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EXTERNAL FORCED CONVECTION

Prabal Talukdar

Associate Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering IIT Delhi E-mail: prabal@mech.iitd.ac.in

b a l T a l u kd ar Associate Professor De p artment of Mechanical

Fluid flow over solid bodies frequently occurs in practice, and it is responsible for numerous physical phenomena such as the drag force acting on the automobiles, power lines, trees, and underwater pipelines; the lift developed by airplane wings; upward draft of rain, snow, hail, and dust particles in high winds; and the cooling of metal or plastic sheets, steam and hot water pipes, and extruded wires.

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2

P.Talukdar/Mech-IITD

What is Drag?

What is Dra g ? Drag is a mechanical force. It is generated by the interaction

Drag is a mechanical force. It is generated by the interaction and contact of a solid body with a fluid. For drag to be generated, the solid body must be in contact with the fluid. If there is no fluid, there is no drag. Drag is generated by the difference in velocity between the solid object and the fluid

There must be motion between the object and the fluid. If there is no motion, there is no drag. It makes no difference whether the object moves through a static fluid or whether the fluid moves past a static solid object. Drag acts in a direction that opposes the motion. (Lift acts perpendicular to the motion.)

•We can think of drag as friction, and one of the sources of drag is the skin friction between the molecules of the fluid and the solid surface of object.

• Because the skin friction is an interaction between a solid and a gas, the

magnitude of the skin friction depends on properties of both solid and gas.

• For the solid, a smooth, waxed surface produces less skin friction.

• For the gas, the magnitude depends on the viscosity of the air

•This source of drag depends on the shape of the aircraft and is called form drag.

•As air flows around a body, the local velocity and pressure are changed. A varying pressure distribution will produce a force on the body.

•We can determine the magnitude of the force by integrating (or adding up) the local pressure times the surface area around the entire body.

•The component of the force that is opposed to the motion is the drag;

•The component perpendicular to the motion is the lift.

Factors that affect dra g

The Object Aircraft geometry has a large effect on the amount of drag generated. As with lift, the drag depends linearly on the size of the object moving through the air. The cross-sectional shape of an object determines the form drag created by the pressure variation around the object. If we think of drag as aerodynamic friction, then the amount of drag depends on the surface roughness of the object; a smooth, waxed surface will produce less drag than a roughened surface. This effect is called skin friction and is usually included in the drag coefficient.

effect is called skin friction and is usually i nc luded i n th e d

Motion of the Air Drag is associated with the movement of the aircraft through the air, so drag will then depend on the velocity of the air. Like lift, drag actually varies with the square of the velocity between the object and the air. How the object is inclined to the flow will also affect the amount of drag generated. If the object moves through the air at speeds near the speed of sound, shock waves may be formed on the object which create an additional drag component called wave drag. The motion of the object through the air also causes boundary layers to form on the object. A boundary layer is a region of very low speed flow near the surface which contributes to the skin friction. Properties of the Air Drag depends directly on the mass of the flow going past the aircraft. The drag also depends in a complex way on two other properties of the air: its viscosity and its compressibility. These factors affect the wave drag and skin friction which are described above. We can gather all of this information on the factors that affect drag into a single mathematical equation called the Drag Equation. With the drag equation we can predict how much drag force will be generated by a given body moving at a given speed through a given fluid.

Friction and Pressure Drag
Friction and Pressure Drag

The drag force is the net force exerted by a fluid on a body in the direction of flow due to the combined effects of wall shear and pressure forces. The

part of drag that is due directly to wall shear stress τ

friction drag (or just friction drag) since it is caused by frictional effects, and

the part that is due directly to pressure P is called the pressure drag (also called the form drag because of its strong dependence on the form or shape of the body). When the friction and pressure drag coefficients are available, the total drag coefficient is determined by simply adding them,

is called the skin

w

C

D

= C

D,friction

+ C

D,pressure

The drag force F D depends on the density of the fluid, the upstream velocity, and the size, shape, and orientation of the body, among other things.

The drag characteristics of a body is represented by the dimensionless drag

coefficient C D defined as

1

F

D

C

D

=

2

2

ρ V A

P.Talukdar/Mech-IITD

7

When a fluid is forced to flow over a curved surface at sufficiently high velocities, it will detach itself from the surface of the body. The low-pressure region behind the body where recirculating and back flows occur is called the separation region. The larger the separation area is, the larger the pressure drag will be.

The effects of flow separation are felt far downstream in the form of reduced velocity
The effects of flow separation are felt far
downstream in the form of reduced velocity
(relative to the upstream velocity). The
region of flow trailing the body where the
effect of the body on velocity is felt is called
the wake.
The separated region comes to an end when the two flow streams reattach,
but the wake keeps growing behind the body until the fluid in the wake region
regains its velocity. The viscous effects are the most significant in the
boundary layer, the separated region, and the wake. The flow outside these
regions can be considered to be inviscid.
P.Talukdar/Mech-IITD
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Frictional drag comes from friction between the fluid and the surfaces over which it is flowing . This friction is associated with the development of boundary layers, and it scales with Reynolds number as we have seen above.

Pressure drag comes from the eddying motions that are set up in the fluid by the passage of the body. This drag is associated with the formation of a wake.

Formally, both types of drag are due to viscosity (if the body was moving through an inviscid fluid there would be no drag at all), but the distinction is useful because the two types of drag are due to different flow phenomena.

F r i c ti ona l d rag i s i mpor tant for attached flows (that i s, there i s no separation), and it is related to the surface area exposed to the flow. Pressure drag is important for separated flows, and it is rel ated to t he crosssectiona l area o f th e b o d y.

For the flow of an “idealized” fluid with zero viscosity past a body, both the friction drag and pressure drag are zero regardless of the shape of the body.

a body, both the friction drag and pressure drag are zero regardless of the shape of

Two Opposite Situation

Two O pp osite Situation Drag force acting on a flat plate normal to flow depends

Drag force acting on a flat plate normal to flow depends on the pressure only and is independent of the wall shear, which acts normal to flow

independent of the wall shear, which acts normal to flow For parallel flow over a flat

For parallel flow over a flat plate, the pressure drag is zero, and thus the drag coefficient is equal to the friction coefficient and the drag force is equal to the friction force

Heat Transfer Coefficient

Nu

x

=

*

f (x , Re

1

Nu = C.Re

m

L

.Pr

x

n

, Pr)

Laminar flow

Turbulent flow

Nu

Nu

x

x

 

h

x

.x

=

 

k

 

h

x

.x

=

k

P.Talukdar/Mech-IITD

&

Nu

=

f (Re

2

= 0.332 Re

0.5

x

.Pr

1 3
1
3

= 0.0296 Re

0.8

x

.Pr

1 3
1
3

L

, Pr)

Pr > 0.6

0.6 Pr 60 5 x 10 5 Re x 10 7

Parallel flow over flat plate

The transition from laminar to turbulent flow depends on the surface geometry, surface roughness, upstream velocity, surface temperature, and the type of fluid, among other things, and is best characterized by the Reynolds number.

The Reynolds number at a distance x from the leading edge of a flat plate is expressed as

Re

x

=

P.Talukdar/Mech-IITD

ρVx V.x

μ

=

ν

expressed as Re x = P.Talukdar/Mech-IITD ρ Vx V.x μ = ν For flow over a

For flow over a flat

late critical Re

p

,

Re

cr

=

ρ Vx

cr

μ

= 5x10

5

13

Friction Coefficient

Laminar flow

Turbulent flow

δ

δ

v,x

v,x

=

5x

ReL am i nar fl ow Turbulent flow δ δ v,x v,x = 5x x 0.382x

x

0.382x

=

1

5

Re

x

&

&

C

f ,x

C

f ,x

=

0.664 1 Re 2 x
0.664
1
Re
2
x

0.0592

=

1

5

Re

x

R

e x

< 5

x

10 5

5 x 10 5 Re x 10 7

Average values

Re L < 5 x 10 5

Laminar flow

5 x 10 5 Re L 10 7

Turbulent flow

C

f =

C

f =

1.328

1 Re 2 L 0.074 1 Re 5 L
1
Re
2
L
0.074
1
Re
5
L

In some cases, a flat plate is sufficiently long for the flow to become turbulent, but not long enough to disregard the laminar flow region

C

f

=

1

L

x

cr C

0

f ,x _ la min ar

dx

+

L

x cr

C

f ,x _ turbulent

dx

⎞ ⎟ ⎟ ⎠

The average friction coefficient over the entire plate is determined to be

0.074 1742 C − f = 1 5 Re Re L L P.Talukdar/Mech-IITD
0.074
1742
C
f =
1
5 Re
Re
L
L
P.Talukdar/Mech-IITD

5 x 10 5 Re L 10 7

Taking the critical Reynolds number to be Re cr = 5 x 10 5

15

C f for turbulent flow

For laminar flow, the friction coefficient depends on only the Reynolds number, and the surface roughness has no effect.

For turbulent flow, however, surface roughness causes the friction coefficient to increase severalfold, to the point that in fully turbulent regime the friction coefficient is a function of surface roughness alone, and independent of the Reynolds number

A curve fit of experimental data for the average friction coefficient in this regime is given by Schlichting as

Rough surface, turbulent flow

C

f

= ⎜

1 89

.

1 62 l

.

og

turbulent flow C f ⎛ = ⎜ ⎝ 1 89 . 1 62 l − .

ε ⎞

L

2.5

In the absence of a better

relation, this relation can be used

for turbulent flow on rough

surfaces for Re > l0 6 especially

when ε/L > 10 -4 .

,

Variation with x

V ariation with x Laminar flow Turbulent flow P.Talukdar/Mech-IITD Nu = h x .x x k

Laminar flow

Turbulent flow

P.Talukdar/Mech-IITD

Nu

=

h

x .x

x k

= 0.332 Re

0.5 .Pr

x

1 3
1
3
0.664 C = Re x < 5 x 10 5 f ,x 1 Re 2
0.664
C
=
Re x < 5 x 10 5
f ,x
1
Re
2
x
h
x .x
1
0.8
Nu
=
= 0.0296 Re
.Pr
3
x
x
k
0.0592
5 x 10 5 ≤ Re x ≤ 10 7
C
=
f ,x
1
Re
5
x

Pr > 0.6

0.6 Pr 60 5 x 10 5 Re x 10 7

Average Coefficient

Average quantities

Laminar flow

Turbulent flow

Nu =

Nu =

C =

D

h =

1

L

1

L

L

0

L

0

C

D,x

dx

h

x

dx

h.L

k

h.L

k

= 0.664 Re

0.5

L

= 0.037 Re

0.8

L

.Pr

.Pr

1 3 1 3
1
3
1
3

Pr > 0.6 Re x < 5 x 10 5

0.6 Pr 60 5 x 10

5

Re x 10

7

h for combined laminar and turbulent flow

In some cases, a flat plate is sufficiently long for the flow to become turbulent, but not long enough to disregard the laminar flow region

h =

1

L

x

cr h

0

x,la min ar

dx

+

L

x cr

h

x,turbulent

dx

The average h over the entire plate is determined to be

Turbulent flow

Nu =

h L

.

k

=

(

0.037 Re

0.8

L

)

871 .Pr

60 5 x 10 5 ≤ Re L ≤ 10 7 60 5 x 10 5 ≤ Re L ≤ 10 7 60 5 x 10 5 Re L 10 7

0 6 P

.

r

Taking the critical Reynolds number to be Re cr = 5 x 10 5

Liquid metals such as mercury have high thermal conductivities. However, they have very small Prandtl numbers, and thus the thermal boundary layer develops much faster than the velocity boundary layer. Then we can assume the velocity in the thermal boundary layer to be constant at the free stream value and solve the energy equation. It

gives

h

x .x

(

= 0.565 Re .Pr

x

1 ) 2
1
)
2

Nu

Pr < 0.05

=

x k

It is desirable to have a single correlation that applies to all fluids, including liquid metals

Churchill and Ozoe :

Nu

=

h

x

.x

x k

=

1 0.3387 Re 0.5 .Pr 3 x 1 2 ⎡ ( 4 ⎤ 0.0468 )
1
0.3387 Re
0.5 .Pr
3
x
1
2
(
4
0.0468
)
3
1 +
Pr

Applicable for all Prandtl numbers and is claimed to be accurate to 1%,