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PHOTOS:ADAM NEWMAN; CASS GILBERT

Departments

Features

CONTENTS

26 UNLEARN PAVEMENT

Moving to Oklahoma and learning to embrace the unique topography opens the author’s eyes to new satisfaction in cycling. By Bobby Wintle

34 FAMILY ALBUM

Reader submi ed photos of real families who ride.

36 THREE HEARTS, TWO WHEELS, ONE PASSION

A young family’s adventures (and misadventures) riding with their toddler son. By Cass Gilbert

58 LA ZONA CAFETERA

Beyond Columbia’s sha ered past is a beautiful and timeless world where farmers grow the country’s other famous export: coffee. By Sean Jansen

Provisions

Plus!

02

Editor’s Note

48

Bianchi Volpe Disc and Zurigo

20 1,200 km of the Paris-Brest-Paris on one

04

Contributors

50

Linus Rover 3

gear, with no coasting.

06

Feedback

51

Trek Fuel Ex Jr.

By Paul Rozelle

08

The Spin

52

SRAM Rival 1x group

12

Shop Window

57

Burley Kazoo trailer and Burley Plus

14

Vintage Velo

16

Ask Beardo

18

Globetro ing

24

Funnies

42 Riders from across the

64

Parting Shot

cycling spectrum gathered at the first Bicycle Times Adventure Fest presented by Trek Bikes. Under sunny skies and beautiful fall foliage we explored the back roads of Central Pennsylvania.

PHOTO: RUSS ROCA

EDITOR'S NOTE

F rom the most extreme

mountain bikers to the

most demure com-

muters, we’re all a family of cyclists. Sometimes we have different tastes, sometimes different styles and o en differ- ent opinions, but we all share a love for the wind across our cheeks and the satisfaction of personal power. I’ve been fortunate enough to be welcomed into the family of cycling with open arms, and here I’ve found not just a voca- tion but a personal passion. I’ve had countless riders stop to offer me a spare tube, some extra water or just a tip for a more scenic route. Somehow we instinctively know to watch out for one another, celebrate with one another and, sadly, far too o en grieve with one another. Families are never homogeneous and certainly never perfect, but they stick together through and through. Usually starting a family means making major changes to one's lifestyle, but for world

bicycle traveler Cass Gilbert he saw it as an opportunity for a host of new experiences. Now before his third birthday his son Sage has already traveled by bike on excursions near and far. Read what it’s like touring with young children and learn some tips for your next adventure starting on page 36. We celebrated with a family of another sort this fall at the first Bicycle Times Adventure Fest presented by Trek Bikes. Hundreds of cyclists of all stripes gathered under the beautiful Central Pennsylvania foliage to explore new terrain, make new friends and celebrate life on two wheels. You can relive the fun or read about what you missed in our story starting on page 44. Riding with your family can be one of the most rewarding experi- ences on two wheels. We met the moms, dads and kids of the Kidical Mass movement and learned how, for some, cycling was a gateway to creating a family and, for others, how the needs of hav- ing a family brought them to cycling. Spending time with them we saw how riding together is not only fun and healthy, it brings them closer together. But don’t take my word for it, read what they have to say on page 30. I’ve made countless friends through cycling and I’m looking forward to making many more. While our taste in two wheels some- times differs, I consider you all part of the Bicycle Times family and I’m honored to be a part of it.

- Adam Newman, Editor-in-Chief

CONTRIBUTORS

DAVID A. BAINBRIDGE worked on

bikeway planning and design in the 1970s. His company, Bainbridge, Behrens and Moore, Inc., prepared a guide to bikeway design and Bainbridge developed a sketch plan for a bikeway along the old railroad right of way from Merced, California, to Yosemite. His focus on sustainability also led to pioneering work on solar design, straw bale buildings, environmental restoration, eco- preneurship and sustainability reporting. For a sampler visit works. bepress.com/david_a_bainbridge. David shared with us the story of the Peugeot UO-8 he purchased new in 1971 on page 28.

BOBBY WINTLE is the co-owner of District Bicycles in Stillwater, Oklahoma, with his wife Crystal. The couple moved with their 1-year-old daughter Emory from Emporia, Kansas, in Sep- tember of 2011. Emory is now 5 and their son El- lio , who was born in Stillwater, is 2 and a half. In 2013 Bobby and Crystal created the Land Run 100, a self-supported 100-mile gravel race that starts and ends in downtown Stillwater in front of District Bicycles. It has grown to more than 500 riders and the cap on the March 12, 2016, event is 750 riders. All info can be found at landrun100.com. Read about how riding gravel in Oklahoma has changed Bobby’s perspective on page 26.

ANNA SCHWINN is a writer and bicycle product designer out of Minneapolis, Minne- sota. In her free time, she captains and man- ages a women's developmental race team, Koochella. She enjoys making disappoint- ing photographs, singing karaoke, racing track, and riding cyclocross bikes where they don't belong. Her creations in both words and metal can be found throughout the bike industry. She shared with us her thoughts on the problems in modern bike sizing on page 22.

Born and raised in Southern California, surfing was breakfast, lunch and dinner for contributor SEAN JANSEN. A er moving north and going to college at Humboldt State University, other adventures and activities were sparked, in- cluding cycling and cycle touring. And with this passion, he has cycled down the California coast with a surfboard and now he is currently hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. Always on the move and always writing and photographing every adventure, he documented his bike trip to Columbia beginning on page 58.

IMAGES:

Julia Green, Shawn Granton, Henri Boulanger, Justin Steiner, Mike Cushionbury, Stephen Haynes, Beth Puliti, David Bainbridge, Jeff Archer, Paul Rozelle, Jason Boucher, Cass Gilbert, Maurice Tierney, Adam Newman, Nancy Pucke , Jen Sotolongo, Dave Hoch, Ed Gunderson, Stuart and Kirstie Wickes, and Brice Shirbach.

WORDS:

Jeff Archer, Eric McKeegan, Beth Puliti, Anna Schwinn, Bobby Wintle, David Bainbridge, Cass Gilbert, Jon Pra , Justin Steiner, Stuart Wickes, Mike Cushionbury, Stephen Haynes, Sean Jansen and Adam Newman.

EDITORIAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Newman - editor@bicycletimesmag.com TECH EDITOR Eric McKeegan - eric@bicycletimesmag.com ART DIRECTOR Stephen Haynes - artdirector@bicycletimesmag.com ONLINE EDITOR Kathrine Fuller - kathrine@bicycletimesmag.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Mike Cushionbury - mike@bicycletimesmag.com

OPERATIONS FOUNDER & PUBLISHER Maurice Tierney - publisher@bicycletimesmag.com GENERAL MANAGER/PHOTOGRAPHER Justin Steiner - justin@bicycletimesmag.com QUALITY MANAGER Karl Rosengarth - karl@bicycletimesmag.com

COPY EDITOR Beth Puliti

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FEEDBACK LETTERS

TOP COMMENT

I am mad at Bicycle Times. You tempt and tease. Your articles

fuel my biking fantasies. Eye-catching photos don’t help either.

I look outside my window with longing. My long-neglected bike

beckons from a dusty corner. Stop toying with me. I know a seduction when I see one. Dan- gling bait is for fishermen. I’ve had enough. I’ll take the plunge. To hell with wife and kids. Tell the boss not to look for me. The gloves are off. And so am I. I’ll see you when I see you. (Farewell Walter Mi y. Hello Dorothy.) I’m off to see the Wizard of Biking. But don’t worry, a new me will be back. I leave to chase dreams of childhood. I leave to chase the joy of discovery. Midlife crisis? Maybe. Bucket wish list? Perhaps. Point the finger at Bicycle Times. It lit the fuse, pulled the trigger, snapped the tripwire. Cancel my subscription? Sorry, too late. Try damage control instead. Bicycle TImes, I am no longer mad. I forgive you. You brought me home to places I thought I le . You brought me to new places as well. You struck a chord. Other magazines tried. They failed. Knock- out punch or Hail Mary pass. Bicycle Times delivered. Bom Brumberger Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Thanks Bob! We agree the simple joy of riding a bike is impossible to resist. Since you wrote our favorite le er this issue we’ll extend your subscription three issues.

SURFIN’ SAFARI

Just renewed my subscription and caught up on old issues. Was delighted to find the Issue #27 “California Surf Tour” article, which reminded me of my 2005 Oregon cycle/surf tour, also with a trailer. The experience of rear wheel

li ing resulted in modifying the trailer to have self-actuating brakes and eventually building an overhead surfboard rack for a recumbent trike (photo

a ached). I always hope your

articles will encourage people to park their cars when they read of the fun, utility and economies of human-powered transport. Ed Gunderson Creswell, Oregon

STAY OFF THE DIRT

I felt compelled to add a comment to this discussion. The opinion of Anna Schwinn (“Plenty of Pie For All,” Issue #37) on e-bikes totally missed the point of the debate. I am a mountain biker— love, love, love hitting the trails either locally here in Atlanta, the north Georgia mountains, Pisgah or Dupont, North Carolina, etc. And admittedly, I don’t know many roadies but of all of the bike riders I know, roadie and mountain bike, none of them have anything against e-bikes, I myself have con- sidered purchasing one on two separate occasions. I think they are great for roads and other pathways that allow such transpor- tation. More cars off the road is a great thing! But let’s call them what they are: motored cycles, e-bikes is sim-

ply a term by the industry to dumb down the debate. As “motored cycles” they should never be allowed on our precious singletrack and mountain bike trails! We have come too far and fought too hard for the trails that we have. By ignoring the “elephant in the room,” Anna has lost all cred- ibility in her opinion piece. This is the real debate. They obviously want to take over the trails— just look at the marketing. It’s obvious where this is headed, and for a bicycling magazine to help white- wash this main point, just leaves a bad taste in my mouth. Can we not just be a bicycling magazine and not an “e-bike” maga- zine too? Pick your poison, I’ll decide whether to keep subscribing. You should be advocating for the cyclist and not the industry. Thanks, Curtis Henson via email

Thanks Curtis. We agree that using e-bikes off pavement is some- thing we need to keep an eye on. Here at Bicycle Times and in our sister mountain bike magazine, Dirt Rag, we currently support the recommendations of the International Mountain Bicycling As- sociation that e-bikes be treated as motorized vehicles in regard to land access. You can read IMBA's white paper concerning e-bikes at bicycletimesmag.com/imba.

LET'S KEEP IT POSITIVE

I loved Anna Schwinn’s opinion piece in the most recent issue. I love that it calls out the trouble with identifying yourself in opposi-

tion to something else, I love that it calls out the reality of privileges

of mobility, time, money

And most of all, I love that it calls on us all

to figure out why we are so cranky about other people enjoying something we get to enjoy. Let us truly share the road, with anybody who wants to be there. What a lovely, big-hearted take on behavior that’s not our best! Emma Rehm Pi sburgh, Pennsylvania

WHAT HAPPENED?

Congratulations on your first issue as Editor-in-Chief! I hope you enjoy the role! I also hope you are able to restore Bicycle Times to its once great state. What happened to it? One day it was everyones Everyday Cycling Adventure magazine but that seems to have disappeared. Now it seems like just another magazine with more focus on people who race or tour than on cycling as an everyday activity such as going for coffee, to the store or even commuting. I’m hoping you take it back to where it was, back to its original target audience. I still reread the original issues from the first few years. The new ones don’t hold much interest for those of us who cycle for every day purposes. Thanks! John Hauser Via email

We want to hear from you!

Like it? Hate it? Have a tip to share or a story to tell? Send your feedback to editor@bicycletimesmag.com. If we choose yours as our Top Comment we’ll extend your subscription three issues.

PHOTO COURTESY OF STRIDER BIKES

OF SOTOLONGO

AND JEN

COURTESY

HOCH

PHOTO

DAVE

THE

pin

EIGHT THINGS

Since most of this issue is dedicated to riding as a family, one key family member surely can’t be le behind. Sora traveled through a handful of foster homes before she found her forever family with her humans, Dave and Jen. Together they ditched their 9-to-5 routine and embarked on a European bike tour with a scholarship from Kurgo, a brand that makes outdoor gear for dogs. Along the way they’ll be sharing tips, tricks and advice for traveling with a dog through their blog, longhaultrekkers.com. Enjoy the ride, Sora!

16 MONTHS

The age of the youngest of 241 competitors at the Strider World Championship held in August in Rapid City, South Dakota. Payton Harty of Gille e, Wyoming, raced against his soon-to-be 3-year- old brother Cooper as well as kids from Japan, Ecuador, Slovakia, Canada and China. Surely the cutest racing on two wheels, kids compete in four age categories atop their Strider balance bikes. This year was also the first to include an adult category for special needs riders on board Strider’s adult-sized balance bikes. The course wound its way 600 feet through dirt mounds and wooden ramps to the finish line where all participants received a medal and the fastest took home trophies as tall as they are. The 2016 calendar includes events in Atlanta, Georgia; Lincoln, Nebraska; Salt Lake City, Utah; Spokane, Washington; and the San Francisco Bay area.

“I’m not willing to trade away safety for convenience”

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee told the San Francisco Chronicle a er he announced he would would veto any legislation that crossed his desk allowing for the so-called “Idaho Stop.” The city’s Board of Supervisors was poised to pass legislation that would have allowed cyclists to treat a stop sign as a yield, as is the law in Idaho. The San Francisco police vehemently opposed the idea, saying the same laws applied to everyone. The Board of Supervisors could override a mayoral veto but it seems unlikely. The issue became front-page news in July a er a police crackdown on cyclists running stop signs inspired a protest ride through the “Wiggle Route” connecting Market Street and Golden Gate Park. Hundreds of cyclists stopped at every stop sign on the popular, flat bike route, backing up traffic for hours.

The decline in the mortality rate for cyclists under the age of 15 between 1975 and 2012, according to a new study by the Centers for Disease Control with data collected from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Cyclists under the age of 15 went from the most likely to suffer a fatality to the least likely, a rate of just 0.09 per 100,000. Unfortunately the mortality rate of cyclists age 35 to 74 increased significantly, from 0.11 to 0.31 per 100,000. The study cited several factors for the changes over time, including “road design and engineering, traffic law enforcement, driver and bicyclist behavior, helmet use, and traffic volume.” Read the full study at bicycletimesmag.com/mortality.

YEAR-END

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THE

pin

EIGHT THINGS CONT.

PHOTO BY NANCY PUCKETT

Last seen on September 17 in San Diego, California, Charlie was the rubber chicken mascot of traveling dog Bixby and her human, Mike, who have so far ridden more than 9,000 miles through 31 states raising funds for animal shelters along the way. Bixby’s bike, along with Charlie, was sto- len out of a garage, and Bixby’s unfortunate story made it on the local news. Later 10News reporter Itica Milanes spied a bike matching the descrip- tion of Bixby’s and stopped to interview the rider who eventu- ally confessed and was ar- rested. Unfortunately many items, including some gear and personal momentos from the road were not recovered. Bixby and Mike say they are hugely grateful to the San Diego com- munity for helping find their bike and they want to forward some of that goodwill onto the person who stole it. “If he would want it, maybe we could use some of this new attention to help him,” they wrote on a Facebook post. “Maybe no one has ever offered. Maybe he needs a chance at a new beginning.” For their “Hug Your Dog Tour” the pair plan to ride back across the United States from Califor- nia through Washington D.C. and New York doing fundrais- ing and spreading good- will. If you see Chicken Charlie, or just want to follow along with the adventures of Bixby and Mike, visit wheresbixby.com.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE MINNICK

ARKANSAS, NEW JERSEY, NORTH CAROLINA AND PENNSYLVANIA

Those are the four states that have joined the ranks of the Na- tional Interscholastic Cycling Association (NICA), the growing middle and high school mountain bike league for kids. More than 7,500 student athletes from 19 state and regional leagues are choosing mountain biking as a way to build a strong body, healthy mind, and most of all, have fun. Most leagues organize a four-or five-race schedule, and teams can vary from just a few students to more than 70. Certified coaches and assistants help kids new to cycling learn how to ride and in many cases girls-only classes are held. Learn more about the league and how to join at nationalmtb.org.

PHOTO COUTESY OF NEXTBIKE POLSKA

BIKE SHARE—FOR KIDS!

Kids love ge ing around on two wheels as much as adults, and Warsaw, Poland, is the first city to introduce kids-sized bikes to its bike share fleet. Built for kids aged 4 and up, the 10 available bikes are part of the Veturilko system and can only be rented in conjunction with parental supervision. Feel like doubling up? Tandems are available for rent, too.

#interbikepacking by the numbers

Riders: 9 Ra lesnakes: 1 Bighorn sheep: 3 Nude kayaker dudes: 1 Coyotes howling: LOTS #coffeeoutside: Yes Miles: 18 Whiskey: 750ml Joy to not be in a Vegas casino:

All of it

We joined Blackburn Design for a quick overnight adventure at the annual Interbike tradeshow. Read all about it at bicycletimesmag.com/interbikepacking

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF TRAITOR CYCLES, ADAM NEWMAN

SHOP WINDOW

NEW PRODUCTS HEADED YOUR WAY

EDDY MERCKX STRASBOURG71

Not the kind of bike you’d normally expect to see from a brand syn- onymous with racing, the new Strasbourg71 is a big-tire adventure bike that is equally at home on rough gravel as on your morning commute. The aluminum frame is paired with a carbon fork with room for 38 mm tires. It will retail for $2,999.

NEW TRAITOR RUBEN AND WANDER

We reviewed the Traitor Slot all-purpose bike in Issue #37, and Trai- tor has followed it up with a revised version of the Ruben commuter and an all-new Wander touring bike. The Ruben has been a drop bar commuter for years and the new version is available with either drop bars ($1,399) or flat bars ($999), each with a new rocker drop- out that can run gears, singlespeed or internal hubs. The Wander ($1,299) is a full-blown touring bike with long chainstays, stout steel tubing, disc brakes and classic bar-end shi ers.

PAUL COMPONENTS BOXCAR STEM

You can add stems to the list of beautiful CNC carved aluminum parts coming from the Chico, California, workshop of Paul Compo- nents. The Boxcar stems are machined from a solid block of 2024 aluminum and finished in black or silver for $90. The lengths available are 50 mm, 70 mm and 90 mm with no rise and 70 mm and 90 mm with a 15 degree rise.

PEARL IZUMI SHOES

The new X-Alp Drive IV shoe features some crossover ap- peal with a rubber sole and casual styling. It wouldn’t look at all out of place with a pair of jeans. The synthetic mesh upper offers tons of breathability for the summer and is designed to be comfortable with or without socks. It will sell for $110.

GIRO SILO HELMET

Bicycle helmets have always been made with petroleum-based EPS foam, until now. The new $50 Silo commuter helmet from Giro uses foam made from Expanded Polylactic Acid, a “bio- foam” derived from corn. It offers the same level of safety as other helmets, but when its lifespan has ended it can be disassembled and the plastic shell recycled and the foam and coconut webbing composted. The Silo will be available in spring 2016.

CRANKBROTHERS DOUBLE SHOT PEDALS

Clipless pedals are great for sporty riding, but not always conve- nient for casual cruising. Single-sided clipless pedals are a good solution, with one side being clip-in and the other side offering traction for street shoes. The new Crankbrothers Double Shot is the brand’s first take on such a model, with the classic Eggbeater springs in the center. They will be available in black/silver or or- ange/black for $89.

BROOKS C13 SADDLE

Brooks isn’t the kind of brand you would normally associate with lightweight, racy products, but the new Cambium C13 ($220) has carbon fiber rails and weighs just 259 grams. The new saddle is in its testing phase now and if you want to be one of the first to try one you can sign up at brooksengland.com.

PHOTO: JEFF ARCHER

VINTAGE VELO

1991 IBIS UPTUBE TANDEM

BY JEFF ARCHER

I f you’re new to the cycling family, Ibis may be best known as a purveyor of high-performance carbon fiber mountain bikes. For those who have been riding for multiple decades, Ibis has also

been through several other iterations. Founded in 1981 by Scot Nicol, Ibis began by offering steel hardtail mountain bikes. The mid-1980s then brought Ibis to the forefront of the burgeoning trials scene. In 1987 Nicol wanted to take a European bike tour with his wife Ginny, so a tandem was deemed necessary. A er much research, Nicol se led on the Uptube design of Rick Jorgensen. Rick used oversized tubing in conjunction with an oval- ized “up” tube connecting the front bo om bracket to the rear seat cluster to minimize the flex that was introduced by the stoker on conventional tandems. Nicol chose 26-inch wheels which could be used on road with slicks or off road with knobbies. By 1990 half of the Ibis production capacity was dedicated to tandems. This Uptube tandem was made for the owner of Cane Creek and has an early Chris King prototype Aheadset style headset (Cane Creek owned the Aheadset patent). This bike was origi- nally set up to accept both flat bars and road bars. Currently it is outfitted with the drop bars and Specialized Fat Boy 1.25-inch slick tires which would be needed to take advantage of the Ibis 60-tooth front chainring. The paint is a black base with blue

“ON TOP OF [THE PAINT], A HEARD OF DEAD

OPOSSUMS HAVE BEEN APPLIED IN VARIOUS

LOCATIONS ON THE FRAME.”

and red splatter which also has been applied to the stems and Silca pump. On top of that, a herd of dead opossums have been applied in various locations on the frame. The mid-1990s found Ibis in good humor with goodies such as the Hakkalügi cross bike (sound it out), Hand Job cable stop (shaped like a hand holding the cable), Moron tubing (more on the ends) and the Toe Jam pump peg (use your imagination). The 2000s brought a sale of the company followed by a bankruptcy. Fortunately Nicol got back into the game and brought us the cur- rent iteration of Ibis.

This bike can be seen at the Museum of Mountain Bike Art & Technol- ogy which is housed at First Flight Bicycles in historic downtown Statesville, North Carolina. If you can’t visit in person, check out the collection at mombat.org.

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PROTECT WHAT YOU VALUE FROM THOSE WITH NO VALUE.

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ASK BEARDO

KIDS ON BIKES

BY BEARDO THE WEIRDO ILLUSTRATION BY STEPHEN HAYNES

Q: Hey Beardo, I love riding bikes and I’d like to share that experience

with my kid, but they just aren’t into it. Any suggestions

on how I can get them on two wheels? Thanks, Fernando Crombestia

A: Fernando, Let’s get this out of the way first. Until recently, I didn’t

have much experience with kids. Kids kinda scared me. They seemed so needy, and there was an odor about them that I couldn’t get down with. And some part of my brain figured if I spent enough time around them, I might end up with one of my own, and I have a hard enough time keeping my cactus alive, and a whole other human seemed too much. But these li le buggers have grown on me, and once I fixed a flat tire for one neighborhood kid, the rest of the li le urchins seemed to glom onto my repair skills like moths to a stadium light. And while their parents might not be doing a great job teaching these grubby youngsters to say thank you, keeping them on two wheels warms me up like a handle of whiskey never could. Anyway, your li le urchins don’t like bikes. But you do. I’m willing to bet you had a very different childhood than your offspring. Your bike took you places, places without the ever-present parental eye- ball. To the store to buy penny candy, to play basketball, to soccer practice, to sleepovers. In other words, the bike was your first taste

of freedom and adventure. But your kids? You probably have to find helmets, load the bikes up on the car, drive somewhere, ride around in the circle and repeat the car trip home. It is a crying shame. Literally. I tear up thinking about this stuff, even when I haven’t been warming myself with whiskey. At some point, all you parents got scared. Scared of all the stupid cars driven by people checking emails and twitters and weather and the stock market and guaranteed-you’ll-have-an- affair websites while “sharing the road,” all in a hurry to get to work, school, the store or home. While somehow car deaths have gone down, all those airbags in modern cars can’t protect little Josie when some careless driver pulls that rolling right turn and smashes the kid in a crosswalk. My advice? Go somewhere via bike with your kids. Some place your kids want to go. The movies. The hot mess that is Chuck E. Cheese’s. To get ice cream. To the park. Get them associating bikes with good times. Maybe even think about swallowing some of that fear and le ing them ride somewhere themselves when they are old enough to be saddled with some responsibility. Give them a few bucks for ice cream sandwiches, make them a map, ride the route with them first, and then suck up that knot in your stomach and untie those apron strings. This is a form of bribery. And I fully support it. Because you should listen to a childless bachelor when it comes to child-rearing. But only about bike stuff. And teaching the li le heathens to say thank you to the dude who fixed that flat tire.

Beardo’s no Luddite; in fact, he just got dial-up and has his own email address: askbeardo@bicycletimesmag.com. He loves bikes and movie references. Ask him anything, ANYTHING, and he’ll answer you. Be forewarned.

GLOBETROTTING

THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE REALITY OF LIFE ON THE ROAD

BY BETH PULITI

“REAL QUICK: HIGHLIGHTS, LOWLIGHTS. GO.”

W e’re si ing with friends on our deck when the request

is made to share the awesome and awful details of our

travels to date. While our bike tour is far from over, we’re

home for a week to a end a wedding and clean house in between renters. It’s a nice opportunity to reflect on what we’ve experienced so far, and as the sun sets and the stars rise above us, I lose myself in memories from the past 14 months on the road. “Alright, Justin. You start with the highs,” I joke. Why is it so much easier to remember the lows? Truth be told, it’s difficult to limit myself to pick just a few experi- ences worthy of sharing—good or bad. But there’s a crowd and, like an ‘80s band on a comeback tour, I have no choice but to play the hits.

THE GOOD

In December 2014, I convinced my 24-year-old brother to travel with us in Southeast Asia. Working his first job out of college, he didn’t have much time off, but when his company–an indie video game studio in Philadelphia–shut down for two weeks over Christmas, he tacked on an additional two weeks and promised to check in with his co-workers regularly via email and video calls. That month saw us walking barefoot through the many color- ful shrines that dot the landscape, weaving through Bangkok traffic in a tuk-tuk, sipping steaming mugs of hand-picked tea at Malaysian tea plantations, sleeping in tiny bunk beds on the overnight train, watching our lives flash before our eyes as mon- keys encircled us outside Kuala Lumpur’s Batu Caves, navigat- ing through a fresh monsoon-triggered mudslide, sharing vivid dreams inspired by the anti-malarial medicine and creating New Year’s resolutions while letting lanterns loose into the sky on the Thai coast. It was his first time bike touring, and I don’t think it will be his last.

“DEFEATED AND UTTERLY EXHAUSTED, WE

POINTED OUR TIRES THE WAY WE CAME EIGHT

HOURS AFTER WE ARRIVED, FORCED TO PEDAL

1,000 KILOMETERS IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION

OF OUR INTENDED DESTINATION.”

THE BAD

Far and away the most disheartening experience of our bike tour thus far took place when we a empted to re-enter Kyrgyzstan a er pedaling the Wakhan Valley in Tajikistan. A er talking with several tourism repre- sentatives and a local travel agent who placed multiple calls with the authorities in Kyrgyzstan’s capital, we were assured that entry via a small border crossing wouldn’t be an issue. So we made our way there, pedaling through a handful of check- points where, at each one, our passports were checked, our information was recorded and we were sent on our way with no further questions. Several days, mountain passes and bouts of food poisoning later, we reached the border only to be told it was a locals-only crossing. Pleading and bribing (suggested tactics from our newfound friends in tourism) didn’t work. Justin even hitched a 30-minute ride through no man’s land to try and gain sympathy from the Kyrgyz border guard. He was denied entry a second time. Defeated and u erly exhausted, we pointed our tires the way we came eight hours a er we arrived, forced to pedal 1,000 kilometers in the opposite direction of our intended destination.

HONORABLE MENTIONS

These events made the B-side, but it doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be shared. Hitching a ride in an 18-wheeler on a one lane dirt road dug into a cliff above a raging river paralleling Afghanistan with a midnight pit stop to sleep on the side of the road. Food poisoning that had me heaving in the dirt from dusk until dawn. Meeting my relatives living in Italy and sharing with them photos of family now living in America. A sandstorm so strong I was repeatedly blown clear off of my bike. Creating a slideshow of our travels to share with a wonderful group of orphaned children. Retrieving our stolen phone—which was a means of communication as well as a GPS and camera—from a shepherd at the top of a mountain.

No matter the distance you tour by bike, a mix of highs and lows are par for the course. And while you ride in search of the highs, rest assured the lows will always make for some of the best stories, especially when gathered on your deck sur- rounded by close friends.

Beth Puliti is a writer and photographer currently traveling the world by bicycle. Visit bethpuliti.com and follow her travels at @bethpuliti.

PHOTOS COURTESY: PAUL ROZELLE

CATCHING UP WITH

PAUL ROZELLE

BY ADAM NEWMAN

T his cafe just outside of Brest is a popular stopping point for cyclists a empting the famous Paris-Brest-Paris brevet. Paul

Rozelle completed his third PBP this year, riding 1,200 km on a

fixed gear Moots. At right, Paul’s placard from the 2015 event.

FOR THOSE FOLKS WHO MAY NOT BE FAMILIAR WITH THIS EVENT, CAN YOU EXPLAIN WHAT PARIS-BREST-PARIS IS AND WHY IT’S SO SIGNIFICANT AND FAMOUS? Only held every four years, PBP has run 18 times since 1891. Rid- ers have 90 hours to ride 1,230 km from Paris to Brest and back, unsupported. It’s an amateur-only event now, but for decades PBP was a pro race and it’s the grandfather of most cycling disciplines and events. The French love great cycling and history, and PBP combines both. Even at 3 a.m., the towns are jammed with people cheering the riders.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE UNIQUE CHALLENGES OF RIDING IN AN EVENT LIKE THIS? HOW DOES IT COMPARE TO OTHER BREVETS? The key to all brevets is to keep moving, stay comfortable, and get good nutrition, hydration, and rest when you can. PBP is unique because it’s just huge. Not only is it a long way to ride a bike, but there are 6,000 other people from 65 countries on the road with you. You want to revel in the full experience, but you’ve got to keep moving to finish in time. Every 10 minutes there’s another awesome café or a li le kid who wants to hand you a marzipan. If I stopped for every sight of beauty or act of kindness, I’d still be somewhere in Bri any.

YOU RODE A PRETTY UNIQUE SETUP THIS YEAR. CAN YOU TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOUR BIKE? At the start of the brevet season I treated myself to a Moots Vamoots CR, built up by the guys at Swi Cycle, in Gainesville, Florida. We spec’d it out with track dropouts, Sugino 75 cranks,

and hi-flange Phil Wood hubs laced three-cross to Velocity Deep Vs. It’s a pre y bike, but also very comfortable and bombproof for randonneuring. I rode it fixed, running 48x17.

THIS ISN’T THE FIRST TIME YOU’VE DONE SOMETHING LIKE THIS, IS IT? I’ve been doing brevets for 11 years and this was my third PBP and my seventh 1,200k. There’s a randonneuring award for cycling enough brevets to add up to the circumference of the Earth (aren’t we a quirky bunch?) and I should complete that sometime next year.

CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT A MOMENT FROM THIS YEAR’S EVENT THAT WILL STAND OUT IN YOUR MEMORY? Somehow, I convinced three guys I used to work with to do this with me. Rob, Rich and Jay were all doing their first 1,200k and they put so much time and commitment into training for and riding PBP. We kept together the first night but the next day we began to split up, with everyone riding his own pace. By chance, we reconnected in Brest, which was awesome and a big lift for everyone. We all finished, which made sharing this experience together even better.

WHAT’S NEXT ON YOUR TO DO LIST? I’m the Regional Brevet Administrator (a fancy randonneur word for “ride organizer”) for Central Florida Randonneurs and we’re putting on a little something called The Cracker Swamp 1,200K, from October 13-16, 2016. It’s a four-day tour of Old Florida showing off every tucked-away town and tree-canopied country lane I can find.

Facebook.com/zefalbikeaccessories

youtube.com/user/ZefalO cial

zefal.com

WHAT IF?

De ector FC50

De ector RC50

ILLUSTRATION: STEPHEN HAYNES

OPINION

IF THE SOCK FITS

BY ANNA SCHWINN

T he cycling industry has a massive problem with women. This problem persists despite small victories including the rise in prominence of women’s racing and the increase in

shops and brands that cater to female consumers. The big issue? In this industry, men and their product needs remain the default. Products designed to serve the needs of men, which do a half-

assed job of serving the same population of women, continue to be marketed as unisex. If you’re

a woman and a consumer you

continue to have to wait for trickle down products—items that are first developed for men then adapted for women when companies feel like it, usually with fewer features or options, and many times at a lower qual-

ity but a greater cost. And this is stunting our industry. The biggest indicator that this remains an issue is in the core product of our industry: the stock bicycle. We are o en dis- tracted by the marketing being inappropriate or consumer ex- periences being negative, but at the end of the day it’s all about the bike. The first step a person takes to becoming a cyclist is walking into a bike shop and purchasing a stock bicycle off of the shop floor. The problem

is that the standard range of

unisex sizes, a range that works for nearly all men, does not work for a sizeable percentage of women. If the bike isn’t there, the consumer isn’t either. To frame this, I have to drop some numbers straight from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention*. The average adult American man is 5 feet 9 inches tall, and 90 percent of American men are in the range of 5 feet 4 inches to 6 feet 2 inches tall. Most stock bike sizes cover that range of human stature pre y well. That means that if you’re a guy in the U.S. you can expect to walk into a bike shop and find something that you can ride away on. Most bikes designed around the predominant wheel size (700c/29-inch) will have a geometry that fits you well enough and offer a consistent level of handling. You, sir, are catered to. The average adult American woman, however, is 5 feet 4 inches tall and 90 percent of women fall between 4 feet 11 inches and 5 feet 8 inches in height (the 5th and 95th percentiles). If you fall un- der 5 feet 4 inches you begin to run into issues such as toe overlap with your front wheel, top tubes that are too high to stand over, uncomfortable fit and poor handling. For you, cycling is a lower- quality experience. These problems are exacerbated when fa er cyclocross or gravel tires are dropped into the mix.

If you are in that 5th percentile or lower, good luck finding any- thing at all. Your neighborhood bike shop might even say that you are out of luck—that you need to seek out lower spec’d children’s models or make a significant investment in a custom frame. But it doesn’t stop there. The UCI minimum bicycle weight require- ments apply to all size frames, regardless of the rider, meaning that women’s race bikes have frames that are proportionally heavier to compete on. Also, UCI dimensional requirements ban different sized wheels so that frames are unable to utilize a smaller front wheel to bet- ter accommodate bike fit for those with short reach requirements. And though these race requirements would, on their surface, appear to af- fect only race bikes, it is important to note that race technology largely dictates product trends and development investment in our industry. The industry standard for testing bicycles (ISO) requires that small bicycles for short people with lower weights and power outputs pass the same tests at the same loads as those designed for much larger, heavier and more powerful rid- ers—meaning that small frames tend to be overbuilt. Modern drivetrains have minimum chainstay length requirements to properly shi so that even if you wanted to design an appro- priately handling small frame around a small wheel (26 inches or 650b or 650c), you could not utilize those drivetrains. And then there is the pervasive problem of “down spec’ing” women’s product, where women are charged more for “women’s” bicycles that feature lower quality components. I understand that this bias towards the standard men’s bell curve also affects large and small men, but not nearly to the degree that it affects women as an overall population. And sure, companies may extend a model line or two of their total offering to the smaller sizes to give those riders something at all to ride, but really it’s just throwing small statured cyclists, predominantly women cyclists, a bone. Why do we not question the lack of small bicycles in stock, “unisex” size ranges? Because it is inconvenient for the industry at large. Designing product to serve smaller (predominantly women) cyclists to the level that we serve our current male default consum- ers will require investment in time, testing and tooling. It will be expensive and it will take thought. Most critically, it will require that as an industry we acknowledge that our market, when considered as a whole, looks different and has different product needs than the group we currently serve. We must reestablish our default.

*Source: “Anthropometric Reference Data for Children and Adults:

United States, 2007-2010.” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. October 2012.

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10mm hexagonal links, outstanding corrosion resistance Fabric sleeve protects bike from damage Integrated lock body Patented PowerCell locking provides superior protection against attacks

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PHOTO: JASON BOUCHER

ESSAY

UNLEARN PAVEMENT

BY BOBBY WINTLE

I t has existed for much time.

Much more time than we are

able to understand. This is

Unlearn Pavement. It was already here. Under- neath. In the thick of the brush and trees. Where forge ing the busy becomes easy. Where only listening to your beating heart and deep breath in perfect rhythm ma er. We just had to stop looking to find it. To stop pushing so hard. To let it show us all that we have paved over. It’s in those places, forgo en, that we begin to realize what we are made of. What we are made for. Confusion stops. Clarity

begins. The next vista or valley

is all that is ahead. We are “un-

learning.” It is about time. It’s 2 a.m. and my 1-year-old daughter Emory can’t get back to sleep. It’s become almost rou- tine to load her up in the car and

drive into the night until her cries turn into deep, calm breaths. It’s 2011 and we’re new to Stillwater, Oklahoma, and the surround- ing area. My wife Crystal and I moved here to build and open

a shop called District Bicycles

and we haven’t had much time to venture out and explore, let alone ride our bicycles. The car keeps driving west, and Emory is still wailing. Still in town the hills start to get big- ger, steeper, and the road a bit rougher. Down a steep road a T comes into sight. Le or right. I choose le . Emory starts to let up. In the limited sight ahead of

me illuminated by the head- lights I’m not sure if I believe what I see. Rugged, steep, endless dirt roads and hills. The edge of town has immediately turned into a gravel mecca of

roads never spoken about in the cycling world. Was this hap- pening? Would the roads get be er the farther I drove? One mile in on these deep red roads and Emory finally falls asleep. It was time to turn back and tiptoe into our one-bedroom apart- ment walking ever so slowly as to not wake the ever so pre- cious sleeping monster. The next morning I had no

choice. I got on my bike and headed west. The gravel and dirt roads southwest of Stillwater are a mix of sand, rock, red dirt and hills. This is where Land Run 100, our 100 mile gravel race, and the idea of Unlearn Pavement was born. When everything is taken away and only the core is ex- posed we have something very simple. Something that allows

each person the opportunity to begin to find out who they really are, and what they are capable of. This is the heart of Unlearn Pavement. The community here has been deeply affected by this idea that less is more. It has brought us together and given us a common thread among us to describe how each of us feel about the gravel and our time spent on it. Mile by mile, pedal by pedal we are un- learning. We are understanding that nothing is more important than the relationships around us, the way we interact with our surround- ings and environment, and experiencing all of that on a bicycle. Riding on gravel is where this idea was born and where it con- tinues to grow and take on its own identity. Unlearn Pavement is a time, a place, a moment experienced through the understanding that nothing under this blazing sun is new. Sometimes it is be er to take away rather than to add. Ge ing back to the very reason of what a racted each of us to riding the bicycle is what is most important. Everything else is filler. Go get lost on your bike. Find something worth your a ention. Find yourself and your limits that you never knew existed. Welcome to Unlearn Pavement.

Learn more about what Unlearn Pavement means at unlearnpavement.com or share what it means to you through the hashtag #unlearnpavement on social media.

PHOTOS: COURTESY DAVID A. BRAINBRIDGE

HOW WE ROLL

A PEUGEOT UO-8 LOVE STORY

BY DAVID A. BAINBRIDGE

W hen I take my bike down off the rack on the back of my truck and pedal off up the road I am always thankful for the remarkable invention and development that led to my bike.

I also think of Eddy Merckx, the factory workers in Beaulieu, France, and

the Japanese engineers and workers who designed and assembled my SunTour derailleurs and shi ers. I love the feeling as much now as I did

in 1971 as a graduate student at the University of California - Davis when

I bought my bike new and rode all the time. My Peugeot UO-8 has the characteristic long wheelbase of French bicycles, intended to provide stability and a soft ride on city streets and rough French rural roads, but also ideal for touring. The UO-8 became the most popular model distributed by Cycles Peugeot after its release in the early 1970s. During the bike boom that began in 1972 the demand exceeded capacity at the Peugeot factory and the quality dropped off. Bad manage- ment led to further problems and by 1980 Cycles Peugeot was part of a conglomerate, never to recover. The Japanese factories took up the challenge and were soon dominant. If my bike could talk it would have many tales to tell—about the mountain passes of Alberta and British Columbia, snow storms,

rain, sand blasts, and the icy winds of Quebec in October. From the desert to Mesa Verde in Colorado, and from Yosemite across the mountain passes of the Sierras, my bike has never failed me, though

I have failed it. For too many years it sat outside through rain and

heat and cold. At one point the seatpost was welded to the frame by galvanic coupling and had to be sawed and hacked out.

PEUGEOT UO-8

24-inch, metallic green frame, purchased November 10, 1971 for $112.62 including sales tax from B&L Bike Shop, Davis, California.

PARTS CHANGED OR REPLACED:

Derailleurs (1)

Rear wheels (3)

Shi ers (1) Brakes (1)

Front wheels (3) Freewheels (3)

Once in Nova Scotia we were si ing in the icy rain at dusk trying to decide where to camp when a car stopped and asked us where we were staying. Finding us clueless they invited us to their “camp.” This turned out to be a nice li le house, and they fed us le over Thanksgiving dinner and then le us in the house as they headed home to Halifax. It was like heaven a er a day of icy rain and wind. Even a er 44 years my UO-8 remains one of the noblest inventions of the human race. The changes over the years have improved perfor- mance and made it be er for touring (triple chainrings, bar-end shi ers). I’ve also made adjustments for a back injury that made upright bars essential. It was tired, dirty but still functional when I finally decided it was time for a major service in 2014. I stripped and repainted the frame in French blue, cleaned and adjusted everything, added a new chain, replaced the rear rack (the same Pletscher from Switzerland) and now I look forward to another 20 years of cycling. Still in love…

Have a bike with a great story that you’d like to share? Send the details and some quality photographs to editor@bicycletimesmag.com

Time flies when you’re having fun.

RUSS ROCA AND ADAM NEWMAN ( INSET )PHOTOS:

MISSION KIDICAL

FAMILY BIKERS GATHER TO INFORM, INSPIRE AND OF COURSE, RIDE

BY ADAM NEWMAN

F or Katie Proctor, the director of the Portland Kidical Mass “chapter,” her love affair with family biking began even before she had a family. A journalism student at the University of

Oregon, she interviewed her future husband for a story about sus- tainable business practices. He told her to look into Burley, maker of kids trailers, which was based in Eugene, Oregon, at the time. “He gave me this catalog and all of the models in the catalog were Burley employees. Their families would get together and do these big shoots with all their products. And I looked at it—I was 19 years old—and I was like, ‘That’s us. That’s going to be us. I’m going to marry you, we’re going to have babies, we’re going to get a Burley and that’s going to be our life.’” Fast forward a few years and it all came true. Proctor would find her and her family living car-free in Portland, getting around on a mix of tandem bikes and trail-a-bikes (sometimes together). When the local Kidical Mass chapter was in need of leadership, she didn’t hesitate to step in and begin planning the monthly rides for kids and families. Founded by Shane MacRhodes in Eugene in 2008, Kidical Mass is more of a movement than an organization. As the Safe Routes to School director in the transportation department of the local school district, MacRhodes wanted to host a family-friendly ride inspired by the famed Critical Mass rides. At the time MacRhodes

didn’t even have kids of his own, but now he rides regularly with his daughter and twin sons. “Now communities around the country are holding their own, at times and places that work best for them,” he said. “It will be inter- esting to see the movement grow and our rides change a li le bit.” Each city that hosts Kidical Mass events has evolved the concept differently. There is no central leadership structure or schedule and the events can vary from city to city. For example, in Portland where large groups of cyclists are a regular occurrence, it’s sometimes necessary to block intersections (known as “cork- ing”) so all the riders can pass through, but the rides in Eugene

MISSION KIDICAL

“SHOWING PEOPLE THAT RIDING BIKES AS A

FAMILY ISN’T CRAZY IS PART OF THE MISSION.

KIDICAL MASS ISN’T AN ADVOCACY MOVEMENT,

PER SE, MOST OF THE PARTICIPANTS AGREE, BUT

BEING AN ACTIVE PRESENCE IN THE COMMUNITY

CAN SHOW OTHERS THAT IT’S SAFE AND FUN.”

would never do so. In some cities the rides are on public streets and in others they stick to bike paths. The group rides are an opportunity for both parents and kids to make new connections in the community. Parents can check out other families’ bikes and sometimes take them for a test ride, while some kids have friends they only know through biking, Proctor said. “When they were babies it was fun because they were chillin’—happy on the bike and it was a chance to get out and be with other adults who had kids. It was very much about having that interaction but also about sharing gear ideas, what’s work- ing for you, test ride each others’ bikes, that sort of stuff,” she said. “In 2009, 2010 there was a lot less gear commercially avail- able, so it was like ‘What hack have you done?’ and ‘How does your hack work?’ ‘How can we make a better hack?’ And also just the support when we are all doing this crazy thing that seems less crazy now, I think, because of the rides.” Showing people that riding bikes as a family isn’t crazy is part of the mission. Kidical Mass isn’t an advocacy movement, per se, most of the participants agree, but being an active presence in the com- munity can show others that it’s safe and fun. “It’s fun and advocacy all wrapped into one,” MacRhodes said. “What I was advocating for before was pretty much the same but now it’s coming from a whole different viewpoint be- cause I’m not talking about me, I’m talking about my daughter who’s 6 and by the time she’s 10 I want her to be able to ride around the whole city by herself.” “You sort of fall into advocacy if you’re a family biker,” said Madi Carlson of Sea le. “It’s really hard to make that jump [to family bik- ing]. Friends and knowledgeable people and the whole safety in numbers thing made a huge difference.” Like Proctor, Carlson was fascinated with the idea of family biking before she even started a family. “My mother is from the Netherlands, so I grew up every few years going to visit my

PHOTOS: ADAM NEWMAN

relatives there and seeing everyone on bikes. My uncle rode his bike to work in a three-piece suit and when my cousins started having babies they put them on bikes. I saw that and thought when I have babies I’m going to do this, too.” And she did. Now Carlson runs a website, familyride.us, where she shares tips, tricks and experiences for families on two wheels. “I love showing people sneaky routes to get to places that maybe they don’t know about,” she said. “The more you ride, the more routes you learn and streets to avoid and I also know the flat- test routes to get to any part of town.” Flat-routing is big in the Kidical Mass movement. “I double the ride times on Google Maps,” said Kath Youell of Portland, who prides herself on knowing the fla est route from A to B. A er mov- ing into the city from the suburbs and ditching the car in favor of a bakfiets bike, she had to adjust her family’s lifestyle a bit and she had to keep reminding herself it was worth it. “You can do this. Cargo biking is fun. Slow transportation is fine, just like slow food. That’s the kind of stuff that goes through my head as we are passed by joggers and passed by people on little bikes.” Transporting her 10-year-old, special-needs son to school is in many ways easier by bike because they aren’t tied to a specific bus schedule and can make stops easily along the way. “A really big thing to me is modeling for Evan that you don’t need to have a personal vehicle to do whatever it is you need to do,” she said. Teaching kids that cycling is fun, safe and worth continuing beyond their childhood years was the foundation for creating the Kidical Mass rides in the first place, MacRhodes said. “Our goal as parents is to build independence into our children and cycling is an important part of that. I think most people will remember the freedom they felt as kids when they started riding, [and we’re] trying to rediscover that again and help families rediscover that again.”

“WHEN MY COUSINS STARTED HAVING BABIES

THEY PUT THEM ON BIKES. I SAW THAT AND

THOUGHT WHEN I HAVE BABIES I’M GOING TO

DO THIS, TOO.”

Todd with

Ma hias British

and Gabriel.

Penticton,

Columbia.

Ed and George. Chicago, Illinois.

David with

FAMILY PHOTO ALBUM READER-SUBMITTED FAMILY BIKING PHOTOS

Andre, Eric, Makayla, Carlene, Nehemiah, James and Sydney. Pi sburgh, Pennsylvania.

Madi with Brandt and Rijder. Sea le, Washington.

Armando with Amelia and Jean-Luc. Portland, Oregon.

Dan and Anna with Anna Kay and Lauren at the Grand Canyon.

Theo and Lennon. Sacramento, California.

Mark and Nick. San Diego, California.

Tyler with Felix and Amelie. Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Ben with Jacob and Calista, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Margaret with Seán, Pádraic and Éamonn. Sea le, Washington.

Esaias and Valle. Västerås, Sweden.

Do you have family biking photos you’d like to share? Send them to shots@bicycletimesmag.com and we’ll feature our favorites on our Instagram, @bicycletimes.

3

2

1

hearts

wheels

Passion

36

BICYCLE TIMES ISSUE 38

As the distances of their travels grow, so too does the bond formed by a young family on the go.

Words and photos by Cass GilberT

M y son Sage is something of a seasoned traveller. At the ripe

old age of two and three quarters, he’s already chalked up

an impressive tally of countries visited, including the U.K.,

France, Chile and Ecuador—all of which have been enjoyed from the comfort of his bicycle trailer. But first allow me to rewind a couple of years. Like any father with a passion for bicycle touring I was formulating adventures within the first few days of his birth. All the necessary accessories had already been gathered. he intricacies of a whole new world of gear had been duly studied. From what I could see all I needed was to bundle him into the trailer and go! Of course the reality wasn’t quite as simple as that. It took eight long months before I was given the all clear to devise our first family trip: a simple overnighter close to our hometown of Santa Fe, New Mexico. I fretted over our route. I pondered the terrain. I poured over our packlist, wishing only that our first trip as a family be as positive an experience as possible. Which, despite its many undoubted challenges, it turned out to be. he fact that we only rode a handful of miles before setting up camp in a swathe of forest I'd scoped out on Google Earth was inconse- quential. hose precious miles were, without doubt, amongst the most rewarding miles of all my bicycle tours to date.

"The fact that we only rode a handful of miles before setting up camp in a swathe of forest I'd scoped out on Google Earth was inconsequential. Those precious miles were, without doubt, amongst the most rewarding miles of all my bicycle tours to date."

"We explored, we laughed, and we shared a love of bikes, good company and simple living and, of course, we enjoyed some fabulous riding."

Since that day the reach and breadth of our adventures has grown, as the three of us have become more versed with how best to tour as a family. After numerous local jaunts close to home Sage was ready to take on Chile at the tender age of 18 months. It was there that he earned the nickname El Huevito—the Little Egg— from all the women who scooped him up into their arms, tussled his blond hair and fed him untold amounts of sugary treats. he family bond is especially strong in South America, and the man- ner in which everyone we met interacted with us, warming im- mediately to Sage, introduced a whole new richness to traveling on a bicycle. his interaction was just as important as the riding itself, which was as varied as we could have hoped for. Over a three week period we camped in the lunar landscape of Conguillio National Park, explored the seaside city of Valparaíso by foot and rode from beach to beach along the windswept Pacific Coast. After our adventures in Chile we progressed the following year to Ecuador, joining forces with three brothers I’d met on previous two wheeled travels through South America. Since then we had kept in touch and we'd all had children. In any shape or form, our first outing together would have been enjoyable enough. It came complete with dirt roads, singletrack, a hike-a-bike and even a stint bouncing along the sleepers of a disused railroad, set to a backdrop of high altitude Andean páramo and silhouetted volca-

nos. Factor in no less than eight bicycles and five accompanying trailers, with a payload of 6-month-old to 3-year-old children, and such a journey takes on an even more memorable character. Together we blazed a trail of family mayhem through the countryside. We built roaring campfires and drank water that bubbled up from highland springs. We collected watercress and roasted it with garlic. Every moment was a chance to learn and share, from cooking outdoors, to pitching tents, to gathering firewood and purifying water. We explored, we laughed, and we shared a love of bikes, good company and simple living and, of course, we enjoyed some fabulous riding. Basing ourselves at our

friends’ family-run organic farm, Sage, Nancy and I set out on several week-long excursions around the countryside, exploring local markets, feasting on exotic fruit and rubbing shoulders with poncho-clad horsemen. By the time we were done in Ecuador, we were hooked on two-wheeled family travel. More recently, visiting my own family in the U.K. afforded us another opportunity for a mini adventure. his time it was to Exmoor National Park, a small but enchanting parcel of land located in the rolling hills of the South West. It came complete with quiet back roads and verdant combes harboring secret mossy glades—perfect wil- derness camping material. Elsewhere, open and windswept moorland was punctuated by traditional tea houses, serving up fresh scones, jam and dollops of clotted cream. Of course we still enjoy local jaunts as much as those that lie further afield, camping with friends on short overnighters out- side of Santa Fe, or heading into Colorado when the aspens are ablaze with color. With each trip, and each month that goes by, Sage seems to enjoy himself more and more. He’s now at the point where he actively relishes the whole experience rather than simply tagging along with what his parents are doing. He knows how to scout for a good camp spot, he’s eager to help put up the tent and he delights in studying the map with me. He loves being part of the team. Indeed, as someone who lives for being outside, it's been one of my great delights to experience the world through his eyes. We'll watch him wander off and forage for sticks, or investigate interesting rock piles, or collect pine cones. He sleeps as well in the tent as he does at home, and loves the undivided attention he gets from us when we're unplugged from our various electronic

"Indeed, as someone who lives for being outside, it's been one of my great delights to experience the world through his eyes."

devices, spending undiluted time as a family. Whether he grows into a passionate bicycle tourer is another matter. I hope at least that these experiences are broadening his mind, introducing him to the concept of car-free travel and allowing him to feel comfort- able and confident in the great outdoors. here is, however, a disclaimer. Despite their diminutive distances, I can’t promise that family bike tours are always easy. Without doubt, they have their own set of physical, mental and logistical challenges to contend with. he first few trips will undoubtedly involve a massive learning curve. But I couldn't more highly recommend trying one out, wherever it may be in the world, for however many days you may have. So gather the troops and brew up a plan. Choose a route that everyone will enjoy. Enjoy being off the bike as much as you are on it. Above all, make time for family adventures. I can guarantee they will warm the heart and feed the soul. For everyone involved.

16 tips for touring with a toddler

1. Devise a route that’s as traffic-free as possible. It will be a lot more relaxing.

2. Forget the miles. Focus on having a good time. Take regular breaks and lengthy lunches.

3. Factor in terrain to your expected distances—if it’s moun- tainous, we rarely cover more than 15 or 20 miles a day.

4. Ride while your child is napping whenever you can.

5. Don’t forget hydration. Initially Nancy found it a challenge to stay hydrated while riding and breastfeeding.

6. Figure on four hours of trailer time a day, split into smaller portions. On longer trips factor in plenty of off-the-bike days too.

7. Pack light. Hauling a trailer, plus extra food, water and baby gear can be a challenge.

8. Leave bulky toys at home. Allow your child to fully be im- mersed in nature. hey'll find plenty of things to do.

9. Keep it varied, particularly as your child becomes a toddler. After lunch, we often push our bikes and let Sage walk or run alongside us. Sometimes we bring a football to kick around in forest glades. Never pass up a good playground!

Read about the bike and camping gear that has worked best for two-year-old Sage and his family at bicycletimesmag.com/familytouring.

10. To help pass the time, listen to music or audiobooks on the move. We use the excellent Outdoor Tech Buckshot speaker.

11. Stop early enough that you have time to settle into your campsite and enjoy some downtime together.

12. Pack delicious, nutritious food, even if it weighs a little more.

13. A familiar bedtime storybook is great for helping your child get to sleep.

14. Engage your children to help out whenever possible, like cooking, setting up a tent, gathering firewood or purifying water. Sage loves helping out.

15. Be prepared for the occasional meltdown! It doesn't mean your child isn't having fun. Similarly, always keep your child’s needs to the forefront. After all, if they’re not enjoy- ing themselves, what’s the point?

16. If you can, team up with another family—your toddler will love the company.

THE

FAMILY

ADVENTURE

PROJECT

10 Lessons from 10 years adventuring with kids

By Stuart Wickes

T en years ago my wife Kirstie and I started he Family Ad- venture Project after making resolutions to put our family first. We wrote some ideas down and promised each

other we’d act on them. Over the years those handwritten notes became a website and now a blog, recording all the things we’ve done together, providing lasting memories of our little and big adventures and reminding us not to settle for a life less lived.

LESSON 1: NEWBORNS CAN TRAVEL TOO

Babies don’t melt if you take them out in the rain and they don’t break if you hike them up a mountain. Sure, those early months and years are a precious and demanding time, but you don’t have stay at home to enjoy them. You might as well have no sleep in a place you’ll remember.

LESSON 2: TODDLERS ARE EASIER IN THE OUTDOORS

Toddlers were made for stamping in puddles, for gathering up leaves in the woods and for stuffing twigs into pockets. he out- doors is a great big playground. It’s also free. Why visit expensive fun factories or waste money on play barns when you can explore the world together at no cost? Take a wagon of snacks and go see what’s out there.

LESSON 3: TWEENS AND TEENS BRING CHALLENGES WHEREVER THEY ARE

Everyone knows children can be challenging, tweens and teens especially, so why not let them sulk in a pleasant environment? Give them the chance to say what’s on their mind without the distractions of everyday life. Spend time with them now, keep those communications channels open and you can build relation- ships that will survive almost anything.

LESSON 4: THE WORLD IS A NATURAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

School is a great thing, but the world is the most effective teacher there is. Just think of all the subjects that crop up when you’re out exploring the real world. History, geography, science, maths, art and languages never feel like a chore when they’re studied as part of a journey.

LESSON 5: FAMILY LIFE IS MORE FUN WHEN YOU’RE TOGETHER

So much of daily life is spent in separate rooms, or even separate buildings. Come together once in awhile and get to know each other. Build up a bank of shared experiences that you can draw on. It’ll help to ground you for when more difficult times set in.

LESSON 6: YOU DON’T NEED ALL THAT STUFF. REALLY, YOU DON’T

Life is about people. Ditch the stuff and try playing with each other for a change. Even the littlest member of the family can make a doll out of a stick and we’re constantly surprised by how many games they can all create from a pocket full of stones.

LESSON 7: TAKING ON NEW CHALLENGES BOOSTS CONFIDENCE

Who doesn’t want confident children? Every time you go on a journey together, go some- where new or try something different you create an op- portunity to learn new skills for yourself and the rest of the family. You’ll discover that you and your family can deal with way more than you think and that’s great for everyone’s confidence.

LESSON 9: GETTING OUT WITH THE KIDS KEEPS YOU FIT NOT FAT

Middle aged spread setting in? Get on your bikes. Or up a moun- tain. he children will be fitter than you, and closer to their peak. Let that be a challenge not a problem. If the kids are eating too many trans fats then make them burn them off. hey’ll thank you when their own middle age sets in.

LESSON 10: PARENTHOOD IS SHORT

You think it will last forever. It doesn’t. Make the most of it while you can.

Stuart Wickes and his wife Kirstie lead the Family Adventure Project, a UK- based website that chronicles its adventures online and beyond in an effort to encourage families get out, get active and adventure together. Learn more at familyadventureproject.org.

PRESENTED BY

I n early October we celebrat-

ed the first

"

the first ever

Bicycle Times Adventure Fest

on the shores of Raystown Lake in Central Pennsylvania. We were joined by more than 400 readers and new friends for blue skies, warm temperatures and endless fall colors through the hills of the Allegheny Moun- tains. Trek Bikes hosted a huge fleet of demo bikes chosen from its touring and adventure lines, the first time they have ever hosted a demo event of bikes built for adventure riders. And what an adventure the rides were. here isn't much flat land in this part of the country and a heartfelt congratulations is in order for everyone who tackled one of the paved or unpaved route options ranging from 13 to more than 100 miles. he fun didn't end when the ride did though. We had a whole expo area with vendors and exhibitors, from bike shops to coffee shops. If you needed something for you or your bike Race Pace Bicycles came up from the Baltimore area and Rockrock Outfitters was on hand from nearby Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, with some end- of-season deals.If you wanted to get out on the water you could jump in a kayak or paddle board and explore the tranquil waters of Raystown Lake. After the adventure it was time to relax, with tunes from the Tussey Mountain Moon- shiners and free beer flowing from Happy Valley Brewing Company and New Belgium Brewing Company under an amazing canopy of stars. Finally, we owe a heartfelt thank you to all the volun- teers who donated their time to make Adventure Fest hap- pen—we couldn’t have done it without you. - Adam Newman Editor-In-Chief

PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FULLER, JUSTIN STEINER AND ADAM NEWMAN

2015

SPONSORS AND

EXHIBITORS

Trek Bikes

Presenting Sponsor

Michelin Tires

Silver Sponsor

Sea Sucker Racks

Bronze Sponsor

Swi Industries

Bikepacking Sponsor

New Belgium Brewing

Rollin’ Fat Sponsor

Bar Mi s Bianchi Doan’s Bones BBQ Green Guru Happy Valley Brewing Company KHS Bikes KMC Chains People For Bikes Philly Bike Expo ProGold Lubricants Race Pace Bike Shop Randita's Organic Vegan Cafe Rothrock Outfi ers Salsa Cycles Stan’s NoTubes Standing Stone Coffee Company Vee Tire Co. Wilderness Voyageurs Yuba Cargo Bikes

TREK 1020 PROTOTYPE

Anyone who attended Adventure Fest could demo bikes from the Trek Bicycles trailer for free, including the rough and ready 920, the versatile 520 disc and the speedy Domane road bike. But it was one bike that you couldn’t ride that caught our eye. The 1020 is a one-off concept bike that Trek put together as a design study. Based on the Stache mountain bike, it features 29x3.0 tires and custom racks that attach to a modified frame. No show pony, it bears the scrapes and scuffs of being well-used on adventures around the country by Trek employees. Will it become a produc- tion model? We’ll have to wait and see, but judging from the public’s interest we wouldn’t be surprised it if does.

WINNER, WINNER!

With its knobby mountain bike tires and big racks, the Trek 920 is a new breed of go-anywhere adventure machine, the perfect kind of bike for Adventure Fest. Trek was kind enough to donate one to raffle off on Saturday night and after call- ing several names chosen randomly from the list of contest entrants—you had to be present to win—Rachel Dingfelder of Pittsburgh was called to the stage as the lucky winner.

PHOTO GALLERY

See more photos from Adventure Fest at

bicycletimesmag.com/2015adventurefest

PHOTOS: JUSTIN STEINER

PROVISIONS

BIANCHI VOLPE DISC BIANCHI ZURIGO TIAGRA DISC

REVIEWERS: ERIC MCKEEGAN AND JON PRATT // PRICE: VOLPE - $1,500; ZURGIO - $1,600 // WEIGHT: VOLPE - 26.3 POUNDS; ZURIGO - 22.6 POUNDS // SIZES: VOLPE: 46, 49, 51, 53, 55 (TESTED), 57, 59, 61; ZURIGO: 49, 52, 55 (TESTED), 57, 59, 610 // BIANCHIUSA.COM

ZURGIO

B ianchi has been at the bike game for a long, long time. One hundred thirty years to be exact. Al- most as old is Bianchi’s signature celeste green,

perhaps the most recognizable color in cycling. While much of Bianchi’s history revolves around road racing, it has also had much success in the urban market and with a line of now extinct singlespeed mountain bikes. The Volpe and Zurigo represent the road bike market’s move from racing to more general riding pursuits. In years past these bikes would have been categorized as cyclocross bikes, but now fall under the banner of “all-road” bikes, a much be er term to describe sturdy, versatile drop-bar bikes that can commute, tour and maybe even see the start line of a dirt road race or cyclocross course. It isn’t o en we get to ride two such similarly equipped bikes from the same manufacturer at the same time, so we assigned a pair of riders to ride them both and report back. Both bikes have Shimano 10-speed Tiagra drivetrains with compact cranks,

“THE ZURIGO IS PERHAPS THE MOST

EXPENSIVE-LOOKING $1,600 BIKE

I’VE EVER RIDDEN. ALL THAT GREEN

SHOULD LOOK TACKY BUT THIS BIKE

MANAGES TO BE UNDERSTATED,

CLASSY AND ATTRACT ATTENTION.”

VOLPE

-ERIC MCKEEGAN

Hayes CX 1 disc brakes and nearly identical geometry. Both bikes have rack and fender mounts too. Of the two, the Volpe is probably the more familiar—the rim-brake version has

been a favorite of utility cyclists for years. This steel-frame stalwart has low-rider rack mounts on the fork, downtube cable adjusters and a well-padded WTB Speed

V saddle. The Zurigo has an expensive looking paint job adorning its aluminum

frame and carbon fork, a racy Selle San Marco saddle, and tubeless-ready rims. The Zurigo pictured here is the 2015 model, but will be updated for 2016 with a SRAM Apex drivetrain and a price increase to $1,700.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS

Eric: The Zurigo is perhaps the most expensive-looking $1,600 bike I’ve ever ridden. All that green should look tacky but this bike manages to be understated, classy and a ract a ention. It also looks and feels racy. The Volpe looked and rode like an old friend, although a er a few rides I installed

a more sporty saddle to try to get the fit and feel more similar between bikes.

Jon: I couldn’t agree with Eric more. The Zurigo looks and feels the racier of the two bikes. A bit too over the top with the colors for my taste, but it is classic Bianchi. Immediately, I felt like the Volpe was “my bike.” Understated and comfortable.

RIDE

Eric: My first long ride on the Zurigo was a doozy. A road spin to watch a Red Bull mountain bike event, followed by a group mountain bike ride, and then ride back home. Even with the street tires the Zurigo was game for some dry trails. The drivetrain wasn’t very happy be bounced around off-road, and it paid me back by bouncing between gears, but all in all, it was a willing companion for this type of riding. The Volpe struck me as a much more laid back ride, and where the cyclocross racing heritage of the Zurigo had me attacking climbs, the Volpe took a kinder and gentler approach. Easier gears, sit down, relax, we’ll get there. One of the main things that stood out to me was how much of the ride feel was about things other than frame material. I noticed the saddle, the handlebar height and the tire pressure much more so than any perceived differ- ences between the frame and fork. That said, the Zurigo felt lighter and stiffer, but less forgiving than the Volpe.

PRODUCT REVIEWS

Jon: To sum up my riding experiences with both

bikes, I’ll harken back to the day Eric and I met up at a coffee shop downtown to swap bikes.

I had ridden down on the Volpe, feeling at ease.

It lazily darted in and out of alleyways and felt compliant as I navigated the sometimes broken streets of Pittsburgh. The Volpe wanted me to keep exploring. The combination of the saddle and handlebar height made my experience on the Volpe a very pleasant, relaxed one.

A er a relaxing, tasty espresso, I headed home on

the Zurigo.

It felt like it was begging me to stand up and mash.

Find the quickest route home and go. The bike felt snappier, more rigid and not as friendly to the errant pothole or crack in the street. As Eric pointed out, a lot of that feeling is directly related to the seat, tires and handlebars.

WHICH WOULD YOU CHOOSE?

Eric: Normally, I’m a steel guy. But something about the Zurigo clicked with me. I could use a racier bike in my stable, and my mountain bike background is very a racted to the tubeless rims. While I don’t plan to mix it up on a cyclocross course anytime soon, this would make a fine race bike for dirt-roads, although it does lose a few points to purpose-built all-road bikes with its cyclocross racing genealogy. And those rack and fender mounts would make this a great winter commuter in areas that salt the hellout of the roads, such as my home city of Pi sburgh, no worries about rust.

Jon: While I feel the Zurigo is a fine bike, and both bikes are great deals at their price points, there’s no doubt I would buy the Volpe. It be er fits my riding style, which tends to be a slow exploration of urban cityscapes or a short run the store. Where the Volpe felt like a bike I had been riding all along, the Zurigo’s racier touch made the bike feel like it was something I borrowed from one of my friends and could never really get comfortable on. I can see why so many people around town choose the Volpe as their go-to urban commuter.

PHOTO: JUSTIN STEINER

PROVISIONS

LINUS BIKE ROVER 3

REVIEWER: JUSTIN STEINER // PRICE: $629 // WEIGHT: 31.9 POUNDS SIZES: ONE SIZE, MEDIUM // LINUSBIKE.COM

L inus Bike blends classic styling cues with mod- ern parts to create everyday transportation that’s both fashionable and functional. Linus

offers some of the classiest looking bikes available right now and the Rover 3 continues that tradition. Backing up that aesthetic are some stout 29-inch wheels with 45 mm-wide tires, which certainly add a lot of functionality to this robust package. Speaking of functionality, the Rover offers front and rear fender mounts and will accommodate a rear rack for day-to-day utility. The steel frame is available in one size only, a medium, that’s said to fit folks from 5 feet, 8 inches to 6 feet, 3 inches. At 5 feet, 7 inches, I’m obviously just a touch under the recommended height range but had no issues fi ing on the Rover while riding. However, the frame’s upward-arching top tube didn’t offer any standover clearance for my 31-inch inseam. The Rover’s riding position is very upright thanks to relatively short top tube and highly swept handle- bars. A quill stem sticks to the traditional look and offers a welcome range of height adjustment for the one-size-fits-most frame. Caliper brakes do their best to slow bike and rider, and are adequate for all but the most aggressive riding. That said, the Rover encourages a relaxed, we’ll-get-there-when-we-get-there a itude. Those big Kenda tires provide a nice big contact patch and the large volume offer a lot of comfort on

“I REALLY APPRECIATE THE ROVER’S ABILITY TO NAVIGATE

OFF-THE-BEATEN-PATH STRETCHES OF MY URBAN

SETTINGS. ITS WIDE AND TOUGH TIRES ALLOW ME TO RIDE

ALONG RAILROAD TRACKS, THROUGH INDUSTRIAL ZONES

AND TAKE SINGLETRACK SHORTCUTS THROUGH OUR CITY

PARKS.”

rough surfaces. These tires are reinforced to guard against flats as well. The Rover’s Shimano Nexus three-speed hub is a nice touch in my hilly terrain, providing a gear low enough to mostly prevent walking. On flat ground, I o en found myself between second and third gear, but swapping the rear cog from the stock 22-tooth to a harder 19-tooth or easier 23-tooth cog might eliminate some of the hunting back and forth. As a mountain biker at heart, I really appreciate the Rover’s ability to navigate off-the-beaten-path stretches of my urban se ings. Its wide and tough tires allow me to ride along railroad tracks, through industrial zones and take singletrack shortcuts through our city parks on the way from point A to point B. I really ap- preciate that versatility. Sure you can buy more technologically advanced bikes at this price point, but they don’t look as good as the Rover. If you’re into classic styling and versatil- ity, the Rover might be just your ticket. Folks looking to save a few bucks should consider the singlespeed Rover 1, which retails for $539.

PHOTO: JUSTIN STEINER

B uying your kid a bike is a good idea. Is buying your kid a better bike a better idea? Fortunately my daughter and I got

PRODUCT REVIEWS

TREK FUEL EX JR

REVIEWER: ERIC AND OONA MCKEEGAN // PRICE: $1,800 SIZES: ONE SIZE, 12.5 INCHES // TREKBIKES.COM

“I WAS INITIALLY SKEPTICAL ABOUT HOW MUCH THE

SUSPENSION WOULD MATTER TO MY ENTRY-LEVEL

the

chance to find out with the new Fuel EX Jr. Un-

like

the full-suspension kids bikes that are often

OFF-ROADER KID BUT SHE WAS IMMEDIATELY MORE

all show and no go, the EX Jr is built with most of

the same technology and care as the adult sized

Fuels, which is to say, this is a real mountain bike. That means it has a 2x10 drivetrain, air sprung suspension front and rear and hydraulic disc brakes. It also uses 26-inch wheels, which are all but dead in the mountain bike world now that 27.5 has taken over. But the smaller wheels allow for a wider range of fit options, which is helpful when dedicating $1,800 to a bike that will no doubt be outgrown.

Fit is one of the main things I noticed with this bike. My daughter Oona is lanky, and while the reach on

her old 24-inch bike was OK, the seatpost was almost

maxed out, but most adult bikes were too long in the

top tube to make the jump yet. The Fuel was a great fit

from the start, with some room to grow as well.

I was initially skeptical about how much the sus- pension would matter to my entry-level off-roader

CONFIDENT AND TRAIL RIDES BECAME SOMETHING SHE

LOOKED FORWARD TO.”

the correct position for one or two finger braking, it pushed the shifters into a hard to reach position. If we were keeping this bike, I would swap the levers to something more ergonomical. The trigger shifters are one of the best features on this bike. Both my kids lack the hand strength to shift their twist shifters when wet or sweaty, and often forget which way to turn them. No such issues with the triggers.

A bike like this is an investment in your kid’s future riding mountain bikes,

and probably a guarantee you’ll end up with a bike snob when little Johnny or Janey grows up. For your little ripper, or ripper-to-be, the Fuel EX Jr might make for the best Christmas morning ever.

kid,

but she was immediately more confident, and

OONA’S THOUGHTS:

trail

to, and less something she did to please me (not to imply I force my kids to ride bikes). Trek made some nice choices with parts spec, including a low-volume rear shock, narrow 580

rides became something she looked forward

I liked the colors, though if Trek got more colors like black, orange or blue I believe kids would enjoy it. Compared to my old bike (a bike of many bikes) this one was smooth and the shifters were good, but a little confusing. The bike was very comfortable and fit my shape very well. I enjoyed how fast it

mm

bars, and hard to find 160 mm cranks. I was

goes down and up hills. I very much liked how well it went off-road and the easiness of going over bumps.

less

happy with the grips and brake levers. The

A

detail I did not like was that the shifters were confusing and hard to

grips could be thinner (a minor complaint), and

the brake levers are too long and can’t be adjusted

close enough to the bar. When I set the levers to

remember where everything was. The bike took some getting used to. I even- tually got used to it and became “the master Trek kid biker’’ as I call myself! (only in my head of course).

PHOTOS: BRICE SHIRBACH

PROVISIONS

SRAM RIVAL 1X - $1,357 W/HYDRAULIC DISC BRAKES

By Mike Cushionbury

While SRAM certainly hasn’t abandoned double chainrings and tight ratio cassettes for the road,

its commitment to 1x11 is clear. First was the highly successful version for mountain bikes, next came

a cyclocross specific group and now we have

road-specific Force 1 and Rival 1. This begs the question: Can less be better? Much of the technology behind the road group

is the same as what you find in the dirt version.

In fact, the wide range 10-42 Rival cassette is the exact same as X1 (and can be swapped with the lighter, pricier XX1, or heavier, cheaper GX1 if you really wanted). Also the chain is the same, the rear derailleur uses the same high-tension clutch, straight parallelogram and narrow/wide pulley tooth design and the chainrings have the same X-Sync narrow/wide tooth profile. All these put together is what makes 1x work flawlessly without dropping the chain. The biggest question is gear ratio. Rival has seven chainring choices in 110 BCD (Force has nine including 52 and 54t in a 130 BCD.) After some debate I chose a 48t ring to go with the wide range cassette since this was going on my primary road/ gravel bike. The highest gear is equal to a 52x11

and my lowest matches a 34x28. Obviously this means it doesn’t have the tight ratio of a 2x11 but the simplicity, reliability and clean lines are attractive factors. I’ve been using and loving SRAM’s XX1 and X01 drivetrains on the dirt since their release; switching over on the road was an easy choice. After months of riding Rival 1x on dirt, gravel and pavement I can say it performs flawlessly. Dirt and gravel is its obvious home turf. It’s completely silent with no chain slap against the chainstay and I’ve never dropped a chain or had shifting issues over washboards and other rough terrain. The other bonus is the simplicity. There’s no toggling between front chainrings and risk- ing a dropped chain—the right gear is just usually just one or two clicks away on the right hand shifter. My gearing choice was certainly low enough for the steeps but there’s always the option to go with a smaller ring, all the way down to a stump pulling low 38t to go with the big 42t on the cassette. For pure road riding I didn’t readily notice the lack of tightly spaced gears, especially on rides with a lot of climbing, descending and rolling terrain unless I was doing a fast-paced Sunday training ride. Sometimes I would find myself shifting a lot, looking for the right cadence, although I still had the same top speed gearing when there was a strong tailwind. That isn’t really the target application for Rival 1x though. It’s not a road or crit racing group, it’s for road riders, fitness enthusiasts and dirt and gravel lovers. It also passes just fine for cyclocross. If you want to save a few dollars or aren’t yet sold on hydraulics, 1x11 will work with any current SRAM 11 speed shifter. SRAM offers a front brake lever with no shift paddle if you want to dump that unused front shifter. Is road 1x for everyone? Probably not. Will it replace a tight ratio double ring set-up? Certainly not. However it is a viable alternative for a great many riders who want to further simplify their bikes and who aren’t focused on high- end road racing. For me, it fits the bill perfectly. sram.com

PHOTOS: JON PRATT

BLACKBURN 2’FER BIKE LIGHT - $25

By Jon Pra

PRODUCT REVIEWS

THULE RACEWAY PRO 9001 - $330

By Jon Pratt

Thanks to Thule’s Fit Guide it was incredibly easy to install the Raceway on my Subaru Impreza. The upper and lower arms of the carrier easily adjust and lock in the recommended position then two upper and two lower ratcheting cables attach to the top and bottom edges of your trunk or hatch. Spin a dial to tighten them up and you are done. It’s really that easy. The cables, arms and bikes can be locked to prevent theft. Bikes are held by well-padded cradles, includ- ing a vertical cage to hold the seat tube and prevent sway. The arms can be folded down and out of the way when the carrier is not in use. I experienced some fit issues with full-suspension bikes. Thule sells a frame adapter that mimics

a straight top tube which can help alleviate this

issue. Unfortunately on the hatchback the carrier occupies most of the rear window making it some- times difficult to see objects behind the car. This would be less of an issue on a sedan. The Raceway Pro performed perfectly for most

of the bikes we tried it with, and is the best strap- rack system I’ve used. Never once did I worry about my bikes moving around, or coming in contact with the car, or loosening up on long trips.

If you have a mountain bike that might interfere

with the cradle design, I would suggest looking into something like Thule’s Raceway Platform. The Platform relies on wheel trays to support the bike instead of using your bike’s top tube like the Pro. thule.com

This is a smart commuter light, capable of emi ing a 60 lumen solid or blinking white light or a 20 lumen solid or blinking red light. Pressing the bu on at the cen- ter of the light turns it on and off and cycles through the different modes. The light even remembers the last mode you were in, so you won’t need to hunt for the right se ing when you turn it off then on again a er running into the store. Nice touch. The 2’Fer comes with a replaceable silicone band to a ach it to your bars or seatpost, and a clip for a pack strap or rack. Runtimes are adequate: 1.5 hours on white or red solid, and 5 hours on white or red blinking. Recharging takes 3 hours via the Micro USB port. Caught in the rain? Don’t worry, the light carries an IP-65 rating, which means it’s sealed against dust and waterproof enough that pre y much anything you will encounter on your ride won’t phase it. Just don’t submerge it. I’ve been using it primarily as a rear light, but have put it on the bars to make it through some dark wooded paths on my way home once or twice. The 2’Fer per- forms well in all situations and emits a good deal of light through its sides, making you more visible to cross traffic. The 60 lumens out front isn’t going to light up the whole street but it will help you get home safely. Certainly having a rear blinky that can moonlight as a front safety light when needed is a great tool for the urban commuter. If you really want to get crazy, it is available in a two pack for $45. blackburndesign.com

JUSTIN STEINER

( BLAQ ) ERIC MCKEEGAN; ( THULE )PHOTOS:

PROVISIONS

THULE PACK ‘N PEDAL COMMUTER BACKPACK - $160

By Justin Steiner

BLAQ DESIGN KAGERO - $250

By Eric McKeegan

Blaq Designs makes a variety of sturdy bags out of Port- land, Oregon. How sturdy? Blaq says “We believe that a bag should be able to endure being thrown on the ground, kicked to the curb, ridden through a rainstorm, sprayed with a line of road grime, and over-stuffed with sharp objects. For year a er year a er year a er year. “ That sounds like my kinda bag. Blaq sent me the Kagero, an new mid-size, roll-top addition to its two strap line-up. A heavy-duty seamless floating tarp liner has proven to be absolutely water- tight, but the zippered front pocket is unlined and only water resistant. The external material is heavy cordura, the single zipper is super-beefy and all straps and buck- les feel more than strong enough for the job. Six compression straps can keep the bag small, and the contents tight, I only used the pair around the side pockets to keep my water bo le and u-lock from bounc- ing out. I’d be into longer straps on the bo om of the bag to secure bulky stuff like a jacket, yoga mat, or bed roll, a few more inches would help a lot. Internal organization is limited to a laptop sleeve, which is well protected by the padded back panel. The shoulder straps are wide and comfortable, and I’m thankful for the waist belt, which keeps the bag from bouncing around when my commutes get too rad for just shoulder straps. This is well designed and executed bag. The $250 price tag includes custom colors in the body, trim, liner and logo. For ten bucks more, you get a reflective stripe across the bo om or top. Backed by a generous lifetime warranty, the Kagero is a serious investment for the rider who asks a lot of a bag. blaqpaks.com

Though Thule is a name most o en associated with racks and cargo boxes, the company has been steadily branching out by producing panniers, backpacks and travel cases. We’ve been impressed with all of the Thule bags we’ve tested over the years and this pack is no different. Quality construction and materials certainly help justify the asking price. The main compartment is accessed via a zippered, roll-top closure. Inside, a re- movable laptop sleeve accommodates up to a 15-inch machine and a 10-inch tab- let. This removable sleeve connects to the bag’s back panel, suspending it from the bo om of the bag. With 24 liters of capacity, this bag’s middle-of-the-road size is perfect for commutes where you need to carry a flat repair kit, computer, change of clothes, shoes and your lunch. I really appreciate the genius, hard-shell pocket on the side of the bag. It’s the perfect place to protect items like your glasses or phone. The organizer pockets on the front of the bag are well-sorted and convenient to use. A rain cover and helmet holder deploy out of the bo om of the bag when needed. Two minor gripes. First, while including a zipper on the roll-top closure provides an extra level of security; it also adds another step to the process of opening and closing the bag. Second, I’m a big fan of waist straps on backpacks designed for riding, and wish this bag offered one. The added stability is welcome for anyone who likes to jump the occasional curb on the way home from work. Ultimately, this bag’s positives far outweigh those minor drawbacks. thule.com

ADAM NEWMAN

( PEDALS ) MICHAEL CUSHIONBURY; ( TIRES )PHOTOS:

PRODUCT REVIEWS

NIKOLA ZIVO PEDALS - $199

By Mike Cushionbury

Nikola has developed a new idea in pedaling dynam- ics. Its Zivo technology allows for 25 mm of lateral movement at the pedal body along the pedal’s axle. In the 12 o’clock crank arm position the pedal body is closest to the crank and then as you cycle through a pedal stroke the body continuously moves outward, maximizing at 25 mm when the crank arm is at 6 o’clock. The fixed, non-adjustable movement reverses on the upstroke. The pedals come with detailed installation instructions (it’s not difficult) and the mechanics of the pedals as well as clipping in and out are all very smooth. Founder and CEO of the brand Nick Stevovich came upon the idea while rollerblading and says the movements mimic that of skating. It’s an interest- ing concept that mostly seems suited to occasional bikers who mostly run, skate or ski and what to mimic the same motions, those who can’t find a proper po- sition with standard float pedals or perhaps time trial and triathlon specialists—these la er two are two key user groups for the brand. For most road riders who have dialed in their cleat position the lateral movement can be bothersome (in the 12 o’clock position my shoe also always hit the crank arm) and not as effective as a good set of pedals with float, such as Speedplay or Shimano. Ad- ditionally they’re heavy—505 grams a set compared to 278 grams for a pair of Shimano’s aluminum Dura Ace pedals. While the concept is notable, a er put- ting in some miles I think these pedals are ideal for only a fairly niche user group. nikola.com

BRUCE GORDON ROCK N ROAD 650B TUBELESS TIRES - $57

By Adam Newman

There’s a lot of history spun up in these tires. With a tread design cra ed by Joe Murray decades ago, the Rock N Road has been recapturing interest with the resurgence of gravel and mixed-surface adventure riding. When framebuilder Bruce Gordon starting building touring bikes with big tire clearance, he wanted a larger tire to fit his bikes. The original 700x43c Rock N Road bikes and tires were a precursor to the modern 29er mountain bike. The new 650b version takes the same ethos and applies it to the smaller size, plus adds a tubeless kevlar folding bead. Made in Japan by Panaracer, the Rock N Road tires sealed up well on a pair of Stan’s NoTubes rims. Ge ing them to seal isn’t idiot-proof, but if I can do it with a floor pump you probably can too. I installed these wheels as an experiment on a Specialized Tricross that was designed for 700c wheels. Because the diameter of the 650x43c version is very close to that of a 700x28c tire it was a good fit and didn’t drastically affect the bike’s handling. On the road the thin, supple sidewalls paired with the low pressure afforded by the tubeless setup give a comfortable, forgiving ride. The tread pa ern might look retro but it rolls really well on smooth pavement while still allowing for some bite when the going gets so . The gum sidewalls look fantastic but the tires are avail- able in all black if that’s more your style. The Rock N Road tires are available straight from bgcycles.com or your local bike shop.

ERIC MCKEEGAN

( JACKET ) ADAM NEWMAN; ( RACK )PHOTOS:

PROVISIONS

SUGOI ZAP JACKET - $150

By Adam Newman

There is a coming revolution in cycling apparel, not just in high-visibility colors (which are oh-so-hot right now) but in reflective garments. The technical capabilities to print on or impregnate materials with reflective details has taken huge leaps in the last few years, and it’s leading to be er products and safer cycling. A lot of companies tout their jackets, bags, hats or shoes as having reflective stitching or other “hits,” but few can come close to the Zap jacket from Sugoi, which has thousands of micro glass beads inserted into the shell to make the entire jacket pop under bright light. This Pixel fabric has every inch of it covered with small, reflective dots that look like any sort of printed pa ern during the day, but glow intensely under a streetlight or when reflecting a car’s headlights. The Zap is built around Sugoi’s semifit, which is athletic enough for riding but certainly not a race fit. I found my normal size was plenty roomy enough to wear over a bulky sweater for commuting—the perfect application for a reflective jacket. Made from a fully waterproof and breathable material with taped seams, I was impressed with its water protection abili- ties and the drop tail is unusually long to keep your rear dry. There is a rear zippered pocket for storing your gloves or other small items along the way. The elastic cuffs are simple and block the wind from enter- ing at the wrists. While it may seem like a simple jacket, the reflectiv- ity has made it my favorite lightweight wind and rain shell for urban riding. I feel safer knowing that I’m glowing like a light bulb, while I can still feel comfort- able walking into a coffee shop without looking like I just stepped out the movie “Tron.” Sugoi has launched a whole line of Zap products, including gloves, hats, booties, knickers and other accessories. The Zap jacket is available in both men’s and women’s versions too. The men’s version we

YAKIMA TWOTIMER HITCH RACK - $300

By Eric McKeegan

Tire widths, axle standards, fenders, wheel sizes and full-suspension mountain bikes can all complicate things when it comes to carrying your bike on your car. Yakima has solved most all of these issues with this “budget” hitch rack, an impressive feat in this day and age of constantly evolving standards. Instead of the more common tire clamp arm, the TwoTimer uses a single main beam with offset, padded hooks that ratchet down on the top tube to hold the bike. This system can present some problems with ge ing the right bike on the right side when carrying different frame sizes, but takes things like wheel size, tire width and fenders out the clamping equations. The wheel trays handle tires up to 5 inches wide and are easily adjustable via threaded knobs, but even when solidly tightened the trays can slide around. This is more of an annoyance than a serious issue, as everything stays in place when a bike is clamped down. The rack includes a tilt function to access the trunk or hatch, but it only drops a few degrees. I could unclamp the inside bike and tilt it over to get my hatch up. I’m tempted to break out the grinder to get some extra clearance, but obviously I have no respect for warranties and safety, so proceed at your own peril. Both the sliding trays and tilt issues are being addressed by Yakima. A real metal (not plastic!) 2-inch hitch adaptor is included, as well as a threaded hitch pin with an SKS lock. There isn’t an option of an integrated bike lock, but any longer cable lock can work, including Yakima’s SKS cable ($40). Yakima also includes a long secondary safety strap. I tossed it in the car for use on long trips, but I never felt the need for it on short trips. While I can never see any real frame damage occurring in regular use, the well pad- ded clamp arm could cause some rub marks. Since most of my bikes get used quite hard and look it, rub marks aren’t much of a concern for me, but I do add some extra protection when carrying my fancy custom 29er with the cool paint job. Even with a few issues. I’ve been tremendously happy with this rack. It’s been a relief to never worry if a bike will fit on the rack. And while I’m usually turned off by integrated bottle openers, the low profile one on the end of the rack got more use than I expected. Well done, Yakima. yakima.com

PHOTOS: STEPHEN HAYNES

BURLEY KAZOO TRAILER - $300

By Stephen Haynes

As a parent with kids whose interest in cycling ranges

from lukewarm to ice cold, it’s o en difficult to get the

li lest of riders excited about going for a ride longer

than a few blocks. There are many options for parents or caretak- ers wishing to tow their little bundles of joy over yon hill but many, if not most, suffer from what amounts to the same fundamental flaw; namely the herky-jerky nature of the trailer on the tow vehicle. Enter the Burley Kazoo and its most outstand- ing feature, the company’s patented Trailercycle Hitch. Coupled with its proprietary rear rack the hitch almost completely alleviates the side-to- side violence associated with other trailer bikes. While it’s true that you have to install the pur- pose built rear rack (included) and you lose the ability to (quickly) move the trailer from one bike to another, you gain ease of use and a much more pleasurable ride quality for yourself and ultimately your little one. The Trailercycle Hitch is connected to two rails of the rear rack of the tow vehicle and is locked in place by a by a screw clamp from the top. A two-way, ball bearing pivot point sits perpendicular to the ground and offers a smooth, wide range of movement for the trailer. Since the pivot point is actuated by ball bearings and isn’t in direct contact with

the tow bicycle (being a ached, instead to the rear rack), the the force of the child leaning either le or right and then leaning the opposite direction is absorbed by the rack itself and not the tow bicycle’s seat tube, minimizing the aforementioned violence generally associated with trailer bikes. The single speed Kazoo features adjustable handlebars and seatpost, and a mud flap to avoid spray from the tow vehicle and will accommodate riders up to

85 pounds.

This is by far the smoothest trailer bike I’ve ever used. I think it would be a worthy investment for parents who are devoted to taking their child with them and want a super smooth ride for themselves and their li le ones. Also available is a 7-speed model called the Piccolo which also has a rider weight limit of 85 pounds.

BURLEY PLUS - $150

The Burley Plus allows users to extend the lifespan and usage of their Kazoo or Piccolo trailers by turning

the trailers into fully functional bikes for riders up to

85 pounds.

Simply remove the front end of the trailer and replace it with the Burley plus, which is essentially the front wheel, fork, stem and down tube of the bike(s), along with both front and rear rim brakes. Once the transition is made, six bolts need to be tightened (front brake lever, stem and down tube) and your li le ripper is ready to roll. Reverse the pro- cess to transform it back into trailer form. While it is relatively easy to make this transition, it certainly requires at least a li le bit of pre-meditation. On the fly, trailside transformations might turn off all but the most die-hard bikepacker/parents among us. It’s great having the option of trailer bike or regular bike whether your mini me has outgrown the trailer, or because you want the flexibility of having both. Either way, the Burley Plus is a welcome addition in this parent’s arsenal. burley.com

BY SEAN JANSEN

I f

you look beyond the violent history of Colombia you will see a

country that not only has moved on considerably from its past when Pablo Escobar was running things, but also a country that

has something for everyone. It has the tropical climes of the Ama- zon, the Caribbean and the Pacific coasts. It stretches from massive cities to the Andes Mountains. If you trek deep into the misty hills

you’ll find an area, nestled just south of the city of Medellin, that is famous for the country’s other top export. It is known as the Zona Cafetera, and that’s where the coffee is grown.

I came to Colombia years ago for the first time via the sail-

boat crossing from Panama and it was on this boat where I tried Colombian coffee for the first time. I have had Panamanian, Indonesian, Bolivian and Brazilian coffee too, but it is really the Colombian coffee that sweeps them all off of their feet. It is rich and thick with flavor, but also smooth enough that you need not add cream or sugar to enjoy it.

Zona Cafetera

“I’VE HAD PANAMANIAN, INDONESIAN, BOLIVIAN AND BRAZILIAN COFFEE TOO, BUT IT IS REALLY THE

COLUMBIAN COFFEE THAT SWEEPS THEM ALL OFF OF THEIR FEET.”

The region where I ventured on my most recent visit is near a town called Salento, close to the Valle de Cocora, a valley that looks straight out of “Jurassic Park.” Salento is a small town

and it isn’t really known to tourists as the coffee hot spot, but

it has fantastic coffee and a really cool way of getting to the

plantations and surrounding areas. Salento is only about 15 miles from a much larger city, but because the Andes are so treacherous it takes 45 minutes to get there. The only way to get to the plantations from Salento is on dirt roads, some of which are impossible to drive on. There- fore you can either walk, ride a horse, or get there the way we chose: by grabbing a couple mountain bikes and heading out to the plantations on two wheels. We rolled up and down the terrain of the Andes, all the while peering at vegetation that looked like something prehistoric. While

trying to breathe the thin air more than a mile above sea level, it was lost to us what our ultimate goal of the trip was. We were complete-

ly taken away by the sheer bizarreness and beauty of a place that

God clearly intended on being lost and never found. Going up and down on a bumpy dirt road puts into perspective how many li le nooks and crannies there are still undiscovered and most likely untouched on this planet. We were seriously contemplating when

a dinosaur would come out of the vegetation and cross the road.

To think that the country’s famous coffee comes from this zone was something that dumbfounded us.

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A er about 45 minutes of jaw dropping, life changing beauty, we arrived at the plantation and were immediately welcomed into the estate and given an introduction to the coffee. We learned about its journey from the plant in the soil to the black liquid in a cup that people all over the world rely on every day. Coffee is grown between the altitudes of 1,800 and 6,000 feet on mountainsides and o en interspersed with plantain and banana trees as the combination of plants help each other grow. Columbia is special because unlike some other coffee growing regions of the

“IT TAKES AROUND 40 TO 100 BEANS

TO MAKE A SINGLE CUP OF COFFEE,

WHICH IF I WERE THE PICKER WOULD

TAKE ME ABOUT AN HOUR.”

world, Columbia sits almost on the equator and has two growing seasons instead of just one. The coffee that we drink and the beans that we buy at the store are black because they are cooked and are ready to be ground and brewed to your desire, but they don’t look like that when they are first picked from the plant. The guide explained to us how to use the colors of the leaves to see if the beans are ready or not and how to pick them. A coffee picker has to pick around 40 to 100 beans to make a single cup of coffee, which if I were the picker would take me about an hour. We all picked coffee beans from the plants and tried our best to peel back the skin to get to the light brown inner bean. It is then ready to put into the caldron for cooking. Then the beans are dried

in the sun, which could take up to a couple days. Finally once dried, they are placed into what is known as a popper. A popper is a device that not only heats up to an incredible tem- perature, but also stirs the beans every two to three seconds while they are roasting. In the popper they are cooked and stirred until the dark brownish black color comes about. Once achieved, they are taken out and cooled for approximately 12 hours. Then finally, a er the hours it took to pick the beans, peel the skin, dry the beans, cook them and grind them, you are ready to have your first cup of coffee. And that we did, and the coffee gave us the energy and stained teeth to continue cruising around the Andes mountains and the Zona Cafetera. Two of my favorite things in the world are coffee and cycling, and to have both of them together with such a spectacular setting, I’m not sure my afternoon could have been any better.

See photos from Jansens’s ride at bicycletimesmag.com/coffeetour.

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