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Gillette 1

American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 1

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level

The American Revolution World Civilizations

10

th Grade

Utah State Core Standard and Objective

Standard 4 Students will understand the influence of revolution and social change in the transition from early modern to contemporary societies. Objective 2 Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

Understanding(s) for the day

People often become set in their way of thinking and may be unable to accept change.

A government’s actions impact its citizens.

Essential Question(s) for the day

What is a revolutionary idea and why might people be afraid of it?

How do you anticipate activities, materials, etc. connect to students’ prior knowledge? (Academic, interests, learning styles, motivation, Funds of Knowledge)

Students will be interested in the quotes from V for Vendetta, as well as the movie clip from Jimmy’s Hall. We will connect revolutions from the past with modern day political movements, which will interest them because it affects their life.

Daily Assessments (formative and/or summative)

Daily evaluation (formative) Presenting on a revolution (formative)

Learning Activities:

1. Starter: What is a revolutionary idea? Why might people be afraid of it? — 10 minutes

(Include description and time frame for each activity)

2. Watch clip from Jimmy’s Hall3 minutes

3. Read speech from V for Vendetta and discuss the ideas presented by V—5 minutes

4. Have students in small groups do a Think/Pair/Share to answer the questions about revolutions: How would you define the word revolution? How would you distinguish a revolution from an uprising, a coup d’état, a rebellion or revolt, or a protest or demonstration?

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Can the word revolution be used to mean different things? What examples from history illustrate your ideas? — 20 minutes

5. Review “Historical Revolutions” PowerPoint—15 minutes

6. What types of things have emerged from a revolution? Notes—10 minutes

7. Break students into group by table. Assign them one of the 12 uprisings we looked at in the PowerPoint and have them fill out the worksheet, answering the question about the uprising—30 minutes

8. As a group, present on what you found while researching your historical revolution—20 minutes

9. What did you find most surprising about what you researched? What did you find that was the most interesting? Exit ticket & daily evaluation—5 minutes

Accommodations made for struggling and accelerated learners (grouping patterns, content literacy strategies, etc.)

For my blind student, there will be a lot of audio accompanying the visuals, as well as explanations. In the Think/Pair/Share, her partner can write down the information, as well as she can work in partners to discover more information about the revolution. For the final daily evaluation, I will verbally ask these questions.

Resources

V for Vendetta "Good Evening London"

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American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 1 [Revised]

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level The American Revolution World Civilizations 10 th Grade Utah
Course, Unit Theme, and
Grade Level
The American Revolution
World Civilizations
10
th Grade
Utah State Core Standard and
Objective
Standard 4
Students will understand the influence of revolution and
social change in the transition from early modern to
contemporary societies.
Objective 2
Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of
governmental systems.
Understanding(s) for the day
People often become set in their way of thinking
and may be unable to accept change.
A government’s actions impact its citizens.
Individuals and groups have struggled to attain
equality.
Essential Question(s) for the
day
What is a revolutionary idea and why might people be
afraid of it?
How do you anticipate
activities, materials, etc.
connect to students’ prior
knowledge? (Academic,
interests, learning styles,
motivation, Funds of
Knowledge)
Students will be interested in the quotes from V for
Vendetta, as well as the movie clip from Jimmy’s Hall.
Students love the integration of media into lessons, so this
will grab their attention.
We will connect events from the past with modern day,
allowing students to make connections that are relevant to
them.
I will incorporate YouTube clips into the lesson to gain my
student’s attention.
Multiple different learning styles will be incorporated into
the lesson: audio, visual, and textual examples will be
provided.
Daily Assessments
(formative and/or summative)
Daily evaluation (formative)
Presenting on a revolution (formative)
Learning Activities:
1.
Starter: What is a revolutionary idea? Why might
(Include description and time
frame for each activity)
people be afraid of it?—5 minutes 1

1 Cues/Questions/Activating Prior Knowledge

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2. Watch clip from Jimmy’s Hall . Provide a transcript of the speech to students

2. Watch clip from Jimmy’s Hall. Provide a transcript of the speech to students have them follow along.—

2 5 minutes
2
5 minutes

3. Read speech from V for Vendetta and discuss the

ideas presented by V.

ideas presented by V. Provide a transcript of V’s

Provide a transcript of V’s

ideas presented by V. Provide a transcript of V’s
ideas presented by V. Provide a transcript of V’s
ideas presented by V. Provide a transcript of V’s

speech to students and have them follow along.—5

minutes 3

4. Have students in small groups do a Think/Pair/Share to answer the questions about revolutions: How would you define the word revolution? How would you distinguish a revolution from an uprising, a coup d’état, a rebellion or revolt, or a protest or demonstration? Et cetera—20 minutes 4 5 6 7

5. Review Introduction to Revolutions PowerPoint 8 15 minutes

6. What types of things have emerged from a revolution? Notes 9 10 minutes

7. Break students into group by table. Assign them one of the 12 uprisings we looked at in the PowerPoint and have them fill out the worksheet, answering the

question about the uprising—30 minutes. May not

   

have time for this. If running out of time, go over the

historical revolutions audibly and talk about them

 

as a group.

 

8. As a group, present on what you found while researching your historical revolution—20 minutes.

If out of time, skip this and incorporate the above. 10

9. Daily Evaluation & Exit Ticket: What did you find most surprising about what you researched? What did you find that was the most interesting—5 minutes 11 12

10. Assignments Due:

2 Adapting Learning Styles/Multiple Intelligences

3 Reading Aloud

4 Formative Assessment Process

5 Flexible/Strategic Grouping

6 Identifying Similarities and Differences

7 Cooperative Learning

8 Lecture

9 Summarizing and Note-Taking

10 Formative Assessment Process

11 Student Self-Assessment

12 Formative Assessment Process

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a. Starter b. Think/Pair/Share c. What Types of Things Have Emerged from a Revolution? Notes
a.
Starter
b.
Think/Pair/Share
c.
What Types of Things Have Emerged from
a Revolution? Notes
d.
Uprising worksheet (could be eliminated)
e.
Exit ticket
Accommodations made for
struggling and accelerated
learners (grouping patterns,
content literacy strategies,
etc.)
For my blind student, there will be a lot of audio
accompanying the visuals, as well as explanations. In the
Think/Pair/Share, her partner can write down the
information for the both of them.
Instead of taking notes textually, my blind student will
draw an “emoji conversation” drawing pictures to
symbolize the events being discussed. My blind student is
comfortable drawing, so I will provide her with a large
piece of white paper and black marker.
If there is time for the uprising worksheet, my blind student
will instead take notes on her specialized laptop instead of
paper.
For my English language learners, I have provided a
“Cloze” note style that will help them take notes and retain
information. This will also benefit my struggling students.
For my accelerated students, they are allowed to research
the famous revolutions discussed on a deeper level and
provide more analysis.
Resources
V for Vendetta "Good Evening London"
"Jimmy Hall's" Speech

Revisions

I have highlighted my revisions to my original lesson plan in yellow; I have done this to

make locating revisions easier. I provided a printed handout for students to follow along during the V for Vendetta and Jimmy’s Hall video clips. I read V for Vendetta aloud to the students, but the length of the speech provided too long without something to follow along or video clip to

watch. I also provided more specific accommodations for my students, not just vague accommodations for only one student.

I changed the time for some activities; for example, the discussion of “What is a

revolution?” took much less time than the ten minutes I had originally set aside for it. I also sharpened the focus of my lesson by adding another essential question: Individuals and groups have struggled to attain equality. I also structured to different learning styles.

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American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 2

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level

The American Revolution World Civilizations

 

10

th Grade

Utah State Core Standard and Objective

Standard 4 Students will understand the influence of revolution and social change in the transition from early modern to contemporary societies. Objective 2 Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

Understanding(s) for the day

A government’s actions impact its

citizens.

Ideals and principles are how people justify their actions.

New ideas can be challenging and lead to conflict.

Individuals and groups have struggled to attain equality.

Essential Question(s) for the day

When should someone question authority? Were the reasons for the American Revolution justified?

How do you anticipate activities, materials, etc. connect to students’ prior knowledge? (Academic, interests, learning styles, motivation, Funds of Knowledge)

Students will be interested in the starter because it includes music.

Students will be excited to play Mission: U.S. History because it is an online game about the American Revolution.

 

The “Fact or Fiction” activity will allow students a kinesthetic opportunity to move.

Daily Assessments (formative and/or summative)

Think/Pair/Share (formative)

Learning Activities:

1. Starter: Students will read and analyze “Revolutionary Tea” and answer the following questions: —10 minutes

(Include description and time frame for each activity)

a. What is this poem about?

b. What real-life event is this poem

alluding to?

 

2. Students will fill out the American Revolution Anticipation Guide—10 minutes

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3. Think/Pair/Share: What are the 3 of the most important rights or responsibilities you have as Americans? How might this be difficult if it included people from other national backgrounds?

4. Students will play Mission: U.S. History. This game allows student to simulate being a colonist and experiencing the upcoming revolution –20 minutes

5. Fact or Fiction? Activity: A volunteer will walk into the hall and wait until the teacher signals them for to come inside. They will then come inside and do 2 different activities. Students will be instructed to write down as much information about what the other student did—acting a visual witness. Then compare the different answers given by students and discuss the unreliability of eye witness accounts—10 minutes

6. “Boston Massacre” YouTube Video5 minutes

7. “Before the Revolution” PowerPoint presentation and notes—15 minutes

8. Primary Source Analysis: Split the class into 2 groups: British and colonists. Have the British read their primary source and the Americans read their primary source and have a quick class debate about how the two differ—15 minutes

9. Read the textbook explanation of the Boston Massacre and discuss how they differ—10 minutes

Accommodations made for struggling and accelerated learners (grouping patterns, content literacy strategies, etc.)

Struggling learners will have “Cloze” style notes to follow along; this will also benefit my English Language Learners.

Resources

Mission: U.S. Before the Revolution

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American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 2 [Revised]

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level

The American Revolution World Civilizations

10

th Grade

Utah State Core Standard and Objective

Standard 4 Students will understand the influence of revolution and social change in the transition from early modern to contemporary societies. Objective 2 Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

Understanding(s) for the day

A government’s actions impact its citizens.

Ideals and principles are how people justify their actions.

New ideas can be challenging and lead to conflict.

Due to unreliable eyewitness testimony during the Boston Massacre, it will never be known who fired the first shot.

Essential Question(s) for the day

When should someone question authority?

How do you anticipate activities, materials, etc. connect to students’ prior knowledge? (Academic, interests, learning styles, motivation, Funds of Knowledge)

Students will be interested in the starter because it includes music.

The Think/Pair/Share will call upon my student’s funds of knowledge to think about what they already know about America’s Bill of Rights.

 

The Eyewitness Testimony Activity will allow some students a kinesthetic opportunity and will engage the students because it is an unusual activity.

There will be an activity, a YouTube clip shared, and a PowerPoint presentation for different types of learners.

Daily Assessments (formative and/or summative)

Exit Ticket (formative)

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Learning Activities: 1. (Include description and time frame for each activity) Starter: Students will read
Learning Activities:
1.
(Include description and time frame for
each activity)
Starter: Students will read and analyze
“Revolutionary Tea” and answer the
following questions: —5 minutes
a. What is this poem about?
b. What real-life event is this poem
alluding to? 13
Students will fill out the American
Revolution Anticipation Guide—10
minutes
2.
Discussion:
What are the 3 of the most
important rights or responsibilities you
have as Americans? How might this
be difficult if it included people from
other national backgrounds?—10
minutes 14
3.
Eyewitness Testimony Activity: Three
students (chosen anonymously) will
be selected to go into the hall while
the rest of the class has their head
down. I will come in and tell the class
which 3 students I have chosen. The
class will then fill out a worksheet
about their attempts to describe their
15 16
peers.—15 minutes
a. Who is in the hall?
b. What color is their hair? How
is it styled?
c. What color are their eyes?
d. What top are they wearing
today? Any jackets?
e. What type of pants are they
wearing?
f. What do their shoes look like?
g. Do they have any jewelry?
Any distinguishing marks?
h. How tall are they?
i. How old do you think they
are?

13 Music and Song

14 Debate

15 Role Play/Simulations

16 Student Self-Assessment

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j. What are some things you got wrong once the students walked back into the
j. What are some things you got
wrong once the students
walked back into the room?
k. How many errors did you
make describing them?
l. How reliable do you think you
were describing them?
4.
“Boston Massacre” YouTube Video—
5 minutes
5.
“Before the Revolution” PowerPoint
presentation and notes—15 minutes 17
6.
Exit ticket: Explain the reliability of
eyewitness testimony and discuss how
you came to this conclusion.—10
18
minutes
7.
Assignments Due
a.
“Revolutionary Tea” Starter
b.
Eyewitness Testimony
Activity Worksheet
c.
Exit ticket
Accommodations made for struggling and
accelerated learners (grouping patterns,
content literacy strategies, etc.)
Struggling learners will have “Cloze” style
notes to follow along; this will also benefit
my English Language Learners.
For my blind student, I will select her to be
one of the students being described during the
activity. Instead of forcing my blind students
to take notes in the same way, I will engage
her in the discussion and have her contribute
to the lecture.
My accelerated students will be expected to
draw deeper conclusions from the discussion
and will analyze the activity further.
For my shy students, I will instruct students to
raise their thumbs only if they want to
participate in the activity. I will also ask my
blind student prior to class if she is
comfortable participating.
Resources
Before the Revolution PowerPoint

17 Summarizing and Note-Taking

18 Formative Assessment Practices

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Revisions

I have highlighted my revisions to my lesson plan in yellow. I added a worksheet to the

Eyewitness Testimony Activity, as well as sharpened the instructions of the assignment to make it more clear to students. I changed the Think/Pair/Share to a discussion to add variety to my lesson plans; I had forgotten I had done a Think/Pair/Share the day before.

I removed many activities—my lesson was over-packed, especially for a Monday class

(shortened period). It was way too many activities for a tenth grade class and would have overwhelmed them. My lesson plan lacked any sort of assessment, so I added an exit ticket at the end of the class. I also wanted to make sure to add more specific accommodations I made for my different types of students. I also wanted to allow shy or embarrassed students a silent opportunity to opt out of the activity.

Finally, I added an “assignments due” section to my lesson plan to keep it standard with prior lessons.

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The American Revolution Anticipation Guide

1. The British lost the Revolutionary War.

T

F

2. Many of the early colonists were loyal to England.

T

F

3. It is unfair to tax people who cannot vote on how the taxes are to be spent.

T

F

4. The American Revolutionary war started in 1775.

T

F

5. The American Colonies were fighting for their independence.

T

F

6. There were 13 original Colonies in America.

T

F

7. George III was the King in Britain.

T

F

8. The Boston Massacre was the first battle of the war.

T

F

9. The Declaration of Independence was signed on August 2, 1776.

T

F

10. Wars need to be fought to fix things that are wrong.

T

F

11. Soldiers are scared to fight their enemies for the first time.

T

F

12. Soldiers are often compassionate and understanding of their enemy’s

T

F

cause.

13. Soldiers experience personal growth because of war.

T

F

14. Death is one of the consequences of fighting a war, and should not be

T

F

feared.

15. Women were soldiers in the Revolutionary War.

T

F

16. The Revolutionary War fought between the North and the South.

T

F

17. Slaves were forced to fight in the revolutionary war.

T

F

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American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 3

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level

The American Revolution World Civilizations

10

th Grade

Utah State Core Standard and Objective

Objective 2

Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

 

A.

Explain the political, economic, and social

philosophies that lead to revolution.

 

B.

Compare and contrast major world revolutions; e.g., American, French, Russian, Chinese.

Understanding(s) for the day

Discontent with English rule led colonists to rebel.

Essential Question(s) for the day

Was the Boston Tea Party an act of terrorism?

How do you anticipate activities, materials, etc. connect to students’ prior knowledge? (Academic, interests, learning styles, motivation, Funds of Knowledge)

This lesson plan uses extensive media examples to engage students.

The lecture will be interactive, keeping students engaged.

 

Clips from “Hamilton!” (a wildly successful Broadway play) will be played.

Funny pictures throughout the PowerPoint will break up the monotony.

There will be a variety of popular parodied songs.

Students will find the web activity new and interesting—a change of pace from the usual routine.

Asking students to form their own opinions using their Funds of Knowledge gets them interested.

Daily Assessments (formative and/or summative)

Starter (formative) Exit Ticket (formative)

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Learning Activities:

1. Starter: How reliable is eyewitness testimony? How does eyewitness

testimony relate to the Boston Massacre? —10 minutes

(Include description and time frame for each activity)

2. Intolerable Acts PowerPoint and accompanying notes. Cloze style notes accompanying the PowerPoint are found below—30 minutes

3. Fun With History Web Activity—15 minutes

4. “Was the Boston Tea Party an Act of Terrorism?” Article—10 minutes

5. Exit ticket: Was the Boston Tea Party an Act of Terrorism? Why or why not?—5 minutes

Accommodations made for struggling and accelerated learners (grouping patterns, content literacy strategies, etc.)

For my blind student, I will have her listen to the “Revolution!” PowerPoint while students are doing the web activity.

For struggling students, Cloze reading notes will be used to maximize understanding and literacy.

For my accelerated students, they will be given the chance to further research and debate if the Boston Tea Party was an act of terrorism.

Resources

Lesson Plan PowerPoint Boston Tea Party Rap Too Late to Apologize The Boston Tea Party Podcast Boston Tea Party Twitter Fun with History Activity Was the Boston Tea Party an act of terrorism?

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American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 3 [Revised]

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level The American Revolution World Civilizations 10 th Grade Utah
Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level
The American Revolution
World Civilizations
10
th Grade
Utah State Core Standard and Objective
Objective 2
Investigate the role of revolution in the
establishment of governmental systems.
A.
Explain the political, economic, and social
philosophies that lead to revolution.
B.
Compare and contrast major world
revolutions; e.g., American, French, Russian,
Chinese.
Understanding(s) for the day
Discontent with English rule led colonists to
rebel.
A terrorist act and civil disobedience can be
two different things.
Essential Question(s) for the day
What makes something a terrorist act?
How do events from the past effect and mirror
modern day?
How do you anticipate activities, materials,
etc. connect to students’ prior knowledge?
(Academic, interests, learning styles,
motivation, Funds of Knowledge)
This lesson plan uses extensive media
examples to engage students.
The lecture will be interactive, keeping
students engaged.
Clips from “Hamilton!” (a wildly successful
Broadway play) will be played.
Funny pictures throughout the PowerPoint
will break up the monotony.
There will be a variety of popular parodied
songs to
hook student’s interests and motivate
them to listen.
Students will be interested in learning the
theories of the Boston Massacre after the
previous day’s activity.
Daily Assessments
Starter (formative)

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(formative and/or summative) 300-word response (summative) Was the Boston Tea Party an Act of Terrorism?
(formative and/or summative)
300-word response (summative)
Was the Boston Tea Party an Act of
Terrorism? Response (formative)
Learning Activities:
1.
(Include description and time frame for
each activity)
Starter: What makes something a terrorist
act?—5 minutes 19
2.
Intolerable Acts PowerPoint and
accompanying notes—30 minutes 20
3.
“Was the Boston Tea Party an Act of
Terrorism?” Article—10 minutes 21
4.
Compare and contrast the Boston Tea
Party to other homegrown terrorist events
we have discussed in class in a 300-word
response (Timothy McVeigh, the
Unabomber, etc.)—20 minutes 22
a.
How does this relate to modern
day?
5.
Assignments Due
a.
Starter
b.
Intolerable Acts PowerPoint &
Notes
c.
300 word written response
Accommodations made for struggling and
accelerated learners (grouping patterns,
content literacy strategies, etc.)
For my blind student, I will have her draw
different visual representations of the notes on
a white board. She will be expected to draw a
picture related to each piece of important
information in the PowerPoint
.
For struggling students, Cloze reading notes
will be used to maximize understanding and
literacy.
For my accelerated students, they will be
given the chance to further research and
debate if the Boston Tea Party was an act of
terrorism.
Resources
Lesson Plan PowerPoint
Boston Tea Party Rap
Too Late to Apologize
The Boston Tea Party Podcast
Boston Tea Party Twitter

19 Cues, Questions and Activating Prior Knowledge

20 Summarizing and Note-Taking

21 Close Reading

22 Integration of Content Areas

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Was the Boston Tea Party an act of terrorism?

Was the Boston Tea Party an act of terrorism?

Revisions

I highlighted the changes to my lesson plan in yellow. I removed an activity from the lesson plan because the students disliked the Fun with History Activity. I also added a written assessment to add variety of my assessments, as well as including more assessments.

I improved my essential question to make it more specific to my essential understandings, where I have also added another understanding.

I changed the assessment from an exit ticket to a 300-word response. I want to incorporate

more varied methods of assessment than just an exit ticket, as well as incorporating more writing

to my lesson plans.

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American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 4

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level

The American Revolution World Civilizations

10

th Grade

Utah State Core Standard and Objective

Standard 4 Students will understand the influence of revolution and social change in the transition from early modern to contemporary societies. Objective 2 Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

Understanding(s) for the day

A government’s actions impact its citizens.

The American Revolution was the birth of America as we know it today.

Essential Question(s) for the day

How did the independence movements and/or revolutions in the United States influence subsequent revolutions? To what extent was the American Revolution a revolt against taxes?

How do you anticipate activities, materials, etc. connect to students’ prior knowledge? (Academic, interests, learning styles, motivation, Funds of Knowledge)

The starter will allow students to recall their Funds of Knowledge from the unit started the time before.

The PowerPoint will have Cloze notes to optimize literacy. The PowerPoint will incorporate primary and secondary sources, as well as a brief analysis on the events.

 

“Crash Course World History” is a video that will interest students with its silliness and its connection to noted children’s author, John Green. They will be initially interested in this character, based off prior knowledge.

Auditory learners will receive the information auditory as well as the ability for visual learners to read the information. For challenged students, I can differentiate the information read or read it aloud with my other special needs students.

Daily Assessments

Starter (formative)

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(formative and/or summative)

Primary source analysis and worksheet (formative)

Learning Activities:

1. Starter: What other countries did the American Revolution influence? How was it regarded by most of the world? —10 minutes

2. American Revolution PowerPoint—20 minutes

(Include description and time frame for each activity)

3. Crash Course World History video— 10 minutes

4. Primary source analysis—60 minutes. Arrange class with 7 stations. Place one primary source document at each station. Documents include transcriptions of Proclamation of 1763, Sugar Act, Stamp Act, Declaratory Act, Townshend Acts, Tea Act, and Quartering Act. Have

students visit each station to analyze the intent and purpose of each document. They should use the primary source analysis graphic organizer to keep track of their analyses from each document. Groups should spend about 10 minutes at each station analyzing each document.

a.

Have students answer the following question in groups. How did each document have an impact on colonists?

5. At the end of class lead students in a whole group discussion about the impact of Great Britain’s Acts on the colonies.

Accommodations made for struggling and accelerated learners (grouping patterns, content literacy strategies, etc.)

Learners will be grouped according to ability.

For my visually impaired students, I will have supplemental materials (me reading the accounts, a recording of me reading them, or a computer reading them). The student will create notes on her own personal laptop or draw a visual representation of the notes.

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For ESL students, there are opportunities for easier accounts, as well to slip in easier accounts and a lower reading level. For accelerated students, they will have opportunity and access to learn more and write a little more detailed about one. Students will also be referred to other, supporting documents.

Resources

• Boston Tea Party Eyewitness Accounts

The Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Rights and Grievances. March 1774

Complete Collection of British Acts of Parliament, 1763-83 from Her Majesty’s Cabinet Office and Treasury Library

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American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 4 [Revised]

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level

The American Revolution World Civilizations

 

10

th Grade

Utah State Core Standard and Objective

Standard 4 Students will understand the influence of revolution and social change in the transition from early modern to contemporary societies. Objective 2 Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

Understanding(s) for the day

A government’s actions impact its citizens.

The American Revolution was the birth of America as we know it today.

Essential Question(s) for the day

How did the independence movements and/or revolutions in the United States influence subsequent revolutions? To what extent was the American Revolution a revolt against taxes? What social, economic and political factors lead to revolution?

How do you anticipate activities, materials, etc. connect to students’ prior knowledge? (Academic, interests, learning styles, motivation, Funds of Knowledge)

The starter will allow students to recall their Funds of Knowledge from the unit started the time before.

The PowerPoint will have Cloze notes to optimize literacy. The PowerPoint will incorporate primary and secondary sources, as well as a brief analysis on the events.

 

Auditory learners will receive the information auditory as well as the ability for visual learners to read the information. For challenged students, I can differentiate the information read or read it aloud with my other special needs students.

Daily Assessments (formative and/or summative)

Starter (formative) Primary source analysis and worksheet (formative)

Learning Activities:

1.

Starter: What other countries did the American Revolution influence? How

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(Include description and time frame for each activity)

was it regarded by most of the world?—10 minutes 23 24

 
 

2.

American Revolution PowerPoint—20 minutes 25

3.

Crash Course World History video— 10 minutes

 

4.

Primary source analysis—60 minutes. Arrange class with 7 stations. Place one primary source document at each station. Documents include transcriptions of Proclamation of 1763, Sugar Act, Stamp Act, Declaratory Act, Townshend Acts, Tea Act, and Quartering Act. Have

 

students visit each station to analyze the intent and purpose of each document. They should use the primary source graphic organizer to keep track of their analyses from each document. Groups should spend about 10 minutes at each station analyzing each document. 26 27 28 29

a.

Have students answer the following question in groups. How did each document have an impact on colonists?

 
 

5.

If time permits: Read out loud the

   
 

two articles from the Boston Gazette

 

and the London Chronicle. Split the

 

students into two groups (Boston

 

Gazette and London Chronicle) and

 

have them individually illustrate the

eyewitness accounts of the Boston

 

Massacre according to the newspaper

 

assigned to you.

 
 

6.

Assignments Due

 

23 Mastery Learning

24 Review

25 Summarizing and Note-Taking

26 Learning Centers

27 Flexible/Strategic Grouping

28 Document Based Questioning

29 Graphic Organizers

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a.

Primary source analysis

 

worksheet

 

b.

Boston Gazette/London

 

Chronicle illustration

 

Accommodations made for struggling and accelerated learners (grouping patterns, content literacy strategies, etc.)

Learners will be grouped according to ability.

For my visually impaired students, I will have supplemental materials (me reading the accounts, a recording of me reading them, or a computer reading them). The student will create notes on her own personal laptop or draw a visual representation of the notes.

 

For ESL students, there are opportunities for easier accounts, as well to slip in easier accounts and a lower reading level.

For accelerated students, they will have opportunity and access to learn more and write a little more detailed about one. Students will also be referred to other, supporting documents.

Resources

• Boston Tea Party Eyewitness Accounts

The Declaration of Independence

 

The Declaration of Rights and Grievances. March 1774

Complete Collection of British Acts of Parliament, 1763-83 from Her Majesty’s Cabinet Office and Treasury Library

Revisions I highlighted the changes to my lesson plan in yellow. My revisions to this lesson-plan weren’t as extensive as other lesson plans. I cleaned up the instructions for the primary source analysis and replaced the discussion with an artistic activity that hits higher order thinking skills.

Gillette 24

American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 5

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level

The American Revolution World Civilizations

10

th Grade

Utah State Core Standard and Objective

Objective 2

Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

B.

Compare and contrast major world revolutions; e.g., American, French, Russian, Chinese.

Understanding(s) for the day

Leadership can play a significant role in the outcome of war.

Essential Question(s) for the day

Is everything we read about in history books true?

How do you anticipate activities, materials, etc. connect to students’ prior knowledge?

(Academic, interests, learning styles, motivation, Funds of Knowledge)

Students will be interested in Paul Revere because they have learned about him in history classes before.

Students will be given a transcript of “Paul Revere’s Ride” to follow along during the video clip, helping different learning styles understand the poem.

Students will be motivated for the True or False? Activity because they will have an opportunity to share their findings with their peers.

Daily Assessments (formative and/or summative)

Starter True or False? Padlet discussion

Learning Activities:

(Include description and time frame for each activity)

1. Starter—Name 3 things you learned from our last lesson, write 2 things that you found interesting, and ask 1 question you still have—10 minutes

2. Lexington & Concord PowerPoint & Notes—20 minutes

a.

Video clip of battle re- enactment

3. “Paul Revere’s Ride”—10 minutes

Gillette 25

 

4. “Debunking America’s Enduring Myths” Article & Analysis—15 minutes

5. True or False? —10 minutes

a. Find one fact about the American Revolution that is not widely known or covered by traditional historical accounts.

b. Find one count of revisionist or a “fictional” myth that is commonly perpetuated about the American Revolution.

Accommodations made for struggling and accelerated learners (grouping patterns, content literacy strategies, etc.)

Cloze style notes will help my struggling students and ELL’s to synthesize the information and take notes more easily.

Accelerated learners will be expected to come up with more examples of American myths, as well as speculate the origin of these false stories.

Resources

Paul Revere's Ride

Gillette 26

American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 5 [Revised]

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level

The American Revolution World Civilizations

 

10

th Grade

 

Utah State Core Standard and Objective

Objective 2

 
 

Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

 
 

B.

 
 

Compare and contrast major world revolutions; e.g., American, French, Russian, Chinese.

Understanding(s) for the day

Leadership can play a significant role in the outcome of war.

Essential Question(s) for the day

Is everything we read about in history books true?

 

How do historical myths begin?

 

How do you anticipate activities, materials, etc. connect to students’ prior knowledge? (Academic, interests, learning styles, motivation, Funds of Knowledge)

Students will be interested in Paul Revere because they have learned about him in

 

history classes before.

Students will be

 

interested to read “Paul Revere’s Ride,”

 

which is the origin of Paul Revere’s story.

 

Students will be given a transcript of “Paul Revere’s Ride” to follow along during the video clip, helping different learning styles understand the poem.

 

Students will be motivated for the True or False? Activity because they will have an opportunity to share their findings with their peers.

The use of Padlet for a formative assessment

will interest students, since technology is an

easy way to get learners engaged.

 

Daily Assessments (formative and/or summative)

Starter (formative) True or False? (summative) Padlet discussion (formative)

 

Learning Activities:

1.

Starter—Name 3 things you learned from our last lesson, write 2 things that you found interesting, and ask 1 question you still have—10 minutes

 

(Include description and time frame for each activity)

Gillette 27

2. Lexington & Concord PowerPoint & Notes—20 minutes a. Video clip of battle re- enactment
2.
Lexington & Concord PowerPoint &
Notes—20 minutes
a.
Video clip of battle re-
enactment
3.
“Paul Revere’s Ride”—10 minutes
4.
“Debunking America’s Enduring
Myths” Article & Analysis—15
minutes 30 31 32
5.
True or False? —10 minutes
a. Find one fact about the
American Revolution that is
not widely known or covered
by traditional historical
accounts.
b. Find one count of revisionist
or a “fictional” myth that is
commonly perpetuated about
the American Revolution.
c. If time: Have students share
one of the American
Revolution myths they found,
as well as an interesting fact
that is not widely covered.
6.
Padlet discussion: How do you know
if something is a good source? Does it
mean something is fact if its found in
a history book?—5 minutes
Accommodations made for struggling and
accelerated learners (grouping patterns,
content literacy strategies, etc.)
Cloze style notes will help my struggling
students and ELL’s to synthesize the
information and take notes more easily.
Students will work on “Debunking America’s
Enduring Myths” in ability groups, helping
struggling students.
Accelerated learners will be expected to come
up with more examples of American myths,
as well as speculate the origin of these false
stories.
Resources
Paul Revere's Ride

30 Cooperative Learning

31 Academic Vocabulary and Language

32 Close Reading

Gillette 28

Revisions I highlighted the changes to my lesson plan in yellow. Although I give students the opportunity to work in groups for most assignments, due to the difficulty of the “Debunking America’s Myths” article, I will seat students by ability and instruct them to work in mixed groups to answer the questions. I also noticed my lack of assessment, so I decided to use a Padlet discussion as a quick way to assess the main ideas of the class.

Gillette 29

American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 6

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level

The American Revolution World Civilizations

10

th Grade

Utah State Core Standard and Objective

Standard 4 Students will understand the influence of revolution and social change in the transition from early modern to contemporary societies. Objective 2 Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

Understanding(s) for the day

How do you learn the meaning of a word? Were the Constitutions list of grievances enough?

Essential Question(s) for the day

Why is a government important?

How do you anticipate activities, materials, etc. connect to students’ prior knowledge? (Academic, interests, learning styles, motivation, Funds of Knowledge)

The students will be interested in listing grievances about a topic. They will also like to enjoy their grievances to their classmates.

I have addressed different learning styles:

 

reading and audible.

Students will connect with the Declaration of Independence when they recognize phrases, activating their Funds of Knowledge.

Students will be motivated to work in small groups and talk to their classmates. Students that enjoy art will be interested in designing the Frayer Models.

Daily Assessments (formative and/or summative)

Frayer Model Presentation (summative) Homework (formative)

Learning Activities:

 

(Include description and time frame for each activity)

1. Starter: What is a grievance? —5 minutes 33

2. I will split the class into three groups. While they are reading, they will identify 5 words in their section that they don’t understand. Students will

33 Activating Prior Knowledge

Gillette 30

write down these words as they find them. —30 minutes 34 35

a. The first group will read the first two paragraphs of the Declaration of Independence.

b. The second group will read the list of grievances.

c. The third group reads the last 3 paragraphs.

d. After each group has read the passage and found their 5 words, hand out each group 5 cardstock papers.

e. Instruct each group to divide their 5 words among the members and each student will create a Frayer model for the word.

f. Model 1-2 (depending on understanding—thumbs up/thumbs down assessment) Frayer models for other words they may not have known or example words—15 minutes

g. Have each group member construct a Frayer model for their word—10 minutes

h. Have each student present their Frayer model—20 minutes

i. Assignments Due

i.

Frayer Model

j. Homework (due before the next class)

i.

Have students post on a discussion on Canvas, answering: Do you think the American’s grievances were justified in starting the war? Why or why not?

34 Learning Centers

35 Graphic Organizers

Gillette 31

Accommodations made for struggling and accelerated learners (grouping patterns, content literacy strategies, etc.)

For struggling students, I am employing a new vocabulary strategy for them to fully understand the meaning of the Declaration of Independence.

I

am using mixed skill groups to allow the

students to learn from each other and see examples from each other.

I

am assessing throughout the activity, using

the Thumbs Up/Thumbs Down method of assessment to adapt my instruction.

am using a class-wide Jigsaw strategy to not overwhelm individual learners.

I

These strategies will also benefit the ELL’s in my class.

For accelerated students, I will expect them to pick more difficult words to define and to really expand their vocabulary, as well as expressing it to their peers.

Resources

 

Frayer Model

Revisions I did not revise this lesson plan. I felt as if it went really well and hit higher-order thinking skills. The students noticeably understood the meaning of the Constitution more and were really adding to their Funds of Knowledge.

Make-Up/Catch-Up Day:

Students will make-up missing work to improve their grades.

Students will also watch and take Cloze notes on Creating a Constitution by the Constitution Project.

Gillette 32

American Revolution Daily Lesson Plan Day 7 [Cross-Curricular]

Course, Unit Theme, and Grade Level

The American Revolution World Civilizations

 

10

th Grade

Originally

Graphic Novels

Humanities 12

 

12

th grade

Utah State Core Standard and Objective

Standard 4 Students will understand the influence of revolution and social change in the transition from early modern to contemporary societies. Objective 2 Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems. Reading: Literature Standard 1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Reading: Literature Standard 2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

Understanding(s) for the day

Graphic novels allow authors another level of expression compared to traditional books.

Essential Question(s) for the day

What are the components of a graphic novel? What elements distinguish the graphic novel as a medium?

How do you anticipate activities, materials, etc. connect to students’ prior knowledge? (Academic, interests, learning styles, motivation, Funds of Knowledge)

Students will be interested in graphic novels as they are not a medium typically discussed in schools.

Different learning styles will have different opportunities to synthesize the information.

Gillette 33

Daily Assessments (formative and/or summative)

End of Class Quiz (summative) Own graphic novel (summative)

Learning Activities:

1. Starter: How are English and history intertwined? —10 minutes

2. Graphic Novel PowerPoint—30 minutes

(Include description and time frame for each activity)

a. Students will sit through a lecture while filling out Cloze styles notes of what I am instructing

b. There will be informal

 

assessments throughout the PowerPoint

c. Students are going to read and discuss multiple graphic novels in small groups: Maus, The Killing Joke, etc.)

3. Hand student’s excerpts from The Dreamer. Instruct them to read and analyze half of a page—10 minutes

4. Explain the “Create Your Own Graphic Novel” assignment and hand

out the rubric. Explain that students will have multiple days in-class to work on these projects. 36

a.

Due Date: after 5 class periods

5. Assignments Due:

a. Graphic Novel PowerPoint Notes

b. The Dreamer analysis

Accommodations made for struggling and accelerated learners (grouping patterns, content literacy strategies, etc.)

For struggling learners and my ELL’s, I have provided Cloze notes for the PowerPoint. I will also allow mixed-skills group to work through their except of The Dreamer together.

Accelerated students will be expected to deeper analyze The Dreamer and come up with deeper ideas for the Graphic Novel final project.

Resources

The Dreamer Comic

36 Integration of Content Areas