Sei sulla pagina 1di 2

SIMPLE, COMPOUND, AND COMPLEX SENTENCES

A. Simple sentence structure


A simple sentence is a sentence that has only one clause. Two types of sentence
structure errors are possible in sentence with only one clause:
1. The clause can be missing a subject or a verb
2. The clause can be introduced by a subordinate clause connector.

The following chart outlines what you should remember about editing simple
sentences:

SIMPLE SENTENCES
1. A simple sentence is a sentence with one clause.
2. A simple sentence must have both a subject and a verb.
3. A simple sentence may not be introduced by a subordinate clause connector.

B. Compound sentence structure


A compound sentence is a sentence that has more than one clause. The main clause
in a compound sentence can be connected correctly with either a coordinate
conjunction (and, but, so, or, yet) and a comma or with a semi-colon (;).

It is possible to use adverb transition in compound sentences. It is important to note


that adverb transitions are not conjunction, so either a semi-colon or a coordinate
conjunction with a comma is needed.

The following chart lists some commonly used adverb transitions:


ADVERB TRANSITIONS
TIME CAUSE CONTRAST CONDITION
Afterwards As a result However otherwise
Next Consequently In contrast
Then therefore
finally

C. Complex Sentence Structure


A complex sentence is a sentence that has at least one main clause and one
subordinate clause. Noun, adjective, and adverb clauses are all types of
subordinate clause.

A variety of errors with complex sentence structures can occur in student writing, but
the following two errors are occur with great frequency:
1. Repeated subjects after adjective clauses.
2. Repeated subjects after noun clauses as subjects.

The following chart outlines what you should remember about editing complex
sentences:

COMPLEX SENTENCES
1. When a subject comes before an adjective clause, do not add an extra
subject after the adjective clause.
2. When a noun clause is used as a subject, do not add an extra subject after
the noun clause.
Identify these sentences by choosing (a) Simple, (b) Compound or (c) Complex
1. The training rooms of these college athletes smell of grease and gasoline.

A) simple
B) compound
C) complex

2. Their practice field is a stretch of asphalt, and their heroes make a living driving cars.

A) simple
B) compound
C) complex

3. Their tools are screwdrivers and spanners rather than basketballs and footballs.

A) simple
B) compound
C) complex

4. Although their usual speed ranges from 50 to 90 miles an hour, Legends cars can move
up to 100 miles an hour on a straightaway.

A) simple
B) compound
C) complex

5. Most of the students are engineering majors, and they devote every minute of their spare
time to their sport.

A) simple
B) compound
C) complex

Error sentences
6. when he ran the race hard.
A B C

7. He ran, indeed, he fell.


A B C

8. How the chef of the party cook the beautiful big Italian cake.
A B C

9. Air travel is fast, safe, and it is convenient.


A B C

10. The man whom I met last week he is so handsome.


A B C

1. A 4. C 7. A 10. C
2. B 5. B 8. A
3. A 6. A 9. C