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Student Teaching edTPA Lesson Plan Template

Subject: 4th grade ELA using historical fiction. Central Focus: To compare and contrast different historical
fiction passages to determine the point of view.
Essential Standard/Common Core Objective:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.6
Compare and contrast the point of view from
which different stories are narrated, including Date submitted: Date taught: March 20, 2017
the difference between first- and third-person
narrations.

Daily Lesson Objective:


Performance- The students will be able to correctly answer specific questions and use evidence to determine the
point of view of a passage.
Conditions- The objective must be completed in both small group and independently.
Criteria- The students will complete the A Cabin in Syracuse, 1855 worksheet independently. Students must
receive at least 7 out of 10 points to meet the objective. These points are based on both completeness and
accuracy. 2 points for question one, 3 points for question two, 5 points for question three.

21st Century Skills: Academic Language Demand (Language Function and


Critical thinking Vocabulary):
Communication and collaboration Academic Language Demand: Compare and contrast
Vocabulary: point of view, narrator, first person, third person.

Prior Knowledge: Students should know what a historical fiction is. Students should know what the word
dialogue means and that dialogue is in quotation marks in the text. They should also know what the word
perspective means.

Activity Description of Activities and Setting Time


I will ask students if they know what point of view means.
I will have them turn and talk with a partner for one minute to
discuss the definition.
Point of view is the angle of considering things, which shows
us the opinion, or feelings of the individuals involved in a
situation. In literature, point of view is the mode of narration
that an author employs to let the readers hear and see 6 minutes
what takes place in a story
1. Focus and Review
The term point of view refers to who is telling a story, or who
is narrating it.
I will ask students if they know what a narrator is.
I will have a few students share what they think a narrator is to
the class.
A narrator is a person who tells a story; in literature, its the
voice that an author takes on to tell a story.

2. Statement of Today we are going to read different passages to help you compare
Objective and contrast first hand point of view and third hand point of view. 1 minute
for Student

I will explain that point of view is the perspective from which


a story is told to the reader. I will tell students that we will be
learning two different types of point of view.

I will introduce first person point of view by explaining that


the narrator is telling the story and is a character in the story. I 15 minutes
will discuss how sentences written in first person usually use
the pronouns I, me, and my.

I will introduce the third person point of view by explaining


that the narrator is telling the story from someone elses
viewpoint and the narrator is an observer - not a character in
the story. I will discuss how sentences in third person usually
use the pronouns, he, she, and they.

I will use a PowerPoint to show students the difference


between the two and the key words for both. The PowerPoint
will include first person point of view, third person point of
view, the keywords listed above and why dialogue is different
3. Teacher Input
than narration.
Students will be given a worksheet to fill out for first and third
person.
I will discuss how dialogue is not counted towards the point of
view of the story. If the words are in quotation marks, then
they are not counted. Dialogue is different than narration.
I will give brief examples of what the difference would sound
like in a passage.
Example 1: It was a warm summer day and I was playing
jump rope with my friends Ann and Beth. I have been
practicing all week and have gotten very good at double dutch.
My little brother Peter walked over to us and asked if he could
play too. I thought, Hes too little. Hell just mess up, so I
told him, No and he walked away. (first person)
Example 2: It was a warm summer day and Sarah was playing
jump rope with her friends Ann and Beth. She had been
practicing all week and gotten very good at double dutch.
Sarahs little brother Peter walked over to the girls and asked
if he could play too but the girls told him No. (third person)

4. Guided Practice Students will use historical fiction passage from reading street
to read in small groups. This passage is called Sailing Home
and is located on pages 520-531. 20 minutes
I will begin by introducing the story to students and having
them think about the name of the story Sailing Home and what
it may be about.
While reading, students will need to think about what point of
view the story is being told from, who is telling the story, and
what key words and examples from the passage helped them
determine that.
Have them think about what the story would look like if it
were being told from a different point of view.
We will come back together as a class and discuss this
passage.
The passage is told in first hand point of view and the person
telling the story is a character in it named Matilda. The
narrator (Matilda) uses words such as I our my.

Students will independently read a historical fiction passage


called A Cabin in Syracuse, 1855.
Students will complete a worksheet where they have to 15 minutes
5. Independent Practice
determine who is telling the story, what point of view the story
is being told in and what evidence from the text supports their
answers.

I will collect the A Cabin in Syracuse, 1855 worksheet that students


completed during the independent practice.
Students will receive 10 points in total for accurately completing the three
6. Assessment Methods
questions, 2 points for question one, 3 points for question two, and 5 points
of
for question three. They will receive points based off of accuracy and
all objectives/skills:
completeness.
To reach mastery, the student must receive 7 points or 70 percent.

Today we learned that a story can be told from a different point of view
or perspective. If the keywords in the story are I, me, my and we that is 3 minutes
a good indicator the story is in first person. If the keywords in the story
are he, she, they, him, and her that is a good indicator the story is in
7. Closure third person.

Remember that if there is dialogue going on in a story, that doesnt


affect the point of view. You want to focus on who is telling the story.

According to my criteria, the students must receive at least 7 of the 10 points to


reach mastery. After assessing students, the results came back that 71% of the 24
students reached that. These students gave good details in their answers and
8. Assessment Results of provided me with how they were able to get their answers. They correctly applied
all objectives/skills: what they learned during the lesson to the assessment. The 29% of the students who
did not reach mastery missed the questions almost in their entirety because they
confused third person point of view and first person point of view which affected all
of the questions asked.
Targeted Students Modifications/Accommodations Student/Small Group Modifications/Accommodations

For struggling readers, the teacher can allow them The teacher should provide scaffolding to students during
to read with a partner or have the passage and guided practice. For students who are struggling, the
questions read to them by the teacher. The guided teacher can pull them into a small group and review the
practice should be interactive to accommodate material.
students. Early finishers can get on iready and
work on their reading skills.
Materials/Technology:
PowerPoint
Computer
Smart board
Reading passages
Worksheets for independent practice
Worksheets for teacher input
Reading street books for passage
Pencils