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ICT Semester IV

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Course Title : CS 202 Title : Database Management Systems Credit Structure (Lecture-Practical-Total Credits) : 3 - 3 – 4.5 Prerequisites:

Computer Programming Discrete Mathematics Data Structures and Algorithms

Contents Data Models, Relational databases, Relation, Relational Schema, Relational Database Design Methodology, Entity-Relationship Model, Normalization of Forms, Relational Algebra, Relational Calculus, Structured Query Language, Database Transactions, and Concurrency

Textbook(s)

1. Database System Concepts, 6th edition, Avi Silberschatz, Henry F. Korth, S.

Sudarshan, Tata McGraw-Hill Reference books

2. A First Course in Database Systems, 2/e, Jeffrey D. Ullman, Jennifer Widom, Pearson

Education

3. Fundamentals of Database Systems, 5th ed., Ramez Elmasri and Shamkant B. Navathe, Pearson Education

Course outcomes:

A student passing this course will have acquired the following abilities:

The students will be able

• To design and implement relational databases for a mid-size real-life scenarios

• To write and execute queries written in SQL to process and manipulate databases

• To understand and resolve concurrency issues involved in a multi-user environment

Detailed Content:

Topic

No. of hours

Introduction: Basic Definitions, Data Storage, and Queries

3

Data Models, Entity-Relationship Model, Conceptual Design using E-R Model, Relational Model: Introduction, Integrity Constraints, Relational Database Design Methodology

10

Relational Algebra, Introduction to Structured Query Language (Data Definition Language, Data Manipulation Language), Intermediate SQL, Advanced SQL

12

Application Design and Development

2

Database Design & Tuning: Functional Dependency, Normal Forms, Decomposition, Normalization, Schema Refinement

6

Transaction Management: ACID property, Concurrency Control: Snapshot Isolation, Weak Levels of Consistency, Lock based, Multiple Granularity, Optimistic, Optimistic 2PL, Timestamp, Multiversion, Recovery System: LOG, LOG Records, ARIES, backups

6

Physical Database Design, Query Processing, Query Optimization

2

Total theory hours

41

ICT Semester IV

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Course Code : DS 202 Title: User Centred Design II Credit Structure (Lecture-Practical-Total Credits) : 3 - 3 – 4.5 Prerequisites: None

Contents As a follow up to Semester 1, the students will be further exposed to the fundamentals of user centered design which are directly applicable to ICT product development. This semester the students will be taught fundamentals of interaction and user interface design. The students

will gain an understanding of the following areas:

interface The students will have hands on experience in working in several team based and individual projects. The students will develop working prototypes of two interdisciplinary projects by applying design principals together with electronics and computers science. The students will be exposed to relevant books, research papers in class and be exposed to making presentations

(A) Basics of interaction design (B) User

Textbook

Universal Principles of Design, William Lidwell , Kritina Holden, Jill Butler

Reference books

Sketching User Experiences: Getting the Design Right and the Right Design (Interactive Technologies), Bill Buxton

Course outcomes:

Knowledge of User centered design, interface design and interaction design. Problem solving Hands on experience design and development of ICT based product Ability to conceptualize products and related rationale that led to the concept generation. Knowledge of interdisciplinary project work Team work Secondary and primary research Presentation Skills, critiquing skills, analyzing strengths and weakness of a given design

Detailed Content:

(MD multidisciplinary Lab, CS is computer science and VS is Venture Studio)

1 User interface Design MD and CS

2 User interface Design MD and CS

3 User interface Design MD and CS

4 Information Design MD and CS

5 Information Design MD and CS

6 Information Design MD and CS

7 Form Design Venture Studio

8 Form Design Venture Studio

9 Form Design Venture Studio

10 System Design MD and CS

11 System Design MD and CS

12 System Design MD and CS

13 Interaction Design MD and CS

14 Interaction Design MD and CS

15 Interaction Design MD and CS

ICT Semester IV

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Course Code : EC 202 Title: Analog & Digital Communications Credit Structure (Lecture-Practical-Total Credits) : 3 - 3 – 4.5 Prerequisites: Signals & Systems

Contents:

Resonant circuits : Series and parallel resonant circuits. Loaded and unloaded Qs. Bandwidth Calculations. L-C Oscillators. Mixers. Continuous wave modulation :

AM, FM and PM systems. Time domain and frequency domain descriptions. Frequency division multiplexing. Superheterodyne receivers. Noise analysis of AM,FM and PM systems. Pulse Modulation :

Sampling and quantization. PCM. TDM. Noise in PCM. Baseband demodulation and detection :

Vectorial view of signals and noise. Matched filter and correlator. Error probability calculations. ISI and equalization. Bandpass modulation and detection :

BPSK, BFSK,MPSK, MFSK schemes and their comparisons. Shannon Hartley capacity theorem. Modulation and coding trade-offs. Power limited and Bandwidth limited systems.

Textbook(s) :

Communication Systems : By Simon Haykin Digital Communications : By Bernard Sklar

Reference books : Digital & Analog Communications by B.P.Lathi Course outcomes: A student passing this course will have acquired the following abilities:

Distinguish between analog and digital communication systems Able to do analysis of resonant circuits Understand various schemes for generation and detection of analog and digital modulation signals Understand the performance measures of analog and digital communication systems.

Detailed Content:

Topic

No. of hours

Introduction

1

Resonant circuits

2

Oscillators and mixers

2

Amplitude modulation: AM-DSB-SC: SSB

4

Frequency and Phase modulation

4

Noise performance of various systems.S/N ratios

4

Formatting & Baseband modulation in digital communication

3

Baseband Demodulation

5

Bandpass modulation BPSK & BFSK ,MPSK,MFSK QAM

5

Detection of various digital modulation schemes

5

Error performance of various digital modulation schemes

5

ICT Semester IV

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Course Code : EC 206 Title: Embedded Systems Design Credit Structure (Lecture-Practical-Total Credits) : 3 - 3 – 4.5 Prerequisites: Computer Organization and Programming, Digital Logic Design, C- Programming

Contents Definition of Embedded System, Embedded Systems Vs General Computing Systems, History of Embedded Systems, Classification, Major Application Areas, Purpose of Embedded systems

Overview of Microcontrollers, Differentiation between Processors & Microcontrollers, Different types of Memory (RAM, ROM, EPROM, EEPROM, FLASH), The 8051 Microcontroller and its Architecture, Different types of Advanced Microcontrollers and their comparison

Introduction to AVR Microcontrollers, AVR architecture, RISC architecture of AVR, Addressing modes, Instruction set, I/O Ports, Interrupts, Timers & Counters, C- programming, Programming examples

Embedded System Components & Peripherals: Analog-to-Digital (ADC) & Digital-to- Analog (DAC) Converters, Wired Communication standards and protocols such as Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter (UART), RS232, RS485, I2C, SPI, Input interfacing – keypad, Temperature Sensor, PIR Motion Sensor, Output interfacing – LED, 7-Segment Display, LCD, Relays, Special Interfacing of Flash Memory, Real Time Clock (RTC)

Textbook(s) The AVR Microcontroller and Embedded Systems – By Muhammad Ali Maxidi, Sarmad Naimi and Sepehr Naimi

Reference books Embedded C programming and the Atmel AVR – Barnett, Cox, & O’Cull, The 8051 microcontroller and Embedded System – By Mazidi, Mazidi and Mckinlay ( 2nd edition) for ‘C’ programming examples, ATMega32 Datasheet

Course outcomes:

A student passing this course will have acquired the following abilities:

The objective of the embedded systems and software Design course is to present to the student the Computing Devices, associated Peripherals and Networks along with High Level Software (C) and low level language (Assembly) which are used in the design of a modern day embedded system. Students will be able to explore various hardware kits used to design any embedded system. In summary, this course is to provide an understanding of the various components and design philosophy of a contemporary embedded system.

Detailed Content:

Topic

No. of

hours

Definition of Embedded System, Embedded Systems Vs General Computing Systems, History of Embedded Systems, Classification, Major Application

3

ICT Semester IV

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Areas, Purpose of Embedded systems

 

Overview of Microcontrollers, Differentiation between Processors & Microcontrollers, Different types of Memory (RAM, ROM, EPROM, EEPROM, FLASH), The 8051 Microcontroller and its Architecture, Different types of Advanced Microcontrollers and their comparison

6

Introduction to AVR Microcontrollers, AVR architecture, RISC architecture of AVR, Addressing modes, Instruction set, C-programming, Programming examples

10

Embedded System Components & Peripherals: Analog-to-Digital (ADC) &

 

Digital-to-Analog (DAC) Converters, Wired Communication standards and

protocols such as Universal

Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter (UART),

RS232, RS485, I2C, SPI, Input interfacing – keypad, Temperature Sensor, PIR Motion Sensor, Output interfacing – LED, 7-Segment Display, LCD, Relays, Special Interfacing of Flash Memory, Real Time Clock (RTC)

15

Project Discussions

3

System Overviews

3

ICT Semester IV

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Course Code : HS 202

Title: Economics

Credit Structure (Lecture-Practical-Total Credits) : 3 - 0 – 3

Prerequisites: None

Contents

Introduction, Time value of money, Demand and supply, Production and cost concepts, Market, Capital budgeting, Depreciation and cost analysis, National income accounting, Money and banking, economic reforms

Reference books

1. Varshney R L and Maheswari K L, Managerial Economics, S.Chand & Co.

2. PanneerSelvam, R, “Engineering Economics”, Prentice Hall of India Ltd, New Delhi.

3. Introduction to Microeconomics and Macroeconomics”, H.L. Ahuja, S.Chand Publishers, New

Delhi.

4. Suma Damodaran, “ Managerial economics”, Oxford university press.

5. Samuelson P A and Nordhaus W D, Economics, Tata McGraw Hill.

6. James L Riggs, David D. Bedworth, Engineering Economics, Tata McGraw Hill.

Detailed Content:

UNIT 1.

Micro and Macro Economics, Relationship between Science, Engineering, Technology and Economic Development. Production Possibility Curve, Nature of Economic Laws. UNIT 2. Time Value of Money Concepts and application. Capital budgeting; Traditional and modern methods, Payback period method, IRR, ARR, NPV, PI (with the help of case studies) UNIT 3. DEMAND AND SUPPLY Meaning of Demand, Law of Demand, Elasticity of Demand; meaning, factors effecting it and its practical application and importance. Demand forecasting (a brief explanation), meaning of supply, law of supply, elasticity of supply, factors affecting supply. UNIT 4. PRODUCTION AND COST CONCEPTS Meaning of Production and factors of production, Law of variable proportions and returns to scale.Internal and external economies and diseconomies of scale.Law of variable proportions and laws of returns to scale.Concepts of cost of production, different types of costs; accounting cost, sunk cost, marginal cost, Opportunity cost. Break even analysis, UNIT 5. MARKET Meaning of market, types of market, perfect competition, Monopoly, Monopolistic, Oligopoly. (Main features). Supply and law of supply, Role of demand and supply in price determination, Price Discrimination, Duopoly or Non-Collusive Oligopoly, Collusive Oligopoly UNIT 6. CAPITAL BUDGETING Need for capital budgeting – method of apprising project profitability – rate of return method, payback period method, present value comparisons method, cost benefit analysis. UNIT 7. DEPRECIATION AND COST ANALYSIS

Introduction to the subject

ICT Semester IV

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Causes of depreciation, objectives, methods of computing depreciation, simple problems.Breakeven analysis, break even point – assumptions, breakeven chart, uses of breakeven analysis, simple problems. Financial statements – cash flow statement, profit and loss account, balance sheet and evaluation of projected financial statements.

UNIT 8. National Income Accounting Basic issues studied in macroeconomics; measurement of gross domestic product; income, expenditure and the circular flow; real versus nominal GDP; price indices; UNIT 9. MONEY AND BANKING Value of money – inflation – deflation, banking- commercial bank and its functions, central bank and its functions.New economic environment – globalisation, liberalisation and privatisation. Unit 10. Economic Reforms An Introduction; Globalization: Meaning, Merits and Demerits, Impact of globalization on Indian economy; Privatization:Meaning, Merits and Demerits, Steps of Indian Economy towardsprivatization ; Elementary concepts of VAT, WTO, GATT and TRIPS

ICT Semester IV

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Course Code : MA 202

Title: Probability and Random Processes

Credit Structure (Lecture-Practical-Total Credits) : 4 - 0 – 4

Prerequisites: Calculus

Course content Probability Introduction to probability, Revision on basic set theory: Union, intersection, difference, Basics of probability: Random experiments, events, sample space with examples, classical definition of probability, relative frequency definition, axiomatic definition, conditional probability and its axioms, properties of conditional probability, joint probability, independent events, mutually exclusive events, Baye's theorem, Trials: Bernoulli trial, Binomial law and approximation, Poisson law and approximation. Random variables (RV) Mathematical preliminaries on functions and continuity, Definition and axioms, probability distribution function (PDF), cumulative distribution function, their properties, types of RV:

discrete, continuous, mixed, probability mass function (pmf), probability density functions(pdf) for continuous and mixed RV's, its properties, conditional distribution and density function and their properties, Total probability theorem and Baye's rule, functions of RV, statistics of RV: Expectation, variance, moments, their properties, inequalities:

Chebysev, Markov, characteristic functions of RV its relationship with the moments, important discrete RV: Bernoulli, Binomial, Uniform, exponential, Gaussian, their statistics, Generation of random numbers, joint probability distribution function, marginal distribution functions, joint probability density functions and their properties, joint distribution of RV, conditional pmf, PDF, pdf and their properties, Baye's rule for discrete, continuous and mixed RV's, transformation of two RV and their PDF and pdf, joint probability density function of two RV, Expectation of functions of RV (joint Expectation), conditional Expectation of function of RV, Bayesian estimation theory, likelihood function, minimum mean square error (MMSE) estimator, RV and vector space, Schwarz inequality, orthogonal RV, MMSE estimation, Linear mean square estimation (LMSE), Convergence of sequence of RV, convergence in mean square sense, Cauchy criterion, convergence in probability sense, Law of large numbers (strong and weak), central limit theorem: proof and importance. Random (Stochastic) processes (RP) Introduction and Definition, continuous and discrete time process, moments of RP, Gaussian RP, Bernoulli RP, mean and autocorrelation, independence and uncorrelated process, Independent and Identically Distributed Process, its moments: mean, variance, covariance, correlation. Important RP: Random walk, Markov process, Wiener process, Poisson Processes, Stationary RP, strict sense stationary (SSS), Wide-sense stationary process (WSS) their mean, variance, autocorrelation function, continuity (mean square) of RP, Differentiability of RP, Time average of RP, mean and variance of time averages, Ergodicity principle, spectral visualization(Fourier representation) of the Real WSS. Power spectral density (PSD) and its properties, relationship between PSD and autocorrelation function: Wiener-Khinchin-Einstein theorem, cross PSD and its properties, white noise process, band limitation in white noise, Linear systems and signal estimation in presence of noise, Band pass RP, its quadrature representation, Hilbert transformer. Text:

ICT Semester IV

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Papoulis, A, and S. U. Pillai (2002), Probability, Random Variables and Stochastic Processes, 4th Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill.

References:(Partial list)

1. A first Course in Probability, Sheldon Ross, 9th Edition, 2012, Pearson

2. Johnson, R. A., and Gupta, C. B. “Miller and Freund’s Probability and Statistics for Engineers.” Pearson Education.

3. Grimmett, Geoffrey, and David Stirzaker. Probability and Random Processes. 3rd ed. Oxford University Press, 2001.

Video lectures

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-041-probabilistic-systems-

analysis-and-applied-probability-fall-2010/video-lectures/

http://nptel.iitm.ac.in/courses/111102014/

Course outcome: At the end of course

Students would attain sufficient maturity to apply probability and stochastic theory.

They will be able to visualize probabilistic view point of the problem as the extension of deterministic view point.

Understand different probabilistic view points based on deductive theory, axiomatic and frequentist approach.

Students will be able to apply basic estimation theory to the Engineering problem specifically in signal processing domain.