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Biomedical Engineering MSc programme

Study Guide

2016/2017

www.bme.msc.tudelft.nl

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p1/43

Disclaimer

This study guide has been compiled with the utmost care and is based on information provided by the faculties involved; this information was up to date on September 4 th , 2016. Changes, additional information and detailed descriptions of subjects can be found on Blackboard:

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Content

Preface

 

5

1.

Introduction

7

2.

Goals

9

3.

Qualifications of BME MSc-graduates

10

4.

Study Programme

12

4.1 General Information

12

4.1.1 Academic calendar and daily schedule

12

4.1.2 Lecture hours

14

4.1.3 Examinations

14

4.1.4 Study Load and European Credits

14

4.2 MSc: First Year (60EC)

14

4.2.1

Individual Study Programme (ISP)

15

4.3 MSc: Second Year (60EC)

16

4.3.1 Traineeship in a hospital, industry or another research institute (15EC)

16

4.3.2 Literature survey (10EC)

16

4.3.3 Master thesis project (32EC)

17

4.3.4 Oral presentations (3EC)

17

4.4 Student Interviews

17

5

Specialisations within the BME MSc-programme

18

5.1 Medical Instruments and Medical Safety (MIMS)

19

5.2 Biomechatronics (BM)

20

5.3 Biomaterials and Tissue Biomechanics (BTB)

21

5.4 Medical Physics (MP)

22

5.5 Biomedical Electronics (BE)

23

5.6 Annotation Entrepreneurship

24

5.7 Honours Programme

24

6

Admission

25

6.1 Admission for students with an academic bachelor degree

25

6.2 Admission for students with bachelor degree from a Dutch school for higher vocational education (HBO)

26

6.2.1

Introduction

6.2.2 Pre-master programme for Medical Instruments and Medical Safety (MIMS); Biomechatronics (BM); and Biomaterials and Tissue Biomechanics (BTB)

27

6.2.3 Pre-master programme for Medical Physics (MP)

28

6.2.4 Pre-master programme for Biomedical Electronics (BE)

29

6.3 Admission for students still in their academic bachelor programme

30

7

Teaching in Leiden (LUMC) and Rotterdam (Erasmus MC)

31

7.1 Courses in Leiden

31

7.2 Courses in Rotterdam

32

8

All BME master courses

33

8.1 Biomedical Courses

34

8.2 Mathematics and Engineering Courses

36

9

Study and traineeship abroad

37

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10

Enrolling for courses and tests

38

10.1 Courses

38

10.2 Tests

38

11 Organisation

39

11.1 Faculty 3mE

39

11.2 Interfaculty master programme

39

11.3 Education support staff

39

11.4 Education committee

40

11.5 Board of Examiners

40

11.6 Student association

40

11.7 MSc-coordinator

40

11.8 Academic Counsellor

41

12 Further information

43

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Preface

We are very pleased that the MSc programme in Biomedical Engineering will start again on Monday, September 5 th , 2016. Since the launch of the master programme in 2004 many students were awarded their MSc-degree and most of them found that the programme was exactly what they were looking for: challenging, interesting, relevant, multi-disciplinary, application-oriented and more. Almost all of them have been able to find rewarding jobs in the biomedical industry or in related fields, mostly as researchers or designers.

In 2012 we received a visit from an evaluation committee which is responsible for monitoring the quality of the education programme. The committee members were very enthusiastic about the multi- disciplinary character of the Biomedical Engineering programme, offered in collaboration with Leiden University Medical Centre, the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam, and the medical centres in Amsterdam. They were particularly in favour of the use of direct confrontation with clinical research issues as the main tool for keeping the students focused. The committee appreciated the strong focus on the engineering/technology aspects of biomedical engineering within the programme.

The unique collaboration between the departments of Applied Sciences, Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering in an interfaculty MSc programme does present challenges in terms of the lecture schedules and examinations, etc. However, on the positive side, students are encouraged to look beyond the traditional boundaries of the individual disciplines and to discover new horizons.

The contribution made by our clinical partners at the Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC). the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam (ErasmusMC), and the medical centres in Amsterdam (AMC and VUMC), is very important. Medical doctors from these centres visit the Delft campus and introduce the BME students to the clinical problems that they are facing. The future BME engineers make several trips to Leiden, Rotterdam, and Amsterdam in order to gain direct experience of the clinical environment and many BME students carry out their MSc-thesis assignments or at least part of them at the Leiden, Rotterdam, and Amsterdam sites. As an indication of the positive nature of the collaboration, during the last years some medical students have also come to Delft to take an introductory course in Biomedical Engineering. Medical doctors with a good appreciation of engineering methodology and design are very important as a counterpart to the BME engineers. This coming year more medical students are likely to spend part of their study time at Delft. In 2006 an official collaboration programme involving the LUMC, the University of Leiden, ErasmusMC, Erasmus University and Delft University of Technology began. This regional collaboration between three large knowledge institutes will act as a major stimulus for biomedical companies in the province of South Holland, which is referred to as the ‘Medical Delta’ www.medicaldelta.nl. The collaboration involves both research and education. For new MSc students

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in particular it represents an ongoing commitment on the part of our clinical partners to participate in the education programme. In addition new jobs will be created in the region for our graduates. The BME programme at Delft University of Technology differs from other BME programmes offered in the Netherlands, because it focuses on producing good engineers in the traditional engineering disciplines who can apply their skills within multi-disciplinary research teams which also include medical scientists. The MSc programme puts the emphasis on multi-disciplinary collaboration and the MSc theses are often under the guidance of both technical and clinical tutors.

In the field of biomedical engineering there are still many new discoveries to be made and there is a constant search for better equipment. It is a hi-tech field where research programmes in universities can still compete (and collaborate) with industrial programmes. Its importance for society as a whole is obvious. It is very rewarding for students to see that their efforts can have an impact on clinical practice.

We look forward to the coming year and the many new opportunities for students, researchers and clinicians!

Prof.dr. Frans C.T. van der Helm Dr.ir. Dick H Plettenburg

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1.

Introduction

Biomedical Engineering (BME) involves the application of engineering principles and technologies to medicine and biology so as to define and solve problems in these fields. The two-year MSc programme in Biomedical Engineering at Delft University of Technology started in September 2004. Although still a young programme, it is founded on a long history of teaching and research in BME within three collaborating faculties:

the Faculty of Applied Sciences (Physics),

the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, and

the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Marine Technology and Materials Science.

Bundling the education and research programmes of these three faculties a broad BME programme could be realised. Additionally, the programme includes close and intensive collaboration with clinical partners at Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), the Erasmus Medical Centre Rotterdam (Erasmus MC), the Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam (AMC), and the Free University Medical Centre (VUMC). Clinical partners participate in first-year MSc teaching, and in the tutoring of MSc projects in the second year.

Biomedical engineers have a solid technical background and additional knowledge of the medical field. In the biomedical industry, they apply their knowledge to the development and improvement of instruments for minimally invasive surgery, biomaterials, joint replacement prostheses, pacemakers, catheters, etc. Within the health service, in particular in academic medical centres, biomedical engineers participate in research and education. Two examples are biomechanical research focused at the improvement of joint replacement prostheses at an orthopaedic department, and image processing research for the automated detection of narrowing blood vessels at a department of cardiology.

In total, five specialisations are offered within the MSc in BME programme. Three of these specialisations require a background in Mechanical Engineering; one requires a background in (Applied) Physics, and one in Electrical Engineering. This means that BSc graduates in Mechanical Engineering, Applied Physics or Electrical Engineering from a University of Technology may enter the BME programme without any restrictions. Academic BSc graduates holding other degrees may also enter the programme but may need to acquire the required prerequisite knowledge. Graduates holding a degree from a Dutch polytechnic school (Technische Hogeschool) may also enter the programme upon completion of a number of additional courses: the Pre-Master programme. See chapter 6 for detailed information on enrolment.

Chapter 2 sets out the goals of the master programme in Biomedical Engineering and Chapter 3 describes the qualifications of the MSc in Biomedical Engineering graduate. In Chapter 4, an overview

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of the study programme is given. The five specialisations are presented in more detail in Chapter 5. In Chapter 6, the admission programmes for academic bachelors and Dutch polytechnic bachelor graduates are described. The medical courses on offer at LUMC and the Erasmus MC and in some of the research groups in the two academic hospitals that offer final master thesis assignments are presented in Chapter 7. Chapter 8 contains an overview of biomedical and medical courses and an overview of mathematics and engineering courses. Chapters 9-12 provide further practical information.

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2.

Goals

The goal of the master programme in Biomedical Engineering is to educate academic engineers, who are technically high-skilled and have additional medical and biological knowledge. Graduates are capable to collaborate with clinicians, researchers and other health care professionals in order to:

Identify, define and analyse biomedical problems, for the solution of which Biomedical Engineering principles and techniques can contribute

Develop and to produce a sound solution to the problem

Present these solutions effectively

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3.

Qualifications of BME MSc-graduates

The graduated Master of Biomedical Engineering meets, to a qualifications:

sufficient

level, the

following

1. Broad and profound knowledge of engineering sciences (mathematics and applied physics) and the ability to apply this at an advanced level in one biomedical engineering specialization.

2. Basic physiology and anatomy knowledge as well as more advanced but specialized physiology and anatomy knowledge required for one biomedical engineering specialization.

3. Broad and profound knowledge of science and technology and of the particular BME specialization and, moreover, the skills to use this knowledge effectively in biophysical modelling of human anatomy and physiology, data acquisition and processing as well as in the design of technical tools to analyse, monitor, assist and replace anatomical and physiological functions in a clinically effective, biocompatible, safe and cost-effective way. The discipline is mastered at different levels of abstraction, including a reflective understanding of its structure and relations to other fields, and reaching in part the forefront of scientific or industrial research and development. The knowledge is the basis for innovative contributions to the discipline in the form of new designs or development of new knowledge.

4. Thorough knowledge of paradigms, methods and tools as well as the skills to actively apply this knowledge in analysis, modelling, simulating, designing and performing research with respect to innovative biomedical engineering, with an appreciation of different application areas.

5. The capability to independently solve technological and biophysical problems in a systematic way through problem analysis, formulating sub-problems and providing innovative technical solutions, also in new and unfamiliar situations. This includes a professional attitude towards identifying and acquiring lacking expertise, monitoring and critically evaluating existing knowledge, planning and executing research, adapting to changing circumstances, and integrating new knowledge with an appreciation of its ambiguity, incompleteness and limitations.

6. Broad knowledge of medical ethics and medical statistics. The capability to understand and potentially implement the regulatory procedures required for certification of medical devices relevant to one biomedical engineering specialization.

7. The capability to work both in multidisciplinary teams and independently, interacting effectively within clinical and pre-clinical settings with clinicians or medical researchers. Good professional and scientific communication skills and the ability to take initiatives where necessary.

8. The capability to effectively communicate (including presenting and reporting) details about one’s work such as solutions to problems, conclusions, knowledge and considerations, to both

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professionals and non-specialised public, in the English language.

9. The capability to evaluate and assess the technological, ethical and societal impact of one’s work, and to take responsibility with regard to sustainability, economy and social welfare.

10. A commitment to independently maintain one’s professional competence through life-long learning.

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4.

Study programme

Biomedical Engineering is a two year academic master programme. There are five specialisations within the programme:

Medical Instruments and Medical Safety (MIMS);

BioMechatronics (BM);

Biomaterials and Tissue Biomechanics (BTB);

Medical Physics (MP);

Biomedical Electronics (BE).

These specialisations cover a broad spectrum within Biomedical Engineering. Each specialisation requires its own specific background knowledge. At the beginning of the study programme students must choose their specialisation. Switching between specialisations is possible, but students should take into account the obligatory courses and additional courses required for each specialisation. This chapter gives general information on teaching periods, examinations and European Credits, followed by a presentation of the first and second year study programmes.

4.1 General information

4.1.1 Academic calendar and daily schedule

The academic year is divided into two semesters. The semesters run from September to February and from February to September. Each semester consists of two periods. Each period consists of seven or eight weeks of teaching (the “teaching period”), followed by examination periods of varying lengths. There is an extra examination period in August, which is for retaking exams only. Vacations are around the Christmas and Easter periods and in the summer. See the calendar for details. A course of lectures may, for example, have a 2/2/0/0 timetable. This means that there are two lecture hours scheduled for the subject in the first and second teaching periods and no lecture hours in the third and fourth periods. This means a total of 28 - 32 hours of lectures. All details on teaching and examination activities are presented in a timetable. These timetables are available on the TU Delft website timetables.tudelft.nl and on Blackboard, the virtual learning

environment for students, lecturers and staff. You can find general timetable information on the Timetable page of the student portal.

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4.1.2

Lecture hours

Period

Time

1

08.45 – 09.30

2

09.45 – 10.30

3

10.45 – 11.30

4

11.45 – 12.30

lunch

12.30 - 13.30

5

13.45 – 14.30

6

14.45 – 15.30

7

15.45 – 16.30

8

16.45 – 17.30

9

17.45 – 18.30

10

18.45 – 19.30

4.1.3 Examinations

Examinations may be oral or written. For those subjects in which written examinations are scheduled,

students will have at least one opportunity per year to re-sit examinations (written or oral).

Examinations are scheduled immediately after the period in which the course is taught. Re-sits

generally take place after the next period. Re-sits for examinations taken in period 2B are scheduled

in the second half of August.

4.1.4 Study load and European Credits

The study load of a course is expressed in European Credits (EC) to reflect the European Credit

Transfer System (ECTS), which encourages acknowledgement of qualifications between higher

education institutions in the European Union. The study load for one study year is 60 EC. Credits give

an indication of the relative weights of certain parts of the course. One EC involves approximately 28

study hours. The study load includes all time spent on the course: lectures, private study, traineeship,

practical assignments, examinations, etc.

The study programme involves two years of study, each with a study load of 60 EC. The total

programme is worth 120 EC.

4.2 MSc: first year (60 EC)

In the first year, students are expected to take at least 30 EC in biomedical courses and at least 30 EC

in fundamental technical courses. Both the biomedical courses and the fundamental technical courses

have an obligatory part that is specific to each specialisation and an elective part that must be chosen

in agreement with the professor responsible for the specialisation. Lists of recommended courses and

other elective courses are provided for this purpose (see Tables IX, X and XI in Chapter 8).

Biomedical courses are taught by engineers and clinicians. Clinicians discuss clinical issues and explain

their viewpoints, whilst also covering progress in clinically-related research. There are several medical

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courses that can be taken within the educational programme of two of our clinical partner universities, Leiden University Medical Centre and the Erasmus Medical Centre Rotterdam: students may list these medical courses to a maximum of 10 EC in their Individual Study Programme. From the engineering viewpoint, emphasis is placed on technical and biophysical aspects, such as the latest advances in design, modelling and simulation, all the time relating this to the engineering background of the students.

4.2.1 Individual Study Programme (ISP)

All 'new' students need to register their program with selected courses using a prescribed template, which can be found on Blackboard under the Biomedical Engineering Organization. Please check the Study Guide to ensure that your program meets the requirements, check your calendar for conflicting lecture times and to spread your study load evenly over the year, and consult the applicable professor

to ensure that you optimally prepare for your specialisation. The template needs to be signed by the applicable professor and by the student and the original signed form shall be delivered to the Master Coordinator Dick Plettenburg (Coordinator-BME-3ME@tudelft.nl) for formal registration.

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4.3

MSc: second year (60 EC)

The second year starts with a traineeship in a biomedical research group or biomedical company. The remainder of the year is taken up with a literature survey and a master thesis project. The traineeship and literature survey may be undertaken in any order. In general, assignments are carried out individually. It is best if the literature survey, traineeship and master thesis project are in the same field of research. Students shall discuss and plan the traineeship, literature survey and master thesis project with the professor of the chosen specialisation. Examples of assignments and internships can be found on www.bme.msc.tudelft.nl.

4.3.1 Traineeship in a hospital, industry or other research institute (15 EC)

Over the course of their traineeship students undertake a project task defined in consultation with the

host institute. It is recommended that Dutch students undertake their traineeship abroad. The faculty overseeing the Biomedical Engineering master programme will support student initiatives for study abroad, or will actively help in finding host institutions. Traineeships should culminate in a report.

Important! Traineeships are usually arranged via one of the staff members in the student’s chosen specialisation. Students are encouraged to contact the professor in charge of their chosen specialisation at the start of the traineeship selection process. This helps to avoid problems later on: professors have a good overview of institutes and companies within their line of work and are in a position to judge whether or not the chosen institute or company is suitable. The responsible professor must give his approval before traineeships are started. Please, carefully check the information provided at http://studenten.tudelft.nl/en/students/faculty- specific/3me/education-3me/practical/student-forms/internships/. Use the Internship Application Form to be found on this web site.

4.3.2 Literature survey (10 EC)

It is recommended that students do their literature survey in the same research field as their master thesis project. The literature survey will finish with a report and presentation in a seminar attended by staff and fellow students. In this presentation an outlook into the master thesis project is given as well, providing an outline of the project goals, methodology and the research plan of the thesis project.

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4.3.3

Master thesis project (32 EC)

The master thesis project is the final part of the BME programme. Ideally, the project is undertaken in

collaboration with a clinical partner (Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), Erasmus Medical Center (ERASMUS MC) Rotterdam, the Academic Medical Center (AMC) Amsterdam), or the Free University (VUMC) Amsterdam. Regardless of whether thesis work is carried out in Delft or at the premises of the clinical partner, most MSc students will have a clinical tutor and a technical tutor. Students then prepare the MSc thesis as a project report. Thesis work is evaluated by way of an oral presentation (graduation colloquium) by the candidate and an oral examination before an MSc examination committee composed of at least three scientific staff members, including the thesis supervisor and one staff member from outside the research group. The examination committee may also include external examiners from research institutes or from industrial partners.

4.3.4 Oral presentations (2 EC)

In multidisciplinary research it is essential that students have good communication skills. Each student must therefore give two oral presentations (literature colloquium and graduation colloquium) as part of their training in delivering a clear message to a public from a different background. For each presentation a grade will be given. These colloquia are obligatory for all final-year Biomedical Engineering students. Moreover, these presentations provide an excellent overview of the different research lines within the field of Biomedical Engineering at the Delft University of Technology and its affiliates. As such attending these presentations is encouraged for all students in the master BME, especially for those is search for a MSc-thesis topic. For this reason each student is required to attend at least ten different seminars.

4.4 Student interviews

We feel that it is essential that students know what is expected of them, and that students let us know if there are problems within the study programme, in order that we can make improvements. At the beginning of the academic year a central presentation will be given, in which new students will be given a thorough introduction to the BME programme, and where new students can meet each other. Following this presentation an individual study programme (ISP) will be drawn up in discussion with the master coordinator (see section 4.2.1). During the master programme students complete anonymous questionnaires, usually issued at the end of each semester, which forms the basis for action taken to improve courses.

Important! Student interviews are supplementary to, but not a replacement for, regular student-professor contact held on a more informal basis.

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5.

Specialisations within the BME MSc-programme

Students starting the BME master programme should be aware that the programme is divided into 5 specialisations.

Medical Instruments and Medical Safety (MIMS)

BioMechatronics (BM)

Biomaterials and Tissue Biomechanics (BTB)

Medical Physics (MP)

Biomedical Electronics (BE)

Not only do these specialisations focus on different aspects of biomedical engineering, they also

require different baseline knowledge to be admitted.

Important! At the beginning of the study programme students must choose their specialisation. Switching between specialisations is possible, but students should take into account the obligatory courses required for each specialisation. Chapter 5 describes the main focus of education and research in each specialisation and Chapter 6 describes admission requirements. More detailed information is provided during the yearly Introduction Event in the first week of the academic year. This five-day event presents the students with comprehensive information on the master Biomedical Engineering in general and on each of the specialisations in particular. At the end of the event the participants will be able to make an educated choice for a specialisation and to compose the Individual Study Programme accordingly. As students of the Biomedical Engineering master programme come from many different previous educations and have many different nationalities, the Introduction Event also aims at community building.

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5.1

Medical Instruments & Medical Safety (MIMS)

Professor in charge: Prof. Jenny Dankelman Tel: +31 (0)15 27 85763 E-mail: j.dankelman@tudelft.nl

Medical Instruments Group, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering (3ME).

Overview The goal of research within the Medical Instruments & Medical Safety specialisation is to develop new devices, processes and systems aimed at improving the quality and safety of medical interventions, and to make new interventions possible. The research focus on minimally invasive application. To operate through small incisions in the skin, surgeons and interventionists require slender multifunctional instruments, making minimally invasive techniques a challenging field of application. Application areas include minimally invasive surgery, cardiology, arthroscopy, anaesthesiology, colonoscopy, and catheter and needle interventions. Medical instrument research also focuses on the quality of medical instruments and their optimal use, maintenance and sterilisation. New training equipment such as virtual reality trainers and simulators with force/haptic feedback is being developed to train surgeons outside the operating theatre. Finally, systems are developed supporting patient safety in the operating room.

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5.2

Biomechatronics (BM)

Professor in charge: Prof. Frans van der Helm Tel: +31 (0)15 27 85616 E-mail: f.c.t.vanderhelm@tudelft.nl

Biomechatronics & Biorobotics group, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering (3ME)

Overview Biomechatronics is the interdisciplinary study of biology, mechanics and electronics. It focuses on the research and design of assistive and diagnostic devices for patients with disorders of the neuromuscular-skeletal system. A thorough knowledge of the healthy system is required, in addition to knowledge about patient status, i.e. the causes and symptoms of disease. In particular, biophysical models of muscles, joints, the Central Nervous System and sensors, and human motion control are very helpful for analysis and innovative designs. The interactivity of biological organs (including the brain) with (electro-)mechanical devices and systems is an important feature. In this specialisation the main focus is on prosthetics, orthotics, joint implants, diagnostic devices for neurological disorders, neuro-rehabilitation robots, and haptic interfaces, etc. Other exciting biomechatronic opportunities that scientists foresee in the near future include electronic stimulators of muscles and nerves for stroke victims and patients with trauma to the Central Nervous System.

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5.3

Biomaterials and Tissue Biomechanics (BTB)

Professor in charge: Dr.ir. Amir Zadpoor, E-mail: a.a.zadpoor@tudelft.nl, Tel: +31 (0)15 27 81021

Primary Contact: Dr.ir. Iulian Apachitei, E-mail: i.apachitei@tudelft.nl, Tel: +31 (0)15 27 82276 Biomaterials and Tissue Biomechanics Section, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering (3ME)

Overview Various types of diseases and traumas damage human tissues. The promise of modern approaches to biomaterials, regenerative medicine, and tissue biomechanics is to offer solutions through which damaged tissues are either replaced by synthetic multi-functional biomaterials or, even better, are repaired through tissue (re-)generation. The BTB specialization focuses on applying modern approaches for substitution and regeneration of tissues in general and skeletal tissues in particular. 3D printing (additive manufacturing) of biomaterials, tissues, and organs, otherwise known as bioprinting or biofabrication, has recently emerged as a powerful approach for fabricating patient- specific implants, multi-functional biomaterials with arbitrarily complex geometries and micro- architectures, medical instruments, prostheses/orthotics, drug products, tissues, disease models, and organs. The educational and research programs of the BTB specialization are designed to take full advantage of recent developments in 3D printing for biomedical applications and to address the above-mentioned challenges in terms of tissue substitution and (re-)generation. Development of new 3D printing technologies, image-based design and printing of patient-specific implants, applications of patient-specific finite element modelling for designing biomaterials and implants and evaluating their response, application of bio-nanotechnology to improve tissue regeneration performance, study of cell-biomaterial interaction, preventing implant-associated infections through development of antibacterial coatings are all examples of the many areas of interest within this specialization. Students with different backgrounds could find interesting projects within the BTB specialization. For example, students with Mechanical Engineering or Aerospace Engineering backgrounds could engage in development of 3D printing technologies and in application of finite element models for design of patient-specific implants and biomaterials. Students with Industrial Design Engineering will find a lot of projects where their design background will be of much value, particularly when designing and subsequently 3D printing medical devices, implants, biomaterials, etc. Students with Biomedical Engineering will find themselves at home, because the combination of their technical and biological training will be be instrumental in development of biomaterials, bioprinting approaches, implants, etc. Finally, students with Life Science background will be able put their wet lab and/or medical/surgical skills into use when performing projects that require in vitro cell culture and/or animal experiments.

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5.4

Medical Physics (MP)

Professors in charge: Prof. Wiro Niessen, Tel: +31 (0)10-7043050, E-mail: w.niessen@erasmusmc.nl; Prof. Lucas van Vliet, Tel: +31 (0)15 27 87989, E-mail: l.j.vanvliet@tudelft.nl; Prof. Freek Beekman, Tel. +31 (0)15 278 6560, E-mail: f.j.beekman@tudelft.nl,

Primary Contacts: Dr. Frans Vos; Tel: +31 (0)15 27 87133, E-mail: f.m.vos@tudelft.nl Quantitative Imaging Group, Faculty of Applied Sciences Secretary: A. van Beek; Tel: +31 (0)15 27 81416, E-mail: a.vanbeek-3@tudelft.nl. IST/Quantitative Imaging (room F240)

Overview Medical Physics is aimed at the application of physical methods in health care. Medical physicists are responsible for the standardisation, calibration and purchase of medical instruments, in close cooperation with medical and paramedical professionals. Furthermore, they are responsible for the accuracy and safety of physical methods applied in hospitals for diagnosis and therapy. In the BME Medical Physics specialisation emphasis is placed on Medical Imaging and Radiotherapy. In Medical Imaging methods such as Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and Nuclear Medicine imaging are providing high-quality 3D and 4D information of the human anatomy, but also of its function and its changes over time. The high quality of these images and resulting diagnostic information must be balanced against factors such as acquisition time and radiation burden to the patient. In radiotherapy, medical physicists play a major role in clinical, technical and bio-physical concepts resulting in optimised treatment planning. Medical physicists are often involved in research. As in each BME specialisation, graduates must show competence in cooperating with medical specialists, giving feedback on problems as well as on providing solutions. Professional opportunities lie in medical research, clinical support, and interaction with suppliers and manufacturers of the various devices for acquisition and processing of medical images as well as for providing state-of-the art radiotherapy.

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5.5

Biomedical Electronics (BE)

Professor in charge: Prof.dr. Paddy French Tel: +31 (0)15 27 84729 E-mail: p.j.french@tudelft.nl

Primary contact: Prof.dr.ir. Wouter Serdijn Tel.: +31 (0)15 27 81715 E-mail: w.a.serdijn@tudelft.nl Section Bioelectronics Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science

Overview Within the Department of Microelectronics, biomedical research activities are directed towards:

flexible and stretchable electronic components in the Laboratory for Electronic Components, Technology and Materials;

sensor microsystems in the Laboratory for Electronic Instrumentation; and

biomedical electronics in the Section Bioelectronics.

In the Laboratory of Electronic Components, Technology and Materials (ECTM) innovative devices, device integration concepts and novel microstructures and materials are investigated, based on in- depth knowledge of device physics, silicon technology and electrical-material characterization.

In the Laboratory for Electronic Instrumentation smart microsystems for biomedical measurements (both in vivo and in vitro) and implants are being developed. The group focuses on sensing devices and read-out electronics. In recent years the laboratory has been developing a catheter navigation system, multi-sensors for catheters (including measurements in blood), microsystems for monitoring cardiac output, a blood impedance measurement system, polymerised chain reaction (PCR) chips, streaming potential in bone, blood analysis and drain fluid analysis.

The Section Bioelectronics focuses on technology for the successful monitoring, diagnosis and treatment of cortical, neural, cardiac and muscular disorders by means of electroceuticals. To this end the lab works on topics like neuroprosthetics, biosignal conditioning and detection, transcutaneous wireless communication, power management, energy harvesting and bioinspired circuits, as applied in, e.g., hearing instruments, cardiac pacemakers, cochlear implants, portable, wearable, implantable and injectable ExG recorders and neurostimulators.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p23/43

5.6

Annotation Entrepreneurship

Students may include additional courses on Entrepreneurship in their program and select a Master Assignment with Entrepreneurial aspects. The Entrepreneurship annotation will be mentioned on the MSc degree (see www.dce.tudelft.nl). Conditions and courses will be similar to those for the Entrepreneurship programme within the Master Mechanical Engineering.

5.7 Honours Programme

The Honours Programme Master (HPM) will allow individual students to excel and thus deliver a performance that is significant above the performance of average students. HPM students will be producers/directors of their own master programme, rather than being a consumer of a programme that already exists. In addition to the regular master programme, an additional 20 ECTS needs to be earned and there is a very large freedom in how to obtain this extra 20 ECTS.

The HPM is intended for students that:

finished their bachelor education within 4 years with an average grade of at least 7,5

have another reason to participate

For details regarding the content of the programme, the application procedure, and the selection criteria, please, check http://studenten.tudelft.nl/en/students/faculty-specific/3me/education-

Please contact honourscommittee-3mE@tudelft.nl for more information.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p24/43

6.

Admission

The content of the bachelor degree and results will be evaluated for each candidate. The intake committee of the Faculty 3mE is responsible for this selection.

6.1 Admission for students with an academic bachelor degree

Students with a Dutch academic Bachelor degree listed in the ‘Doorstroommatrix’ [doorstroommatrix.nl] can enter the MSc programme. Students with a Dutch academic Bachelor degree not listed in the ‘Doorstroommatrix’ may be admitted on an individual basis after completion of a pre-master programme.

International applicants with an academic Bachelor degree need to follow the admission and application process as outlined on the BME web site [http://www.tudelft.nl/en/study/master-of- science/master-programmes/biomedical-engineering/admission-and-application/].

Important! The specializations within the master BME are tailored to fit the [TUD] bachelor programmes in Mechanical Engineering, Applied Physics, or Electrical Engineering. As a result other bachelor programmes do not always perfectly match a specialization. In these cases it is the student’s responsibility to acquire the prerequisite knowledge. Please, contact the BME coordinator [Coordinator-BME-3ME@tudelft.nl] for more information and advice.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p25/43

6.2

Admission for students with a bachelor degree from a Dutch school for higher

vocational education (HBO)

6.2.1

Introduction

Candidates with a Dutch HBO Bachelor in Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Applied Physics, Aerospace Engineering or Human Motion Technology are eligible for admission. The candidate must have completed the Bachelor programme within 4 years with good results. The intake coordinator on the Examination Committee is responsible for the selection of

candidates. Students with a Dutch HBO Bachelor degree in areas not mentioned above can be admitted on an individual basis. Please, contact the BME coordinator [Coordinator-BME-3ME@tudelft.nl].

An additional pre-master programme must be completed before candidates are formally admitted to the MSc programme. In the pre-master programme, a number of courses from the second year of the academic bachelor programme must be followed. These additional requirements will ensure that students have an entrance level at least comparable to that of the second course year of the academic bachelor programme that forms the basis for the specific specialisation, i.e. Mechanical Engineering for MIMS, BM, and BTB; Applied Physics for MP, and Electrical Engineering for BE. The person in charge of the chosen specialisation may also require that a number of third-year courses from the bachelor programme are followed.

Important! All courses in the pre-master programme are taught in Dutch.

Candidates are formally admitted only to the pre-master programme. It is not allowed to participate in MSc-courses before the pre-master programme is completed. Final admission to the MSc programme is granted after completing the pre-master programme. The proposed pre-master programme must be approved by the Examination Committee. As explained above, it is important to note that the pre-master programme gives admission to specific specialisations within the BME MSc programme. This means that students must choose their specialisation at the start of their pre-master programme.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p26/43

6.2.2

Pre-master programme for Medical Instruments and Medical Safety (MIMS);

Biomechatronics (BM); Biomaterials and Tissue Biomechanics (BTB)

In these three specialisations, bachelor graduates with a HBO degree in Mechanical Engineering,

Aerospace Engineering or Human Motion Technology (Bewegingstechnologie) may enrol after they

have followed a pre-master programme of courses that will give them the same level of knowledge as

an academic BSc graduate in Mechanical Engineering. Therefore, this pre-master programme is almost

the same as the pre-master programme for the MSc in Mechanical Engineering.

This programme totals an additional 28 EC.

Advice on this pre-master programme can be obtained from Lourdes Gallastegui,

Table IV: Mechanical Engineering pre-master programme.

Code

Lecture hours

Course name

EC

WB2630*

8/0/0/0

Advanced Mechanics

6

WB2631T2 S*

#/0/0/0

Finite Element Methods

1

WB2230

0/0/8/0

Systeem- en Regeltechniek

6

WI1708th1

4/0/0/0

Analyse 1 TH

3

WI1708th2

0/4/0/0

Analyse 2 TH

3

WI1708th3

0/0/4/0

Analyse 3 TH

3

WI1807th1

4/0/0/0

Lineaire algebra 1 TH

3

WI1909th

0/4/0/0

Differential Equations

3

   

Total

28

* Students are encouraged to prepare by careful reading material from the corresponding first-year courses:

wb1630wb-14 Statica, wb1631-14 Sterkteleer1, and wb1632 Dynamica. # Practical work + assignments.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p27/43

6.2.3

Pre-master programme for Medical Physics (MP)

In this specialisation, bachelor graduates with a vocational degree (HBO) in Applied Physics may enrol

after they have followed a pre-master programme of courses that will give them the same level of knowledge as an academic BSc graduate in Applied Physics. Therefore, this pre-master programme is similar to the pre-master programme for Applied Physics. This programme totals an additional 27 EC.

Table V: Applied Physics pre-master programme.

Code

Course name

EC

TN2054

Electromagnetism

6

TN2345

Introduction to Waves

3

TN2421

Optics

3

TN2545

Systems and Signals

6

WI1142TN

Linear Algebra part 1

3

TN2244WI

Linear Algebra en Differential Equations

6

 

Total

27

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p28/43

6.2.3

Pre-master programme for Biomedical Electronics (BE)

In this specialisation, students with a HBO bachelor degree in Electrical Engineering may enrol after

they have followed a pre-master programme of courses that will give them the same level of knowledge as an academic BSc graduate in Electrical Engineering. This pre-master programme is exactly the same as the pre-master (or bridging) programme for Electrical Engineering – track Microelectronics. For further information E-mail: studieadviseurs@ewi.nl Part of the pre-master programme is filled in on an individual basis. Therefore, it is essential that students make an appointment with Prof. Wouter Serdijn or Prof. Paddy French at the start of the year (w.a.serdijn@tudelft.nl or p.j.french@tudelft.nl). They can also provide students with any information missing in Table VI. Table VI: Electrical Engineering pre-master programme

Code

Course name

EC

EE3P11

Elektromagnetisme

5

EE3C11

Elektronica

5

ET8027

Solid State Physics

3

EE2S11

Signals & Systems

5

WB2230

Systeem- en Regeltechniek

6

WI1000

Refresher Track

0

WI1708TH1

Analysis 1

3

WI1708TH2

Analysis 2

3

WI1708TH3

Analysis 3

3

WI1807TH1

Linear Algebra 1

3

WI1807TH2

Linear Algebra 2

3

Total

 

39

Students will gain access to the Master degree programme if they have their HBO diploma and if they earned a mark greater than or equal to 6 for a set of study units that add up to at least 30 EC and include at least WI1000, WI1708TH1, WI1708TH2, WI1708TH3, WI1807TH1 and WI1807TH2.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p29/43

6.3

Admission for students still in their academic bachelor programme

Students who have not yet finished their bachelor programme are not permitted to take examinations in the MSc programme [harde knip]. For more information, please refer to:

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p30/43

7.

Teaching in Leiden (LUMC) and Rotterdam (Erasmus MC)

Part of the master programme can be taken at Leiden University Medical Centre or the Erasmus Medical Centre (Rotterdam). Students have numerous opportunities to do their internship or master thesis assignment at one of these two medical centres; and they may also take biomedical courses as listed in Table X. Summaries of these courses can be found at www.studiegids.tudelft.nl. In Leiden, the focus is on courses for the first year of the master. In Rotterdam the focus is on courses in the second year of the master; although the courses can be taken separately in the first year of the master, they are also integrated into a traineeship programme that is offered to students.

Students may choose medical courses at LUMC and Erasmus MC to a total of no more than 10 EC. Any additional EC points will come on top of the total of 120 EC needed to accomplish the MSc BME programme.

7.1 Courses in Leiden

Leiden University Medical Centre offers several courses to Biomedical Engineering students. These 3 to 4 week courses will be followed alongside (bio)medical students to encourage interaction between future colleagues. The schedule of courses taught at LUMC is optimised for Leiden students. Therefore, these courses can and will have an overlap with Delft courses and sometimes even with the Delft examination period. Students should ensure that they check carefully that attending a full- time course in Leiden will not interfere too much with the rest of their study programme. At LUMC, teaching is based on "doelstellingengestuurd" learning. The courses offer lectures (overview, patient demonstration, or response), workgroups, and practicals. Self-study is guided by a course book that includes self-study-assignments. In workgroups, material is discussed in more detail under the guidance of a tutor. Each course is examined by a 3-hour written examination. Detailed information on the courses and their time schedule can be found at http://www.lumc.nl/onderwijs.html. The latest admission procedures for TU Delft students can be found at TU Delft Blackboard > Organisation BME > Announcements. Students must register for courses at least 6 weeks in advance, however, it is appreciated if students can make their choice right at the beginning of the academic year. Each course has its own module on the LUMC blackboard, through which the course-coordinator communicates with students. Students who have been granted admission to the courses will get access to the LUMC blackboard environment.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p31/43

7.2

Courses in Rotterdam

A general medical course (7 EC, BM41080) on “Disorders of Environment & Interior” is taught each year at the Erasmus University in the first semester and covers the anatomy and physiology of selected organ systems (e.g. lung, kidney and bladder). Since this course is also part of the general medical training program it encourages interaction with medical students/colleagues.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p32/43

8.

All BME master courses

BME students select their master courses from Tables IX, X, XI. For each specialisation, there are:

Obligatory courses,

Recommended courses which are particularly suited to the specialisation,

Elective courses that may be selected when desired.

There are many more courses at TU Delft that students may include in their study programme than those listed in Table XI: there are simply too many TU courses to fit in one table. Furthermore students may select Master courses from other Universities in and outside the Netherlands. Students wishing to take courses that are not listed should consult the professor in charge of their specialisation.

Important!

Students need to select at least 30 EC Biomedical courses in total from Table IX and X.

Students may select medical courses at LUMC and the Erasmus MC worth a total of no more than 10 EC. Any additional EC points will come on top of the total of 120 EC needed to complete the MSc BME programme.

Students need to select at least 30 EC Mathematics and Engineering courses from Table XI.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p33/43

8.1

Biomedical courses

Table IX: Biomedical courses at TU Delft O = Obligatory; R = Recommended; E = Elective

Course Code

Course name

Lecture

EC

MIMS

BM

BTB

MP

BE

hours

AP3232 D

Medical Imaging, Signals & Systems

0/0/2/2

6

R

R

R

O

R

AP3582

Medical Physics of Photon and Proton Therapy

0/0/2/2

6

     

O

 

BM41030

Orthopaedic Implants and Technology

0/4/0/0

3

E

E

O

E

E

BM41035

Biomaterials

0/4/0/0

4

R

R

O

E

E

BM41050

Applied experimental methods

0/0/0/2

4

O

R

E

 

E

BM41055

Anatomy & Physiology

2/2/0/0

4

O

O

O

O

O

BM41060

Physiology & Engineering

0/0/0/2

3

R

R

E

 

E

BM41065

Medical Technology I (Diagnostic devices) & Health Care Systems

3/2/0/0

5

O

O

O

O

O

BM41090

Computational Mechanics of Tissues and Cells

0/0/3/3

6

E

R

O

   

BM41095

Medical instruments A: Clinical challenges and engineering solutions

4/0/0/0

3

O

R

R

E

E

BM41100

Medical instruments B: Quality assurance in design

0/0/3/0

3

O

R

R

E

E

BM41105

Selected Topics in Biomaterials and Tissue Biomechanics

x/x/x/x

1

E

E

O

   

BM41040

Neuromechanics & Motor Control

0/0/4/4

5

R

O

R

E

 

BM41075

Regenerative Medicine

0/0/0/4

4

E

R

O

E

 

BM41150

Hand-on Haptic Interface Design

4/0/0/0

3

E

E

     

ET4127

Themes in Biomedical Electronics

0/0/0/3

4

     

E

O

ET4130

Bio-electricity

0/0/3/0

3

E

E

E

R

O

ME41045

Tissue Biomechanics of Bone, Cartilage and Tendon

2/0/0/0

3

E

R

O

E

 

ME41075

Biomedical engineering design

0/2/0/0

4

O

O

E

E

E

ME41085

Biomechatronics

0/0/2/2

4

R

O

R

E

E

ME41095

Bio-inspired design

0/0/4/4

4

R

R

R

 

E

 

Total obligatory courses (EC)

EC

23

23

30

21

16

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p34/43

Table X: Biomedical and medical courses at LUMC (see section 7.1) & Erasmus MC (see section 7.2).

You can take at most 10 EC points of these electives. Timely registration is required and availability cannot be guaranteed. For dates and registration procedures see:

TU Delft Blackboard > Organisation BME > Announcements.

R = Recommended; E = Elective

Univ.

Course

Course name

Lecture

EC

MIMS

BM

BTB

MP

BE

Language

code TUD

hours

Leiden

BM41000

301122000Y: Hersenen en Aansturing

May - June

8

E

R

 

E

R

Dutch

Leiden

BM41005

3112055PPY:

Jan - Feb

6

E

R

E

E

E

Dutch

Introduction into

Neurosciences

Leiden

BM41010

301220000Y:

Dec - Feb

9

E

R

E

E

E

Dutch

Vraagstukken Beweging

Leiden

BM41015

301121000Y: Sturing en Stofwisseling

Apr - May

8

R

R

 

R

R

Dutch

Leiden

BM41020

301302100Y: Buik

Feb - Mar

7

R

E

 

E

E

Dutch

Leiden

BM41025

Surgery for Engineers

To be

2

R

E

R

E

E

Dutch

announced

Leiden

BM41160

3112065PPY: Design and Analysis of Biomedical Studies (DABS) – Statistical research methods

Feb - Mar

6

R

R

E

E

E

Dutch

Rotterdam

BM41080

Kvr7: General Course on Disorders of Environment & Interior

Sep - Oct

7

E

E

E

E

E

Dutch

Note

These medical courses are not taken into account when applying for the post-initial education programme for Clinical Physicist.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p35/43

8.2

Mathematics and Engineering courses

Table XI: Mathematics and engineering courses at TU Delft O = obligatory; R = recommended; E = elective

 

Course Code

Course name

Lecture

EC

MIMS

BM

BTB

MP

BE

hours

AP3082 D

Computational Physics

x/x/x/x

6

     

E

 

AP3121 D

Imaging systems

4/4/0/0

6

     

E

 

AP3371TU D

Radiological health physics

0/0/8/8

6

     

O

E

AP3531

Acoustical imaging

0/0/2/2

6

E

     

E

BM41045

Experimental design, statistics, and the human

0/0/4/0

2

O

O

O

O

O

BM41070

Medical Device Prototyping (limited capacity)

0/0/2/2

6

E

E

     

BM41155

3D printing

0/0/4/0

4

   

O

   

CH3771

Nuclear Chemistry

0/8/0/0

6

     

E

 

CIE4353

Continuum Mechanics

4/4/0/0

6

   

R

   

CIE5123

Introduction to the Finite Element Method

0/0/6/0

4

   

R

 

E

CIE5142

Computational methods in non-linear solid mechanics

0/0/0/4

3

   

E

   

EE4C01

Profile Orientation and Academic Skills

2/2/0/0

3

       

R

EE4C02

System Engineering

0/0/2/x

3

       

O

EE4C08

Measurement and Instrumentation

4/0/0/0

5

       

R

EE4C09

Structured Electronic Design

4/0/0/0

5

       

O

EE4520

Analog CMOS Design I

0/3/0/0

3

       

E

EE4555

Implantable Biomedical Microsystems

0/0/0/4

5

   

E

 

R

EE4585

Semiconductor Device Physics

0/4/0/0

5

       

E

ET4252

Analogue IC Design

0/0/3/0

4

       

E

ET4257

Sensors and Actuators

0/3/0/0

4

       

O

ET4260

Microsystem Integration

0/0/0/3

4

       

E

ET4277

Microelectronics Reliability

0/0/3/0

4

       

E

ET4283

Advanced Digital Image Processing

4/4/0/0

6

     

O

E

ET4289

Integrated Circuits and MEMS Technology

0/0/0/3

4

   

E

 

E

ET4399

Extra Project

x/x/x/x

≤15

       

E

ID4010

Design theory and methodology

3/0/0/0

3

E

     

E

IN4085

Pattern recognition

2/2/0/0

6

E

E

E

O

E

IN4086

Data visualization

0/4/0/0

6

   

E

R

 

IN4307

Medical visualization

4/0/0/0

5

   

E

R

 

IN4320

Machine learning (requires IN4085)

0/0/2/2

5

         

ME41055

Multibody dynamics B

0/0/2/2

4

R

O

R

   

ME41065

System identification & parameter estimation

2/2/0/0

7

O

O

R

   

ME41070

The Human Controller

0/0/0/4

3

 

E

     

ME41080

Man-machine systems

0/4/0/0

4

R

R

     

ME43010

Materials for light-weight constructions

0/6/0/0

5

   

R

   

ME46085

Mechatronic System Design

0/4/0/0

4

E

E

E

   

SC42000

Control System Design (or the more extensive course: SC42015 - 6EC)

4/0/0/0

3

R

O

E

E

E

SC42090

Control methods for Robotics

0/0/4/0

3

 

E

     

SC42095

Digital Control

0/4/0/0

3

E

E

E

   

WI4014TU

Numerical analysis

x/x/0/0

6

   

E

   
 

Total Obligatory courses - this Table

EC

9

16

6

20

14

 

Total Obligatory courses - Table IX

EC

23

23

30

21

16

 

Total Obligatory courses

EC

32

39

36

41

30

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p36/43

9.

Study and traineeship abroad

Study abroad offers a wealth of attractive prospects. Students become acquainted with a different (organisational) culture, university life and educational system. In addition to enlarging their personal network, students learn to live within a foreign environment, and improve their language skills. To put it briefly, a period of study abroad will make a valuable contribution to any student’s personal education and will pay dividends in the search for a job.

Students wishing to study at a foreign university may make use of one of the many exchange agreements held with European and non-European universities. Under the terms of these agreements students do not pay tuition fees to the foreign university. Grants are also available to help finance the added cost of staying abroad. Extensive information on studying abroad is available from Back Office International Programmes at the Student Facility Centre, including information on all universities with which an exchange agreement exists, financing study abroad, and student travel reports. Further information is available on http://studenten.tudelft.nl/en/students/faculty-specific/3me/study-abroad/.

Internships abroad are highly encouraged and your professor / supervisor may help to arrange. Please, also consult the International Office at 3mE for practical issues. Students may, with prior approval of the professor in charge of their specialisation, select master courses at other (foreign) universities as part of their study program.

If you have a clear idea about where you would like to go, you should seek the advice of the International Exchange Coordinator about your programme at the foreign university and the recognition of your results at the host university. Your graduation professor will assess your work on your return according to the guidelines you agreed upon prior to departure. The foreign programme should contribute 12 EC to your MSc programme.

Studying abroad requires a lot of personal preparation. Students should account for a preparation period of preferably one year, but at least half a year. Students are advised to contact the International Office at 3mE:

Mrs. Sara van Dalen-Bus or Mrs. Marion van Eijck Room A-1 Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft Tel: +31 (0)15 27 83856 or +31 (0)15 27 83689 E-mail: internationaloffice-3me@tudelft.nl

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p37/43

10.

Enrolling for courses and tests

The latest information can be found at http://www.studenten.tudelft.nl under 3mE. Students are usually required to enrol for courses and tests. There are different procedures for both.

10.1 Courses

Students may register for specific courses on Blackboard (http://blackboard.tudelft.nl). Most of the communication between lecturers and students takes the form of Blackboard announcements, along with exchange of information, assignments and reports.

10.2 Tests

Enrolling for tests is obligatory and can be done on the Osiris site, accessible through Blackboard. Students should enrol two weeks at the latest before tests take place, otherwise tests will not be accounted for by the lecturer. If a student has registered but decides not to do the test, the student must cancel at least three working days before the test is due to take place.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p38/43

11. Organisation

11.1 Faculty 3ME

3mE is an abbreviation of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering. The 3mE Faculty offers the study programmes Biomedical Engineering (BME), Clinical Technology (KT), Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Mechanical Engineering (ME), Marine Technology (MT), Systems and Control (SC) and Offshore Engineering (OE). The Faculty also participates in the interfaculty MSc programme Transport, Infrastructure and Logistics (TIL).

11.2 Interfaculty master programme

BioMedical Engineering is an interfaculty master programme. Three faculties collaborate in this programme: the Faculty of Applied Sciences, the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, and the Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering. The BME programme is run from the Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering. By bundling the BME knowledge in these faculties a broad BME programme could be realised. Additionally, there is close and intensive collaboration with clinical partners at Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), the Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam (Erasmus MC), the Academic Medical Center Amsterdam (AMC), and the Free Univerisy in Amsterdam (VUMC). Clinical partners participate in first-year MSc teaching (LUMC and Erasmus MC), and in the tutoring of MSc projects in the second year (LUMC, Erasmus MC, AMC, and VUMC).

11.3 Education support staff

The education support staff support the Mechanical Engineering programmes and provide information for students relating to the study of Mechanical Engineering. The education support staff comprises the following persons:

Geerlinge Pessers g.pessers-vanreeuwijk@tudelft.nl Fatma Çinar

Head Education & Student Affairs Tel: +31 (0)15 27 85451 Coordinator International Office

Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86753

Marion van Eijk

Coordinator International Office

Tel.: +31 (0)15 27 83689

Sara van Dalen-Bus s.vandalen-bus@tudelft.nl Ewoud van Luik

Coordinator International Office Tel.: +31 (0)15 27 83856 Coordinator Education

Tel: +31 (0)15 27 85734

Pelle Alons

Coordinator Education

Tel: +31 (0)15 27 88186

Lourdes Gallastegui

Academic Counsellor

Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86591

Daniëlle de Jong d.y.m.dejong@tudelft.nl Esther Kroes

Secretary Tel: +31 (0)15 27 83570 Secretary

Tel.: +31 (0)15 27 87884

Francisca Coladarci

Board of Examiners

Tel.: +31 (0)15 27 88224

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p39/43

Celine Goedee

c.goedee@tudelft.nl

Daniëlle Rietdijk d.rietdijk@tudelft.nl Judith de Kruif j.dekruif@tudelft.nl Lourdes Gallastegui

Pauline van der Sman

Lieke Defourny-Smits

Marian Roodenburg m.roodenburg@tudelft.nl Evert Vixseboxse

Mirte Kramer m.m.kramer@tudelft.nl Gerard van Vliet

Hans Hellendoorn

Education Support Staff Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft Location A-1, first floor Tel: +31 (0)15 27 85499

11.4 Education committee

Quality Assurance Tel.: +31 (0)15 27 88676 Quality Assurance Tel: +31 (0)15 27 84923 Quality Assurance Tel: +31 (0)15 27 82176 Academic Counsellor Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86591 Academic Counsellor Tel: +31 (0)15 27 83350 Academic Counseler Tel: +31 (0)15 27 84645 Academic Counseler Tel.: +31 (0)15 27 81199 Academic Counsellor Tel: +31 (0)15 27 82996 Course schedules Tel: +31 (0)15 27 83302 Coordinator IWS Tel.: +31 (0)15 27 89281 Director of Education Tel: +31 (0)15 27 89007

The education committee advises the Dean and the Director of Education on the contents and the structure of the study programme and examinations. The education committee consists of five lecturers and five students. The Director of Education, the Education Advisor and a student advisor also take part in meetings.

Chairman - Dr.ir. Dick H. Plettenburg Tel: +31 (0)15 27 85615 E-mail: d.h.plettenburg@tudelft.nl

Secretary - Hanneke Hustinx Mekelweg 2 Room E-1-200 2628 CD Delft Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86841 E-mail: h.m.hustinx@tudelft.nl

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p40/43

11.5

Board of Examiners

The Board of Examiners consists of lecturers involved in the study programme and is responsible for setting the rules and regulations for examinations and the assessment of examination results. Requests for changes to or deviations from the study programme should be addressed to the Board of Examiners.

Chairman - Prof. dr. ir. Paul Breedveld Tel: +31 (0)15 27 85232 E-mail: p.breedveld@tudelft.nl

Secretary - Francisca Coladarci Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86595 E-mail: f.m.y.coladarci@tudelft.nl

11.6 Student association

The master programme has an active student association, “Antoni van Leeuwenhoek”, which organises meetings, break-out sessions, and other social events on a regular basis. Information can be found on avl.tudelft.nl and on the AVL Blackboard society.

11.7 MSc coordinator

The MSc coordinator is the person to approach for questions or problems related to the individual study programme and for monitoring progress. Every student can consult the MSc coordinator to draw up an individual study programme made up of the following: obligatory courses, current ideas on a topic for the thesis project, specialisation courses bridging the gap between the obligatory courses and the thesis project and the use of the free elective space. Students submit their plans for approval to the Board of Examiners. In order to finish the programme in two years, students should plan to take an average of 30 credits of courses per semester. At the end of the first year students will meet with the MSc coordinator to discuss their progress and their plans for the remainder of the programme. Students are also asked to fill in a questionnaire to evaluate the master programme. The BME-MSc coordinator, Dick Plettenburg, can be contacted via: coordinator-BME-3ME@tudelft.nl.

11.8 Academic Counsellor

The Faculty has five academic counsellors on hand to give assistance and advice to students regarding study-related questions or problems, or other issues which might influence a student’s ability to study. The academic counsellor functions as a sounding board and as a confidential consultant to students.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p41/43

Individual help and advice Academic counsellors have no teaching responsibilities and can therefore devote themselves entirely to individual students in addressing problems which may be an obstacle to their study progress. Academic counsellors also are a member of many boards and have contact with lecturers, so they are kept up to date with the latest in the Biomedical Engineering programme. Academic counsellors are also in contact with other student advisors and personal advisors at TU Delft and outside the University.

Personal circumstances During sessions with an academic counsellor, personal and intimate information will often come up. Students can be assured that this information will be kept confidential. This kind of information will only be used after consultation with the student in appeals to the TU or the Faculty.

Alerting the Examination Committee, professors, and other members of staff An academic counsellor may decide, under certain conditions, to alert the Board of Examiners or a professor to a specific student. Where necessary the academic counsellor becomes an intermediary between TU Delft personal advisors: student, deans, psychologists and physicians. The extent to which the academic counsellor pays attention to a student is up to the student. The academic counsellor keeps an eye on the study progress of most students and calls them up if necessary, but it is strongly recommended that students contact the academic counsellor themselves when a question or problem comes up. Waiting often exacerbates the problem. The academic counsellors at the Faculty are available for any questions you might have. They also have their own areas of specialisation.

Foreign Student Financial Support (FSFS) Delft University of Technology provides financial assistance to foreign students in the event that their studies are delayed due to special circumstances such as physical illness, physical or sensory disorders, mental problems, or insufficient organisation of the educational programme by the Faculty.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p42/43

12.

Further Information

This study guide is the main information source for the study programme. The website www.bme.msc.tudelft.nl always contains the most recent information. Detailed course information is available in the Digital Study Guide via www.studiegids.tudelft.nl or via http://blackboard.tudelft.nl - here it is not necessary to log in; go to the “Digital Study Guide” tab. Procedures and forms are available at http://studenten.tudelft.nl/en/3me. The Course and Examination Regulations can be found here:

and the Regulations and Guidelines for the Board of Examiners here:

Another source of useful information is http://www.3me.tudelft.nl/en/about-the- faculty/departments/biomechanical-engineering/graduation-guide/, especially the information available under “More information” at the bottom of this web-page.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GUIDE 2016/2017 (version September 2016) – p43/43