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SYLLABUS for MAT091 Basic Math Skills

Fall 2005

Professor: Mr. David Olivani

OFFICE: TBD - Math/Science Suite PHONE: 343-0055 ext. 7624


[If I am not in, please leave message and include phone number.]

OFFICE HOURS: By Appointment

EMAIL ADDRESS: dmolivani@genesee.edu

TEXTBOOK (Required): Basic College Mathematics, 8th edition, Aufmann/Barker/Lockwood

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:
Review of basic arithmetic skills and vocabulary, which are required for the study of
algebra and for numerical computations in science, business, nursing, computer
information systems, and other courses. Topics include operations with whole
numbers, fractions, decimals, and signed numbers; ratios, rates, and proportions;
percent; scientific notation; evaluating and simplifying variable expressions; and
solving linear equations. Includes U.S. and metric measurement conversions and
basic geometry topics as time permits. Prerequisite: By placement.

MAJOR GOALS OF THE COURSE:


1. Develop basic math skills used in other courses in math, science, computer
information systems, business, economics, and other fields.
2. Develop math skills that help the student function effectively in daily life.
3. Become familiar with standard math vocabulary, approaches, and applications,
and strengthen communication skills in math.
4. Expand the student's problem solving and critical thinking skills.
5. Increase the student's confidence and comfort level in using mathematics.

OBJECTIVES - DESIRED STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:


The student will be able to demonstrate each of the following skills in writing on one
or more tests without referring to notes, textbook, or other resources:

1. Use Order of Operations Agreement to correctly evaluate numerical expressions


involving integers and/or fractions and any combination of addition,
subtraction, multiplication, division, whole number exponents, and parentheses.
2. Write the prime factorization of a given natural number greater than 1 and less
than 1000.
3. Correctly evaluate expressions involving addition, subtraction, multiplication,
and division of pairs of numbers from the following categories, and express the
answers in simplest form: a) integers, b) decimal numbers, c) fractions with
unlike denominators and mixed numbers (in combination with each other and
with whole numbers).

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4. Use the symbols < , > , and = to correctly identify the size relation between
pairs of integers, pairs of fractions with unlike denominators, pairs of decimals,
and a fraction compared with a decimal.
5. Correctly round a given whole number or decimal number to a given place value.
6. a) Using words, correctly write the name of a given whole number, less than
one quadrillion, shown written in standard decimal form.
b) Using words, correctly write the name of a given positive number, less than
one, shown written in standard decimal form.
c) Correctly write a whole number, less than one quadrillion, in standard
decimal form when given its name written in words.
d) Correctly write a positive number, less than one, in standard decimal form
when given its name written in words.
7. a) When given two quantities (measured with either the same or different
units), correctly express their relationship using a ratio or rate written in
simplest fraction form.
b) Correctly write a unit rate involving two given quantities.
8. Correctly set up and solve a proportion when given a verbal description of a
proportional situation in which one quantity is unknown.
9. Correctly convert a given number from one of the following forms to each of the
other two forms: a) percent, b) fraction/mixed number, c) decimal.
10. Find the missing percent, base, or amount when given the other two using
either the percent equation percent base = amount
amount percent
or the percent proportion .
base 100
11. Correctly evaluate expressions involving only rational numbers, absolute value
symbols, and negative signs.
12. a) Correctly convert given numbers greater than 10 from scientific notation to
standard decimal form.
b) Correctly convert given numbers less than 0.1 from scientific notation to
standard decimal form.
c) Correctly convert given numbers greater than 10 from standard decimal form
to scientific notation.
d) Correctly convert given numbers less than 0.1 from standard decimal form
to scientific notation.
13. Correctly use the Distributive Property, Commutative and Associative
Properties of Addition and Multiplication, and combining like terms to simplify
a variable expression.
14. Correctly solve linear equations in one variable that may include variable
and/or constant terms on both sides of the equation and may include
expressions in parentheses.
15. Write a variable expression or equation that correctly represents an expression
described verbally in writing.
16. a) Convert measurements of length/distance, weight, and capacity to
equivalent measurements with different sized units within the U.S. Customary
System.
b) Convert measurements of length/distance, mass, and capacity to equivalent
measurements with different sized units within the Metric System (S.I.).

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ATTENDANCE:
Class attendance is required. Do not schedule appointments that conflict
with class or require you to leave early.

Consider college to be your full-time employment. Just as any full-time job, you
must report for work every time you are scheduled. If a serious illness or
emergency makes it necessary to be absent, contact the professor the day of the
absence (as you would call your boss if you missed work). When you return to
class, arrange with another student to copy class notes; and ask the professor for
missed assignments, announcements or handouts. A student who is late for class
should ask for handouts, announcements and the attendance sheet after class.
Frequent lateness is not acceptable and results in point deduction.

You have 5 "sick days/personal days" for the semester. Additional absences will
result in points being deducted from your participation grade, just as missing too
many days of work results in dollars being deducted from your paycheck.

EXTRA HELP AVAILABLE:


1. Drop in for tutoring in the Math Learning Center in D360. (It is FREE!)
2. Use the HM3 computer software that came with your textbook.
3. Videos that cover course content are available in the Math Learning Center.
4. Form a study group of fellow students and help each other. As you explain
math definitions, concepts, and procedures to each other, you all learn more
and benefit! You are welcome to meet together in the Math Learning Center.

INTEGRITY:
Each student must show his or her own work on all assignments and tests.
Copying someone else's work, or allowing your work to be copied, is not acceptable.
If there is evidence of cheating or inappropriate sharing of information, each
student involved will be severely penalized, in most cases receiving a zero.

HOMEWORK:
Homework exercises are very important because learning is most effective when the
student has frequent and repeated practice in applying skills. Each assignment will
be due at the beginning of the next class. Assignments should be neat, legible (easy
to read), and well organized, with page numbers, section numbers, and problem
numbers clearly labeled, and all work shown.

Keep in mind that according to college standards, students are


expected to spend an average of at least 2 hours of preparation
outside of class (reading, studying, and homework assignments) for
each hour of classroom instruction.

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TESTING:
There will be four or five unit tests, a vocabulary test, and a comprehensive final
exam. Expect quizzes that may not be announced ahead of time.

If an emergency arises the day of a test you must contact the professor that day to
let him know why you will not be there and to arrange another time to take the test.
If you do not contact the professor or leave a message, you will not be allowed to
reschedule the test and your score will be zero. Re-tests are not available.

The final exam will be held (tentatively) during final exam week - December 20, 21,
or 22. DO NOT make plans to leave or begin summer employment before 6 p.m. on
December 22, 2004. Tell your family members that you must not have airline,
train, or bus reservations that leave before then. The actual date and time will be
announced in class a few weeks before the final exam.

CALCULATORS:
The use of a calculator is not permitted on any tests or quizzes unless the student
has given the professor a valid accommodation form issued by the Student Support
Services program in the CAP.

GRADING:
The student's final course grade will be determined by averaging together the tests
mentioned above with a participation grade reflecting quiz scores, attendance and
homework completion. The letter grade will be assigned as shown below. Note that
the lowest passing average is 70%.

Test Average Grade Note: IP status will be granted only under


90% - 100% A extraordinary circumstances.
80% - 89.99% B
70% - 79.99% C
0% - 69.99% F

Exceptions:
1. One low unit test score may be replaced with the final exam score.
2. A student's final grade may be based on the average of just the final exam
and the vocabulary test as long as he/she has had excellent attendance and
homework completion.

MATERIALS NEEDED FOR THIS COURSE:


Textbook
3-ring binder (11/2 works best)
Loose-leaf paper for homework and class notes
Pencils and good erasers
Colored pencils or multi-colored pens (for taking color-coded notes, if desired)
Index cards (for helping to learn vocabulary and procedures)

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EXPECTATIONS FOR ALL STUDENTS (including those with accommodations
for physical or learning disabilities or other learning challenges ):

In this course, knowing the process by which we arrive at an answer is often


more important than getting the answer itself. Every student is expected to
demonstrate mastery of the algorithms (step-by-step procedures) for each of the
skills covered in class. On homework, tests, and quizzes students will be
required to show all the steps that document how they arrived at an answer.
Correct answers without any documentation will earn few (if any) points.

Here are a few examples of how this applies to students who are allowed by law
to use calculators because of physical or learning disabilities:
1. When asked to add 2 fractions with different denominators the student must
show how to find the least common multiple of the two denominators to be
used as a common denominator, then show how the original fractions can be
transformed into equivalent fractions that use this common denominator.
They will then show that only the numerators are added, while the common
denominator is copied into the sum. Finally, they need to document how the
answer is simplified to "lowest terms" by dividing each part of the fraction by
their greatest common factor. The calculator may be used as a tool for doing
the operations with whole numbers involved in the process, but the steps that
are written on the paper will look very much like the work of students who do
the problem correctly without the aid of a calculator. A correct answer that
results from using a calculator in "fraction mode" (where fractions are entered
in fraction form and the calculator automatically presents the answer in
simplest fraction form) will earn no credit. It is knowledge of the procedure
that is being tested, because this same procedure is used later in more
complex situations in which most calculators would be inadequate.
2. When asked to add decimal numbers, the student will be required to write the
numbers under each other with the decimal points aligned, and show the
decimal point of the sum also aligns with the decimal points of the addends.
3. In general, for any calculations done on a calculator, show what was entered
into the calculator. For example, when dividing 2511 by 9 and then adding
568, the student should write "2511 + 9 = 279" and "279 + 568 = 847", rather
than just writing the result 847. This is especially important in questions
involving more than one-step or calculation to reach the final answer.

CLASS CANCELLATION PROCEDURES:


If the professor is unable to hold class, a notice will be posted on the classroom
door. Be sure to read and follow the instructions (assignments, etc) on the
notice. If all classes at GCC need to be cancelled due to inclement weather or an
emergency, the information will be announced on the following radio and TV
stations:

WBTA- AM (1490) Batavia WBEN AM (930) Buffalo


WHAM AM (1180) Rochester WGCC PM (90.7) Batavia
Buffalo TV stations: WGRZ, WIVB, and WKBW
Rochester TV stations: WROC, WHEC, and WOKR (channels 8, 10, and 13)

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MAT091 BASIC MATH - COURSE OUTLINE

Chapter 1: Whole Numbers

Test #1 on Chapter 1 (M 9/13, R 9/9) [Note: "R" = Thursday on college forms]

Chapter 2: Fractions

Test #2 on Chapter 2 (M 9/27, R 9/23)

Chapter 3: Decimals

Chapter 4: Ratio and Proportion

Chapter 5: Percents

Test #3 on Chapters 3, 4, and 5 (M 11/1, R 10/28)

Chapter 10: Signed Numbers

Chapter 11: Introduction to Algebra

Exponential Expressions (class handouts)

Test #4 on Chapters 10 and 11 (M 11/29, T 12/2)

Chapter 8: U.S. Measurements (plus supplementary handouts on measurement)

Chapter 9: Metric Measurements

Chapter 12: Geometry

Test #5 on Chapters 8, 9, and 12 (W 12/15, R 12/16), [if time permits]

Test on Vocabulary from entire course (M 12/20, F 12/17, or by appointment)

Comprehensive Final Exam December 21, 22, or 23 (*details announced later)

PLEASE NOTE: All dates listed are approximate, tentative and subject to change.
Actual test dates will be announced in class.

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DETAILED OBJECTIVES FOR BASIC MATH (MATO91)

Upon completing each unit, the student should be able to demonstrate knowledge
of all of the mathematical vocabulary used in the unit. For each word or phrase on
the vocabulary list, the student should be able to:
a. Write a correct definition of the word or phrase
b. Recognize the definition of a word or phrase, and identify the concept being
defined
c. Identify an example which illustrates the meaning of the word or phrase
d. Make up an example to illustrate the meaning of the word or phrase

In addition, students should be able to demonstrate mastery of skills covered in


these units:

Chapter 1: WHOLE NUMBERS


1. Identify the order relation between two numbers
2. Write whole numbers in words and in standard form
3. Round a whole number to a given place value
4. Add whole numbers with/without carrying
5. Subtract whole numbers with/without borrowing
6. Multiply whole numbers
7. Divide whole numbers with/without a remainder
8. Simplify expressions containing whole number exponents
9. Use the Order of Operations Agreement to evaluate numerical expressions
containing only whole numbers
10. Find all the whole number factors of a number
11. Write the prime factorization of a number
12. Solve application problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication,
and division of whole numbers

Chapter 2: FRACTIONS
1. Find the least common multiple (LCM) of two or more numbers
2. Find the greatest common factor (GCF) of two or more numbers
3. Write a fraction that represents part of a whole (as illustrated in a diagram)
4. Rewrite an improper fraction as a mixed number or a whole number
5. Rewrite a mixed number or whole number as an improper fraction
6. Write an equivalent fraction with a given denominator
7. Reduce a fraction to simplest form
8. Add fractions with like or unlike denominators
9. Add any combination of mixed numbers, whole numbers and fractions
10. Subtract fractions with like or unlike denominators
11. Subtract any combination of mixed numbers, whole numbers and fractions
12. Multiply fractions
13. Multiply any combination of mixed numbers, whole numbers and fractions
14. Divide fractions
15. Divide any combination of mixed numbers, whole numbers and fractions
16. Identify the order relation between two fractions
17. Simplify expressions containing fractions raised to powers (exponents)
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18. Use the Order of Operations Agreement to evaluate numerical expressions
containing fractions
19. Solve application problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and
division of fractions and mixed numbers

Chapter 3: DECIMALS
1. Write decimals in standard form and in words
2. Round a decimal to a given place value
3. Add decimals
4. Subtract decimals
5. Multiply decimals
6. Divide decimals
7. Rewrite fractions as decimals
8. Rewrite decimals as fractions
9. Identify the order relation between two decimals
10. Identify the order relation between a fraction and a decimal
11. Solve application problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and
division of decimals

Chapter 4: RATIO, RATE, AND PROPORTION


1. Write the ratio of two quantities in simplest form
2. Write rates
3. Recognize and describe similarities and differences between ratios and rates
4. Write unit rates
5. Solve application problems involving unit rates
6. Determine if a proportion is true
7. Solve a proportion
8. Solve application problems involving proportions

Chapter 5: PERCENTS
1. Rewrite a percent as a fraction
2. Rewrite a percent as a decimal
3. Rewrite a decimal as a percent
4. Rewrite a fraction as a percent
5. Use the equation percent x base = amount to solve for percent, base, or
amount when the other two quantities are known
amount percent
6. Solve percent problems using the proportion
base 100
7. Solve application problems involving percents

Chapters 8-9: MEASUREMENTS (supplemental material supplied by instructor)


1. Convert measurements of length, distance, weight, capacity, area, volume,
pressure, speed, and time to different size units in U.S. Customary System
2. Convert measurements of length, distance, mass, and capacity to different
size units within the Metric System
3. Perform arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and
division) with measurements within the U.S. Customary System or within the
Metric System

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Chapter 10: RATIONAL NUMBERS
1. Identify the order relation between two signed rational numbers
2. Evaluate expressions containing absolute value notation
3. Add any combination of positive and/or negative rational numbers
4. Subtract any combination of positive and/or negative-rational numbers
5. Multiply any combination of positive and/or negative rational numbers
6. Divide any combination of positive and/or negative rational numbers
7. Convert a number from standard decimal form to scientific notation
8. Convert a number from scientific notation to standard decimal form
9. Use the Order of Operations Agreement to evaluate numerical expressions
containing negative as well as positive numbers

Chapter 11: INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA


1. Evaluate variable expressions
2. Simplify variable expressions containing no parentheses
3. Simplify variable expressions containing parentheses, using the Distributive
Law of Multiplication over Addition
4. Determine whether a given value is a solution of an equation
5. Solve an equation of the form x + a = b
6. Solve an equation of the form ax = b
7. Solve an equation of the form ax + b = cx + d
8. Solve a linear equation (in one variable) containing parentheses
9. Translate a verbal expression into a mathematical expression
10. Translate a complete sentence into an equation and solve it

EXPONENTIAL EXPRESSIONS (Class notes)


1. Rewrite an expression containing negative exponents so that it contains only
positive exponents
2. Multiply two expressions having the same base: y m y n
3. Multiply two monomials
4. Divide two expressions having the same base: x m x n
5. Divide two monomials
6. Raise a power to a power
7. Raise a product to a power
8. Raise a quotient (fraction) to a power

Chapter 12: GEOMETRY


1. Define and describe the characteristics of lines, angles, and geometric figures
using standard mathematical vocabulary
2. Find the perimeter of geometric figures
3. Find the area of geometric figures
4. Find the volume of geometric solids
5. Use proportions to find the lengths of missing sides when given similar
triangles
6. Solve application problems involving geometric figures