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Modellierung
und Simulation

Strip theory
(Material is taken from
http://www.amarcon.com/fileadmin/user_upload/Documentation/1370-StripTheory-03.pdf)

UNIVERSITY OF ROSTOCK | CHAIR OF MODELLING AND SIMULATION


Assumptions
Strip theory considers a ship to be made up of a finite number of
transverse two dimensional slices, which are rigidly connected
to each other.
Each slice is treated hydrodynamically as if it is a segment of an
infinitely long floating cylinder;

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Assumptions
All waves which are produced by the oscillating ship
(hydromechanic loads) and the diffracted waves (wave loads) are
assumed to travel parallel to the (y, z )-plane - of the ship.
The fore and aft side of the body (such as a pontoon) does not
produce waves in the x -direction.
For the zero forward speed case, interactions between the cross
sections are ignored.

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Assumptions

Strip theory is valid for long and slender bodies only.

In spite of this restriction, experiments have shown that strip theory


can be applied successfully for floating bodies with a length to
breadth ratio larger than three, L / B 3 , at least from a
practical point of view.

UNIVERSITY OF ROSTOCK | CHAIR OF MODELLING AND SIMULATION 4


Assumptions

The appearance of two-dimensional surge forces seems strange here. Then, the 2-
D hydrodynamic sway coefficients of this equivalent cross section are translated
to 2-D hydrodynamic surge coefficients by an empirical method based on
theoretical results from three-dimensional calculations and these coefficients are
used to determine 2-D loads

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Account for the ship velocity

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Force representation

Ordinary strip theory by Korvin-Kroukovsky & Jacobs

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Mathematical problem formulation
The two-dimensional nature of the problem implies three
degrees of freedom of motion:
vertical or heave,
horizontal or sway and
rotational about a horizontal axis or roll.

The following assumptions are made:


the fluid is incompressible and inviscid,
the effects of surface tension are negligible,
the fluid is irrotational and
the motion amplitudes and velocities are small enough that
all but the linear terms of the free-surface condition, the
kinematic boundary condition on the cylinder and the
Bernoulli equation may be neglected.

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Mathematical problem formulation

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Mathematical problem formulation

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Franks method of pulsating sources

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Franks method of pulsating sources

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Franks method of pulsating sources

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Franks method of pulsating sources

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Franks method of pulsating sources

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