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EBP Putting Evidence to Practice in Speech Sound Disorders
EBP Putting Evidence to Practice in Speech Sound Disorders

EBP

Putting Evidence to Practice in Speech Sound Disorders

EBP Putting Evidence to Practice in Speech Sound Disorders
EBP Putting Evidence to Practice in Speech Sound Disorders
EBP Putting Evidence to Practice in Speech Sound Disorders
EBP Putting Evidence to Practice in Speech Sound Disorders
Tonight’s Discussion ➢   EBP: I remember something about that! ➢   EBP is great

Tonight’s Discussion

EBP: I remember something about that!

EBP is great

Avoiding quackery, pseudoscience, & frivolous fads Sifting through all of the medical lit to find ‘gold’ How can I apply this concept to my daily practice? A quick & (relatively) painless quiz!

but

I have no time.

How can I apply this concept to my daily practice? ➢   A quick & (relatively)

A quick refresher

A quick refresher
A quick refresher

PBE: EBP 2.0

PBE: EBP 2.0 ●   ASHA’s Principles of Ethics requires SLPs to monitor treatment effectiveness

ASHA’s Principles of Ethics requires SLPs to monitor treatment effectiveness

Before jumping to treat SSDs consider the EBP -   -   -   -

Before jumping to treat SSDs consider the EBP

-

-

-

-

Seven steps to effective EBP in an ideal world Barriers in the real world Networks & groups: making EBP manageable Following the evidence and Australia’s example

Barriers in the real world Networks & groups: making EBP manageable Following the evidence and Australia’s
Barriers in the real world Networks & groups: making EBP manageable Following the evidence and Australia’s
Barriers in the real world Networks & groups: making EBP manageable Following the evidence and Australia’s
manageable Following the evidence and Australia’s example Baker, E., & McLeod, S. (2011). Evidence-based practice

Baker, E., & McLeod, S. (2011). Evidence-based practice for children with speech sound disorders:

Part 1 narrative review. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 42(2), 102-139.

How to quit following the herd and avoid the quacks (or how to embrace your

How to quit following the herd and avoid the quacks

(or how to embrace your inner skeptic)

and avoid the quacks (or how to embrace your inner skeptic) Lof, G. L. (2011). Science-based
and avoid the quacks (or how to embrace your inner skeptic) Lof, G. L. (2011). Science-based

Lof, G. L. (2011). Science-based practice and the speech-language pathologist. International journal of speech-language pathology, 13(3), 189–96.

If it quacks like a duck

1.Quackery seldom looks crazy 2.Pseudoscientific jargon 3.Anecdotes & Testimonials 4.Claims that treatment works for large range of unrelated problems 5. Despiration

Barrett, 1997

Testimonials 4.   Claims that treatment works for large range of unrelated problems 5. Despiration Barrett,

How do we stay up to date with current literature?

How do we stay up to date with current literature? Straus, S. E., & Sackett, D.

Straus, S. E., & Sackett, D. L. (1998). Using research findings in clinical practice. British Medical Journal, 317, 339–342.

3 ways to change thought process

our

Guide to EBP

…“current, high-quality research evidence is integrated with practitioner expertise and client preferences and values into the clinical making decisions.”

expertise and client preferences and values into the clinical making decisions.” Guide to EBP: Linguisystem (2009)

Guide to EBP: Linguisystem (2009)

Clinical Integration

What’s working and what isn’t:

- Thoughts based on your clinical experiences thus far?

Clinical Integration What’s working and what isn’t: -   Thoughts based on your clinical experiences thus

Questions

1.According to Lof, one way we can avoid being “quacked” is by being a skeptic. This means that we should:

a.Not believe anything unless seen with your own eyes and used in your own practice. b.Only try methods that other clinicians whom you trust have tried and recommend.

c.

investigate all claims, even ones that sound legitimately scientific. d.Avoid trusting and using newer methods; until a method has at least a decade for clinicians to find problems and tweak it, it’s not trustworthy.

Be willing to trust all claims--even very peculiar ones--and stringently

2. According to Baker and McLeod, how can SLPs alleviate the time burden of EBP?

a.Form clubs or networks of clinicians to evaluate and discuss evidence pertaining to specific clinical topics. b.Only consider search results from the first page of results on electronic search engines such as Google Scholar.

c.

Decrease the amount of time spent evaluating evidence by reading just the abstract and conclusion.

d.Phone an opinionated friend and ask what they think.

3. The first step in the EBP process is to develop a question to help identify an answerable

clinical question.

a.PICO

b.CHIO

c.ICCO

d.IPCO

4. If there is no evidence for a particular method/type of therapy, we should avoid using it. T/F?

a.False! We can use indirect evidence (ie look at studies with adults if

there is no info on kids) and transfer the evidence is applicable. If

there is limited research-PhD opportunity?

b.False! We should use every type of tx evidence we find, even if it’s

contradictory to ethical practice.

True! We should avoid tx if no one has researched it before.

c.

d.True! We should refrain from researching any further and stop tx with that client if we can’t find evidence for a particular method of tx.

ASHA resources for EBP

guidelines and systematic reviews

http://www.asha.org/members/ebp/compendium/

systematic reviews grouped by year

http://www.asha.org/members/reviews.aspx

clinical practice guidelines grouped by year

http://www.asha.org/members/guidelines.aspx

References:

Baker, E., & McLeod, S. (2011a). Evidence-based practice for children with speech sound disorders: Part 1 narrative review. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 42(2), 102-139.

Baker, E., & McLeod, S. (2011b). Speech-language pathologists’ assessment and intervention practices for childhood speech sound disorders [Powerpoint slides].

Guide to EBP: Linguisystem (2009)

Lof, G. L. (2011). Science-based practice and the speech-language pathologist. International journal of speech-language pathology, 13(3), 189–96. doi:10.3109/17549507.2011.528801

NSW Speech Pathology EBP Network (n.d.). Retrieved from: http://nswspeechpathologyebp.com

SpeechBITE (n.d.). Retrieved from: http://speechbite.com/ebp/links/

Straus, S. E., & Sackett, D. L. (1998). Using research findings in clinical practice. British Medical Journal, 317,

339–342.