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College Baseball Training Plan

Morgan Bross
EXSC 541
4/18/2016
Part I:
o 20 year old right-handed starting pitcher for weekday and Saturday games, in
sophomore year of college
o Duration of competition: 9 innings with intermittent activity involving 9 players on
the field lasting around 2 to 3 hours depending on the game. The starting pitcher
will usually throw around 5 innings, throwing approximately 60-70 pitches per game,
but no more than 100 pitches per game. There is usually a two-day rest period for
pitchers after pitching during a game.
o Competitive season roughly 50 games from February to the last week of May
o Post-season games (Regionals, Super-Regionals, World Series) from May to June
o 2-3 games per week, Friday-Saturday and usually one game during the weekday
o Key requirements and determinants of successful performance of baseball:
Skills and tactics vary among the position of the player
Running, hitting, fielding, and throwing are key requirements for every player.
To have a successful pitching performance, the pitcher needs to get ahead in the
count, starting off with one or two strikes first while varying the location and
the speed of each pitch such as throwing a curve ball, inside first, a change up,
outside and low 2nd, and a fastball, low third.
A pitcher that works quickly is another determinant that will contribute to a
successful performance because it will catch the batter off guard and keep the
pitchers defense focused
o Physiological demands and performance limiting aspects:
Physical demands of baseball are very low.
Estimation of Energy and Muscular Fitness Demands from The American Sport
Education Program (ASEP):
Aerobi Anaerobic Strength Enduranc Speed Powe Flexibilit
c e r y
Baseba Low Medium/Hig Medium/Hig Low Medium/Hig High High
ll h h h
Pitcher

o ATP-PCr System (Anaerobic Capacity)


Essential in baseball because of the short, high-intensity actions in the sport
such as sprinting, hitting, and throwing which last no more than 15 seconds.
o Power and Strength generation
All actions in baseball are explosive; pitching, hitting, throwing, and sprinting
and are in need of muscular power for success in a powerful acceleration,
throwing, and hitting.
Strength in the shoulder, especially in the rotator cuff muscles is an essential
need for baseball pitchers
o Flexibility
Baseball players, especially pitchers need to have the ability to move through a
full range of motion. A higher range of motion improves performance and
decreases risk of injury.
o Stability
Core training will enable the athlete to achieve better performance, increase
torso power and joint stability, improve posture and neuromuscular
coordination, reduce injuries and enhance movement efficiency.

Good stability will improve performance and decrease the risk of injury

o VO2Max 40-50 mL/kg/min

o Specification of Macro cycles over 1 Year


Competitive Season: February-June
Pre-Season: November-February
Off Season: June-August

o Additional Considerations:
Pro, College, High School: Baseball=2 7/8-3 inches, 73-76mm
Baseline=90 feet
Home to second= 127 feet 3 3/8 inches
College Left/Right Field=320-350 feet
College Center Field=400+ feet
Pitcher mound to home=60 feet
College Baseball Bats: Aluminum, -3 length to weight ratio and 2 5/8 inch
barrel. In high school and collegiate sanctioned leagues, bats must be 31"-34"
long to be legal. 20-27oz depending on athlete (Frazier, 2007).

Part II:
Flexibility (Static Flexibility Test- Shoulder and Wrist)
Rationale: measures flexibility of shoulder and wrist which is an essential for a
pitchers range of motion and is important for injury prevention
o The athlete warms up for 10 minutes
o The athlete lays prone on the floor, forehead on the ground, and arms
extended holding the 18 stick with both hands shoulder width apart
o The assistant measures and records the athletes arm length from the
acromial extremity to the stick
o The athlete raises the stick as high as possible whilst keeping their
forehead on the ground
o The assistant measures and records the vertical distance from the ground
to the bottom of the stick
o Repeat the test three times recording the vertical distance achieved
o The assistant subtracts the longest recorded vertical distance from the
recorded arm length and the result is used to assess the athletes
performance (Mac, 1997).
Stability (Standing Stork Test-Blind)
Rationale: to assess static stability, an essential for pitching which needs stability
of the core and legs
o The athlete warms up for 10 minutes
o The athlete stands comfortably on both feet with their hands on their hips
o The athlete lifts the right leg, places the sole of the right foot against the
side of the left kneecap and close both eyes
o The assistant gives the command GO, starts the stopwatch and the
athlete raises the heel of the left foot to stand on their toes
o The athlete is to hold this position for as long as possible
o The assistant stops the stopwatch when the athlete opens their eyes, their
left heel touches the ground or the right foot moves away from the left
knee
o The assistance records the time
o The athlete rests for 3 minutes
o The athlete stands comfortably on both feet with their hands on their hips
o The athlete lifts the left leg, places the sole of the left foot against the side
of the right kneecap and close both eyes
o The assistant gives the command GO, starts the stopwatch and the
athlete raises the heel of the right foot to stand on their toes
o The athlete is to hold this position for as long as possible
o The assistant stops the stopwatch when the athlete opens their eyes, their
right heel touches the ground or the left foot moves away from the right
kneecap
o The assistance records the time and repeats 3 times total
o The score is the best of the 3 attempts for each leg (Mac, 1997).
Power, Strength and Agility
(Rotational Power Ball Throw: Power)
Rationale: measures total body power, especially of arms and upper body and core
strength. For baseball players, it simulates the rotational core movement common
to the sport.
o The test involves throwing a Power Ball across the chest for maximum
distance.
o The athlete warms up for 10 minutes
o The athlete starts by standing perpendicular to the start line (such as in a
pitching or hitting stance).
o The ball is held in both hands with the backhand on the back of the ball
and your front hand under the ball.
o The ball is drawn back, with only a slight bend at the elbows allowed,
keeping the ball between the waist and chest. Then in one motion the ball
is flung up and forward (optimally at a 45 degree angle).
o Several practices may be required to get the best trajectory for maximum
distance. The athlete is permitted to fall forward over the line after the ball
is released, and is in fact encouraged to do so in maximizing the distance
of the throw.
o Three attempts are allowed.
o The distance from the starting line to where the ball first lands is recorded.
The measurement is recorded to the nearest foot. The best result of three
throws is recorded (Mac, 1997).
(Handgrip Strength Test: Strength)
Rationale: measure the maximum isometric strength of the hand and forearm
muscles. Handgrip strength is important for baseball in which the hands are used
for catching and throwing.
o The subject holds the dynamometer in the hand to be tested, with the arm
at right angles and the elbow by the side of the body. The handle of the
dynamometer is adjusted if required - the base should rest on first
metacarpal (heel of palm), while the handle should rest on middle of four
fingers.
o When ready the subject squeezes the dynamometer with maximum
isometric effort, which is maintained for about 5 seconds. No other body
movement is allowed.
o The subject should be strongly encouraged to give a maximum effort.
o The best result from several trials for each hand is recorded, with at least
15 seconds recovery between each effort. Average the best scores from
each hand (Wood, 2010).
(T-Test: Agility)
Rationale: A baseline measure of agility allows you to measure the athletes
progress throughout year-round training.
o The athlete warms up for 10 minutes
o The assistant places 3 cones 5 meters apart on a straight line (A, B, C) and
a 4th cone (D) is placed 10 meters from the middle cone (B) so that the 4
cones form a 'T'.
o The athlete stands at the cone (D) at the base of the T facing the T
o The assistant gives the signal to 'Go', starts the stopwatch and the athlete
commences the test
o The athlete runs to and touches the middle cone (B), side steps 5 meters to
the left cone (A) and touches it, side step 10 meters to the far cone (C) and
touches it, side step 5 meters back to the middle cone (B) and touches it
and then runs 10 meters backwards to the base of the 'T' and touches that
cone (D)
o Three trials will be conducted and the best score of the three will be used
(Wood, 2010).
Anaerobic Capacity (RAST Test)
Rationale: measures power and fatigue index in a distance similar to the bases in
baseball
o The 1st assistant weighs and records the athletes weight
o The athlete warms up for 10 minutes
o The assistants mark out a 35 meter straight on the track with the cones
o The assistants each have a stopwatch
o The athlete completes six 35 meter runs at maximum pace with 10 seconds
allowed between each sprint for turnaround as follows:
o 1. The athlete, using a standing start, gets ready to sprint
o 2. The 2nd assistant gives the command GO for the athlete to start and the
1st assistant starts his/her stopwatch
o 3. When the athlete completes the 35 meter
the 1st assistant stops his/her stopwatch, records the time and
resets the stopwatch
the 2nd assistant starts his/her stopwatch to time the 10 second
turnaround
o 4. When 10 seconds has elapsed the 2nd assistant gives the command GO
for the athlete to start, rests the stopwatch and the 1st assistant starts
his/her stopwatch
o Numbers 3 and 4 are repeated six times (Mac, 1997).
Day 1:
o Stability and Flexibility within the same day
Day 2:
o Power, Strength, and Agility
Day 3:
o Anaerobic Capacity
Test will be administered at the first and second to last week of preseason
Test Results:
o First Week of Pre-Season
o Flexibility:
8.32 inches (average)
o Stability:
Right Leg: 40 seconds (good)
Left Leg: 32 seconds (average)
o Power
20 feet (average)
o Strength
120 lbs. (above average)
o Agility
10.39 seconds (average)
o Anaerobic Capacity:
Power (Watts); Body mass (kilograms); Distance (meters); Time
(seconds)
Power=Body mass x Distance Time
Maximum Power: 1010 watts
Minimum Power: 550 watts
Average Power: 737 watts
Fatigue Index: 13.96 watts/sec
Evaluation:
The athlete was in the average/good percentile for each test however they
need to improve the most on their flexibility, agility and anaerobic
capacity.
The athlete has been a pitcher for over 15 years so his range of motion and
power in the upper body and arms is excellent. His strength is his arm
power. However, his lower body flexibility, agility and anaerobic capacity
tend to be his weaknesses since his lower body is not used as much in
pitching and movement is minimum.
SMART goals:
By the beginning of in-season/competitive season, the athletes overall
flexibility will increase by 3 inches.
By the beginning of in-season/competitive season, the athletes anaerobic
capacity, fatigue index will improve by 2 seconds
By the beginning of in-season/competitive season, the athletes agility
score will improve by .4 seconds
With increasing, power and strength of the upper arms will increase
pitching speed to 85 mph by March
Works Cited:

American Sport Education Program. (n.d.). Coaching Baseball Technical and Tactical

Skills. Retrieved April 12, 2016, from http://www.asep.com/

Frazier, T. (2007, December 30). Baseball Field Dimensions. Retrieved February 17,

2016, from

http://www.fraziersfieldrepair.com/BaseballSoftballFieldDimensions.html

Mac, B. (1997, January 1). BrianMac Sports Coach. Retrieved April 12, 2016, from

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/index.htm

Wood, R. J. (2010). Complete Guide to Fitness Testing. Topendsports.com. Retrieved

April 12, 2016, from http://www.topendsports.com/testing/