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Super Brain Bros:

How Digital Media Affects the Mind

Jordan Dagenais Page 1

Childhood and Education in the Digital Age

Noah Kozminski Page 2

Social Media and its Hold on Society

Ciara Poe Page 3

Cell Phones:

The Real Facts About Them

Sean Robison Page 4

Sources

Page 5

This journal compiles a variety of articles which analyse several types of digital media and their influences on society and the human body.

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Super Brain Bros: How Digital Media Affects the Mind

www.jordan_dagenais.com

“Hey, listen!” Oh good, I’ve got your attention now. Many gamers undoubt- ingly recognize this quote said countless times by the fairy Navi in The Leg- end of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. Chances are, those who have never picked up a video game have also encountered it, or something very similar (does “It’s a-me, Mario!” ring any bells?). Even if you can’t think of any famous video game quotes, it is easy to see that video games are very influential in today’s society. But how are these games influencing people? Some par- ents, researchers, and anti-gamers would argue that video games are noth- ing more than mind-numbing, brain-rotting wastes of time. Who would’ve thought that our favorite mustachioed plumber had such evil intentions? Even though many people think this, a large portion of the opposition to video games is based on misconceptions. Despite these misconceptions, countless research has gone into proving that not only are video games not a detriment to people, they can actually provide advantages to those who play them. More specifically, video games have a positive impact upon the minds of gamers. By sharpening problem solving skills, teaching teamwork, increasing the capacity to remember, and much more, video games have proven to be very beneficial to young minds.

While many consider themselves to be video game buffs, as it turns out, there is a lot more history associated with video games than it seems. Trac- ing my gaming roots to 1980’s Pac-Man and 1981’s Donkey Kong games, I always thought that video games began around the same time. Amazing- ly, though, the first recorded “video game” (with quotes included because it’s not very similar to today’s video games) was created in the late 1930s (“Video Game History”). Presented at the 1940 World’s Fair, the first video game featured a human playing the then-popular game Nim against a com- puter (“Video Game History”). Fast forwarding through three decades of vigorous improvements to computers, 1972 gave us the first revolutionary video game Pong (“Video Game History”). Huge advancements in technol- ogy allowed the creators of Pong to pull it off, which is a trend that has con- tinued into today’s video games. Because video games are technologically based, as technology becomes more complex and global, so too do video games. While recent years of quickening developments in technology have created many changes to the video game industry, though, it can’t really compare to those first revolutionary games such as Pong, Tetris, and many more. To check out more about the fascinating history of gaming, click here. In recent years the Smithsonian has created an exhibit about the top- ic.

With such a rich and long history, you would think that video games have easily assimilated into the lives of many people. However, even though ap- proximately 67% of US households play or own video games, many aren’t happy about it (ESRB). Statistics show that 44% of parents believe that video games are bad for their kids. But why? With two-thirds of the country playing games, but nearly half of it not approving of them, where does the disconnect come from? As it turns out, several different places. One of the biggest beliefs by anti-gaming parents is that video games cause violence in children. If you click here you’ll see the top selling video games of 2013 (Usher). You may notice that six out of the seven top selling games were rated ‘M’ for Mature (Usher). Certainly, it is easy to see why parents would be a little wary after seeing numbers like that. But it doesn’t end there- a second reason that parents are opposed to video games, though unrelated to the mind, is that they believe video games are a waste of money (Ny- hart). Costing approximately $60 for a new game these days certainly isn’t cheap. However, two of the biggest reasons that parents are against their children playing video games is because they think that video games rot your brain and make you anti-social (Nyhart). Luckily, there is a lot of evi- dence that explains why most of these beliefs simply aren’t true.

Cleary, parents have a lot of reasons not to like video games. Thankfully for the gamers of the world, only a fraction of what anti-gamers believe is true. As stated previously, video games grew alongside computers. Resultantly, as computers have improved, so have video games. Even so, everything must be taken in moderation. Some of what those opposed to video games believe can be true depending on the circumstances. For example, vid- eo games can be a waste of money. If you spend all of your hard-earned dollars on only video games, it can be bad. Unlike many of our favorite characters, we need to pay rent and buy food. Also, video games have the potential to make you anti-social. While many video games nowadays do have in-depth online and multiplayer functions, it probably shouldn’t ac- count for all of your social interactions. If you forget to go outside every once in a while and talk to people, everyone will think you’re a creepy re- cluse. And you’ll probably burn up in direct sunlight. None of this has been scientifically proven, but I certainly don’t want to be the one to test it. The last of the anti-gamers’ arsenal can be found in the argument that video games rot your brain. Similar to the last argument, if you spend all of your time playing video games and doing nothing else, you can harm yourself. Humans need more than one activity in their daily lives. That being said, I don’t think anti-gamers have any hard evidence of someone’s brain rotting from playing video games.

Despite all of the people who are opposed to video games, research has shown that they can have a positive effect on your mind. There are also multiple health-related benefits resulting from video game use. Based on the work done by Jane McGonigal in her book, Reality is Broken, one of the first benefits comes from a phenomenon also found with computers. Because of the expansive nature of video games, they teach children a desire to explore and learn (McGonigal). These are very desirable skills in today’s world, but only some schools are working on incorporating video games into their curriculums. One school in New York, the Quest to Learn school, is the first game-based school (McGonigal). All of the children learn just like other students, but they do it through interactive games. Just like the author of the article “Reality is Broken” said, “I’m willing to bet that that [school] will be full of creative problem solvers, strong collaborators, and innovative thinkers ready to wholeheartedly tackle formidable challenges in the real world.” (McGonigal).

And that’s exactly what video games do. Problem solving, collaboration, and innovation are but a few of the benefits that stem from them. Research has shown that problem solving skills and a sense of innovation come from playing video games. “People who play action-based games make deci- sions 25 percent faster than others and are no less accurate, according to one study. It was also found that the most experienced gamers can make choices and act on them up to six times a second, four times faster than most people.” (“LearnEnglish”). Research on young children (approximately six years old) has also shown that multitasking skills are also heightened, allowing gamers to focus on up to six things at once (“LearnEnglish”).

to focus on up to six things at once (“LearnEnglish”). Yet another useful skill that stems

Yet another useful skill that stems from the use of video games is an im- proved sense of spatial visualization (“LearnEnglish”). I myself have been able to experience this skill firsthand recently. As of late, I have been re- playing Super Mario Galaxy 2 for the Nintendo Wii, one of my favorite vid- eo games. In the game, you play as Mario and travel across the universe via dozens of small planets. Each planet has a different gravitational field, sometimes pulling down, inward, and in some crazy cases, up. As a result of these interesting gravitational fields, the player must be able to concep- tualize planets of different shapes in space (in both literal and in three di- mensional spaces). Playing through this game has allowed me to improve my spatial visualization skills greatly. I can see it by comparing my skills to those of my friends. Over time, conceptualizing and traversing these plan- ets in space has become a simple task. Meanwhile, my friends are practi- cally made sick by how dizzy the spatial visualization makes them. I have also seen these skills transfer to real life. While working with three dimen- sional models in the software NX, I was able to conceptualize how to orient shapes much faster than my teammates because of my experience in the game. You should try this too, to see if you get similar results.

Despite the stigma that video games cause kids to become anti-social, recent technological advancements point to the contrary. “Over 70% of gamers play their games with a friend, either cooperatively or competi- tively.” (Granic). Certain games such as the online World of Warcraft are centered completely around teamwork. Players have to work together and often cannot accomplish tasks by themselves. Cooperative play also de- stroys the belief that video games cause violent behavior in children. “Play- ers who play violent games that encourage cooperative play are more likely to exhibit helpful gaming behaviors online and offline than those who play nonviolent games.” (Granic). Establishing prosocial behavior and reducing violence are excellent results of collaborative play.

Even though the mental benefits of playing video games are huge, they ar- en’t the only ones. There are also some physical benefits as well. Research done by the Business Insider has shown that playing video games encour- ages physical activity (Loria). This is especially true for owners of the Nin- tendo Wii. Games such as Wii Sports, Wii Fit, and Wii Play promote move- ment in order to play the game. I personally have even used Wii Fit as a personal trainer. Playing the game during the winter when the snow made me devoid of physical activity, I was able to shed a few unwanted pounds. Other games such as Dance Dance Revolution really make you sweat in order to succeed. As it turns out, not all video games are coach potato-es- que.

Clearly, video games are a lot more useful than many people give them credit for. Despite the many people opposed to them, research has shown that video games are much more beneficial than detrimental. By increasing problem solving, spatial visualization, collaboration, innovation, and multi- tasking skills, among many other things, video games sharpen the minds of those who play. In addition, the physical health benefits that can come from playing video games just add all the more reason to play them. It is clear that video games need to be better embraced by today’s society. Much like computers, they create advantages for those who use them. In order to survive and prosper in the future, video games need to be better utilized by the education system.

If we fail to adhere to the ever-changing world, it will mean:

we fail to adhere to the ever-changing world, it will mean: Home Page Childhood and Education

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Childhood and Education in the Digital Age

Noah Kozminski Page 2

Social Media and its Hold on Society

Ciara Poe Page 3

Cell Phones:

The Real Facts About Them

Sean Robison Page 4

Sources

Page 5

Home

Page 2

Childhood and Education in the Digital Age

www.noah_kozminski.com

The term “digital natives” is defined in Marc Prensky’s article “Digital Na- tives, Digital Immigrants” as being a generation who have grown up being intimately familiar with digital technology. Prensky argues that with the ad- vent of new new media, and the influence it has had on the current gen- eration from an early age, the mindsets of today’s youth are completely altered, and he goes so far as to say that it is as though they are “speak- ing” a different language from older generations, or “digital immigrants.” In order to more effectively educate this digital generation, Prensky essential- ly proposes that education be turned into a collection of specialized video games that accommodate the reduced attention span and interest of these “digital natives.”

When it comes to the extensive implementation of digital media and post-modern methods of teaching into an elementary level education pro- gram, the potential for effective learning is decidedly balanced with the possibility of developmental disruption and alterations to normal cognitive function. The overwhelming statistical consensus is that modern access to media and technology is not only changing the way we live, but the way we function as human beings on a physiological level. The natural tendencies of children to seek out ways of being entertained are ultimately enabled by the inescapable presence of modern technology, and this ease of access is causing complications in the academic performance of many students.

This concept of digital technology being fundamentally integrated into the lives of a generation has been effectively expressed with Prensky’s con- cept of the digital native. The extremity of this connection is only now being seen with the next generation of “plugged in” youth. Having an easy and endlessly available way to effectively entertain children, and for children to entertain themselves, can be a blessing for parents, but the impacts of this access on a child’s mind, body and patterns of thought have the potential to be incredibly influential and even detrimental to a child’s further intellec- tual and social development.

The very nature of digital entertainment is testament to its potential for negative consequences on childhood development. Everything from tele- vision and film, to playing games and even reading is being experienced

in a palatable, easy to access digital form. In the case of just about every medium, this transition from analog to digital is marked by a move towards

a more engrossing experience, with a decrease in accompanying human

interaction and comprehension. For many kids, a great deal of free time is occupied by playing video games or watching TV. Naturally, the expand- ing gulf between individuals that modern entertainment fails to bridge is not something that is advertised or even recognised, but should still be of concern. The integration of social media components directly into your

entertainment is a heavily lauded selling point of many forms of digital en- tertainment. However, the actual results of this may not be quite what they seem. For example, the integration of an online multiplayer component into most mainstream triple-A video game releases seems like an indication of

a positive step towards a more social way of playing games. However, is

the level of interpersonal interaction from gaming online equivalent to what one might experience when we crowd into a living room with friends and play a split-screen co-op game together, a feature that is appearing in less and less games? The unfulfilled promises of increased social entertainment is not exclusive to video games, either. Television, too, is becoming more and more detached from the communal activity it once was. In a deviation from a more traditional episodic, disjointed presentation, today’s most crit- ically successful and popular TV shows, such as Breaking Bad, Game of Thrones, and True Detective, are being presented in a format of continuous long-form narratives spanning dozens of hours that invite the new phenom- enon of “binge-watching.” Entertainment giant Netflix is at the heart of this trend, as its own shows, like House of Cards and Daredevil, are released a season at a time, with all the episodes flooding online at once. Discussion and group viewing is still an important part of watching television, but with

the changes in format, the bulk of viewing time is most often done without the company of others. (need citation) While these developments are not inherently bad, and are often aligned with consumer’s desires for conve- nience and comfort, they have a major role to play in the behavioral devel- opment of young children and the use of their free time.

- opment of young children and the use of their free time. Minecraft, an incredibly popular

Having “binge-watching” on Netflix and other streaming sites becoming a normal component in the lives of many young people and adults sets the precedent for the younger generation to grow up with this being seen as regular and encouraged. While this phenomenon is limited in the busy lives of adults and teens, younger children with access to Netflix and similar on- line services can sit themselves down with a virtually unlimited amount of entertainment to be consumed in an elongated single sitting. As mentioned earlier, this can be seen as a godsend for babysitting and allowing parents some down-time, but with the ever-expanding presence of mobile devices capable of extensive internet access, this non-stop chain-viewing of tele- vision shows and other online broadcasts goes beyond the controllable borders of the living room, and can be accessible from beneath the covers of a child’s bed, or in the bathroom, or wherever else a child can spend an extended amount of time unsupervised. The most potent threat here is of- ten seen as the ability of a child to accidentally or intentionally access more mature content than they ought to, but the amount of content they can con- sume is just as worrisome as what it is they are watching. Video games, movies, cell phone use, and online activities can occupy almost every wak- ing minute of a child’s day, and are liable to infiltrate the hours needed for sleep.

These tendencies illustrate one of the arguments Prensky makes in his ar- ticle is that there are distinct differences in the mental processes of those that have grown up having digital media incorporated into their lives at ev- ery level. This is a valid point of view, one that is backed up with emerging scientific evidence. Technology is changing how we all think, and none are more affected than children. Marked differences in how we focus and ab- sorb information have been noted, with attention being strongly influenced. The very nature of the Internet promotes swift transitions between topics of interest that are practically limitless in quantity and variety. Free and open access to information, however, reduces the need for imagination, creativi- ty, focus, and tenacity, most especially in the more malleable developing minds of children, who are also the most prolific users of digital media. These qualities are indispensable in education, and it is their loss that adds to the growing incompetence of the current education system. One solution to this problem, temporary though it may be, is to increase the digital components of learning.

may be, is to increase the digital components of learning. Several forward-thinking schools are not only

With the increasing potential for unceasing access to movies, televi- sion, video games, and other entertainment at home, the induction of these components into the school setting is a concerning concept. Schools in New York and Chicago are testing media-based curriculums that are en- gaging the students in classes focused on game design and media cre- ation. These first attempts at fully integrated media based schooling are altering every part of a traditional schedule to accommodate more digi- tal interaction, while still adhering to state education laws. Despite these hopeful ventures showing the promise of video game and computer-based teaching in the classroom, the potential detriment of using the authority of academia to introduce additional mandatory hours of computer usage into the daily lives of children may not prove to be the best course of action. Some teachers have been forced to turn to digital media as a last ditch

attempt to regain the attention of their students. “If I’m not using technolo- gy, I lose them completely” said teacher Geoff Diesel in a New York Times piece on digital media in schools. This concerned sentiment is reflected by other teachers in the article, and student interviews see them confessing

a decrease in their ability to focus on the books and homework required

not only for their academic careers, but also for the pursuit of passions like writing and filmmaking.

The question is, will the potential boost to grades and engagement in learning be worth it, or will this change in teaching style only be enabling and catering to the weaknesses that children’s exposure to technology can induce? Education should expose students to many styles of learn- ing, instead of boiling it down to a single method that only limits their ca- pability to understand in other contexts. Making sure that every desire of this generation is met by making education into games and entertainment might be effective at boosting memorization and information regurgitation performance, but beyond that, it is a method that deemphasizes effective communication between the student, teacher, and peers, and devalues the importance of persistence and working through issues in the real world by placing these scenarios in a limited digital context. Sometimes the best way to prepare people for the working world is by having them experience some semblance of reality, rather than setting out to intellectually coddle them for 20 odd years. It is increasingly obvious that education, especially at the K-12 level, could and should be reformed to more effectively convey con- cepts and information, but optimizing learning doesn’t mean turning every- thing into playing on a computer.

Working hard and putting in the time have always been key to understand- ing, and extending the reach of technologies that hamper the development of these positive qualities may not benefit the future of education. Under- standing digital media is only one “language” that today’s students speak, and while it is a versatile and powerful language, it takes a literacy of more than one language to communicate with people beyond the boundaries of age and vocation. Maintaining the ability to focus, to read at length, and to vocally communicate with one another are all qualities that are absolutely

vital for success in the world. It is the role of educators to not only expand

a student’s understanding of the familiar language of digital media, but to

introduce new ideas, and develop their knowledge of multiple means of communication and comprehension. However, this more diverse level of understanding cannot successfully be reached when the academic world aims to deliver only what students want to learn, and fails to convey what they need to learn.

Home Page

Super Brain Bros:

How Digital Media Affects the Mind

Jordan Dagenis Page 1

Social Media and its Hold on Society

Ciara Poe Page 3

Cell Phones:

The Real Facts About Them

Sean Robison Page 4

Sources

Page 5

Home

Page 3

Social Media and its Hold on Society

www.ciara_poe.com

Teenagers these days are tweeting, vine-ing, Instagram-ing, and Face- booking their every moment of every day. “Using social media Web sites is among the most common activity of today’s children and adolescents. Any Web site that allows social interaction is considered a social media site, in- cluding social networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter; gaming sites and virtual worlds such as Club Penguin, Second Life, and the Sims; video sites such as YouTube; and blogs. Such sites offer today’s youth a portal for entertainment and communication and have grown ex- ponentially in recent years” (4). Each generation that is born, is now being immediately affected and influenced by technology. We have four year olds with iPads and six year olds with iPhones. Children instead of going out- side to play are staying inside to play video games and be on social media sites.

inside to play video games and be on social media sites. Social media allows us to

Social media allows us to link up with thousands of different people from around the world. But this constant linkage comes with a price. “During the last 5 years, the number of preadolescents and adolescents using such sites has increased dramatically. According to a recent poll, 22% of teenag-

ers log on to their favorite social media site more than 10 times a day, and more than half of adolescents log on to a social media site more than once

a day. Seventy-five percent of teenagers now own cell phones, and 25%

use them for social media, 54% use them for texting, and 24% use them for instant messaging. Thus, a large part of this generation’s social and emo- tional development is occurring while on the Internet and on cell phones”

(4).

We are all constantly checking our phones and digital media devices for the newest updates from these social media cites. Our lives are laid out for the whole world to see. But social media comes with a price, a main one

is bullying, nowadays it is called cyberbullying. It is easier than ever to bul- ly someone online without them even knowing it’s you. People hide behind their screen names and computers and attack whoever they want for what- ever reason they want. On Facebook people write mean things on peo- ple’s walls and/or tag them in compromising photos that the whole world then sees. There is even a term now that psychiatrists have come up with, “Facebook depression”, to describe what these social media sites can do to

a person.

Because children and teenagers have so much freedom when it comes to technology, they do not really know all the dangers of it. Children and teenagers are mean and when they want revenge they will do whatever they want without thinking of the consequences. Children and teenagers began to do what is now called sexting, “v: the act of text messaging some- one in the hopes of having a sexual encounter with them later; initially ca-

sual, transitioning into highly suggestive and even sexually explicit” (3), and they do this because they do not realize that all someone has to do is take

a screenshot. “One study found almost 1 in 5 high school students have

“sexted”—sending a text message with sexually explicit pictures—and al-

most twice as many reported that they had received a sexually explicit pic- ture via cell phone. More than 25% of students acknowledged forwarding

a sexually explicit picture to others; >33% did so despite knowing the legal

consequences, including being arrested and facing pornography charges.” (5). A girl in my hometown this past year had photos of her leaked and out up on social media sites and around my old high school. She ended up committing suicide a few days after the photos went up. And that is not the first time something like this has happened. Hundreds of teenagers take their lives do to leaked photos of them that they sent to a person they thought that they could trust.

they sent to a person they thought that they could trust. However, not all social media

However, not all social media is bad; there are even benefits to it even

if it does not seem like it. “Social media sites allow teens to accomplish on-

line many of the tasks that are important to them offline: staying connected with friends and family, making new friends, sharing pictures, and exchang- ing ideas. Social media participation also can offer adolescents deeper benefits that extend into their view of self, community, and the world” (1).

Other pros include for social media include (1):

1-Increased criminal prosecution because of social media The NYC police department began using Twitter back in 2011 to track crim- inals foolish enough to brag about their crimes online. When the Vancou- ver Canucks lost the Stanley Cup in 2011, their Vancouver fans took to the streets and rioted, but local authorities used social media to track and tag the people involved, and they caught people who were stealing during the riot. 2-Social networking creates new social connections Statistics show that 70% of adults have used social media sites to connect with relatives in other states, and 57% of teens have reported making new friendships on social media sites. 3-Students are doing better in school This is an interesting statistic about the pros and cons of social media and

its effect on students doing well in school. Students with internet access at

a rate of 50% have reported using social networking sites to discuss school work, and another 59% talk about instructive topics. 4-Better quality of life

If you want to talk about the pros and cons of social media, take a close

look at all the support groups on Facebook. Members of these groups dis- cuss their health conditions, share important information, and resources relevant to their conditions while creating strong support networks. 5-Social media as a source of employment Job sourcing has gone modern thanks to social media. Sites such as LinkedIn are a major resource that 89% of job recruiters take advantage of when looking to hire

Not all social media is bad social media; it just depends on how you use it. “What we share via social media in 2012 would most-likely be seen as an abomination to those generations where social sharing was done in-per- son, through the mail, or via telephone” (6). One thing is that people al- ways forget about the privacy settings and that is the number one thing you should do when setting up any type of social media is the privacy set- ting. Privacy settings make all the difference when it comes to social media sites. You can limit what people post on your walls or can even see your information. Social media sites do offer plenty of ways to protect yourself when you are online you just have to take advantage of it.

Internet and intimacy How to make a splash in social media Home Page Super Brain Bros:

Home Page

Super Brain Bros:

How Digital Media Affects the Mind

Jordan Dagenis Page 1

Childhood and Education in the Digital Age

Noah Kozminski Page 2

Cell Phones:

The Real Facts About Them

Sean Robison Page 4

Sources

Page 5

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Page 4

Cell Phones: The Real Facts About Them

www.sean_robison.com

There’s a good chance that if you reached down into your pocket you would find one. There is also a pretty good chance that you have data on it too right? Well with the rise of smartphones, its very uncommon in the western society to not have a one. This little device has taken over, under the radar. Who would have thought that a little chunk of technology could do so much? With statistics, and just thinking about smartphones, you can tell that some problems can arise. Cell phones now have many positive functions, but the mental draw and possibility of addiction poses a serious threat to extensive users.

Smart phones were first released and bought in the early 2000’s. Before smartphones, things like PDA’s took great leaps into the market. Looking back, the first smartphones were colorless screens, and could only do things as simple as taking notes, have a calendar, and possibly taking photos. What drove engineers and other people to design something sim- ilar to the phones we see today? Simple, people crave something better, something faster, and the ability to do more with each upgrade. What would the world look like without the smartphones? Do you thinks kids would get addicted to outdoor sports, or would the pick up a new digital media phe- nomenon like a cell phone.

up a new digital media phe - nomenon like a cell phone. But why is it

But why is it the most used piece of technology in the world? Cell phones, a device where people can call from device to device, instantly message from device to device, or on some devices search the World Wide Web. Cell phones for daily use have become very important in organizing peo- ple’s thoughts/ days. But what would you do without a cell phone? Younger children are now growing up with this piece of technology, and they are at most for risk. With a young adolescent mind, and a small ability for self-reg- ulation they are easily at most for risk for using and experimenting with smartphones. Most say that without a cell phone they wouldn’t be able to function. They wouldn’t be able to function, give that a thought, how can something that most people have only had for a few years, not function without it? Although cell phones have only be introduced as “smartphones” since early 2000’s, it is what most consider the average cell phone. With the high use of cell phones, there are many things that can go wrong. Ex- ploring and diving into what effects cell phones have on people can be eye-opening and shocking.

How does the use of cell phones or smart phones affect someone’s brain function? I’m going to dive into the facts. According to an article on cell phone use across the world, many sample surveys show that 30% of peo- ple seem addicted to there cell phone (2011) (1). This survey includes those that don’t even have cell phones. Along with addiction to anything, problems must occur. A lot of people have said they feel less connected with people, and more connected using phone. This is a serious problem; cell phones have by themselves dismantled people’s social interaction. This same article has said nearly 45% of people spend up to 6 hours a day on smart phones. While many of these people say they were using many of these hours for work, or checking email, a small survey on 50 people show that over 45% of there time was spent on social networks or non-work re- lated things. Now that I have thrown out some shocking numbers, what exactly can this non-physical socialness thing affect on someone’s brain? Well many people were unaware at where there time was going when they were just checking Facebook, or twitter, they lost the sense of time. An in- terviewee said that she once was on her phone lost in time for 12 hours, and she had only thought she was on for 2 hours. Losing the sense of something so essential like time can cause some unwanted effects. For in- stance what if this lady had work to get to, or a paper to write? While most of aren’t like this lady that spent 12 straight hours plugged into a phone, we all have once spent too much time on it without knowing.

Another interesting feature that cell phones have is keeping people up to late. Even though someone can use a cell phone right before bed, and put

it away and sleep at there scheduled time, it can still cause some serious problems. Studies show (1) that use of cell phones will cause disturbance with sleep levels. People that were used in this survey said while using

a phone for about an hour right before you crashed, felt more tired in the

morning and said they woke up often through the night. Some, including myself with use of cell phones before bed may not be able to sleep, and often have sleepless nights, without one bit of shut-eye. This has caused some serious problems for many others and me. I have personally been working on sleeping better since it is essential for growth and function, so I have a limit that I won’t use my cell phone after 10pm, and get to bed around midnight. This has helped out much better and I rarely have a night where I don’t sleep. Self reliance on cell phones have even made people go insane, while traveling to Mexico this past spring break we obviously weren’t able to use our cell phones to message, or search the world wide web. While for me it was enjoyable since it is nice to get away from it, for others it was difficult. I witnessed a girl, around age 12-14, freak out on her parents and tell them they need to pay the extra bit so she could use her iPhone. While I’m a android user myself, I could already tell this girls head wasn’t screwed on straight. I took deep observation into this girl since she was so young, this wasn’t just a small escapade either, and this lasted for nearly 20 minutes of screaming and bantering. The young girl was so ad- dicted something so small and pointless. She was in Mexico and had such an addiction that it caused this reaction and stress on many vacationers, in- cluding myself. This was very similar to the episode I saw once we arrived back into America and were waiting for our bags, an older lady, with about 400 cigarettes in her duty free bag was shaking and was easily noticeable that she had an addiction. Addiction is something very serious and can cause some bad meltdowns. Although cigarettes are absolutely horrible for someone’s health, you could start to question if Cell phones, or smart- phones, are just as bad.

if Cell phones, or smart - phones, are just as bad. It is easy to see

It is easy to see that the use of can pose some serious threat on the brain.

Despite the high use of nearly everyone, it would seem that they really ar- en’t that bad. But with the research done on the few that have had them for only a little only 15 years, it clear that with more use, and more years of using, things can only get worse. It’s disappointing to know that something so used, and probably the highest use thing in terms of technology. Much like most things that are created in the world, there are advantages to using them, but with safe protocol, and small use it can be safe.

Here are a few vidoes that are relevant

Home Page

Super Brain Bros:

How Digital Media Affects the Mind

Jordan Dagenis Page 1

Childhood and Education in the Digital Age

Noah Kozminski Page 2

Social Media and its Hold on Society

Ciara Poe Page 3

Sources

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Works Cited

www.jordan_dagenais.com Granic, Isabela, Adam Lobel, and Rutger C. M. E. Engels. “The Benefits of Playing Video Games.” American Psychologist 69.1 (2014): 66-78. Web. Apr. 2015.

Loria, Dina. “15 Ways Video Games Make You Smarter And Healthier.”Business Insider. Business Insider, Inc, 20 Sept. 2014. Web. Apr. 2015.

<http://www.businessinsider.com/video-game-health-benefits-2014-9#video-games-encourage-physical-activity-3>.

McGonigal, Jane. Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World. New York: Penguin, 2011. Print.

Nyhart, Paul. “5 Reasons Why Parents Don’t Understand Video Games (How You Can Change Their Minds).” | The Jace Hall Show. N.p., 13 Apr. 2011. Web. Apr. 2015. <http://www.jacehallshow.com/blog/5-reasons-why-parents-dont-understand-video-games-how-you-can-change-their- mind/>.

Tucker, Abigail. “The Art of Video Games.” Smithsonian. The Smithsonian, Mar. 2012. Web. Apr. 2015. <http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-cul-

ture/the-art-of-video-games-101131359/?no-ist>.

Usher, William. “44% Of Parents Think Games Are Bad For Their Kids | CINEMABLEND.” 44% Of Parents Think Games Are Bad For Their Kids. N.p., 05 May 2014. Web. Apr. 2015. <http://www.cinemablend.com/games/44-Parents-Think-Games-Bad-Their-Kids-63871.html>.

“Video Games Are Good for You!” LearnEnglishTeens. The British Coucil, n.d. Web. Apr. 2015. <https://learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/skills/ reading-skills-practice/video-games-are-good-you>.

“Video Game History Timeline.” Video Game History Timeline. The National Museum of Play, 2015. Web. Apr. 2015. <http://www.museumofplay. org/icheg-game-history/timeline/>.

“Video Game Industry Statistics | Entertainment Software Rating Board.”Video Game Industry Statistics | Entertainment Software Rating Board. N.p., n.d. Web. Apr. 2015. <http://www.esrb.org/about/video-game-industry-statistics.jsp>.

www.noah_kozminski.com

Prensky, Marc. “Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants.” On the Horizon, MCB University Press 1 Oct. 2001. Print.

http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky%20-%20Digital%20Natives,%20Digital%20Immigrants%20-%20Part1.pdf

“How American Children Spend Their Time.” Journal of Marriage and Family 63 (2001). Web.

http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/73393/j.1741-3737.2001.00295?sequence=1

Home Page

Super Brain Bros:

How Digital Media Affects the Mind

Jordan Dagenis Page 1

Childhood and Education in the Digital Age

Noah Kozminski Page 2

Social Media and its Hold on Society

Ciara Poe Page 3

Cell Phones:

The Real Facts About Them

Sean Robison Page 4

Taylor Ph.D, Jim. “How Technology Is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus.”Psychology Today. 12 Dec. 2012. Web. 21 Apr. 2015. https://

www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-power-prime/201212/how-technology-is-changing-the-way-children-think-and-focus

Richtel, Matt. “Growing Up Digital, Wired for Distraction.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 20 Nov. 2010. Web. 21 Apr. 2015. http://www.

nytimes.com/2010/11/21/technology/21brain.html?pagewanted=6&_r=0&adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1429640758-AZkeLdPtt%20h9dArqgau%207A

Sylwester, Robert, and Professor Emeritus. “The Effects of Electronic Media On A Developing Brain.” Information Age Education. Web. 21 Apr.

2015.

http://i-a-e.org/articles/46-feature-articles/48-the-effects-of-electronic-media-on-a-developing-brain.html

https://vimeo.com/20018135

Grate, Rachel. “Science Has Great News for People Who Read Actual Books.” Mic. 22 Sept. 2014. Web. 21 Apr. 2015.

http://mic.com/articles/99408/science-has-great-news-for-people-who-read-actual-boo

v

www.ciara_poe.com

http://www.toptensocialmedia.com/social-media-social-buzz/10-pros-and-cons-of-social-media/

http://advisor-chronicle.com/sticks-stones-and-cyberslams-bullying-special-featuring-marshall-teens-p163-1.htm

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=sexting

http://research.fit.edu/sealevelriselibrary/documents/doc_mgr/1006/O’Keeffe_and_Pearson

Adolescents,_and_Families.pdf

2011

The_Impact_of_Social_Media_on_Children,_

http://www.currentpsychiatry.com/home/article/teens-social-media-and-sexting-what-to-tell-parents/81bbcea74ea26fb27460dd70ecc7d9fb.html

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/social-media-and-privacy

www.sean_robison.com

O’Keeffe, Gwenn, and Kathleen Clark-pearson. “The Impact of Social Media on Children, Adolescents, and Families.” The Impact of Social Media on Children, Adolescents, and Families. PEDIATRICS Vol. 127 No. 4, n.d. Web. 1 Apr. 2011.

Curioso, Walter. “Access, Use and Perceptions regarding Internet, Cell Phones and PDAs as a Means for Health Promotion for People Living with HIV in Peru.” BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making. BMC Medical Informatics, Dec.-Jan. 2011. Web. 21 Apr. 2015