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Views from the balcony: Playing


Romeo and Juliet
Table of Contents
Introduction
Unit 1: Knowing Romeo and Juliet
Lesson 1: How did we get here?
Opening the lesson
Main activities
Plenary
Lesson 2: Who do you think you are?
Opening the lesson
Main activity
Plenary
Unit 2: My space character, movement and stage space
Lesson 3: Interpretation
Opening the lesson
Main activities
Plenary
Unit 3: 'Shall I compare thee?'

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Lesson 4: Developing understanding of imagery


Opening the lesson
Main activity
Plenary
Lesson 5: The devil's in the detail!
Opening the lesson
Main activity
Plenary
Unit 4: Testing the words
Lesson 6: Juliet's character
Opening the lesson
Main activities
Plenary
Unit 5: Love and danger themes in language
Lesson 7: How to write and respond coherently
Opening the lesson
Main activities
Plenary
Lesson 8: Close analysis of the language
Opening the lesson
Main activity

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Plenary
Unit 6: Juliet's judgement
Lesson 9: Getting inside Juliet's head
Opening the lesson
Main activities
Plenary
Unit 7: Who's the daddy?
Lesson 10: Reviewing plot and key events
Opening the lesson
Main activities
Plenary
Lesson 11: Looking more widely at Shakespeare's ideas
Opening the lesson
Main activities
Plenary
Unit 8: Other Juliets
Lesson 12: Reviews
Opening the lesson
Main activities
Plenary
Unit 9: Extended writing on Act 2 Scene 2

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Lesson 13: The big question!


Opening the lesson
Main activity
Plenary
Lesson 14: Planning and writing
Opening the lesson
Main activity
Plenary
Unit 10: Designing the past
Lesson 15: Versions of Verona
Opening the lesson
Main activities
Plenary
Lesson 16: My production ideas
Opening the lesson
Main activity
Plenary
Find out how to build on pupils' experiences of Shakespeare from Years 7 and 8 to
develop their skills in responding to and analysing texts and ideas. Use these ideas
in your existing or new scheme of work for Year 9, or as the basis of a GCSE
assessment or other assessment tasks.
Create stimulating learning experiences by using these unit plans to develop logic
and process in your lessons about Romeo and Juliet. You can extend or develop the
plans to suit your needs.

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The units begin by looking at Act 1 and how it leads to the balcony scene. Use the
opening activities, main activities and plenaries within each lesson to explore the two
main characters and stimulate debate.
Help pupils to consider the following questions.
What is the nature of Romeo and Juliet's emerging relationship?
What pressures and demands do they face?
How do they respond to each other's words and actions?
How does what they feel, say and do compare to how young people
behave today?
These plans have been developed from footage of a rehearsal of Act 2 Scene 2 of
Romeo and Juliet directed by Neil Bartlett of the Royal Shakespeare Company
(RSC). By testing what works and resonates with an audience, the actors explore
different interpretations of the scene and a variety of ways to play the central
characters.
For further information on the RSC and its education programme visit Royal
Shakespeare Company.

Related Links
Royal Shakespeare Company

Introduction
You can find out the benefits of using these classroom ideas in Key Stages 3 or 4 to
build on pupils' experiences of Shakespeare. This includes using rehearsal for
exploration and enjoyment, developing transferable skills and creating an
environment for learning.

Build on experiences
Build on pupils' experiences from Years 7 and 8 or earlier and develop their skills in
responding to and analysing challenging texts and ideas. Use these ideas in an
existing or new scheme of work for Year 9 which:
explores play texts
develops reading and writing skills

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engages with speaking and listening contexts and strategies.


You can also use these resources in GCSE controlled assessments or other
assessment tasks. Refer to the later units for extended, project-style assignments.

Use rehearsal for exploration and enjoyment


You can use class rehearsal to explore the text by highlighting key ideas about
character and motivation, themes and action. By actively engaging with the text in
rehearsal, you and your pupils can test the words, as Neil Bartlett of the Royal
Shakespeare Company (RSC) puts it. Try out interpretations, question the obvious
and creatively apply what has been discussed or explored previously.

Address English objectives and assessment focuses


By addressing key elements and substrands of the Framework for English, you can
create opportunities for shorter and more extended tasks which generate evidence in
speaking and listening, reading and writing. The relevant assessment focuses are
identified in each unit and any outcomes could contribute to Assessing Pupils
Progress (APP). If you decide to use these materials at Key Stage 4, you can replace
the assessment focuses with the assessment objectives for GCSE.

Develop transferable skills


The skills demonstrated, developed and applied are generic. They can be transferred
to other plays by Shakespeare and other dramatists, with pupils learning how to test
their own ideas against a writer's own concerns and language.

Create an environment for learning


You could have a living display on the classroom wall where pupils can add
representations of Romeo and Juliet. They can comment, revise and review as you
continue to explore the play. You could create an area for Verona designs (see Unit
10, lessons 15 and 16) in which pupils can add ideas, drawings, designs and images.
You could display key vocabulary, powerful language and viewpoints for pupils to use
when writing and discussing the play.

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Develop and support writing


The lesson plans and ideas focus primarily on active approaches to learning,
encouraging discussion and other speaking and listening work. You will also find
advice on developing extended essay analyses or arguments. When writing is a key
outcome, model the types of writing proposed. Provide opportunities for pupils to
build and develop the ideas and interpretations they articulate in speech.
The rehearsal shown on the accompanying clips was in preparation for the RSC's
production of Romeo and Juliet in 2008, with David Dawson playing Romeo and
Laura Rees as Juliet. Laura Rees had to withdraw before the final production and
was replaced by Anneika Rose.

Unit 1: Knowing Romeo and Juliet


You can use this overview to find out how to complete this unit. You can read about
the suggested timing, unit focus, relevant objectives and substrands, assessment
focuses (AFs), key vocabulary and resources.

Suggested timing
23 hours

Focus for learning


Understanding the key narrative points that have led to Romeo and Juliet's
meeting in her garden.
Establishing a viewpoint on what Romeo and Juliet are like as characters.

Relevant objectives/substrands
Reading 5.1 Developing and adapting active reading skills and strategies.
Reading 5.2 Understanding and responding to ideas, viewpoints, themes
and purposes in texts.
Speaking and listening 3.1 Developing and adapting discussion skills and
strategies in formal and informal contexts.
Speaking and listening 4.1 Using different dramatic approaches to explore
ideas, texts and issues.

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Relevant AFs
Reading AF1, AF3, AF6

Key vocabulary
plot, act, scene, tableaux, motivation, Chorus, character, theme, issue, role

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this unit.
Worksheet 1: Key moments, Act 1 (DOC-48 KB) Attachments (you can
cut this into strips or distribute it as a worksheet).
Worksheet 2: Everyone has a point of view.
Node information
Attachments Zip:
cc0742ae3e9fa89b18a24debf58fc2cc.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 1: Key moments, Act 1 ( doc 48 KB )
Worksheet 2: Everyone has a point of view ( pdf 56 KB )

Lesson 1: How did we get here?


You can find out the focus of this lesson, how to prepare for it and the resources
needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on the plot and action of Act 1.

Preparation
Before the lesson, ask students to read or watch the play, up to and including Act 1
Scene 5 (The masked ball).

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Resources
Download Worksheet 1: Key moments, Act 1 to complete this lesson.

File Attachments
Worksheet 1: Key moments, Act 1 ( doc 48 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to teach your pupils the key events of Act 1, helping them learn
the play and the order of events to explore characters, motivations and issues. You
can read the activity sequence and the resources needed to complete this opening.

Activity sequence
1. In pairs, students sort the key moments strips from 'Worksheet 1: Key
moments, Act 1' into the order in which they occur. [The correct order is C,
D, B, E, A, F, H, I, G, J.]
2. Students feed back the events in the correct order.
3. Ask students whether they notice anything significant here. Some may
mention the Chorus giving the story away, or the fact that Juliet is told before
the party that she should marry.

Additional activity
To support and embed the knowledge from this activity, you can ask students to work
in pairs to retell each other the story as if they were neighbours of the Capulets or
Montagues. Here are two conversation ideas.
'I hear there was a bit of trouble between the two families on the streets.'
'Yes, and did you know that Romeo's been moping around talking about
some girl he fancies?'

Resources
Download Worksheet 1: Key moments, Act 1 to complete this activity.

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File Attachments
Worksheet 1: Key moments, Act 1 ( doc 48 KB )

Main activities
You can find out how to teach your pupils the key events of Act 1, by exploring the
order of events and creating a series of tableaux, and the suggested sequences to
complete these activities.

Activity sequence 1
Ask students to arrange the events in a different order and ask how things would
have been different if the following events had occurred.
The play had opened with the ball and we hadn't had the scene in which
Juliet's mother asks her to consider Paris as a husband.
The Chorus hadn't appeared until the end of the act.
Romeo's musings to Benvolio about love came after he had met Juliet.
It is important to explore the order of events to understand the play. For example,
because of Act 1 Scene 3, we see things differently when Juliet falls for Romeo
because we know that Juliet is under parental pressure.

Activity sequence 2
Ask pupils to work in small groups to create a series of simple tableaux to represent
the following key moments of Act 1.

The Capulets and Montagues fighting on the streets of Verona.


Romeo and Benvolio, watched by Romeo's parents.
Juliet, the Nurse and Juliet's mother discussing marriage.
Romeo and Mercutio on their way to the ball.
The ball and Tybalt's reaction.
Romeo and Juliet meeting or Romeo seeing Juliet for the first time.

You might also want to:


consider simple positioning
discuss different interpretations.

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Pupils can choose whichever key focus they prefer. Ask them to think about how
some simple positioning, such as how Juliet being close to the Nurse with her mother
on the other side of the room, might convey a message about relationships.
Allow time to discuss the tableaux created and how each brings out a slightly
different interpretation of the story. This can be a useful starter for the focused work
on the balcony scene.

Plenary
You can find out how to generate class discussion on how Act 1 sets the scene for
the rest of the play. This includes the activity sequence and examples of similar plays
you could discuss with your class to complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
As a class, discuss how the action of Act 1 sets up what is to follow, by establishing:
some of the characteristics of the main players, such as Juliet's quiet but
non-committal dutifulness to her parents and Tybalt's fiery nature
the potential obstacles and problems ahead
relationships, for example, between Benvolio, Mercutio and Romeo, and
between the Nurse and Juliet.

Discuss other plays


Point out that many Shakespeare plays begin with similar problems and obstacles.
Use the following examples.
A Midsummer Night's Dream, when Hermia's father demands, on pain of
death or exile, that she marry the man of his choosing.
Much Ado About Nothing, when there is a villain intent on ruining another
young man and his lover.
Both of these comedies have happy endings, so at this point in the play Romeo and
Juliet could still be a comedy.

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Lesson 2: Who do you think you


are?
You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on how other characters view Romeo and Juliet and on their
own feelings in Act 1.

Resources
Download Worksheet 2: Everyone has a point of view to complete this lesson.

File Attachments
Worksheet 2: Everyone has a point of view ( pdf 56 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to teach your pupils key quotations from Act 1, helping them
understand that simple lines can tell readers quite a lot. You can read the activity
sequence and the resources needed to complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Display the short quotations from Act 1 on the worksheet, on the board or interactive
whiteboard. For each, ask pupils the following questions.
Who is saying this?
Who are they talking about?
Point out that even seemingly simple lines such as the Nurse's, can contribute to
understanding the play's themes and story.

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Ask pupils what difference it makes that the Nurse's main wish is to see Juliet
married. (She's not really worried who to.)
You might explore the deeper meaning behind simple lines. For example, if Capulet
thinks Juliet is a stranger to the world naive, innocent, unworldly this may
suggest that he thinks he knows what is best for her or that she is still daddy's girl.

Resources
Download Worksheet 2: Everyone has a point of view to complete this activity.

File Attachments
Worksheet 2: Everyone has a point of view ( pdf 56 KB )

Main activity
You can find out how to generate discussion about Act 1 Scene 5, by asking pupils to
imagine and discuss a scenario. This activity relates to substrand 3.1 Speaking and
listening, from the Framework for secondary English, as it helps pupils build their
discussion skills by involving others and reaching conclusions. You can read the
suggested activity sequence to complete this activity.

Activity sequence
Ask pupils to imagine the following scenario for Act 1 Scene 5 (The masked ball).
The ball takes place in a modern, contemporary house.
It is Juliet's 16th birthday party, a family fancy dress party to which friends
and relatives have been invited.
Neighbours have not been invited as Juliet's parents have been in dispute
with them for many years. However, the neighbour's 16-year-old son sneaks
into the house.
In groups, ask pupils to decide the following.
Where Tybalt would see Romeo with his friends and speak with Capulet.
For example, in the hallway looking at Romeo in the garden.
Where Romeo and Juliet would meet. For example, on a bench in the
garden, in the conservatory with potted plants separating them or on the
stairs.

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Once pupils have decided on a setting for these two parts of the scene, reread the
lines and ask them to decide the following.
How they would ask Tybalt, Capulet, Romeo and Juliet to behave.
What particular points in Tybalt's, Capulet's, Romeo's and Juliet's
characters they want to bring out. For example, Juliet's being a stranger to
the world so how does she react to this handsome young man?

Resources
If pupils are struggling to find things to say about the characters, show them the
following clip.
Clip 1: Talking about our characters

File Attachments
Clip 1: Talking about our characters ( mp4 15.9 MB )

Plenary
Find out how you can encourage pupils to take on the role of Romeo or Juliet. This
includes the resources needed and the activity sequence to complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
Following group discussion during the main activity, groups can feed back their
ideas, including:
how they would set the scene
what characteristics to bring out and why.
Ask each student to take on the role of either Romeo or Juliet. This can form the
basis for the diary-writing task that comes at the start of Unit 2. Individually, students
write down a sentence to describe both:
how Romeo or Juliet felt before the party
how he or she felt after it had ended.
Examples of what Juliet might say include the following.

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'Before the party, I was excited but concerned that my parents wanted me
to marry this man, Paris. What if I didn't like him?'
'After the party, I knew I had a problem. I was incredibly attracted to
someone else!'
Briefly introduce the context of the video. It shows the director and actors discussing
the balcony scene and what has led up to it.
End this plenary by watching the following clip.
Clip 1: Talking about our characters
Then ask students to consider the following.
How well they need to know the play before they have this conversation.
[Pretty well.]
How this conversation might help the actors prepare for the rehearsal.
Whether the actors descriptions of how they feel, in role, match the
students views of the characters.

File Attachments
Clip 1: Talking about our characters ( mp4 15.9 MB )

Unit 2: My space character,


movement and stage space
You can use this overview to find out how to complete this unit. You can read about
the suggested timing, unit focus, relevant objectives, substrands and assessment
focuses (AFs), resources and key vocabulary.

Suggested timing
11 hours

Focus for learning


Understanding how an idea of character can be built up in a whole range
of different ways: through speech, gesture, space between characters and
so on.

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Establishing the idea that students own interpretations have validity,


especially when talked through and tested in rehearsal or improvisation.

Relevant objectives/substrands
Speaking and listening 1.2 Understanding and responding to what
speakers say in formal and informal contexts.
Speaking and listening 4.1 Using different dramatic approaches to explore
ideas, texts and issues.
Speaking and listening 4.2 Developing, adapting and responding to
dramatic techniques, conventions and styles.
Reading 5.2 Understanding and responding to ideas, viewpoints, themes
and purposes in texts.

Relevant AFs
Reading AF3, AF6

Key vocabulary
space, represent, gesture, movement, interpretation

Resources
Download Worksheet 3: Different spaces to complete this unit.

File Attachments
Worksheet 3: Different spaces ( pdf 214 KB )

Lesson 3: Interpretation
You can find out the focus of this lesson, how to prepare for it and the resources
needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
The focus of this lesson is considering what interpretation means.

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Preparation
You might remind students of the events that preceded Act 2 Scene 2. You could
touch on Romeo's previous infatuation with Rosaline, or the pressure that Juliet's
parents are putting her under to get married.

Resources
Download Worksheet 3: Different spaces to complete this lesson.

File Attachments
Worksheet 3: Different spaces ( pdf 214 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to teach your pupils to take on the role of Juliet and explore
interpretations of Act 2 Scene 2. You can find out the resources needed and the
activity sequence to complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Part 1
Begin by asking students to take the role of Juliet and imagine she is alone in her
bedroom after the party. She writes a short diary entry describing what has happened
and how she feels.
The amount of time and focus you allocate to this activity depends on whether you
wish to use it simply as a warm-up for the unit or as a more developed piece. If this is
the case, model how the diary might be written, including the tone and style Juliet
would use.

Part 2
Show pupils the following video clip.
Clip 2: Making spaces

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Ask pupils the following questions about the director's interpretation.


How does the director interpret Shakespeare's original idea for Act 2
Scene 2?
Why does the director think this is the right space for Juliet?

File Attachments
Clip 2: Making spaces ( mp4 5.9 MB )

Main activities
You can find out how to encourage pupils to consider how space is used and what
this represents. This can help pupils work with the script and see the number of
possibilities in it. You can read about the resources needed and suggested
sequences to complete these activities.

Resources
Download Worksheet 3: Different spaces (PDF-214 KB) Attachments to complete
these activities.

Activity sequence 1
Distribute the worksheet and ask pupils to work in pairs to link the words and phrases
describing the spaces. Alternatively, use an interactive whiteboard with your class to
drag the words and phrases into the chosen section.
Ask students to explain their decisions. For example, why would Juliet's bedroom
represent safety? You could argue that it seems safe, but in the end it will lead to
danger - Romeo.
You can use this activity to get pupils to think about what spaces represent. Romeo
is in a place of danger, but it might also represent something warm for him. He could
also be seen to be embracing danger in more ways than one.

Activity sequence 2
Read Romeo's first few lines of Act 2 Scene 2, from when he sees Juliet to thou her
maid art far more fair than she.

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In small groups, ask pupils to consider this opening and decide the following.
What is Juliet doing at the moment when Romeo sees her?
Where is she looking?
What gesture or movement, if any, is she making?
How do you think Romeo would move and act?
Where is he?
Does he stay still to say these lines?
Who is he speaking to?
Pupils can feed back ideas to the class as a whole, or, if they wish, act out how they
think this section would be performed.
End this activity by watching the video clip.
Clip 3: Working with spaces

Considering the script


Once students start to work with the script, they can see that there are lots of
possibilities. For example, they can consider the following reasons why Romeo says,
But soft.

Does he mean wait?


If he stops, where was he going?
Did he know where Juliet's window was?
Was he looking for her or just trying to get back into the party?

Node information
Attachments Zip:
5977f6b2d360bf053a767007abf420fa.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 3: Different spaces ( pdf 214 KB )
Clip 3: Working with spaces ( mp4 9.4 MB )

Plenary
You can find out how to generate class discussion about how the characters of
Romeo and Juliet are played. This can help pupils build their skill of self-reflection by

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seeing their own ideas as having merits. You can find the activity sequences to
complete this plenary.

Part 1
Ask pupils to recall their own ideas about how Romeo and Juliet would behave in this
short part of the balcony scene, and then discuss the following as a class.
What impression do you get of Romeo from David's performance?
How does Laura bring out Juliet being in a world of her own here?
How does the director help David play the role?
Conclude that there is not a 'right' way to play Romeo or Juliet, but that by testing out
ideas through rehearsing and trying out different approaches you can see what works
on stage and what does not.
You might take this activity further by asking students whether anything is acceptable
in performance. Ask them to consider the impact if Romeo:

spoke his lines as rap


stood on his head
danced as he spoke
spoke in a sarcastic way.

Part 2
Pupils could take their original diary entry written for Juliet from the plenary of Lesson
2 of Unit 1. Pupils could complete this, or encourage a wider, more independent
response by asking them to write a range of diary entries for the evening of the party.
This includes diaries for Tybalt, Capulet and the Nurse.

Unit 3: 'Shall I compare thee?'


Use this overview to find out how to complete this unit. You can read about the
suggested timing, unit focus, relevant objectives, substrands and assessment
focuses (AFs), resources and key vocabulary.

Suggested timing
23 hours

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Focus for learning


Exploring Shakespeare's imagery in the balcony scene and comparing it
with other expressions of love.
Developing ideas of interpretation and how these grow out of working with
the text.

Relevant objectives/substrands
Speaking and listening 4.1 Using dramatic approaches to explore ideas,
texts and issues.
Reading 5.2 Understanding and responding to ideas, viewpoints, themes
and purposes in texts.
Reading 6.2 Analysing how writers' use of linguistic and literary features
shapes and influences meaning.

Relevant AFs
Reading AF2, AF3, AF5

Key vocabulary
connotation, vestal livery, imagery

Resources
Download Worksheet 4: Sun, moon, light, dark to complete this unit.

File Attachments
Worksheet 4: Sun, moon, light, dark ( pdf 62 KB )

Lesson 4: Developing
understanding of imagery
You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

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Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on the language of love.

Resources
Download Worksheet 4: Sun, moon, light, dark to complete this lesson.

File Attachments
Worksheet 4: Sun, moon, light, dark ( pdf 62 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to encourage pupils to consider what the Sun and Moon
represent, including the activity sequence to complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Ask pupils to quickly jot down any connotations they have for the Sun and the Moon.
This allows them to consider what the Sun and Moon represent. As an example, you
could use the rose and its connotations of sweetness and romance.

Main activity
Find out how to encourage pupils to think about how language is used in the play,
particularly how descriptions of love are rarely straightforward. Find out the resources
needed and the activity sequence to complete this activity.

Activity sequence
Distribute the worksheet and ask pupils to work in small groups to complete the
following steps.
1. Check where and when the quotes are said in the play.
2. Read the lines aloud.
3. Discuss in each case how the images of Sun, Moon, light and dark are
used to tell us something about the characters or their situation.

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Feed back the following thoughts to the class.


The general idea of both Romeo and Juliet bringing light a good thing
to darkness.
Some contradictory ideas about the Sun and Moon. Juliet is the Sun, but
later she describes Romeo as being brighter than the garish sun.
The language of love is rarely straightforward. Love is often linked to
death. For example, even the fair sun that is Juliet will kill' the moon.

Worksheet answers
Here are the places in the play where the quotes on the worksheet appear.
Romeo about Juliet: at the ball; the balcony scene; the final death scene.
Juliet about Romeo: after she is married; before her wedding night.
Romeo and Juliet to each other: the morning after they have spent the
night together, before Romeo goes into exile.

Resources
Download Worksheet 4: Sun, moon, light, dark to complete this activity.

File Attachments
Worksheet 4: Sun, moon, light, dark ( pdf 62 KB )

Plenary
You can find out how to encourage pupils to challenge the idea that the language of
love in the play is all the same. This includes the activity sequence to complete this
plenary.

Activity sequence
Link to the next lesson by watching the following clip.
Clip 4: Romeo sees Juliet at her window

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Discuss the reference to vestal livery with the pupils. Romeo is not just thinking
about Juliet's beauty, but his own physical attraction to her.
Encourage pupils to question the idea that the language of love in the play is all
'Valentine card pretty'. This allows them to explore the lines, focusing on what is
being said, by whom and why.

File Attachments
Clip 4: Romeo sees Juliet at her window ( mp4 11 MB )

Lesson 5: The devil's in the detail!


You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on close analysis of the words used in the play to illustrate how
the characters come alive. It includes a video clip of two different interpretations of
Juliet in the balcony scene.

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to teach pupils the importance of looking at the meaning behind
seemingly insignificant lines in the play. This includes the activity sequences to
complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Part 1
Juliet's first words in this scene, Ay me!, don't seem very important but can actually
reveal a lot.
In pairs, ask pupils to discuss:
how Juliet is feeling at this point
what she might be thinking about.

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Seemingly insignificant lines in a play can be rewarding to analyse. For example, in


the opening of Hamlet, although it looks like there are just two soldiers conversing on
a castle wall, this reveals a lot about the tone and story.

Main activity
You can find out how to teach pupils about dialogue and different ways to deliver
lines the play. This includes the activity sequence to complete this activity.

Activity sequence
Part 1
Ask pupils, in pairs, to try saying the word No in as many ways as possible. Pupils
could perform to the rest of the group or class and get them to guess what attitude,
feeling or situation they are conveying. Examples include the following.

Telling a child off.


Weighing something up carefully before deciding.
Afraid someone is about to shoot you.
Laughing at the idea of something ridiculous.

This can help pupils realise that the play is not a collection of famous quotations but
a real dialogue between people. Even the throwaway lines are important.

Part 2
Now ask some or all of the girls (boys could do this as well) to stand in a line and say
Ay me! in lots of different ways. This can range from light hearted on the left through
to highly emotional, upset, angry and anxious on the right. They can make a simple
gesture as they do so, such as a clenched fist or staring upwards.
You might give suggestions to pupils about how to watch the next clip, such as
whether they make notes while watching, or watch it first then jot things down.
Ask pupils to observe how Laura, the actress, plays the scene both before and after
the director intervenes. Also ask theme to consider the following.
Does Laura seem happily in love and dreamy?
How does the director ask Laura to play the scene?
How does this seem to go against what Romeo is saying?

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Clip 5: Juliet, two versions

File Attachments
Clip 5: Juliet, two versions ( mp4 31.2 MB )

Plenary
You can find out how to help pupils explore light and dark in the language of the play.
This includes the activity sequence to complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
Ask pupils to discuss the different ways they are beginning to see Romeo and Juliet
now, including whether the characters are beginning to seem more real.
Reflecting back to the previous lesson on imagery, some pupils might look at other
references to light and dark in the play.
Pupils might create a light/dark grid to include the relevant phrase or line and when it
occurs, explaining how it is being said and why.

Helping pupils use the light/dark grid


Pupils could write a short paragraph just on Juliet's Ay me and her first four lines of
proper speech. You may want to include, or model, a paragraph so that students
can interweave quotations into it. For example, Juliet's Ay me could be spoken with
her eyes closed, as if trying to re-live in her mind what has happened.
Students could also look at the Prince's ambivalent final words, which suggest that
even when peace comes, it is dark and gloomy.
A glooming peace this morning with it brings;
The sun for sorrow will not show its head.
[Act 5 Scene 3]

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Unit 4: Testing the words


You can use this overview to find out how to complete this unit. Read about the
suggested timing, unit focus, relevant objectives, substrands and assessment
focuses (AFs), resources and key vocabulary.

Suggested timing
11 hours

Focus for learning


Exploring the character of Juliet; getting beyond the stereotype to make
the play come alive.
Looking at how the organisation of the scene contributes to its effect.

Relevant objectives/substrands
Reading 6.2 Analysing how writers use of linguistic and literary features
shapes and influences meaning.
Reading 6.3 Analysing writers use of organisation, structure, layout and
presentation.
Writing 8.1 Developing viewpoint, voice and ideas.
Writing 8.5 Structuring, organising and presenting texts in a variety of
forms on paper and on screen.

Relevant AFs
Reading AF3, AF4
Writing AF4

Key vocabulary
stereotype, interpretation, analogy

Resources
Download Worksheet 5: Testing ideas out to complete this unit.

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File Attachments
Worksheet 5: Testing ideas out ( doc 47 KB )

Lesson 6: Juliet's character


You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on Juliet's language, what it reveals about her character and
how the organisation of the scene contributes to its effect.

Resources
Download Worksheet 5: Testing ideas out to complete this lesson.

File Attachments
Worksheet 5: Testing ideas out ( doc 47 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to help your pupils explore the different ways in which Juliet
can respond to meeting Romeo. This includes the activity sequence to complete this
opening.

Activity sequence
It may be useful to remind pupils that in previous units, they have explored the idea
that Juliet can respond in different ways to meeting Romeo. Juliet can be angry with
the world, dreamy, reflective, nervous and so on.
Equally, Romeo could be nervous, frightened or excited as he enters the garden by
Juliet's house.

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It may be useful to write the phrase test the words on the board, which is something
Neil Bartlett says in rehearsal. It means to try out your interpretation against
Shakespeare's language and it helps prevent pupils from seeing Juliet as a
stereotype.

Main activities
You can find out how to teach pupils about the way in which Shakespeare organised
his material, particularly by exploring how his characters are defined. You can find
out the resources needed and the suggested sequences to complete these activities.

Activity sequence 1
Ask pupils to read, in pairs or as a class, from Act 2 Scene 2, the lines beginning
What's in a name? down to Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike.
Then test the words by asking pupils to discuss the following questions in pairs.
Do you think Juliet knows who it is when Romeo speaks?
How does Romeo speak? Does he blurt out his answer, I take thee at thy
word, or say it gently? Consider what Romeo means here that he'll marry
Juliet.
How might Juliet say the lines beginning What man art thou?
Feed back answers in small groups and share with the class as a whole. Is there any
consensus about how Romeo and Juliet speak? Is one way clearly right once it has
been tested?
Part of the focus here is on Shakespeare's organisation of his material. Juliet says
her lines first, with Romeo watching - both dramatically and in terms of tension.
Pupils imagine they are eavesdropping and wonder whether Romeo will interrupt her.
You might spend some time discussing Juliet's speech, making sure the class are
clear about her argument. She believes that someone is not defined by their name
but by their essence (the rose analogy). This is especially significant because Romeo
is the son of a hated family.

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Activity sequence 2
Explain that in the clips that pupils are about to watch, the director has already tried
out a scene with Laura and David. In this scene, Juliet has been having private,
possibly quite sexual thoughts about Romeo when he suddenly appears in her
garden. You might play the two clips several times to allow pupils to make notes.
Now watch the following two clips, pausing after each one to discuss:
how David and Laura played their lines
whether students think it worked.

Flash

Juliet
What man art thou?
Laura
Do I want to see him?
Director
Well let's find out.
David
Should I be looking straight at Laura? Should that be to you?
Director
Try and find out what happens if you...say it all to her...
David
OK.
Director
...beginning with 'I take thee at thy word', let's take 'Change your name' as
meaning 'Why don't you marry me?' That's her fantasy. Your fantasy, 'Oh you're

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an angel. Run away with me. Let's get married and live together forever.' It's the
kind of thing you only say when you think no one else can hear you. But, no,
Romeo changes everything. What she says is so amazing, so fantastic, that you
say 'I'll do it. I'll change my name.' Then for you, Laura, forget everything except
the basic situation. You thought you were in your private space, with freedom to
think, freedom to think dirty thoughts, freedom to think romantic thoughts, and
suddenly there's a man who's been eavesdropping on you. You don't know who
it is. Let's play it as if you don't know who it is until the words tell us that you've
realised this was the boy at the party. But let's find that out.
Laura
So at first it's just a voice.
Director
It's just a voice, it's just a stranger and it's dark.
Laura
And it's far away.
Director
And it's far away.
Laura
Yes.
Director
And let's find out. We'll test that against the words to see if that's right. Of course
it's possible she recognises his voice straight away, but I want to find out by
doing it.
Laura
OK.
Director
To see which one it is. So first of all let's try it as if you don't know until he gives
you a clue or some information, or something, and just play it as 'Who the hell
are you, spying on me?'
Laura
Yes, OK.
Director
What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other word would smell as
sweet. Thank you.
Juliet
What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other word would smell as
sweet. So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called, retain that dear perfection
which he owes without that title. Romeo, doff thy name, and for that name which
is no part of thee, take all myself!
Romeo
I take thee at thy word. Call me but love, and I'll be new baptised; Henceforth I
never will be Romeo.

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Juliet
What man art thou, that, thus bescreened in night, so stumbl'st on my counsel?
Romeo
By a name I know not how to tell thee who I am. My name, dear saint, is hateful
to myself, because it is an enemy to thee; Had I it written, I would tear the word.
Juliet
Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague?
Romeo
Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike.
[End of clip]
Download formats:
RSC_RnJ_06_AR_1.mov (23.4 MB) RSC_RnJ_06_AR_1.wmv (12.5 MB)

Flash

Director
What told you it was Romeo?
Laura
Saint, the word saint, because that comes...
Director
That comes in the party scene.
Laura
Yes.
Director
So he fed you a clue.
Laura
Yes.

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Director
Try the other thing for me, because you have to try both ways and find the one
that's right, and we don't know yet, as you've just found you came in hard, that
was your instinct, then you went 'Oh, wait a minute. I'm not sure that's right.'
Find out what happens if you recognise his voice straight away and you're
playing it as, 'Oh, how dare you!' because that might be fun to see.
Laura
OK, OK.
Director
I'm not saying I know that's right, I'm saying just to see, come in the other way.
Laura
Alright, OK.
Director
Don't make so much noise that the security guards might hear you, and also
don't get so close, David. Keep the sense of space I can't get to you
because the most important thing about the scene, the single most important
thing is why do they use such incredible words?
David
Because they can't get to each other.
Director
Because they can't, so only the words can. If you want to play a game with him,
if you want to flirt, 'Oh, is that you?' then it's the words, and if you also want to
play, if her playing with you makes you want to play back...
David
OK.
Director
...then use the words to play back, because you do that referring back to the
party. It's almost like saying, 'It's me, do you remember?'
David
The 'dear saint'.
Director
Yes.
David
Right. So if I imagine there's a big security light in this, around her.
Director
Yes, you mustn't get too close and you mustn't be too loud. Otherwise they
might catch you.
Laura
From the same place?

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Director
Let's go from just before, 'Romeo, doff thy name and for that name which is no
part of thee.'
Juliet
Romeo, doff thy name, and for that name which is no part of thee, take all
myself!
Romeo
I take thee at thy word. Call me but love, and I'll be new baptised; Henceforth I
never will be Romeo.
Juliet
What man art thou, that, thus bescreened in night so stumbl'st on my counsel?
Romeo
By a name I know not how to tell thee who I am. My name, dear saint, is hateful
to myself, because it is an enemy to thee; had I it written, I would tear the word.
Juliet
Art thou not Romeo and a Montague?
Romeo
Neither, fair maid, if either thee dislike.
[End of clip]
Download formats:
RSC_RnJ_07_AR_1.mov (23.0 MB) RSC_RnJ_07_AR_1.wmv (14.9 MB)
Pupils might write a short comparison piece on the two clips/interpretations,
explaining:

what lines they looked at


how each version was played
what the similarities and differences were
which version they think worked, and which did not work.

You might divide groups into those watching Romeo and those watching Juliet.
Remind pupils to focus on use of voice, gestures and space/movement. This can be
useful for helping pupils to write coherent paragraphs comparing the two clips.
Finally, use the worksheet to support learners who need their response scaffolded.

Resources
Download Worksheet 5: Testing ideas out to complete these activities.

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Node information
Attachments Zip:
f259ca1d726235df4a89b9f4dacb15d0.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 5: Testing ideas out ( doc 47 KB )
Clip 6: What man? Version 1 ( mp4 20.7 MB )
Clip 7: What man? Version 2 ( mp4 20 MB )

Plenary
You can find out how to encourage pupils to think about their view of Juliet. This
includes the activity sequence to complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
After watching the following video clip, ask pupils what view they are getting of Juliet
now. The second rehearsal suggested a playfulness on her behalf what did they
think of this?
Clip 7: What man? Version 2

File Attachments
Clip 7: What man? Version 2 ( mp4 20 MB )

Unit 5: Love and danger themes in


language
You can use this overview to find out how to complete this unit. You can read about
the suggested timing, unit focus, relevant objectives, substrands and assessment
focuses (AFs), resources and key vocabulary.

Suggested timing
23 hours

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Focus for learning


How the themes in the play recur in the language.
How students written responses can be shaped.

Relevant objectives/substrands
Reading 5.1 Developing and adapting active reading skills and strategies.
Reading 5.2 Understanding and responding to ideas, viewpoints, themes
and purposes in texts.
Reading 6.2 Analysing how writers use of linguistic and literary features
shapes and influences meaning.
Writing 7.1 Generating ideas, planning and drafting.
Writing 8.4 Developing varied linguistic and literary techniques.

Relevant AFs
Reading AF1, AF2, AF5
Writing AF1, AF2, AF4

Key vocabulary
theme, extended metaphor, imagery

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this unit.
Worksheet 6: Images of love, danger and death (PDF-66 KB)
Attachments
Worksheet 7: Stifled in the vault (DOC-48 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 8a: Stifled in the vault (DOC-48 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 8b: Stifled in the vault
Node information
Attachments Zip:
3f362f440dee5ecfb45c15177acc9ce9.zip

Related Links
The Italian Cemetry
Le Cimetire du Pre-Lachaise

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File Attachments

Worksheet 6: Images of love, danger and death ( pdf 66 KB )


Worksheet 7: Stifled in the vault ( doc 48 KB )
Worksheet 8a: Stifled in the vault ( doc 49 KB )
Worksheet 8b: Stifled in the vault ( doc 48 KB )

Lesson 7: How to write and respond


coherently
You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on linking imagery to themes and how to write and respond
coherently.

Resources
Download Worksheet 6: Images of love, danger and death to complete this lesson.

File Attachments
Worksheet 6: Images of love, danger and death ( pdf 66 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to help your pupils explore the idea of Romeo being in danger
in Act 2 Scene 2, and the activity sequence to complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Ask pupils what things are said in Act 2 Scene 2 that remind them it is dangerous for
Romeo to be in the garden.
At this point in the play, it could still be a comedy. There are no deaths, despite
fighting and threats of death from the Prince to brawlers on the streets. At the

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moment the story is about whether Romeo and Juliet will or will not keep their love
secret.
Lines 6278 mention death, murder, peril, swords, hate, and death again. Ask
pupils whether Romeo really believes he will be killed if he is found in the garden.

Main activities
You can find out how to teach pupils about the way in which Shakespeare uses
images of love, danger and death. You read about the resources needed and the
suggested sequence to complete this activity.

Activity sequence
Images relating to love and danger or death feature throughout the play. Distribute
the worksheet to find examples.
1. Start by looking at the first example, the pilot image. This is a persuasive
line from Romeo to Juliet. Explain that a pilot means a sailor here and ask
pupils to consider what Romeo is saying about the danger of coming to see
Juliet. What does this tell them if he can be believed about his feelings
for her?
2. Ask pupils in groups to each find an image in the play. They could split
these up and discuss how the images link death or danger with love or
romance.
3. Use the teaching sequence for writing to model for pupils how they might
respond to a question such as, in what ways are death and love never far
apart in Romeo and Juliet?
4. Use one of the quotations from the worksheet to demonstrate how the
question could be tackled in terms of imagery. For example, death and
danger are often present even in moments of high romance. For instance,
when Juliet sees Romeo in the gloomy garden below, she says how he
seems to look like 'one dead in the bottom of the tomb'. This is a surprising
image, given the joy and love of their wedding night.
5. Pupils can now contribute to a part-modelled response. For example,
Romeo's choice of words when he talks to the Friar is unfortunate to say the
least. He brings together death and love by (Ask pupils to complete this
together.)
6. Finally, ask pupils to choose one of the remaining quotations from the
sheet, or any other example from the text, and write their own paragraph on
death and love.

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Additional activity
Although this is not the focus of the activity, you can discuss why the pilot image for
danger is so appropriate. Sea travel was dangerous in Shakespeare's time and later
he wrote The Tempest, based around a true story of a shipwreck in the Bermudas.
More-able pupils may also like to pick up on the extended metaphor of the pilot who
steers his own fate. Ask them where else Romeo makes reference to this idea. [The
last lines of Act 1 Scene 4.]
Point out that you are dealing directly with the topic of death and love in your answer
and saying why death is close to love. [Romeo and Juliet's wedding night had just
happened.]
You may want to refer to or utilise Point, evidence, explanation and more, which
provides ideas for using quotations.

Resources
Download Worksheet 6: Images of love, danger and death to complete these
activities.

File Attachments
Worksheet 6: Images of love, danger and death ( pdf 66 KB )

Plenary
You can find out how you can reinforce the message of love and death in the play.
This includes the activity sequence to complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
You can remind pupils that love and death are linked together to foreshadow later
events in the play. The audience already knows that Romeo and Juliet will die, so
this adds an extra excitement to these references.

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Lesson 8: Close analysis of the


language
You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
Rather than asking pupils to repeat what they've been taught, this lesson is about
helping them understand the imagery of the senses, and get a sense of the power of
Juliet's speech. You can also help them understand how the speech works for the
audience on different levels. The speech is prescient: Juliet will die in the tomb and
she will, in a way, meet Tybalt as will Romeo. To some extent, Romeo is killed by
Tybalt indirectly because Tybalt's murder of Mercutio led to the events in the tomb
and Romeo's death.

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this lesson.
Worksheet 7: Stifled in the vault (DOC-48 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 8a: Stifled in the vault (DOC-48 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 8b: Stifled in the vault
Node information
Attachments Zip:
94d3bd53d849d0d249066229c2ea95fb.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 7: Stifled in the vault ( doc 48 KB )
Worksheet 8a: Stifled in the vault ( doc 49 KB )
Worksheet 8b: Stifled in the vault ( doc 48 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to help pupils get a sense of the power of Juliet's tomb speech
from Act 4 Scene 3, including how love and death have already been used in the
play. You can find out the activity sequence to complete this opening.

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Activity sequence
Ask pupils how death and love have been linked already in the play, as seen in the
previous lesson. Introduce Juliet's tomb speech, making sure that pupils are familiar
with the events that have led up to this point in the play.

Main activity
You can find out how to teach pupils about the power of imagery in Juliet's tomb
speech from Act 4 Scene 3. You can find out the resources needed and the
suggested sequences to complete these activities.

Activity sequence
A powerful speech in the play is Juliet's vision of what might happen to her when she
awakes in the tomb.
Read lines 30 from How if, when I am laid into to line 58 Here's drink I drink to
thee with your class and then give them a copy of the speech. Hand out Worksheet
7 and ask pupils to annotate or highlight the following.
The most powerful sights and images.
Sounds and smells.
Touch and feeling.

Additional activity
Powerful imagery can do several things at once. The idea of being stifled in the vault
conveys both the image of Juliet being strangled by the air and the feel of it.
You could challenge more confident students to look at the effect of questions,
punctuation and variety of sentence and line length on the speech. Use Worksheets
8a and 8b for an idea of suggested annotation shown in two different ways.
Worksheet 8a shows highlighted passages in the original text, while Worksheet 8b
shows phrases referenced by line number.

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this activity.

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Worksheet 7: Stifled in the vault (DOC-48 KB) Attachments


Worksheet 8a: Stifled in the vault (DOC-48 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 8b: Stifled in the vault
Node information
Attachments Zip:
94d3bd53d849d0d249066229c2ea95fb.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 7: Stifled in the vault ( doc 48 KB )
Worksheet 8a: Stifled in the vault ( doc 49 KB )
Worksheet 8b: Stifled in the vault ( doc 48 KB )

Plenary
You can find out how you can help pupils further explore Juliet's tomb speech,
including the activity sequence to complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
Pupils can further explore Juliet's speech by writing down their own creative account
of a visit to or encounter in a seventeenth or eighteenth century graveyard or tomb.

Planning
Before this plenary, you might dedicate one or two lessons to planning this creative
work in relation to Act 4 Scene 3 of the play.
Students could look at a variety of images from the internet, such as the following.
Cimetire du Pre-Lachaise has a virtual tour and an English guide of the
Parisian cemetery Pre-Lachaise.
The Italian Cemetery contains images of Italian family tombs and vaults in
the USA.

Related Links
Cimetire du Pre-Lachaise
The Italian Cemetery

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Unit 6: Juliet's judgement


You can use this overview to find out how to complete this unit. You can read about
the suggested timing, unit focus, relevant objectives, substrands and assessment
focuses (AFs), resources and key vocabulary.

Suggested timing
11 hours

Focus for learning


Understanding that character and motivation are set but can change.

Relevant objectives/substrands
Speaking and Listening 4.1 Using different dramatic approaches to
explore ideas, texts and issues.
Speaking and Listening 4.2 Developing, adapting and responding to
dramatic techniques, conventions and styles.
Reading 5.2 Understanding and responding to ideas, viewpoints, themes
and purposes in texts.
Reading 6.2 Analysing how writers use of linguistic and literary features
shapes and influences meaning.
Writing 7.1 Generating ideas, planning and drafting.

Relevant AFs
Reading AF3, AF5
Writing AF2, AF3

Key vocabulary
analogy, thought-tracking

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this unit.

Worksheet 9: The facts about Romeo (PDF-60 KB) Attachments

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Worksheet 10: Imagine my thoughts


Node information
Attachments Zip:
d05dafe0933dfd60d72a41f6e83cbf3d.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 9: The facts about Romeo ( pdf 60 KB )
Worksheet 10: Imagine my thoughts ( doc 548 KB )

Lesson 9: Getting inside Juliet's


head
You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
The focus of this lesson is asking questions about Juliet's language to understand
how she is feeling.

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this lesson.
Worksheet 9: The facts about Romeo (PDF-60 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 10: Imagine my thoughts
Node information
Attachments Zip:
d05dafe0933dfd60d72a41f6e83cbf3d.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 9: The facts about Romeo ( pdf 60 KB )
Worksheet 10: Imagine my thoughts ( doc 548 KB )

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Opening the lesson


You can find out how to teach your pupils to consider how Juliet feels, helping them
realise how her feelings change as she speaks and thinks. You can read about the
activity sequence to complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Ask pupils to briefly scan Act 2 Scene 2, from line 62 How cam'st thou hither to 84
I would adventure for such merchandise.
Ask pupils to consider the following questions.
What and how much Juliet says?
What and how much Romeo says?
Once pupils have given their responses, remind them that Romeo says a line
beginning with I am no pilot before Juliet's speech (lines 85106) in which she
expresses her emotions.
Pupils may notice that Juliet says very little here, but what she says is to the point
and practical. She continues to ask Who told you the way? and points out the
situation with If you are found, you'll be killed.
Finally, write the question How is Juliet feeling? on the board and leave it there for
the rest of the lesson, allowing pupils to consider the thoughts going through her
mind.

Main activities
You can find out how to teach your pupils to think about Juliet's feelings as she
delivers her speech in Act 2 Scene 2. You can read about the suggested sequences
and the resources needed to complete these activities.
Show the pupils the following clip, either before the activities to look at the way in
which the director and Laura/Juliet choose to play the speech, or after Activity 2 to
compare the director's version with the pupils ideas.

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Flash

Romeo
I am no pilot; but wert thou as far as that vast shore washed with the farthest
sea, I should adventure for such merchandise.
Juliet
Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say 'Ay,' and I will take thy word: yet if thou
swear'st, thou mayst prove false; at lovers' perjuries they say Jove laughs. O
gentle Romeo, if thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully. Or if thou think'st I am
too quickly won, I'll frown and be perverse and say thee nay, so thou wilt woo;
but else, not for the world. In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond, and therefore
thou mayst think my haviour light: But trust me, gentleman, I'll prove more true
than those that have more cunning to be strange. I should have been more
strange, I must confess, but that thou overheard'st, ere I was 'ware, my true
love's passion: therefore pardon me, and not impute this yielding to light love,
which the dark night hath so discovered.
Romeo
Lady, by yonder blessed moon I vow which tips with silver these fruit-tree tops.
Juliet
O! swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon that monthly changes in her
circled orb, lest that thy love prove likewise variable.
[End of clip]
Download formats:
RSC_RnJ_08_AR_1.mov (11.5 MB) RSC_RnJ_08_AR_1.wmv (7.7 MB)

Activity sequence 1
Hand out Worksheet 9 then ask pupils to read the facts carefully before discussing as
a group what they think Juliet is feeling at this point in the scene (by line 84). Ask

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pupils to consider the following questions about Juliet, as the daughter of a noble
family living in sixteenth century Verona.

What questions are going through Juliet's mind?


What possibilities does she face?
What might Juliet say to Romeo at this moment?
What might the pupils themselves do in a similar situation?

Feed back ideas from groups and ask pupils to justify what they say. This activity
leads up to Juliet's speech, so it is helpful for pupils to get a sense of Juliet's
emotional state.
Pupils might say the following.
Juliet wants to show Romeo that she likes him, but also does not trust him.
Juliet has already said she likes Romeo, so there's no point hiding it.

Activity sequence 2
There are three ways of approaching Juliet's speech.
1. Ask pupils, in pairs, to go through the speech and complete thoughttracking for each chunk of text. One pupil could read the speech slowly
aloud, pausing every so often while the other pupil voices Juliet's thoughts.
For example, I have to tell him how 1 feel! or I need to show him I'm no
pushover!.
2. Pupils read the speech individually and physicalise Juliet's feelings by
using a simple object such as chair as a measure of her holding back or
being open. Every time a line suggests Juliet is holding her feelings back, the
pupil could sit down. Every time Juliet wants to reveal her strong feelings, the
pupil stands up and moves forward.
3. For a visual method of interacting with the speech, hand out Worksheet
10. Cut out the symbols and place them over the text, or use an interactive
whiteboard to drag them into position or draw arrows over the lines of the
speech.

Resources
Download the following resources to complete these activities.
Worksheet 9: The facts about Romeo (PDF-60 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 10: Imagine my thoughts
Node information
Attachments Zip:
86ea120ba88325ecda1e3e9a17a0ddac.zip

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File Attachments
Worksheet 9: The facts about Romeo ( pdf 60 KB )
Worksheet 10: Imagine my thoughts ( doc 548 KB )
Clip 8: Juliet's speech ('Dost thou love me?') ( mp4 9.8 MB )

Plenary
You can find out how to teach pupils to think about the choices and judgements Juliet
has to make. This includes the activity sequence to complete this plenary.

Part 1
Throughout the play, Juliet often makes choices and judgements, usually related to
trusting or not trusting people.
Ask pupils to go through the play and think about the decisions and judgements Juliet
has to make. Do they think Juliet is braver than Romeo?
What evidence can they find in the text to support their interpretations? Encourage
pupils to select appropriate quotations to support the writing task.

Part 2
This final task could be used as planning practice for an extended written response.
Ask pupils to write a detailed plan for a written response to the question 'Considering
the play as a whole, is Juliet braver than Romeo?
This activity can be used to form the basis for a task in Lesson 14 of Unit 9.

Unit 7: Who's the daddy?


You can use this overview to find out how to complete this unit. Read about the
suggested timing, unit focus, relevant objectives, substrands and assessment
focuses (AFs), resources and key vocabulary.

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Suggested timing
34 hours

Focus for learning


Looking at a key concern or theme in Shakespeare's plays with direct
relevance to Romeo and Juliet.
Relating aspects of plot and action to the theme.

Relevant objectives/substrands
Reading 6.1 Relating texts to the social, historical and cultural contexts in
which they were written.
Writing 7.2 Using and adapting the conventions and forms of texts on
paper and on screen.
Writing 8.2 Varying sentences and punctuation for clarity and effect.
Writing 8.3 Improving vocabulary for precision and impact.

Relevant AFs
Reading AF2, AF6, AF7
Writing AF1, AF2, AF7

Key vocabulary
woo, consent

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this unit.
Worksheet 11: Marriage and money in Shakespeare's time (PDF-68 KB)
Attachments
Worksheet 12: A Midsummer Night's Dream extract from Act 1 Scene 1
(PDF-73 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 13: Who's the daddy? (PDF-81 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 14: Juliet's letter (DOC-48 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 15: Juliet's letter writing frame (DOC-46 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 16: Who's the daddy? Extension

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Node information
Attachments Zip:
49f2bac7f026aae7faa593d59ebe7ad1.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 11: Marriage and money in Shakespeare's time ( pdf 68 KB )
Worksheet 12: A Midsummer Night's Dream extract from Act 1 Scene 1 (
pdf 73 KB )
Worksheet 13: Who's the daddy? ( pdf 81 KB )
Worksheet 14: Juliet's letter ( doc 48 KB )
Worksheet 15: Juliet's letter writing frame ( doc 47 KB )
Worksheet 16: Who's the daddy? Extension ( doc 48 KB )

Lesson 10: Reviewing plot and key


events
You can find out the focus of this lesson, how to prepare for it and the resources
needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on exploring the role and character of fathers in Shakespeare's
plays.

Preparation
Before the lesson, ask pupils to read Act 1 Scene 2 and Act 3 Scene 5 (Capulet's
row with Juliet).

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this lesson.
Worksheet 11: Marriage and money in Shakespeare's time (PDF-68 KB)
Attachments
Worksheet 12: A Midsummer Night's Dream extract from Act 1 Scene 1
Node information
Attachments Zip:
8aefc8e6405a71f091d55ac2b9c32930.zip

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File Attachments
Worksheet 11: Marriage and money in Shakespeare's time ( pdf 68 KB )
Worksheet 12: A Midsummer Night's Dream extract from Act 1 Scene 1 (
pdf 73 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to encourage your pupils to reflect on Juliet's situation at the
end of Act 2 Scene 2, when she agrees to marry her family's rival. You can read
about the activity sequence to use to complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Discuss and review Juliet's situation at the end of Act 2 Scene 2.
In agreeing to marry the son of her family's most hated rival, Juliet disobeys both her
father and mother, who want her to marry Paris. In fact, Juliet's father has given Paris
consent to approach her. Encourage pupils to realise that Capulet won't necessarily
object to Romeo.
Ask pupils the following questions.
How will Juliet's father feel if/when he finds out?
At this point, is there any evidence that Juliet's father might accept Romeo
as a son-in-law?
You could elicit the following observations from your pupils.
Capulet praises Romeo at the ball and prevents Tybalt from fighting with
him.
Capulet is initially reluctant in Act 1 Scene 2, to allow Paris to woo Juliet,
stating that her consent is important.

Main activities
You can find out how to generate discussion about the father figures in Romeo and
Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream. You can read about the suggested
sequences to complete these activities and the resources needed.

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Activity sequence 1
In groups, read Worksheet 11. Ask pupils to discuss the following.
What impression do you get of the power fathers and husbands had in
Shakespeare's day?
Does Capulet's response to Paris and how he talks about Juliet fit what
the worksheet says?
From the balcony scene, what impression do you get of the sort of
marriage Romeo and Juliet would have had if they had lived?
Share responses to this discussion with the rest of the class and then consider to
what extent Juliet's father acts unreasonably later in the play (Act 3 Scene 5).
You might reiterate the following.
Although husbands and fathers had legal power, they didn't always force
their wives and children to do as they wished.
Capulet, Lady Capulet and even the Nurse think that Paris is pleasant
looking and rich. They don't see the fuss Juliet doesn't have to love him,
simply find him acceptable.

Activity sequence 2
Distribute Worksheet 12 and ask pupils, in groups of three or four, to read or perform
the extract. Then ask pupils to discuss the following.
What is Egeus' view of his daughter's lover, Lysander?
What does Egeus demand from Theseus?
How does Theseus respond? Does he support Hermia or her father?
During feedback, you might point out the following.
Egeus' demand is very severe that if his daughter does not do as he
says, she should die.
The situation is similar to Romeo and Juliet a duke, like the Prince,
dispenses justice.
A Midsummer Night's Dream is a comedy and although it doesn't start like
one, it has a happy ending.

Resources
Download the following resources to complete these activities.

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Worksheet 11: Marriage and money in Shakespeare's time (PDF-68 KB)


Attachments
Worksheet 12: A Midsummer Night's Dream extract from Act 1 Scene 1
Node information
Attachments Zip:
8aefc8e6405a71f091d55ac2b9c32930.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 11: Marriage and money in Shakespeare's time ( pdf 68 KB )
Worksheet 12: A Midsummer Night's Dream extract from Act 1 Scene 1 (
pdf 73 KB )

Plenary
You can find out how to encourage pupils to think about Egeus' speech in A
Midsummer Night's Dream, including the activity sequence to complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
Ask pupils to look at Egeus' speech and write a short response to the following
question.
In Egeus' speech, what clues are there that this will be a play about night time magic
and potions used to make people fall in love with each other?
Explain that later in the play, magical spirits who live in the forest cast spells over
Lysander, Demetrius and others to make them fall in love.

Lesson 11: Looking more widely at


Shakespeare's ideas
You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

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Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on exploring the character and behaviour of the fathers in
Shakespeare's plays.

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this lesson:

Worksheet 13: Who's the daddy? (PDF-81 KB) Attachments


Worksheet 14: Juliet's letter (DOC-48 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 15: Juliet's letter writing frame (DOC-46 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 16: Who's the daddy? Extension

Node information
Attachments Zip:
3b8ed5804406953fa734f19fa2c2f2fc.zip

File Attachments

Worksheet 13: Who's the daddy? ( pdf 81 KB )


Worksheet 14: Juliet's letter ( doc 48 KB )
Worksheet 15: Juliet's letter writing frame ( doc 47 KB )
Worksheet 16: Who's the daddy? Extension ( doc 48 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to generate class discussion on ideas of marriage and a father
or husband's rights during Shakespeare's time. You can find out the activity
sequence to use to complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Ask your pupils to recap on what they have already learnt about marriage and a
father or husband's rights in Shakespeare's time.

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Main activities
You can find out how to encourage pupils to think about Capulet's roles as father and
husband, and write him a letter from Juliet's perspective in the lead up to Act 4 Scene
3. You can find out suggested sequences to complete these activities and the
resources needed.

Activity sequence
Part 1
Distribute Worksheet 13 and ask pupils to read it in pairs. Ask them the following
questions.
What impression do you get of fathers in Shakespeare's plays?
Which of the fathers mentioned seems to be fairest?
Now ask pairs to make a brief list of Capulet's strengths and weaknesses as a father
and husband, based on their overall understanding of the play. For example,
Capulet's brawling at the start would be a weakness it shows he has a quick
temper.
Ask each pair to join another pair to combine lists and then feed back to the class as
a whole. Create a composite list of strengths and weaknesses on the board or
interactive whiteboard and make sure all pupils have copies of this.

Part 2
Ask pupils to imagine they are in the role of Juliet as she is about to take the sleeping
potion in Act 4 Scene 3. Worried she might die or never see her father again as she
intends to run away with Romeo, Juliet writes a letter to her father explaining her
actions.
Distribute Worksheet 14 to help pupils complete this activity, or use Worksheet 15 for
pupils who need additional support with letter writing.

Resources
Download the following resources to complete these activities.

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Worksheet 13: Who's the daddy? (PDF-81 KB) Attachments


Worksheet 14: Juliet's letter (DOC-48 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 15: Juliet's letter writing frame
Node information
Attachments Zip:
ae2ddffcbe1524a9631f6dbd34dab320.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 13: Who's the daddy? ( pdf 81 KB )
Worksheet 14: Juliet's letter ( doc 48 KB )
Worksheet 15: Juliet's letter writing frame ( doc 47 KB )

Plenary
Find out how you can encourage class discussion about the role of Capulet in the
play and how a Shakespearean audience would have viewed his actions. Find out
the activity sequence, a suggested additional activity and the resources needed to
complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
Ask pupils to discuss:
the role of Capulet in the play
Juliet's behaviour
whether Capulet's actions would have been seen as reasonable by a
Shakespearean audience.
You might notice a range of views come out of this last discussion point. On the one
hand the audience might have supported a father's right to control his daughter, but
on the other, the play is seen from Juliet's perspective, so they may have
sympathised with her.

Additional activity
Distribute Worksheet 16 and ask pupils to research the three plays and fathers
mentioned, including how they behave.

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Resources
Download Worksheet 16: Who's the daddy? Extension to complete this plenary.

File Attachments
Worksheet 16: Who's the daddy? Extension ( doc 48 KB )

Unit 8: Other Juliets


You can use this overview to find out how to complete this unit. Read about the
suggested timing, unit focus, relevant objectives, substrands and assessment
focuses (AFs), resources and key vocabulary.

Suggested timing
11 hours

Focus for learning


How different reviewers respond to performances.
Writing their own reviews.

Relevant objectives/substrands
Reading 5.3 Reading and engaging with a wide and varied range of texts.
Reading 6.2 Analysing how writers use of linguistic and literary features
shapes and influences meaning.
Writing 7.2 Using and adapting the conventions and forms of texts on
paper and on screen.
Writing 8.1 Developing viewpoint, voice and ideas.
Writing 8.2 Varying sentences and punctuation for clarity and effect.

Relevant AFs
Reading AF4, AF5, AF6
Writing AF2, AF5

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Key vocabulary
review, content, interpretation, extended noun phrase

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this unit.
Worksheet 17: Reviewing Juliet (PDF-79 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 18: Review questions (PDF-67 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 19: Reviewing Juliet extended extracts
You might also use a range of film, television and play reviews.
Node information
Attachments Zip:
352785701972a317b6027fee22d130a1.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 17: Reviewing Juliet ( pdf 79 KB )
Worksheet 18: Review questions ( pdf 67 KB )
Worksheet 19: Reviewing Juliet extended extracts ( pdf 97 KB )

Lesson 12: Reviews


You can find out the focus of this lesson, how to prepare for it and the resources
needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on the language of reviews.

Preparation
It might be useful for pupils to look at a range of reviews including film and television.
This can help them recall what they know about the conventions of reviews.

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Resources
Download the following resources to complete this lesson.
Worksheet 17: Reviewing Juliet (PDF-79 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 18: Review questions (PDF-67 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 19: Reviewing Juliet extended extracts
Node information
Attachments Zip:
352785701972a317b6027fee22d130a1.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 17: Reviewing Juliet ( pdf 79 KB )
Worksheet 18: Review questions ( pdf 67 KB )
Worksheet 19: Reviewing Juliet extended extracts ( pdf 97 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to help pupils recall what they know about the conventions of
reviews and remind them what a review conveys. Find out the activity sequence to
complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Ask pupils to look at a range of reviews, including film, television and plays, to recall
what they know about the conventions of reviews. They might look out for how
action, characters are style are often written in packed, adjective-heavy sentences
using extended noun phrases, for example, jaw-dropping, action-packed sequence
in which our muscle-bound blond hunk of a hero.
Remind pupils to focus on content, and that a review conveys:
a taste of the production
a sense of the reviewer's viewpoint.

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Main activities
You can find out how to teach pupils to explore reviews of performances of Juliet,
and write their own review. You can find out the suggested sequences and the
resources needed to complete these activities.

Activity sequence 1
Distribute Worksheet 17 and Worksheet 18 and ask pupils, in pairs, to answer the
questions.
Feed back the answers to the class as a whole. Make the following points.
The review extracts focus on Juliet, but we sometimes learn about other
aspects of the play, such as the feel or design of the production.
The extracts focus on slightly different things, such as her appearance or
interpretation.
No Juliet is the 'right Juliet, but each reviewer has a sense of what works
and what doesn't.
Effective reviews sum up Juliet or the actress in pithy sentences or
examples.

Additional activity
You might want to use the more detailed Worksheet 19, which provides longer
extracts for pupils to look at. More confident pupils could complete a detailed analysis
of the reviews and the particular interpretation by writing a paragraph about each
review, summing up what the reviewer is saying.

Activity sequence 2
Model for pupils how they could build a review paragraph on Laura Rees, the actress
who plays Juliet in the video clips, as seen in earlier units. Start by scaffolding a
sentence.
'Juliet is a [adjective], [adjective] [noun] who is [adjective] by her situation.'
Here is an example review sentence.
'Juliet is a plain, simple girl who is highly irritated by her situation.'

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Resources
Download the following resources complete these activities.
Worksheet 17: Reviewing Juliet (PDF-79 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 18: Review questions (PDF-67 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 19: Reviewing Juliet extended extracts
Node information
Attachments Zip:
352785701972a317b6027fee22d130a1.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 17: Reviewing Juliet ( pdf 79 KB )
Worksheet 18: Review questions ( pdf 67 KB )
Worksheet 19: Reviewing Juliet extended extracts ( pdf 97 KB )

Plenary
You can find out how you can encourage class discussion on performances of Juliet
and the impact of other characters' performances on her role. You can find out the
activity sequence to complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
Ask pupils for a wider reaction to Laura Rees's performance as Juliet in the video
clips they have seen in earlier units.
Ask them to reflect on whether it would be fair to judge Laura's performance on these
clips from a single rehearsal.
How important is Romeo's performance, or other characters performances, in
making Juliet's successful?

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Unit 9: Extended writing on Act 2


Scene 2
You can use this overview to find out how to complete this unit. You can read about
the suggested timing, unit focus, relevant objectives and substrands, assessment
focuses (AFs), resources and key vocabulary.

Suggested timing
34 hours

Focus for learning


How to shape pupils' own ideas to tackle an extended written response to
a character question.

Relevant objectives/substrands
Reading 5.1 Developing and adapting active reading skills and strategies.
Reading 6.2 Analysing how writers use of linguistic and literary features
shapes and influences meaning.
Writing 7.1 Generating ideas, planning and drafting.
Writing 8.1 Developing viewpoint, voice and ideas.
Writing 8.5 Structuring, organising and presenting texts in a variety of
forms on paper and on screen.
Writing 9.1 Using the conventions of standard English.

Relevant AFs
Reading AF2, AF3, AF6
Writing AF2, AF3, AF6, AF8

Key vocabulary
controlled conditions, hot-seating, personal engagement/response, judgement,
evidence

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Resources
Download Worksheet 20: My task notes to complete this unit.

File Attachments
Worksheet 20: My task notes ( doc 48 KB )

Lesson 13: The big question!


You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on working under controlled conditions for a specified time on a
given task. It includes a video clip showing how Romeo and Juliet's characters
change and develop.

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to introduce the idea of working on a task under controlled
conditions for a specified time. You can find out the activity sequence to complete
this opening.

Activity sequence
Introduce the idea that a key aspect of GCSE literature courses is working on a given
task under controlled conditions for a specified time. Similarly, give pupils time to
prepare and write for tasks within this lesson.
Remind pupils that they have already built and developed skills to work under these
conditions. These include:
interpretation
finding and using evidence
expressing their ideas.
Pupils now have an opportunity to apply these skills independently.

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Main activity
You can find out how to teach pupils to consider the argument that Juliet comes
across as naive and impulsive in Act 2 Scene 2. You can read about the sequence to
complete this activity.

Activity sequence
Write the following question on the board or interactive whiteboard.
Act 2 Scene 2 shows that Juliet is a nave girl who acts before she thinks. What do
you think?
Before pupils investigate this, ask them to write down a sentence or two on their
immediate response to this question. This is only for themselves, but keep these
notes as it may be interesting to see whether they change their minds by the end.
Now divide the class in two. One half will spend 15 minutes finding evidence to
support the question on the board, while the other half finds evidence against it.
Encourage pupils to focus on the following.
Juliet's general behaviour and personality before this scene.
How Juliet acts towards Romeo.
What Juliet says and does, and what Romeo says and does.
You may choose to play the following video clip. Be aware that it may direct pupils'
thoughts, but you can allow them to use the ideas. Pupils will notice that Juliet
changes during the video she is both practical and checking Romeo out, willing to
give all to him. She changes Romeo too, helping him become more sincere.
Clip 9: Romeo and Juliet changing and developing

File Attachments
Clip 9: Romeo and Juliet changing and developing ( mp4 24.6 MB )

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Plenary
You can find out how to feed back and gather pupils' responses in preparation for the
next lesson. Find out the activity sequence to complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
Encourage pupils to feed back their ideas from the previous activity and make a note
of their responses. These can be recorded and then distributed to pupils for
reference to use in the written task in the next lesson.
During feed back, you could organise a class debate or use a form of hot-seating in
which Juliet is questioned by the two sides, like defence and prosecution. The jury
can pass a judgement on the original question raised in the opening activity: Act 2
Scene 2 shows that Juliet is a naive girl who acts before she thinks. What do you
think?

Lesson 14: Planning and writing


You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on planning and essay writing under controlled conditions.

Resources
Download Worksheet 20: My task notes to complete this lesson.

File Attachments
Worksheet 20: My task notes ( doc 48 KB )

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Opening the lesson


You can find out how to help pupils keep on track in their writing by breaking down
the discussion question into key words. You can find out the activity sequence to
complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Break down the discussion question Act 2 Scene 2 shows that Juliet is a naive girl
who acts before she thinks. What do you think? into key words for your pupils. These
are:

Juliet
naive girl
acts before she thinks
Act 2 Scene 2.

Remind pupils that by referring to these key words, they can make sure they keep
their writing on track. Distribute Worksheet 20 so that pupils can keep a running
record of their thoughts.
A key aspect of literature work at GCSE is personal engagement. This does not
mean just writing down what they think without any support, but it does reinforce that
what pupils think is important. As the clips have shown, there are various ways that
Juliet can be played.

Resources
Download Worksheet 20: My task notes to complete this opening.

File Attachments
Worksheet 20: My task notes ( doc 48 KB )

Main activity
You can find out how to teach your pupils to create a basic plan for writing an essay
under controlled conditions. You can find out the sequence to complete this activity.

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Activity sequence
Pupils can choose different ways to create a plan. However, you can use the
following steps to help pupils structure their plans.
1. Briefly describe what happens in the scene and what has gone before in
a paragraph or two.
2. Deal with the idea of Juliet as naive and whether this would make her act
carefully or without thinking.
3. Tackle the key question: does Juliet act first, think later? Draw on key
quotations, especially from the speech explored in Unit 6 (Act 2 Scene 2,
lines 85106).
4. Draw conclusions what do you think? This may be a chance for you to
say what you would have done in her shoes.
By the end of this session, pupils have:
written a basic plan
decided what they think
jotted down three or four key quotations to use.
At this point, pupils are ready to write their essay in controlled conditions.

Activities from Unit 6


You may want to return to the work done in Unit 6, when pupils reflected on how
Juliet feels and how her feelings change. Pupils might also consider the pressures a
young girl of Juliet's age would have faced in Shakespeare's day. They might
consider whether it was really possible that she wouldn't have realised what she was
getting herself into by disobeying her father.

Plenary
You can find out how you can prompt pupils to think about how to prepare for writing
controlled-condition essays. You can find out the activity sequence to complete this
plenary.

Activity sequence
Tell pupils when the controlled-conditions essay will take place. You can complete
this task by playing the video clip and looking at Neil Bartlett's final words to actors
Laura and David about what happens after the balcony scene in Act 2 Scene 2.

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When watching the video clip, ask pupils to consider the following.
Why is this scene so important in terms of plot?
Having seen various clips now, how do you think the director wanted
Romeo and Juliet to behave? What view of their relationship did he have?
How did he view their situation?
How alone were Romeo and Juliet?
Clip 10: Discussion what happens next after this scene?

Further study
Ask pupils to bring their notes to the next session when they write their essay.
The questions the director asks the actors can help pupils in their further study of this
play.
When you come on stage:
what do you want?
why did you come on stage?
When the scene ends:
what do I want now?
who or what is stopping me?
how am I going to get what I want?

Unit 10: Designing the past


You can use this overview to find out how to complete this unit. You can read about
the suggested timing, unit focus, relevant objectives and substrands, assessment
focuses (AFs), resources and key vocabulary.

Suggested timing
23 hours

Focus for learning


Carefully researching and drawing together ideas for pupils own use in
order to imagine Verona on stage.

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Independently and creatively applying skills and ideas developed over a


period to a creative task based on the play.

Relevant objectives/substrands
Speaking and listening 4.1 Using different dramatic approaches to explore
ideas, texts and issues.
Reading 5.3 Reading and engaging with a wide and varied range of texts.
Writing 7.1 Generating ideas, planning and drafting.
Writing 8.1 Developing viewpoint, voice and ideas.

Relevant AFs
Reading AF3, AF7

Key vocabulary
tone, style, production, design, staging, period, stylised, minimalist

Resources
Download the following resources from to complete this unit.
Presentation: Images of Juliet (PPT-676 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 21: Design terms (PDF-61 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 22: Verona on stage (PDF-65 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 23: Production design summary
Node information
Attachments Zip:
e7d2eb7d2a0851092b76ad9ce6ebd939.zip

Related Links
http://www.photostage.co.uk/
http://www.theatredesign.org.uk/

File Attachments
Presentation: Images of Juliet ( ppt 677 KB )
Worksheet 21: Design terms ( pdf 61 KB )
Worksheet 22: Verona on stage ( pdf 65 KB )

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Worksheet 23: Production design summary ( doc 47 KB )

Lesson 15: Versions of Verona


You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on tone, style and production.

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this lesson.
Presentation: Images of Juliet (PPT-676 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 21: Design terms (PDF-61 KB) Attachments
Worksheet 22: Verona on stage
Node information
Attachments Zip:
f3ddd791c5a1d7878b7d0298a5e799cf.zip

File Attachments
Presentation: Images of Juliet ( ppt 677 KB )
Worksheet 21: Design terms ( pdf 61 KB )
Worksheet 22: Verona on stage ( pdf 65 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to help pupils explore different images of Juliet and various
ways of presenting the story of Romeo and Juliet. You can find out the activity
sequence and the resources needed to complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Show pupils the Presentation: Images of Juliet, which shows a variety of images of
Juliet from past productions. Point out that they are all different in tone and style.

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Introduce the following terms to describe different ways of presenting the story:
period
minimalist
stylised.
Distribute Worksheet 21 to guide pupils through this activity.

Resources
Download the following resources to complete this opening.
Worksheet 21: Design terms (PDF-61 KB) Attachments
Presentation: Images of Juliet
Node information
Attachments Zip:
ffaa9153797dbdf04bac4a08b59b0a1f.zip

File Attachments
Worksheet 21: Design terms ( pdf 61 KB )
Presentation: Images of Juliet ( ppt 677 KB )

Main activities
You can find out how to encourage pupils to consider how they would design a
production of Romeo and Juliet. You can find out the resources needed and the
suggested sequences to complete these activities.

Activity sequence 1
Ask pupils How would you design a production of Romeo and Juliet to bring out the
themes and story?
Divide the class into production groups and ask each group to look at a variety of
stage designs that have been used in productions of the play. The following websites
might be useful.
Photostage to see the Shakespeare galleries.
The Society of British Theatre Designers to see a range of images of
stage designs, including designs for Romeo and Juliet.

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You can also look at the Presentation: Images of Juliet. Once pupils have gathered
enough ideas, they then discuss what style would suit the play and why.

Activity sequence 2
Divide pupils in their production groups into pairs and run a simple role play. Pupil A
plays a servant of the Prince, who is visiting Mantua or another Italian city. While the
Prince is there, he meets pupil B a person who has never visited Verona and wants
to know what it is like.
A: So, you have come from the great city of Verona. Tell me, my friend, what is it
like?
B: Verona is

Interim session
You may provide an interim session in which pupils talk about what they consider the
key themes and stories to be. They might consider director Neil Bartlett of the Royal
Shakespeare Company's suggested question of whether young people are trapped
by adults into acting in the same ways as their parents generation. Pupils can also
consider the following questions.
Is it a play about infatuation and passion, or angelic love?
Which is the more important story: the love between Romeo and Juliet or
the hatred between the families?
Do students think the play has a positive ending in any way, or is it entirely
negative?
In the role play exercise, pupil A uses his/her imagination to describe the buildings,
streets, sights and atmosphere. Pupil B's job is to help by asking questions.

Resources
Download Presentation: Images of Juliet to complete the first activity.

Related Links
Photostage
The Society of British Theatre Designers

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File Attachments
Presentation: Images of Juliet ( ppt 677 KB )

Plenary
You can find out how to encourage pupils to look at different interpretations of the city
of Verona as a setting for Romeo and Juliet. You can find out the activity sequence
and the resources needed to complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
Ask pupils to look at Worksheet 22, a review of a Romeo and Juliet production, which
describes the city of Verona.
Encourage pupils to discuss the differences in style suggested by each and whether
they find the concepts appealing. Verona is described as:
a cross between a city in Spain and Morocco
Middle Eastern
a 50s mafia-style world.

Resources
Download Worksheet 22: Verona on stage to complete this unit.

File Attachments
Worksheet 22: Verona on stage ( pdf 65 KB )

Lesson 16: My production ideas


You can find out the focus of this lesson and the resources needed to complete it.

Lesson focus
This lesson focuses on creative thinking.

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Teaching and Learning Resources p.74


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Resources
Download Worksheet 23: Production design summary to complete this lesson.

File Attachments
Worksheet 23: Production design summary ( doc 47 KB )

Opening the lesson


You can find out how to help pupils create a production idea for their own
interpretation of Romeo and Juliet. You can find out the activity sequence and the
resources needed to complete this opening.

Activity sequence
Explain that this lesson involves pupils coming up with a convincing production idea
for their own interpretation of Romeo and Juliet. The task involves the following.
Producing a production design summary. Distribute Worksheet 23 to help
pupils create their own.
Explaining their ideas to their group and/or the class.
Backing up their decisions in terms of the the play's themes, ideas and
characters.

Additional activity
In addition, you might ask pupils to produce:
drawings, plans, visual designs, or slide presentations of the stage to
support their ideas
costume designs, including fabric samples
miniature models of actual stage designs.
Ask pupils to support any design items from this list using their production design
summary or other written justification.

Resources
Download Worksheet 23: Production design summary to complete this opening.

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File Attachments
Worksheet 23: Production design summary ( doc 47 KB )

Main activity
You can find out how to help pupils create a production idea for their own
interpretation of Romeo and Juliet, and the activity sequence to complete this.

Activity sequence
Give pupils time to work on their production design and written summaries for their
interpretations of Romeo and Juliet.

Plenary
You can find out how to help pupils present their completed work on production
designs and written summaries to the rest of the class, and about the activity
sequence to complete this plenary.

Activity sequence
Ask pupils to present their completed production designs and written summaries to
rest of the class.
You may want to give separate attention to help pupils prepare for their spoken
presentations.

Crown copyright 2011