œ
œ
œ
!
b
_
œ
_ œ œ
œ
l
l
l
!
etc.
œ .
œ œ .
œ œ .
œ œ .
œ
l
4
œ.
œœ.
œœ.
œœ.
œ
l
l
b
œ .
œœ .
œ œ .
œ œ .
œ !
? 4
Now play the same pattern but with a 7 th in the tenor part.
Example 10.5 The Sus7 through the Cycle (Up a 4 th , Down a 5 th )
b œ
œ
_
œ
7
œ
œ
œ
œ
Csus
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ b œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
b
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ œ
œ œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
l &
œ
l
œ
œ
œ
œ œ l
b
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
!
_
œ
_
œ
_
_ œ œ
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
b
_
œ
.
_
œ
_
œ
_
œ
l
b œ .
œ
œ
œ
l
_
_
_
_
l
!
.
.
.
.
b
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ .
œ œ .
œ œ .
œ
l
œ .
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ
l
l
b
œ .
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ !
?

In contemporary music the sus chord can resolve, but often it does not. Thus the sus has presently obtained an independent status in the same sense that a C major chord is its own entity.

©2011 Barry Liesch

ch10 Sus Chords—Ways to Incorporate

3

Example 10.6 Replace Asterisk with a Sus Chord

 

#

3

*

   

l &

4

l

œ

œ

œ

l

˙

˙

œ

l

œ œ

˙ .

˙ .

œ

l

˙ ˙ ˙ !

l

œ

l

˙

_

˙

.

.

l

˙

l

   

l

!

l

O

l

wor - ship

the

l

King,

all

l

glo - rious

a

- bove

l

!

       

? #

3

Œ

     

˙ .

l

4

l

.

l

 

l

˙

.

l

!

 

˙

˙ .

   
 

3

       

l

& #

4

l

œ

œ

œ

l

˙

˙

œ

l

œ

˙ .

˙ .

œ

œ

l

˙

˙

!

 

œ

˙

.

˙

     

˙

 

l

 

l

_

˙

.

l

l

 

l

!

l

 

O

l

wor - ship

the

l

King,

all

l

glo - rious

a

- bove

l

!

     

l

?

#

3

Œ

l

 

l

 

l

 

l

˙ .

!

 

4

.

 

˙

.

 
 

˙

˙ .

   

Example 10.7 Replace Asterisk with a Sus as well as a Sus7 Chord.

Example 10.8 Replace Asterisk with a Sus as well as a Sus7 Chord

*

& b

4

œj

 

œ œj

     

l

4

 

l

   

l

     

l

.

˙

l

˙

.

!

     

œ .

œ

_

.

.

˙

˙

_

˙

˙

_

 

œ

 

œ

_

œ ˙

.

.

   

˙

!

!

l

l

 

   

˙

_

˙

_

I

l

l

œ

_

˙

_

love you Lord

l

l

˙

_

and

I

l

l

lift

my voice

l

l

   
 

4

 

˙

˙

.

?

Œ

Ó

     

l

b

4

l

l

 

l

˙

 

l

 

!

 

w

˙

˙

 

Example 10.9 Replace Asterisks with a Sus as well as a Sus7 Chord

   

*

    *    
   

& # # #

3

               

l

4

 

l

œ

 

œ

œ

œ

l

œ

˙

œ

!

l

 

œ

œ

l

˙

 

l

˙

!

!

l

   
 

In

-

fant

l

ho

-

ly,

In

-

fant

l

l o w

-

ly,

l

?

# # #

3

œ ˙

œ l

   

l

˙

!

 

4

   

Œ

 

©2011 Barry Liesch

ch10 Sus Chords—Ways to Incorporate

4

Sus Possibilities in Half & Full Cadences

Sus chords are useful in half and full cadences. (Cadences occur at the end of phrases.) Half cadences typically end on a V chord (the "dominant" chord), and consequently have an incomplete feeling. Below a half cadence occurs on the word "me." In hymnbooks, typically a simple G major triad is used, but instead we have substituted a Gsus below.

Example 10.10 Half Cadence Using a Gsus in Amazing Grace

 

C

 

Dm

Gsus

 

l

& 3

l

l & 3 l l   l   . l   !

l

 

l

 

.

l

 

!

4

           

˙

 

˙

 

l

_

_

œ

l

œ

 

˙

œ

l

˙ ˙

. .
.
.

˙ ˙

!

 

l

   

l

l

that

l

saved

a

 

l

wretch

like

l

me

l

!

           
 

˙ .

 

˙ ˙ ˙ .

 

˙

 

l

?

3 4
l

Œ

˙ .

˙ .

 

l

˙ l

 

œ

œ

l

l
   

!

                 
         

˙

.
.

˙

I

 

ii Vsus

Above the Gsus chord does not resolve (the C does not resolve to B). Sus chords at cadences can remain unresolved or resolve. Below all the sus chords resolve.

Example 10.11 Four Different Sus Chords used for a Half Cadence

 

Dm

Gsus

(A)

7

G sus

G

(B)

G 7

(C)

G

9

sus

G

7

(D)

G

13

sus

G

7

                   
             

3

   

3

   

l

"

 

.

l

˙ ! 3

   

.

l

˙ !

.

l

.

!

˙ .

 

l

.

!

4

 

˙

 

4

˙

   

4

˙

 

˙

 

4

˙ .

 

˙

 

l

l

& 3

? 3

 

œ

   

.

˙

   

.

˙

 

.

˙

.

!

!

 

.

˙

.

!

!

like

"

"

˙ ˙

me

.

l

l

_

˙

!

!

 

˙ ˙

me

.

l

_

˙

!

 

˙ ˙

˙

_

.

me

l

_

˙

.

 

˙

˙

_

me

_

.

l

_

˙

.

 
     

l

!

 

l

     

l

˙ .

 
 

˙ .

 

˙ .

 

3

˙ .

 

3

˙ ˙ .

.

                     

l

œ œ l

"

 

˙ ˙ ! 3

   

l

˙ ˙ !

 

l

 

!

 

l

 

!

4

 

.

4

 

.

 

4

.

 

4

.

 
   

˙

˙

˙

˙ .

 

˙

˙ .

 

Notice that in each case above, the 4th (C) in the alto resolves to the 3rd (B) of the G or G7 chord. Also notice in examples B, C, and D, that the seventh of the chord, the note F in the left hand, is situated in the tenor—a good voicing idea, providing the seventh isn't too low so as to sound muddy.

Examples C and D, with the 9 th (A), are the crucial ones for keyboardists. See the two different resolutions. In both cases the 4 th (11 th ) fall to the 3 rd (10 th ) of the next chord, whereas the 9 th can rise of fall.

Listen carefully to the G9sus above. It sounds more modern than a G or a G7, right? Now, see that the same alternatives can be applied to full cadences (V-I).

©2011 Barry Liesch

ch10 Sus Chords—Ways to Incorporate

5

Example 10.12 Three Sus Substitutions for a V7-I Full Cadence

Am C 7 G G C 3 4 l & l œ l ˙ œ
Am
C
7
G
G
C
3
4
l &
l
œ
l
˙
œ
l
!
_
_
˙
_
.
_
œ
_
˙
œ
_
˙
.
l
l
l
l
!
was
blind
but
now
I
see
l
l
l
l
!
˙
˙
.
œ
˙ .
l
4
l
˙
.
l
l
˙ .
!
? 3
˙
œ
V7
I
7
9
G sus
Gsus
Gsus
l
&
l
.
l
.
!
l
!
œ œ
_
˙
! œ œ
_
˙
œ œ
_
˙
.
_
œ
_
˙
.
_
œ
_
˙
.
_
œ
_
˙
.
l
l
! l
!
l
!
I see
! see
I
I
see
l
l
!
l
!
.
œ
˙ .
œ
˙ .
˙ .
˙ .
l
?
œ l
˙ ˙ l
!
.
œ
l
!
œ
l
!
Vsus
I Vsus
I Vsus9
I

Example 10.13 Thirds could even extend to the Sus17

 

Csus

7

9

11

13

15

1 7

 

œ

 

œ

œ

 

œ

œ

œ

!

 

œ

œ

œ

l &

l

b œ

_

b

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

!

!

?

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

The 11 th and 15 th double the 4 th and root respectively. The 17 th (E) clashes with the 4 th (F) in the left hand. But since these notes are far apart, the harsh dissonance is mitigated.

The Sus9

The sus9 is the chord we particularly want to emphasize. It's a particularly valuable alternative to the dominant seventh because the ninth contributes a lot of color. Two spacings of the sus9 chord, with the 5 th and root in the soprano, are the most important.

©2011 Barry Liesch

ch10 Sus Chords—Ways to Incorporate

6

Example 10.14 Two Spacings of the Sus9 chord. Play Through the Octave.

9 G 9 b sus G C D b sus D E E 4 b
9
G
9
b
sus
G
C
D b
sus
D
E
E
4
b œ
œ
b œ
œ
4
œ
l &
!
b
b
#
œ œ
œ œ
_
˙
_
œ œ
_
œ œ
_
˙
!
œ œ œ œ ˙
!
b
œ œ
œ œ
˙
!
œ œ œ œ ˙
!
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
_
œ
_
œ
b ˙
_
#
œ
œ
_
œ
_
œ
_
˙
b ˙
_
_
˙
˙
l
9
!
!
!
!
!
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
˙
œ
œ
# ˙
˙
˙
# ˙
˙
œ b˙
˙
l
4
˙
!
? 4
œ
œ
b
œ
œ
!
œ
œ
!
b
œ
œ !
œ
œ !
V9sus V9sus I
b
A b
F
G
G
b
œ
œ
œ
b
œ
b
b
œ
œ
œ
l &
œ œ
œ œ
˙
b
œ
œ œ
˙
œ œ
œ
œ
! b
œ
œ
b
˙
!
œ
œ œ œ
˙ b œ œ
˙ !
œ
œ
b
˙ ˙ !
_
˙
l
b œ
œ
!
b_
œ
_
œ
˙
œ
_
œ
b
œ
˙
b
! _
˙
!
_
_
˙
!
b
˙
˙
b
˙
˙
œ
l
œ
œ
b œ
œ
œ
!
œ !
!
!
?
b
B
B
A
# œ
œ
C
œ
b
œ
œ
˙
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
˙
œ œ
œ
œ
˙
œ œ
œ œ œ œ
˙
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
œ
œ
˙
l &
# œ
œ
! b
œ
œ
!
˙
œ
˙
œ
˙
#
!
œ
!
b_
œ
_
œ
_
œ
_
˙
l
_
œ
#_
˙
!
_
˙
#
˙
˙
b ˙
_
!
_ !
_
˙
_
!
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
l
!
!
œ !
!
?

Example 10.15 Play (A) and (B) Chromatically Through the Octave

(A)

G

9

 

G

9

sus

C

 

sus

C

(B)

5

     

1

   

l &

2

2

l

1

! l

 

!

l

" ˙ ˙

l

!

b

˙

 

l

!

˙

l

!

4

 

b

     

˙

 

b

       

l

l

˙ ˙

 

˙

_

b

b

˙ ˙

_

b ˙

_

˙ ˙

_

˙

_

 

˙

_

b

b

_

˙ ˙

b ˙

_

˙ ˙

_

˙

_

 

˙

_

l

_

˙

! l

˙

b _

˙

!

˙

l

˙

_

etc.

" !

˙

_

l

_

˙

˙

l

b _

˙

!

˙

l

˙

_

etc.

!

 

˙ l

! ! ˙

l

˙ b

l

 

" !

˙ l

˙ b

l

! ˙

l

!

l

? 2

˙ l

˙ ˙
!

b

 

l

˙

!

 

l

# ˙

˙

 

" !

˙ l

˙ b

˙

l

˙

!

 

l

# ˙

˙

!

4

   

˙

 

˙

     

˙

 

˙

 

V9sus

I

   

V9sus

I

   

©2011 Barry Liesch

ch10 Sus Chords—Ways to Incorporate

7

Example 10.16 Play (A) and (B) Chromatically Through the Octave

 

Csus

9

C

7

F

Csus

9

C

9

 

F

Csus

9

C

7

 

F

Csus

9

C

9

F

(A1)

 

(A2)

(B1)

   

(B2)

       
                             

b

4

           

œ

   

œ

 

œ

     
                           
 

4

œ

 

œ

 

˙

!

œ

 

œ

 

˙

"

œ

˙

œ œ !

œ

 

œ

   

˙

"

l &

l

œ

_

œ

 

œ œ

˙

˙

_

_

!

œ

_

œ

œ

_

œ

˙

˙

_

_

"

˙

œ

œ œ ˙

œ _

œ

_

!

œ

œ

œ

œ

˙

_

"

l

? b

4

œ

 

˙

!

œ

˙

"

     

˙

!

œ

 

˙

˙

"

     

œ

   

œ

   

œ

     

œ

 
   

œ

œ

 

œ

œ

 

œ œ

     

œ

œ

 
 

4

                           

V9sus V7

 

I

V9sus V9

I

Above, the 4 th is in the tenor part.

Example 10.17 4 th in the Tenor Part (Amazing Grace)

 

D

9

sus

l &

#

l & #    
   
                     
     

œ

 

˙

 

œ

     

.

.

   

l

˙

   

œ

l

     

l

˙

 

l

.
.

˙

 

!

l

l

œ

 

l

l

˙

   

l

˙

˙

_

 

œ

   

l

   

.

l

l

   

!

!

_

œ

_

_

˙

œ

_

˙ ˙

˙ ˙

was

blind

but

now

I

see

l

˙ l

   
         

œ

 

˙

l

? #

 

l

   

l

 

˙ l

 

œ

 

˙ .

 

l

˙

!

                 

˙

.

˙

.

 

œ

_˙ .

               
   

Sus9 in Half Cadences

Write into the score a V9sus substitution at the half cadence (asterisk). Label, using the two possible pop symbols for the sus chord (as shown in the above example): sus9, and the major 6 th symbol followed by a slash. Also indicate the Roman numeral designation. The melody should be your top note. Don't forget the 7 th of the chord. Play your solution.

Example 10.18 Let There Be Praise

& # # # #

*

l

c

 

œ j

 

l

œ j œ

 
l c   œ j   l œ j œ   l   œ j  

l

 

œ j

   

l

!

l

 

œ

.

 

œ

œ

l

œ

.

 

œ

œ

œ

l

œ

œ

.

.

œ

 

œ

œ

œ

l

w

w

_

w

!

_

œ

.

 

œ

œ

_

œ

.

 

œ

 

œ

œ

l

Let

there

 

be

l

praise,

let

 

there be

l

joy

in

 

our

l

hearts

!

       

˙

       

œ

.

 

˙

l

?

# # # #

c

œ

.

œJ

˙

l

œ

.

œj

˙

l

 

œJ œ

 

l

w

!

Can you think of two ways of spacing the sus9 chord above and below?

©2011 Barry Liesch

ch10 Sus Chords—Ways to Incorporate

8

Example 10.19 He is Lord

*

 

C

7

C

7

sus

b

4

œ l

œ l

   
b 4 œ l     l l                

l

b 4 œ l     l l                

l

               
b 4 œ l     l l                
 

l

 

!

 

!

l &

l

4

œ

_

˙ ˙ œ œ œ

.

.

l

˙

˙

_

.

.

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

 

œ

œ

_œ

œ

œ.

œ

 

œ

œ

œ

n œ

_

œ

˙

˙

_

.

.

!

˙

.

!

 

l

˙

.

 

l

             

l

3 ˙ .

l

 

He is

l

Lord,

he is

l

Lord! He is

 

ri -sen from the dead and he is

Lord!

!

!

     

l

   

l

 
   

œ

 

.

 

4

     

˙

˙ .

 

œ

 

œ

     

l

? b

4

l

˙

.

œ

l

   

Œ

l

 

œ

 

œ

œ

 

l

˙ .

!

˙

.

!

 

A

 

A

9

sus

   

œ

         

l

l

& # #

œ

˙

.

œ

l

l

œ .

˙

 

œj

 

œ

œ

 

l

l

œ

œ

 

œ

 

l

l

˙

˙

_

.

.

 

! .

! !
!

!

!

˙

l

there

 

is

no

 

l

shad

-

ow

of

œ

l

turn - ing

# ˙

with

 

l

thee

˙

.

l

? # #

˙

.

l

˙

   

l

˙

 

œ

l

 

! .

 

!

     

œ

     

˙

.

˙

 

Example 10.20 Great is Thy Faithfulness

Sus9 in Full Cadences

Below, both voicings of the sus9 chord occur in the half cadence (m.4). Just one version of the sus9 occurs in the full cadence (m.8).

Example 10.21 Sus9 in Half & Full Cadence inSeek Ye First:

G

9

sus

1

l

4

l 4   œ   l l œ   l ˙ l
 

œ

 
l 4   œ   l l œ   l ˙ l

l

l 4   œ   l l œ   l ˙ l
l 4   œ   l l œ   l ˙ l

l

œ

l 4   œ   l l œ   l ˙ l
 
l 4   œ   l l œ   l ˙ l

l

˙

l

l

l

œ

œ

_

œ œ œ

œ œ

œ

_

 

œ

œ

˙

˙

_

 

œ

œ

_

 

œ

œ

œ

_

œ

œ

l

l

-

˙ ˙

 

˙ ˙

Seek ye

first the

l

l

œ

_

king

dom of God,

l

l

œ

_

And

His

_

œ

right -ous

˙

_

ness

˙

_

l

       

l

       
     

˙

     
     

˙

˙

 

˙

 

˙

 

˙

 

l

4

? 4

˙

   

l

 

˙

l

 

˙

l

 

l

   

˙

˙

V9sus V9sus

& 4

©2011 Barry Liesch

ch10 Sus Chords—Ways to Incorporate

9

9 C 9 C sus G G sus C 5 œ l & œ œ
9
C
9
C
sus
G
G
sus
C
5
œ
l &
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
l
˙
l
œ
œ
œ
œ
l
!
_
œ
_œ _œ _
_œ œ
_
˙
œ _
˙
˙ ˙
_
˙
_
˙
_
˙
_
˙
l
l
l
l
!
l
And
all these things shall be
l
add-ed un -to you.
l
Al - le
lu,
Al-le -
l
lu
-
ia.
!
b œ
˙
œ
l
˙
œ
œ
œ œ l
˙
˙
˙
˙
˙
l
l
˙
!
?
˙
˙
˙
_
˙
I6/4
V9sus
I

Example 10.22 Assignment: Write the Cadential Sus9

Write the three-chord progression below (similar to the example above). Use a single note for the bass, and a three-note, four-note, and then a three-note chord in the right hand respectively. Your sus9 chord should have four closely spaced right hand notes.

 

G

G D

D

D

9

sus

G

E

b
b

B b B b

9

sus

E

b

A

E
E

E

9

sus

A

#

 

b b b

   

# # #

l &

l

˙

˙

l

l

w

˙
!

!

˙

 

l

l

w

!

˙

˙

l

l l

w

!

! !

   

l

? #

l

! b b b

l

! ! # # #

 

I6/4 V9sus

 

I

I6/4

V9sus

 

I

I6/4

V9sus

 

I

The following exercise is difficult, but the pay-off is great. Here, the sus9 resolves.

Example 10.23 Play it! Play through the Cycle (Up 4 th , Down 5 th ) by Memory

 

B

b 6 C
b
6
C

9

7

F

 

B b

 

E b

 

C

sus

C

                 

l &

4

   

œ

 

œ œ œ l b

b

œ œ

œ

 

œ

œ

œ

œ

l

   

b

 

l

œ b

b

   

b

œ

œ

 

!

             

œ

œ

 

œ

   

œ

     

œ œ

œ

 

œ œ œ

 
 

4

œ

œ

œ

 

œ œ

   

œ

   

œ

 

b

œ œ

 

œ

 

œ œ

 

œ

 

b

œ

 

œ

œ

l

l

 

œ

b œ

_

œ

   

œ

œ œ

   

œ

_

b

œ

 

œ

_

œ œ b

œ

œ œ

   

!

!

œ œ

   

l

l

 

b

 

.

l

b _

œ

œ œ

 

l

l

 

b

etc.

 

œ

_

l

 

b

 

œ

.

   

œ b œ .

   

_

œ

.

_

 
           

œ .

 

œ

.

       

b

 
                           

œ .