Sei sulla pagina 1di 305

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT

For
Proposed Formaldehyde Production Unit
(80 MT/Day)
AT
Paramount Chempro , C-6 MIDC Industrial Area,
Butibori , Nagpur, Maharashtra
Project Proponent
M/s Paramount Chempro
Environmental Consultant

Anacon Laboratories Pvt. Ltd.

Recognized by MoEF (GOI) as per EPA and valid up to Jan2019


Accredited by NABL for Chemical & Biological), valid up to 03.10.2016
Accredited under the QCI-NABET Scheme for EIA Consultant
Certified by ISO 9001:2008, ISO 14001:2004, OHSAS 18001:2007
Head Office: 60, Bajiprabhu Nagar, Nagpur-440 033, MS
Lab. : FP-34, 35, Food Park, MIDC, Butibori, Nagpur 441122
Ph. : (0712) 2242077, 9373287475 Fax: (0712) 2242077
Email: info@anacon.in, labngp@anacon.in
Website: www.anaconlaboratories.com

JULY 2016

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

1.0

INTRODUCTION

M/s. Paramount Chempro has proposed organic chemicals manufacturing unit to produce
Formaldehyde of 24000 MT/ Annum at plot no. C 6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist. - Nagpur,
Maharashtra.
1.1

NATURE AND SIZE OF THE PROJECT

The proposed project will be mainly involved in the manufacturing of the formaldehyde. The project
activities falls under Category 5(f) as stated in Environment Impact Assessment Notification
Published on 14th September 2006 and need to obtain the EC from the SEAC. The nature of the
project falls under synthetic organic chemicals category.
1.2
IMPORTANCE OF THE PROJECT
Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the simplest and commercially most important aldehyde. It is soluble in
water, alcohols and other polar solvents. It has a demand in the National and International market.
The product is used for the other manufacturing products like Urea- ,Phenol, and melanine
formaldehyde resins (UF, PF, and M resins) which is accounted for about 63% of world demand in
2011; other large applications include polyacetal resins, pentaerythritol , methylenebis(4- phenyl
isocyanate0 (MDI) , 1,4- butanediol hexamethylenetetramine. Most formaldehyde users are
concerned primarily with satisfying captive requirements for derivatives and/or supplying local
merchant sales. Formaldehyde is usually produced close to the point of consumption since its fairly
easy to make, is costly to transport and can develop problems associated with stability during
transport. As a result, world trade in formaldehyde is minimal.
Construction/remodeling activity, vehicle and furniture production, and original equipment
manufacturer (OEM) account for the most world consumption of formaldehyde. Demand for these
markets is greatly influenced by general economic conditions. As a result, Demand for formaldehyde
greatly follows patterns for the leading world economies. Formaldehyde resins are used
predominantly in the wood products industry as adhesives. Growth of these resins is strongly
correlated to construction/remodeling activity (which accounts for over 50% consumption), and China
is the single largest market for formaldehyde , accounting for about 34% of world demand in 2010;
other large markets include the United States, Canada, Brazil, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, Italy
Belgium, Poland, Russia ,Japan and the Republic of Korea. China is forecast to experience fast
growth rates (around 7% per year) and significant volume increased in demand for 37%
formaldehyde during 2011-2016.
Asia experiences 5% gap in its demand and supply. Moreover world consumption is forecasted to
grow at an average annual rate of almost 5% during 2011-2016. Continuing significant-to-rapid
demand growth in Asia (Mainly China) for most applications will balance out moderate growth in
North America, Western Europe, Africa and Oceania. Central and South America, the Middle East
and Central and Eastern Europe are forecasted to experience a significant growth in demand for
formaldehyde during 2011-2016, largely as a result of increased production of wood panels,
laminates, MDI and pentaerythritol.
1.3

JUSTIFICATION AND NEED OF THE PROJECT

To meet the increased market demand for Formaldehyde in India and abroad, M/s Paramount Chempro
has proposed to manufacture Formaldehyde. The proposed project is at plot nos. C-6, in MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Tehsil Hingna, District Nagpur, Maharashtra.

Executive summary

ES-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

1.4

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT STUDIES

In order to assess the environmental impacts due to the proposed project, through EIA study covering
various environmental attributes and to suggest an effective Environment Management Plan, M/s
Paramount Chempro retained the services of M/s Anacon Laboratories Private Limited (ALPL)
Nagpur.
This Environmental Impact Assessment report is based on collection of baseline data through field
monitoring of relevant environmental attributes during January 2016 to March 2016 representing
winter season with secondary data collection as per requirement of the project.
2.0

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The basic requirements for operating the units for the production of organic chemicals are availability
of fuel, water and other infrastructure like road, electricity. Details of these requirements are as under:
Land requirement
The project proponent has acquired total land of 4050 sq. m. and 12% of total plot area for parking
(including visitors parking) and 33 % of non-built area as a green belt. Proposed plantation will be
done in approx. 1336 sq.m area out of 4050 sq.m as C-6 from the developer of notified industrial
area, Maharashtra from the developer of notified industrial area Maharashtra.
Power and fuel requirement
Power Requirement:
The industry has 250 HP proposed power supply from Maharashtra State electricity distribution
corporation Limited (MSEDCL). Thus the total power requirement will be 250 HP.
Fuel Requirement:
Mode of transportation of fuel to site is through Tanker. DG Set will be used in case of Power Failure
The details of fuel requirement are as follows:
FUEL REQUIREMENT
Sr.
No
1.

Fuel

HSD

Daily Consumption
(TPD/KLD)
Existing
Proposed
-3000 lit/annum

Calorific
Value (Kcals/kg)
10600-11300

% Ash

0.01

% Sulphur

0.28

Man power requirement


Man power requirement for the construction phase is 20-25 Nos. and operation phase will be
estimated as 24 Nos. The company will have one Production Manager, One R&D Manager, Shift
Engineers (6 Nos.) and skilled and unskilled labourers to the extent of 16 Nos. The manpower is
locally and easily available.
Fire Fighting Facilities
In order to combat any occurrence of fire in plant premises, firefighting facilities will be involved for
the various units of the plant. All plant units, office buildings, stores, laboratories, etc. will be provided
with adequate number of portable fire extinguishers to be used as first aid fire appliances.

Executive summary

ES-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Availability of Raw Materials


The raw materials required for organic chemicals will be made available locally from the local dealers
The demand for formaldehyde is based resin (liquid & powder) is constantly increasing to
manufacture Electrical Insulation Board and H.P. Decorative laminated sheets & they are widely
exported in domestic market and as well as international market. In recent years, general survey
report shows that laminated sheets are largely exported in huge quantities to develop countries.
In India, the production cost is low due to the availability of good quality raw materials. This increases
the profit margin as compared to other competitors in the world. The Project proponent thus intends
to increase the existing production quantity to meet the current and future market demand.
2.1

DETAILS OF MANUFACTURING PROCESS

Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the simplest and commercially most important aldehyde. It is soluble in
water, alcohols and other polar solvents. Urea- ,Phenol, and melanine formaldehyde resins (UF,
PF, and M resins) accounted for about 63% of world demand in 2011; other large applications
include polyacetal resins, pentaerythritol , methylenebis(4- phenyl isocyanate0 (MDI) , 1,4- butanediol
hexamethylenetetramine. Most formaldehyde users are concerned primarily with satisfying captive
requirements for derivatives and/or supplying local merchant sales. Formaldehyde is usually
produced close to the point of consumption since its fairly easy to make, is costly to transport and can
develop problems associated with stability during transport. As a result, world trade in formaldehyde
is minimal.
The process used for manufacturing formaldehyde is partial oxidation and dehydrogenation of
methanol using a silver catalyst, or partial oxidation of methanol using a metal oxide catalyst.
3.0

DESCRIPTION OF ENVIRONMENT

3.1

LAND ENVIRONMENT

3.1.1

Land Use Studies

The land-use & land cover map of the 10 km radial study area from the periphery of project site was
prepared using Resource SAT-2 , sensor- LISS-3 having 23.5 m spatial resolution and date of pass
29 May 2014 satellite image with reference to Google Earth data. In order to strengthen the baseline
information on existing land use pattern, the data covering approx. 205631.3 N latitude and
785655.5 E longitude and elevation 284 meter was used.
3.1.2

Land Use/Land Cover Classification

3.1.2.1 Land Use/Land Cover Classification- Interpretation


The Land Cover classes were extracted following a visual interpretation method or on screen
digitization of the Resource Sat-2 Imagery, sensor LISS-3 having 23.5m spatial resolution image.
These were later verified by using SOI toposheet and Google Earth imagery. Polygon layers for each
class were digitized and the respective areas were calculated. The Land Cover classes and their
coverage can be seen as given in table and its distribution is shown in Figure. Total six major land
use/ land cover classes were demarcated in the study area and a thematic map of 1:50,000 scale
was generated incorporating these classified categories considering the area of the project. The area
as a whole represents a gently slope, drained by a number of north to south east flowing rivers which
is discharged into the one Vena River, on which one reservoir is constructed for water circulation for
MIDC industrial area. It is also observed that the Krishna nala and Murjhari nala which is one of the
main streams flows through the project site in SW area and confluence to one of the principal stream
Executive summary

ES-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

for Vena river meets at SE direction also there are various channels which flow into the 10 km
periphery of the project area and various reservoirs also present such as Nanhi which is set in
Krishna Nala present in W direction from the project site, Bid-Borgaon which is set up in Sashimar
Nala present in NW direction from the project site & Wakeshwar reservoir which is set up under the
Vena River present in NE direction from the project site.
LU/LC CLASSES AND THEIR COVERAGE IN SQ. KM OF 00-10 KM RADIUS
Sr. No.

LU/LC Class

Built up Land Rural/Urban)

Area (Sq.Km)

Percentage (%)

o Settlement

8.99

2.86

o Industry/other industries

21.23

6.76

o Road Infrastructure

1.98

0.63

o Railway Line/Railway Siding

0.59

0.19

212.89

67.80

River/Nala/Stream

5.69

1.81

Pond/Tank

2.89

0.92

Land with scrub/Open Scrub

39.56

12.60

Dense Forest

9.65

3.07

Open Mixed Jungle

7.98

2.54

Forest Plantation

1.99

0.63

Mining/Stone Quarry

0.56

0.18

Total

314

100

Agriculture Land
Cropland/Current Fallow Land

4
5

Water bodies

Scrub/Waste Land

PIE CHART REPRESENTATION OF LU/LC DETAILS OF 00-10 KM RADIUS

Executive summary

ES-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

21.02

21

20.98

20.96

20.94

20.92

20.9

20.88

20.86
78.88

78.9

78.92

78.94

78.96

78.98

79

79.02

79.04

Legend
10 KM Radius

FASLE COLOUR COMPOSITE OF THE (10 KM RADIUS) STUDY AREA

Executive summary

ES-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

21.02

21

20.98

20.96

20.94

20.92

20.9

20.88

20.86
78.88

78.9

78.92 78.94 78.96 78.98

79

79.02 79.04

Legend
Agriculture Land

Industrial Settlement

Open Scrub

Settlement

Road

Railway

10 KM Radius

LU/LC MAP OF 00-10 KM RADIUS STUDY AREA

Executive summary

ES-6

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.1.3

Soil - Baseline Status

Soil monitoring was carried out by collecting twelve samples from different locations within the study
area to know the existing soil conditions under various land use pattern.
Soil characteristics in the study area
It was observed that the texture of soil was mostly sandy clay to silty loam to clayey in the study area
with pH ranged from 6.62 to 7.97 indicating that the soil is slightly neutral to alkaline in reaction.
The electrical conductivity was observed to be in the range of 117.92 to 792.90 S/cm, generally
organic carbon, available NPK values are considered for the fertility status of the soil. The fertility
status of soil in the study area was observed to be moderate.
3.1.4

Solid/Hazardous Waste Generation

Other Solid & Hazardous Waste Generation:


The collected solid wastes will be segregated at site for organics & inorganics. Organic wastes will be
used for composting and inorganics will be sent to authorized vendors.
The solid wastes generation and mitigation measures to be taken are given below:
SOLID/HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATION
Sr. No. Source
Anticipated Quantity
Biodegradable
1
Domestic Waste
6.0 Kg/day
2
Gardening Waste
4.2 Kg/day
3
Process Waste
Non-Biodegradable
Discarded
plastic 2 Kg/day
1
containers/barrels/liners

3.2

AIR ENVIRONMENT

3.2.1

Meteorological Data

Mitigative Measures
Composting
Composting
Sold to authorized parties

On-site monitoring was undertaken for various meteorological parameters i.e., wind speed, direction,
temperature, rainfall and humidity. The generated data was then compared with the meteorological
data obtained from IMD. The windroses specific to the season were drown.It was observed from the
windroses that the predominant wind directions are N and E so the impact zone will be S and W
directions with the 17.77% calm conditions.

Executive summary

ES-7

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

SITE SPECIFIC WINDROSE (January - March 2016)


3.2.2

Baseline Status

Ambient air monitoring was carried out at 9 locations at project site and surrounding villages. Various
statistical parameters like 98th percentile, average, maximum and minimum values have been
computed from the observed raw data for all nine AAQ monitoring stations. The brief summary of
results is as follows:

PM10 concentration ranged from 39.0-69.0 g/m3in the study area whereas PM2.5 concentration
varied from 10.2-28.1 g/m3in the study area.

The concentration of SO2varied from 10.3-19.7 g/m3 whereas NOx concentration ranged from
8.2-23.3 g/m3in the study area.

CO concentration was found to be in the range of 0.071-0.98 mg/m3 whereas, Ozone


concentration ranged from 11.0-25.6 g/m3 in the study area.

Ammonia concentration ranged from 21.0-46.0 g/m3 in the study area and the levels of Hg and
as at all the locations were found below detectable limits.

Thus, the overall ambient air quality with respect to above parameters was found to be good and
within prescribed AAQMS by CPCB.
3.3

WATER ENVIRONMENT

Water quality Monitoring


Water quality monitoring was carried out within study area. Total 13 water samples were collected from
sampling locations, nine (9) from groundwater sources and four (4) from surface water sources.

Executive summary

ES-8

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.3.1

Physico-chemical Characteristics

3.3.1.1 Surface water quality


The physico-chemical characteristics of the surface water samples collected and analysed, and are
compared with the IS-10500 standards. The analysis results indicated that the pH ranged between
6.75 to 7.64 which are well within the specified standard of 6.5 to 8.5. The TDS was observed to be
219 to 272 mg/l which is within the permissible limit of 2000 mg/l. The Total Hardness recorded was
in the range of 170 to 240.80 mg/l as CaCO3 which is also within the permissible limit of 600 mg/l.
The nitrate was found to be in the range of 4.23 to 9.59 mg/l. The levels of chloride and sulphate were
found to be in the range of 19.57 to 32.18 mg/l and, 12.4 to 24.6 mg/l respectively. Heavy metals
content (i.e. As, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Fe, Mn, Zn and Hg) were found to be very low and within
specified standards. The overall surface water quality was found to be safe for drinking purpose
physico- chemically but unsafe bacteriologically and need chlorination before use for drinking
purpose.
3.3.1.2 Groundwater quality
The physico-chemical characteristics of groundwater are carried out and compared with the IS-10500
standards. The analysis results indicated that the pH ranged between 7.4 to 8.17 which is well within
the specified standard of 6.5 to 8.5. TDS was ranging from 193 to 580 mg/l. Total hardness was
found to be in the range of 164-452 mg/l. The fluoride concentrations were varied between 0.16-0.46
mg/l which is within the acceptable limit of 1 mg/l. The nitrate and sulphate were found in the range of
<2 to 16 mg/l and 9.40-58.32 mg/l respectively. Calcium varied between 35 to 160 mg/l. The heavy
metals content (i.e. As, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Fe, Mn, Zn and Hg) were found to be within permissible
limits.
3.3.2

Bacteriological Characteristics

Bacteriologically, all surface water samples were contaminated and chlorination is needed before use
for drinking purpose whereas some of the groundwater samples were also found contaminated and
need chlorination before use for drinking purpose. Overall, the surface and groundwater within the
study area was found to be good physico-chemically, however bacteriologically found to be
contaminated and need chlorination before use.
3.4

NOISE ENVIRONMENT

The noise monitoring was carried out for determination of noise levels at nine locations covering
industrial, commercial, residential and sensitive areas within 10 km study area.
It was observed that the noise levels ranged from 43 to 57dB (A) during day time and 40 to 48 dB (A)
during night time.
3.5

BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT

Assessment of Flora
A total of 136 plant species were observed in the study area, out of which 63 tree sp., 26 shrub/small
tree sp., 19 herb sp., 15 species of Grasses & bamboo climber & twiner sp. 13 were observed.
Assessment of Fauna
Wild Life (Protection) Act, 1972, as amended on 17th January 2003, is an Act to provide for the
protection of wild animals, birds and plants and for matters connected there with or ancillary or
incidental thereto with a view to ensuring the ecological and environmental security of the country.

Executive summary

ES-9

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Some of the sighted fauna were given protection by the Indian Wild Life (Protection) Act, 1972 by
including them in different schedules. Among the Avifuana in the study area, Pea fowl (Pavocristatus)
is included in schedule I of Wild life protection Act (1972), while many other birds are included in
schedule IV.
Among the reptiles, Indian Cobra (Najanaja), and Common Rat Snake (Ptyasmucosus), Russells
Viper (Viperarusselli) were provided protection as per Schedule-II of Wild life protection act, (1972)
and Common Krait (Bungaruscaerulus) were provided as per Schedule IV of Wildlife protection act.
Among mammals; Fox (Canisaureus), Felischaus (Jungle cat), Presbytis entellus
(Hanuman/Common Langur), Herpestesedwardsi (Common Mongoose) are protected in schedule II
Blubull (Boselaphustragocamelus), Sambhar (Cervus unicolor), Cheetal (Axis axis), Barking deer
(Muntiacusmuntjak), Wild Boars (Susscrofa) are provided protection by incorporating them in
scheduleIII whereas Porcupine & Hare and five stripped squirrels are included in schedule IV of Wild
Life Protection act 1972.
Agriculture
The agriculture crops in study area are mainly categorized as Khariff and Rabi Crops. Major crops
cultivated comprise of Bajri, Jowar and Wheat among cereals, gram, tur and pea among pulses while
soybean among oil seeds and Cotton among cash crops. Vegetable crops grown were Lady finger,
Chavli, Cauliflower, spinach, bringal and onion along with fruit crops like papaya, orange, & mango.
National Parks/Sanctuaries and Biosphere Reserves, etc.
There are five Reserve Forests & five open mixed Judupi Jungle observed in the study area. No
National Park, Wildlife Sanctuary, Biosphere Reserve, Tiger Reserve, are observed within the 10 km
radius study area. The nearest wildlife sanctuary Bor Wildlife Sanctuary, its buffer zone boundary
about ~21 km in W direction from project site
Threatened Plant Species
No species in the study area appeared to be the endemic, endangered and rare as per the Red Data
Book plants of India (Nayar and Sastry 1987).
3.6

SOCIO-ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT

The information including human settlements, demography, and caste composition including
amenities like education, health, drinking water, power supply, and communication data was
collected, compiled and analyzed with the help of Census data 2011 & Village directory 2001.
Demography
The demographic aspect of the study area consists the various features of the population including
size, composition and distribution across the location. The population composition is described here
in term of basic demographic features like, household status, age, social composition, education, etc.
The distribution of population has been reflected here based on the geographic boundaries. The
area covers 49 villages. Out of the total villages, 35 villages are located in Hingana taluka and 14
villages from Nagpur Rural taluka of Nagpur district.
The population distribution in the project area showed that 14407 households were dwelling within
the 10 km radius of the project site. The total households include 59763 peoples including 31570
male and 28193 female. Moreover, 7744 individuals of below six years of age group. Among them
4030 were boys and 3714 of girls. The overall sex ratio was 893 & in 0-6 age group 922 female to per

Executive summary

ES-10

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

1000 male. Total SC population was 8547(14%) and ST population was 8670(15%) of total
population
Literacy rate
The overall literacy rate in the study area was 75%. Out of 44776 literate individuals in the area,
24868(56%) male and 19908 (44%) female were literate.
Occupational patterns
The occupational pattern showed around 26575 (44%) under working groups whereas 33188 (56%)
were non-working groups. Moreover among the working group, 22283 (37%) was main workers
whereas 4292 (7%) was marginal worker. In the main working groups 2616 (12%) were cultivators
and 8150 (36%) were agricultural laborers whereas only 446 (2%) were engaged in house hold
industries and 11071 (50%) were involved in other professions.
Infrastructure availability
The socio-economic well-being of the area is represented by the infrastructure and the social assets
available in the area. In the study area infrastructures are available related to education, health care,
communication, transportation, drinking water etc.
Educational Facilities
Out of total 47 villages, 9 villages deprived from medical facility. PHC facility was available in the study
area. Most of the villages were availing primary Health centre facility.
Medical Facilities
Out of total 47 villages, 9 villages deprived from medical facility. PHC facility was available in the study
area. Most of the villages were availing primary health centre facility.
Power Supply Facilities
Electricity facility was available for domestic purpose.44 villages availing electricity, for agricultural
purpose.
Drinking Water Facilities
Major drinking water sources were tap water, well water, hand pumps and tube wells in the study area.
Transportation Facilities
Roads are the only means of communication founds in the study area. Out of total 47 villages, 30
villages were connected through bus facility.
Road Facilities
Majority of the villages were connected with paved roads.
Bank Facilities
Only 10 villages were availing bank facility in the form of cooperative and commercial bank and
Society.
4.0

ANTICIPATED ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND MITIGATION MEASURES

The identification and appraisal of various impacts due to the proposed project of organic chemicals
manufacturing plant during construction and operational phases are presented in details.

Executive summary

ES-11

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

4.1

IMPACTS DURING CONSTRUCTION PHASE

The construction activities will involve setting up of equipment units that will be used for
manufacturing organic chemicals. This will require specific manpower which will be catered from
outside and thereby the workers. The emission from the activities, it is envisaged that there will be
marginal effect on the existing environment. The project proponent, in order to minimize these
impacts will undertake the required preventive and remedial measures as outlined hereunder.
1.

Land Environment

M/s. Paramount Chempro proposes organic chemicals manufacturing unit to produce


Formaldehyde of 24000 MT/Annum. Hence, minor construction work will be required for the
installation of new/additional machineries for the proposed project. The area of the plant is almost flat
terrain.
2.

Air Environment

Impact on Air Quality


As the proposed project will have minor construction activities for the installation of Machineries, there will
be less impact due to construction activities. The source of air emission during the construction will include
dust from construction activity and excavation of the plant area. These emissions are expected to change
in baseline air quality, primarily in the working area only. Some fugitive emissions will generate by
transportation of raw materials within the plant premises. To mitigate the impact due to suspended
particulate matter (SPM), regular sprinkling of water will be done along with the construction activities.
3.

Noise Environment

Impact on Noise Levels


During construction, construction equipment, including dozer, scrapers, concrete mixers, generators,
vibrators and power tools, and vehicles will be the major noise sources. Noise during construction is
difficult to predict because of the change in activities. Most of construction activities are expected to
produce noise levels within the prescribed limit. The noise generated from various sources will be of
short duration. Therefore, no significant impact is envisaged in the construction phase.
4.

Water Environment

Since the proposed project will be in MIDC industrial area of Butibori where no major construction
activities will be carried out, there will not be any adverse impact on the ground water as no drawl of
ground water envisaged in the project activities. Water will be sourced from MIDC, Butibori Industrial
Area. No disposal of construction waste outside the plant and no leaching are anticipated. Thus the
quality and quantity of ground water will not have any adverse impact
5.

Biological Environment

The majority of local vegetation in project site is seasonal shrubs, herbs and grasses and naturally
grown predominant tree species like Tamarindus Indica (1 No.)Butiamonosperma (Palash) (2 Nos.),
VitexNigundo (Nirgudi) (2 Nos.) and Shrubs like Lantana camera (Ghaneri) and
Hyptissuaveolins(Rantulsi), Calatropissprocera (Rui), etc. will be removed during site preparation.
Efforts will be made in order to minimize the tree cuttings during development stage of the project.
Tree cuttings will be compensated by the development of green belt around the periphery of the
project site and along the approach road.

Executive summary

ES-12

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

6.

Socio-Economic Environment

Direct/ indirect employment opportunities will be generated in the form of skilled, semi-skilled and
labour work. Employment opportunities will be given to local population; therefore there will not be
additional strain for shelter and sanitation facility. Employment opportunities and demand of
construction materials in market will help to improve quality of life in the study area
During construction phase, transportation activities for unloading and loading of construction
materials and dust dispersion during construction of building/installation of machines can create air
pollution to some extent.
4.2
1.

IMPACTS DURING OPERATIONAL PHASE


Land Environment

There may be some contamination in the soil, due to spillages of raw materials during transportation
which may affect the soil adjacent to the plant area, if proper care is not taken. The anticipated
pollution to soil environment due to plant activities is as follows:

Changes in soil texture due to settling of air borne dust or due to wash off solid particulates by
surface or ground water. This will lead to change in porosity, permeability & other such physical
characteristics of soil of the area.
Changes in soil chemistry due to addition of foreign materials from polluted air and water due to
plant activities in the area.

Mitigation Measures:

2.

Proper mitigative measures like use of efficient pollution control systems, proper stack height and
use of top soil in plantation results in no significant impact on soil of the project site.
There will be no impact on soil of the study area located beyond the working area of the proposed
project.
Soil samples will be collected and tested at regular intervals from the nearby areas. This will help
in mitigation of any harmful impact on soil due to the project activity, if any.
Air environment

The sources of gaseous pollutants within the proposed project are DG sets & Boiler. The emissions
of Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) and Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) will be due to operation of DG set, in case of
the failure of the power grid.
In order to control emission of particulates during operation of the DG set, adequate control
equipment will be installed and adequate stack height will be provided as per CPCB norms.
There will not be any type of process emission from the proposed activities. The main source of air
pollution will be flue gas stacks attached to the boiler in which HSD will use as fuel. The most
probable emitted pollutants will be PM, SO2 and NOx.
In the prediction of the impacts, it was assumed that the cumulative AAQ impacts due to the
operations of nearby sources in the vicinity are already taken into account in the monitored baseline
AAQ data and will be continued to remain same during the operation of proposed project.
Besides these emissions, there will be fugitive emissions arising during the transport of raw materials,
loading and unloading of raw materials, raw material storage and handling of materials and transport.

Executive summary

ES-13

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Incremental Ground Level Concentrations


In the present case, a model simulation was carried out for winter season through applying of ISCST3 software, the result showed that The cumulative concentration levels (Ambient + predicted incremental rise) revealed that the
concentration levels for PM10, NOx and SO2 likely to be encountered in the operation of the project are
respectively occurring at a distance of about 1 km, 1 km, 1 km in the South & West direction with a
concentration levels (cumulative) of 69.13 g/m3, 19.754 g/m3 and 25.2 g/m3 respectively which is well
within the NAAQM levels prescribed by CPCB. Hence it is inferred that considering cumulative
concentration levels, the pollution load exerted due to proposed project will be insignificant.
Mitigation Measures:
Flue Gas Emission
Dust collector will be provided to Thermic Fluid Heater Stack
Dust Generation during Storage & Handling
Tarpaulin sheet will be covered on the materials during the transportation. Adequate stockpile
height will be maintained. Nose masks will be provided to all workers.
Evaporation Loss from Storage Tanks
All the storage tanks will be provided with proper dip arrangements for exhausts/vents and
breather valve.
Loading & Unloading of Materials
Loading and unloading of materials may lead to fugitive emissions. To avoid the same, the
materials transfer will be done through fixed piping connections through pumps.
3.

Noise environment

Impact on Noise Levels


As per the model results, the noise levels due to the proposed plant will be in the range of 34 dB (A)
to 36 dB (A) near the plant boundaries in all directions. The ambient noise levels will be within the
permissible limits after the commissioning of the proposed facilities.
The criteria for the environmental noise control is that the design of the proposed plant will not
exceed, in any continuous mode of operation, the level stipulated by MoEF and /or Pollution Control
Board at any point on the site boundary.
Noise Control Measures

All the vibrating parts will be checked periodically and serviced to reduce the noise generation.
Sound producing equipment will be enclosed in the sound proofing enclosure to give residual
sound pressure level of 75 dB (A).

To minimize the adverse effects on health, suitable ear protecting devices will be provided for
working personnel.

To reduce the noise generation during the transportation activities; the vehicles will be kept
periodically serviced and maintained as per the requirement of latest trend in automobile industry.

The vehicles having PUCs and spark arrestors will only be allowed for the transportation.

Executive summary

ES-14

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sources of high noise level such as D.G. set etc. will be provided adequate sound enclosures.

The industry will develop greenbelt in 440.88 sq. mt (33%) within the industrial premises for the
attenuation of noise levels. Since, the area available for plantation is small; Paramount Chempro
will take the initiative to carry out +p0014 lantation programme in part of MIDC, Butibori Industrial
area.

4. Water Environment
The water requirement for the proposed project will be met from the MIDC supply. The proposed daily
water requirement is about 165.6 m3/day. MIDC supplies treated water to all the units established in the
industrial area. Water requirement for proposed project will be fulfilled by Butibori MIDC. No subsurface
drawl of water involved in the project activities.
Wastewater Generation
A) Domestic Waste
The total water requirement for domestic purpose is estimated to be 2.16 m 3/day for proposed
project. Domestic sewage will be treated in the Septic Tank & soak pit. The overflow will be used for
gardening/ let to MIDC Sewerage line.
B) Industrial wastewater
The total water requirement for the plant is estimated to be 165.6 m3/d The wastewater generation is
expected to be 24.16 m3/d. It will be treated and required after treatment.
Suggested Mitigation Measures:
Domestic Effluent
Domestic effluent will be sent to septic tank/soak pit system.
Industrial Effluent
Industrial effluent primarily will be treated in an Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) having evaporation
system. No liquid effluent will be discharged in ground/nearby water body.
Rain Water Harvesting
Rainwater harvesting can serve as a solution to the water problem in the water crises area by capturing the
runoff. Rain water harvesting will be implemented within the plant premises / already done
5. Solid/Hazardous Waste Management:
Mitigation Measures

Used Oil will be collected in drums and reused for low grade lubrication of machinery and for rust
proofing or sold to registered recyclers
ETP Sludge will be collected in HDPE barrels and stored in hazardous waste storage area and
will be disposed off to nearest TSDF site.
Packing Materials discarded carboys/ drums/
HDPE barrels will be stored and sold to MPCB authorized recyclers/vendors.
The company will provide separate storage area for hazardous waste proposed to be generated
from the unit.
The hazardous waste storage area will have RCC flooring and asbestos roof covering on the top so as to
avoid rainwater mixing with the same. The leachate if any, will be discharged to holding tank of Effluent
Treatment Plant

Executive summary

ES-15

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

6. Biological Environment
Impact on ecological environment during operational phase is not envisaged. There are no potential
sources of impacts hence no impact on terrestrial biological environment is envisaged during the
operational phase.
Based on study conducted for ecology in the study area, no rare or endangered flora/fauna were
recorded in the study area except Pavocristatus (Common Indian Peafowl)(Schedule I) species as
per Wildlife Protection act, 1972 and subsequent amendments and least concerned species as per
IUCN classification. There is no direct impact on Pavocristatus (Common Indian Peafowl) species
however, in order to improve the habitat, species conservation plan is suggested
Plantation/Greenbelt Development
M/s. Paramount Chempro proposes to have a green belt programme for the proposed unit. Total plot
area is 4050 sq. mt. (i.e. 0.4 Ha.) out of which proposed plantation will be carried out in approx.1336
sq. mt. (i.e. 0.1 Ha). The green belt will be developed in 1336 sq. mt (0.1 Ha) of land which is about
33 % of the total area.
Since, the area available for plantation is small; M/s Paramount Chempro will take the initiative to
carry out plantation programme in part of MIDC, Butibori Industrial area.
7. Socio-economic Environment
The proposed project will be in MIDC industrial area. Thus the project will not have any negative
impact during operation phase in surrounding communities.
Generation of employment opportunities on regular basis for long term
Contribution to social welfare through project authority
Social upliftment of villages (CSR activities)
MITIGATION MEASURES
Ensure that roads are properly signed, vehicles are well maintained
Drivers are well trained and safety conscious
Cohesive relation should be maintained with the concerned community so that in future any
mishap may not disturb the harmony of the region
Need base CSR activities in concerned communities
Establishing vocational training programs for the local workforce to promote development of skills
required by the project activities
Impacts on Public Health and Safety
The impact from the waste products is not expected to be significant as the solid waste generated will
be sent to TSDF. Also the adverse impacts on ambient air, water and soil quality are predicted to be
low.
The impacts on public safety will be very less due to the effective safety system and safety
management available with the company. There will not be storage of explosive materials in the plant
premises. Overall, the impact on public safety and health from the proposed project activities will be
insignificant.

Executive summary

ES-16

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

5.0

ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVES (TECHNOLOGY AND SITE)

Study of Analysis of Alternatives Related to Site


The proposed project facility for organic chemicals manufacturing will be carried out at Plot No. C-6,
MIDC industrial area Butibori, Nagpur. The land is already acquired by the project proponent. Thus,
site alternatives were not analyzed.
Analysis of Alternatives Related to Technology
Since inception M/s Paramount Chempro has proposed organic chemicals manufacturing unit to
produce Formaldehyde. The technology to be adopted are already in placed which will be used for
the manufacturing of formaldehyde.
6.0

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PROGRAMME

Regular monitoring programme for the environmental parameters is essential to take into account the
changes taking place in the environment during the project implementation. The project proponent
will regularly monitor environmental quality with respect to air, water and wastewater, noise levels,
ecology and social aspects with respect to employment and quality of life. The details are provided in
EIA report.
SL No.

Environmental Parameters

1.
1.1

AIR ENVIRONMENT
Air quality
Ambient air quality monitoring stations will be established inside
the factory area as well outside for PM2.5, PM 10, SO2, NOx, HCs
and VOCs. Selection of monitoring stations will be done in
consultation with State Pollution Control Board based on the
metrological conditions of the area.

Schedule & duration of


monitoring

Quarterly in association with


MPCB or as prescribed by
SPCB/CPCB/ MoEF by third party

1.2

Stack monitoring
Stack monitoring will be carried out for PM10, SO2, NOx, HCs
and VOCs

Once every 3 months or as


prescribed by MPCB/CPCB/MoEF

1.3

Fugitive emissions
Hydrocarbons, VOCs, Particulate matter

Once every 3 months or as


prescribed by SPCB/CPCB/
MoEF

2.
2.1

WATER ENVIRONMENT
Water quality (surface and ground water)
All physico-chemical and bacteriological parameters as
specified in IS 10500 for drinking purpose.

2.2

Wastewater quality
Raw effluent from inlet for pH, SS, BOD, Heavy metals and
Phenolics.

One grab sample per day

Effluent from ETP outlet (After Primary Treatment) for pH, TSS
BOD, COD, Oil and grease and Heavy metals.

Two 8hourly composite sample


per week (flow based)

NOISE ENVIRONMENT
Noise levels will be monitored within premises near equipment
installation, outside the premises and road side with frequency
of vehicles during day and night time.

As prescribed by
MPCB/CPCB/MoEF by third party

2.3
3.

Executive summary

Grab sampling, Once in three


months or as prescribed by
MPCB/CPCB/ MoEF

ES-17

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

SL No.

Environmental Parameters

4
4.1

LAND ENVIRONMENT
Soil quality
pH, EC, Bulk density, ESP, NPK values, CEC, Organic Carbon
and Heavy metals
HAZARDOUS WASTE
pH, Organic matter, Moisture content,
Total inorganic matter
BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT
Plantation
Survival rate of planted species within the plant premises
and outside
Study of practical Implementation of conservation plan
SOCIO-ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT
(Demographic structure, local employment profile, quality of life,
Health status of workers through periodic medical checkup,
implementation of CSR with periodic budgetary provision,
infrastructure availability with respect to amenities)

5.
5.1
6
6.1

7.0

Schedule & duration of


monitoring
Every year in dry season, in all
plantation areas and parking area

Monthly or as prescribed by
MPCB/CPCB/MoEF by third party
Twice in a year

Once in 4 years

ADDITIONAL STUDIES

RISK ASSESSMENT AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN


Risk Assessment
M/s Paramount Chempro will be manufacturing Organic Chemicals i.e. Formaldehyde. Hazard is defined
as a chemical or physical conditions those have the potential for causing damage to people, property or
the environment. The potential hazards at the plant area enumerated below:
Hazard identification is the first step in the risk analysis and entails the process of collecting information
on:

The types and quantities of hazardous substances stored and handled in the proposed project

All raw materials and finished products of M/s. Paramount Chempro are not hazardous chemical as
per GOI rule 1989 and as mentioned in factory act schedule-I & II and hence they are not
considered as hazardous. Therefore no specific MCLS and Loss of Contentment Scenario (Loc)
Hazards are evident.
Hazard Classification
Man Made
These hazards attributes to human behavior and general practices in day to day activities. These
may occur due to ignorance or wrong practices and thus cause injuries and results in to accidents.
However such problems can be overcome by adopting discipline act of all personnels and following
SOP (Standard operating Procedure) and observing statutory compliances.
Natural
Natural hazards deal with environmental and physical state in which plant exists. In such conditions
plant may encounter with natural hazards like, flood, earthquake, Lightning, Subsidence, Storm, etc.
Executive summary

ES-18

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

These problems are tackled in initial stage of construction and thus adopting best practices in vogue
so that all safety measures and precautions are duly addressed.
Enforced Hazard
These conditions are encountered which is normally beyond control of factory management and may
cause damage, accidents due to its intrinsic nature of hazards, Such as sabotage, Theft, Cyberattack, Pilferage ,Riots, etc.
However to deal with such problems, proponent must be well equipped with communications and
maintaining liaison with local administration.
Risk Analysis
Risk analysis involves the identification and quantification of the various hazards (unsafe conditions)
that exist in the plant. Risk analysis follows an extensive hazard analysis. It involves the identification
and assessment of risks the neighbouring populations are exposed to as a result of hazards present.
This requires a thorough knowledge of failure probability, credible accident scenario, vulnerability of
populations etc. Much of this information is difficult to get or generate. Consequently, the risk analysis
is often confined to maximum credible accident studies.
Scope of the Study
The study aims to analyses the risk associated with the following scenarios in the plant:
Hazards associated with various processes
Raw material storages in the plant
The risk analysis assessment study covers the following:

Identification of potential hazard areas


Identification of representative failure cases
Visualization of the resulting scenarios in terms of fire (thermal radiation) and explosion, if any
Assessment of the overall damage potential of the identified hazardous events and the impact
zones from the accidental scenarios, if so occur
Assessment of the overall suitability of the site from hazard minimization and disaster mitigation
points of view by reviewing plot lay out and safety distances
Preparation of broad Disaster Management Plan (DMP), On-site and Off-site Emergency Plan,
which includes Occupational and Health safety Plan.
Approach to the Study
Risk involves the occurrence or potential occurrence of some accident consisting of an event or
sequence of events. The descriptions of the tasks of the various phases involved in risk analysis are
detailed below.
Hazard Identification
Identification of hazards is an important step in risk assessment as it leads to the generation of
accidental scenarios. The merits of including the hazard for further investigation are subsequently
determined by its significance, normally using a cut-off or threshold quantity.

Executive summary

ES-19

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Once a hazard is identified, it is necessary to evaluate it in terms of the risk it presents to the
employees and the neighbouring community. In principle, both probability and consequences should
be considered, but there are occasions where it either the probability or the consequence can shown
to be sufficiently low or sufficiently high, decisions can be made on just one factor.
During the hazard identification component, the following considerations are taken into account.

Chemical identities

Location of process unit facilities for hazardous materials.

The types and design of process units

The quantity of materials that could be involved in an airborne release and

The nature of the hazard (e.g. airborne toxic vapours or mists, fire, explosion, large quantities
stored or processed handling conditions) most likely to accompany hazardous materials spills or
releases

Major Hazards can be identified as under:


I.

Fire Hazard

Fire Explosion and Toxicity Index (FE&TI)


Fire and Explosion Index (FEI) is useful in identification of areas in which the potential risk reaches a
certain level. It estimates the global risk associated with a process unit and classifies the units
according to their general level of risk. FEI covers aspects related to the intrinsic hazard of materials,
the quantities handled and operating conditions. This factor gives index value for the area which
could be affected by an accident, the damage to property within the area and the working days lost
due to accidents.
II.

Toxic Hazard

Toxicity Index (TI)


The TI value is computed from Maximum Allowable Concentration (MAC), General Process Hazard
and Special Process Hazard by use of DOW's hazard classification guide. The scale for TI is given
below:
Ti range
06
6 - 10
Above 10

Degree of hazard
Light
Moderate
High

Classification of Hazard Categories


Preventive and protective control measures are recommended based on degree of hazard.
Therefore, FEI indicates the efforts to be taken to reduce risks for a particular unit. FEI computed for
chemical in Plant is given below.
FIRE EXPLOSION INDEX
Si. No.
Unit Name
Paramount Chempro
1.
Methanol

Executive summary

FEI

Category

82.46

Moderate

ES-20

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Disaster Management Plan


Disaster Management Plan (DMP) will consider all the factors responsible for management of any
small or big disaster. Emergency prevention through good design, operation, maintenance and
inspection are essential to reduce the probability of occurrence. However, certain operation &
practices may lead to unwarranted situation wherein disaster scenario can emerge. The DMP,
therefore, addresses to mitigate the effects of such situation with a view to bring restoration of
normality at the earliest. The overall objective of a disaster management plan is to make use of the
combined resources at the site and outside services to achieve the following:

To localize the emergency and if possible eliminate it.


To minimize the effects of the accident on people and property.
Effect the rescue and medical treatment of casualties;
Safeguard other people, outside the project boundary;
Evacuated people to safe areas;
Inform and collaborate with statutory local and state authorities;
Provide credible information to news media;
Initially contain and ultimately bring the incident under control;
Preserve relevant records and equipment for the subsequent enquiry into the cause and
circumstances of the emergency;
Investigate and take steps to prevent recurrences of similar incidents.
The DMP, therefore need to be related to the identification of sources from which hazards can arise
and the maximum credible loss scenario that can take place in the concerned area.
The actions that can successfully mitigate the effects of losses/ emergency need to be planned in a
way that it would require less effort and resources to control and tackle emergencies.
8.0

PROJECT BENEFITS

The proposed project of organic chemicals unit will result in improvement of infrastructure as well as
overall socio-economic development in the area. The people residing in the nearby areas will be
benefited directly and indirectly as well. It is anticipated that the proposed project will provide benefits
for the locals during operational phase of the activity.
The company has social commitment and will work further to bring out the development of the
surrounding villages by conducting various activities under CSR and thus area and quality of life of
people will be improved.
9.0

COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS

The developmental activities due to proposed project will increase economy of the country and also
help to increase the economy of the state through products transportation, taxes, supporting
economy for nations growth.
The project site is well connected to railways, roadways and airways. The proposed project is
planned in the notified Butibori Industrial area. Therefore, it will not involve loss of vegetation and
biodiversity. The vegetation is similar in the whole area with no sensitive ecosystem or rare and
endangered flora or fauna, hence no environmental loss will be there in terms of net productive value.
Environmental Benefits
Proposed project shall benefit environment in following ways:

Executive summary

ES-21

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

To create an environment that could support the culture of good standards.


To emphasize the policy of afforestation/landscape and rainwater harvesting to create a better
micro-climate in the area
A well designed drainage system to control flooding/overflow of water during the rainy season
The continuous inflow of people will require local transport system like autos, taxis, etc. which
would help local transport business.
Considerable number of people will be benefited by provision of job opportunity to local people.
Thus, the direct and indirect employment generation by this project.

10.0

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

Environnemental Management System


Any industrial development is associated with certain positive as well as negative impacts on the
environment. However, negative or adverse impacts cannot be possibly ruled out scientific
development. At the same time, adverse impacts cannot be neglected.
An Environmental Management Plan (EMP) has been formulated for the mitigation of adverse
impacts. It is based on the present environmental conditions and the environmental impact appraisal.
This plan helps in formulating, implementing and monitoring the environmental parameters during
and after commissioning of the project.
The Environmental Management Plan describes in brief, the management plan for proper and
adequate implementation of treatment and control system for pollutants and for maintaining the
environment. It also includes development of green belt around the plant, proper safety of the
workers, noise control, fire protection systems and measures.
OBJECTIVES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN
The main objectives in formulating this environmental management plan are:
To treat all the pollutants viz. liquid and gaseous those contribute to the degradation of the
environment with appropriate technology.
To comply with all regulations stipulated by the Central / State Pollution Control Boards related to
air emission and liquid effluent discharge as per air and water pollution control laws.
To handle hazardous wastes as per the Hazardous Waste (Management & Handling Rules)
Rules 1989 and subsequent amendments.
To encourage support and conduct developmental work for the purpose of achieving
environmental standards and to improve the methods of environmental management.
To create good working conditions (avoidance of air and noise pollution) for employees.
To reduce fire and accident hazards.
Perspective budgeting and allocation of funds for environment management expenditure.
Continuous development and search for innovative technologies for a cleaner and better environment
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT CELL
The Environmental Management Cell (EMC) will be headed by Manager-Environment having
adequate experience in the fields of Environment, Safety and Occupational Health. He will be
supported by Environmental Engineer, Safety officer and chemists, analyst and support staff. The
Manager-Environment will report to the Operational Head of the Unit.

Executive summary

ES-22

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

11.0

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

The proposed project is environmentally, technically and economically feasible with respect
to followings:

All activities are confined to notified industrial area and minimum possible emission is allowed to
enter the environment. Thus environment will not be adversely affected in any way.
Wastewater will be pre-treated in full-fledged primary treatment plant. Primarily treated water will
be sent to CETP MIDC Butibori.
The development of green belt and plantation will help to attenuate the noise levels and restrict air
pollutants and will increase the aesthetics.
Apart from this, the environmental management plan delineated may help to reduce pollution by
implementation.
The enterprise social commitment policy (formerly CSR) will work further to bring out the
development of the surrounding villages and thus area and quality of life of people will be
improved.
The cost of environmental control and monitoring measures are computed and provision for
capital & recurring is made by the management.

Concluding Remarks:
Thus it can be concluded on a positive note that after the implementation of the mitigation measures,
environmental management and Monitoring Plans as enumerated in the EIA report, the normal
operation of M/s. Paramount Chempro will have no significant impact on environment and the
project will be benefitted to local people to some extent with an economic growth in state/ country
level.

Executive summary

ES-23

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER/
SECTION
1.0
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.10
1.11
1.12
2.0
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
3.0
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
4.0
4.1
4.2
4.3
5.0
6.0
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
7.0
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
8.0
8.1
8.2

TITLE
INTRODUCTION
About the project
Location of the project
Justification and need of project
Importance of the project
Project details
Promoters and background
Purpose of the report
Environmental impact assessment studies (scope and methodology)
Detailed plan of work
Rapid risk assessment
Cost of the project
ToR compliance
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Type of project
Project setting
Magnitude of operation
Proposed schedule for approval and implementation
Process description of existing and proposed products
Basic requirement for proposed expansion project
DESCRIPTION OF ENVIRONMENT
Introduction
Air environment
Noise environment
Water environment
Land environment
Biological environment
Socio-economic environment
ANTICIPATED ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND MITIGATION
MEASURES
Impacts during construction and operation
Overall identification of matrix
Overall assessment of impacts
ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVES
ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PROGRAMME
Introduction
Environmental monitoring system
Action plan for environmental monitoring
Budget for implementation of environmental monitoring plan
Laboratory facilities
RISK ASSESSMENT AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN
Introduction
Hazard identification
MCA Analysis
Basis of selecting material to be studied for consequence assessment
Computation of damage distances
Risk mitigation measures
Approaches to Disaster Management plan
PROJECT BENEFITS
Construction phase
Operational phase

PAGE
NO.
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-5
1-5
1-6
1-7
1-7
1-7
1-9
1-11
1-12
1-12
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-8
2-12
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-9
3-12
3-23
3-42
3-60
4-1
4-1
4-18
4-20
5-1
6-1
6-1
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-5
7-9
7-12
7-16
7-26
8-1
8-1
8-2

CHAPTER/
SECTION
9.0
9.1
10.0
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
10.5
10.6
10.7
10.8
10.9
10.10
10.11
10.12
11.0
12.0
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
12.5
12.6

TITLE
ENVIRONMENTAL COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS
Environmental benefits
ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN
Introduction
Objectives of environmental management plan
Environment management cell
Fire and safety
Noise and communication
Occupational health and safety
Greenbelt development
Pollution control arrangement/ mitigation measures
Cleaner production
Rain water harvesting
Biodiversity conservation
Budgetary allocation for environmental management plan
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
DISCLOSURE OF CONSULTANTS
Introduction
Credentials of testing lab
Services offered
Facilities
Quality systems
Achievements

PAGE
NO.
9-1
9-1
10-1
10-1
10-1
10-1
10-2
10-3
10-3
10-3
10-5
10-7
10-8
10-11
10-14
11-1
12-1
12-1
12-2
12-3
12-4
12-5
12-5

LIST OF PLATES
PLATE
NO.
1.1
2.1
3.1
3.2
3.3

TITLE

PAGE NO.

Proposed Plant site view


1-5
Effluent treatment plant
2-20
Vegetation covers, crops, agriculture field avifauna and animals within 3-49
the study area
Household survey in Dhwalpeth village
3-68
Discussion with women group in Mahar Mandwa village
3-68

LIST OF ANNEXURES
ANNEXURE NO.
Annexure I
Annexure II
Annexure III
Annexure IV
Annexure V
Annexure VI
Annexure VII
Annexure VIII
Annexure IX

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

ANNEXURE NAME
ToR letter
Allotment Letter
CCOE (Petroleum & Exclusive)
Environmental Standards
Demographic Details
Infrastructure Details
Landuse Pattern
Electric & Water Bill
Ambient Air Quality

LIST OF FIGURES
FIGURE
NO.
1.1
1.2
1.3
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
3.15
3.16
3.17
3.18
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
7.1
7.2
7.3
10.1
10.2

TITLE

PAGE NO.

Index map of the project site


Google image showing proposed site of the project
Study area map (10 km radial distance)
Location of M/s Paramount Chempro in MIDC Butibori industrial area
Location of M/s Paramount Chempro in MIDC Butibori industrial area
Study area map (10 km radial distance)
Layout of proposed Formaldehyde manufacturing unit of M/s Paramount
Chempro
Flow chart showing manufacturing of formaldehyde
Site specific windrose (January March 2016)
Study area map with ambient air quality locations
Study area map with noise monitoring location
Surface and groundwater sampling locations
The river/streams/nalas (drainages) within the study area
False colour composite of the study area (10 km radius)
LU/LC details of 00-10 km radius
Pie chart represent the LU/LC details of 00-10 km radius
Contour details of 00-10 km radius
DEM details of 00-10 km radius with project location
Geological map of study area
Soil sampling locations
BOR wildlife sanctuary (BOR wildlife sanctuary map superimposed on
google imagery)
Sex ration in the study area
Literacy rate in the study area
Employment pattern in the study area
Infrastructure facilities availability in number of villages zonewise
Land use pattern in the study area
Windrose diagram January - March 2016
Incremental rise of particular matter for existing scenario
Incremental rise of SO2 for proposed scenario
Incremental rise of NOx for proposed scenario
Cumulative noise levels due to DG sets
Water balance
Accidental Release of chemicals: A scenario
Damage distances due to failure of TT
Offsite emergency plan
Environmental management cell
Rain water harvesting system

1-2
1-3
1-4
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-10
3-3
3-5
3-10
3-15
3-24
3-28
3-30
3-31
3-33
3-34
3-36
3-38
3-45
3-62
3-63
3-64
3-64
3-67
4-4
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-13
4-15
7- 5
7-15
7-41
10-2
10-10

LIST OF TABLES
TABLE
NO.
1.1
1.2
2.1
2.2
2.3

TITLE

PAGE NO.

Proposed production capacity


Environmental attributes and frequency of monitoring
Environmental setting of the site
Details about project and resources availability
Major industries near project site

1-6
1-8
2-6
2-6
2-7

TABLE
NO.
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
3.15
3.16
3.17
3.18
3.19
3.20
3.21
3.22
3.23
3.24
3.25
3.26
3.27
3.28
3.29
3.30
3.31
3.32
3.33
3.34
3.35
3.36
3.37
3.38
3.39
3.40
3.41

TITLE

PAGE NO.

Product list (proposed) alongwith production capacity


Raw materials details
Water requirement
Wastewater generation from proposed plant
Land (Breakup) details
Fuel requirement
Stack details
Stack details
Solid waste generation and disposal
Climatological data for IMD, Nagpur (1981-2010)
Summary of meteorological observation at site
Summary of site specific wind pattern
Details of air sampling location
Summary of ambient air quality results
Levels of volatile organic pollutants
Noise monitoring locations
Noise levels (db(A) in the study area)
Background noise levels in industrial area near highways
Vehicular traffic and corresponding noise levels during peak hours in the
study area
Details of water sampling location
Surface water quality
Groundwater quality
Water requirement (breakup)
Wastewater generation from existing and proposed plant and disposal
pattern
Distance and direction of river/stream/nala present in project site within
10 km radius
Data specification used for presents study
LU/LC classes and their coverage in sq. km of 00-10 km radius
Details of soil sampling locations
Physical characteristics of soil
Chemical characteristics of soil in study area (soil-water extract)
Fertility status
Relationship of CEC with productivity
Relationship of CEC with absorptivity
Levels of heavy metals in soil-water extracts
List of flora in the study area
List of species in the study area
Herbs & grasses in the study area
Bamboo & grasses in the study area
Climbers and twiners in the study area
Agriculture crops grown in the study area
Prominent horticultural trees in the study area
Sukali RF
Junapani RF
Degma reserve forest
Mammals from the study area
Reptiles in the study area
List of birds in the study area with its distribution & migratory status
Butterflies in the study area
Fishes in the study area
Population size of villages

2-8
2-8
2-10
2-11
2-12
2-12
2-15
2-15
2-15
3-2
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-6
3-7
3-9
3-11
3-11
3-12
3-13
3-17
3-18
3-22
3-22
3-23
3-25
3-31
3-38
3-39
3-40
3-40
3-41
3-41
3-41
3-49
3-51
3-52
3-52
3-53
3-53
3-54
3-54
3-55
3-55
3-57
3-57
3-58
3-59
3-59
3-61

TABLE
NO.
3.42
3.43
3.44
3.45
3.46
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
6.1
6.2
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8

7.9
7.10
7.11
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4

TITLE

PAGE NO.

Population details in the study area


Literate & illiterate population in the study area
Employment pattern in the study area
Land use pattern (In ha)
Villages surveyed
Proposed Stack details
Short term modeling results
Resultant concentrations due to proposed project
Vehicular traffic during peak hours in the study area
Incremental noise levels
Water requirement (breakup)
Wastewater generation from proposed plant
Solid/hazardous waste generation
Prediction of impacts
Prediction of impacts
Assessment of predicted impacts during construction phase
Assessment of predicted impacts during operation phase
Environmental monitoring programme
Budgetary provision for environmental monitoring programme
Inventory of Raw material
Degree of hazards based on FEI
Fire and Explosion index
PASQUILL GIFFARD atmospheric Stability
List of damages envisaged at various heat loads
Damage criteria for pressure waves
Range of thermal flux levels and their potential effects
VCE scenario cloud drifting, dilution & quantity of methanol within UEL
& LEL for instantaneous release of methanol from catastrophic failure of
the tank truck (20 KL)
Hazard Distance due to failure of tank truck of capacity 18 MT
Damage distance due to VCE for failure of tank truck (20 KL MT)
Offsite action plan
Recommended species for plantation
Pollution control arrangement/mitigation measures
Cleaner production aspects
Budgetary allocation towards environmental management plan

3-61
3-62
3-63
3-65
3-67
4-4
4-5
4-5
4-9
4-12
4-14
4-14
4-16
4-19
4-20
4-21
4-21
6-2
6-4
7-3
7-4
7-4
7-6
7-8
7-8
7-9
7-13

7-14
7-14
7-41
10-4
10-5
10-7
10-14

CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

1.0

INTRODUCTION

1.1

ABOUT THE PROJECT

M/s. Paramount Chempro has proposed organic chemicals manufacturing unit to produce
Formaldehyde of 24000 MT/ Annum capacity at plot no. C 6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist. Nagpur, Maharashtra. The product is one of the basic organic chemicals and used as a base
material in various downstream industries. It is used to produce urea formaldehyde (UF) resins,
phenolic (PR) resins, polyacetal resins, butanediol, methylene di-isocyanate (MDI), penta erythritol
and other miscellaneous chemicals.
The proposed project will have following advantages:
Economics of scale

Lower power cost

Under MIDC area

Sharing of common infrastructure

1.2

LOCATION OF THE PROJECT

M/s. Paramount Chempro has proposed organic chemicals manufacturing unit to produce
Formaldehyde of 24000 MT/ Annum capacity at plot no. C 6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist. Nagpur, Maharashtra. The unit will be situated at Latitude 205631.3 N and Longitude 785655.5 E
within notified MIDC Area (Figures 1.1 to 1.3).
The proposed unit will be within the industrial premises admeasuring 4050 sq.m area. The nearest
approach road is a MIDC road connected to NH-7, 4.6 km ESE. The elevation of the area is 297m. The
land use is a barren land with no vegetation at site. Since, the plot for the proposed manufacturing facilities
of the company is allotted at MIDC Industrial area, Butibori, Nagpur, no alternative site was corridered for
the establishment of proposed unit. The unit is located at 1.3 km from pohi around 35 km from Nagpur city.
The location of the land confers several advantages, which are summarized as below:

Raw materials availability at competitive price.


Container yard facilities at ICD, Nagpur
The nearest Railway station in Butibori, which is 06 kms from the plant site.
Availability of skilled man power.
Infrastructure facilities are already available at this location.
The project site is at a distance of 4.6 km from the National Highway NH 7.

The plant site photographs are shown in Plate 1.1.

Chapter 1- Introduction

1-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 1.1: INDEX MAP OF THE PROJECT SITE

Chapter 1- Introduction

1-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 1.2: GOOGLE IMAGE SHOWING PROPOSED SITE OF THE PROJECT

Chapter 1- Introduction

1-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 1.3: STUDY AREA MAP (10 KM RADIAL DISTANCE)

Chapter 1- Introduction

1-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

PROPOSED PLANT SITE PHOTOGRAPHS

PLATE 1.1: PROPOSED PLANT SITE VIEW

1.3

JUSTIFICATION AND NEED OF PROJECT

Since the proposed organic chemical is used as a base material for manufacturing of other
chemicals, resins and supporting downstream industries, and to meet the increased market demand
for Formaldehyde in India and abroad, M/s. Paramount Chempro has proposed organic chemicals
manufacturing unit to produce Formaldehyde of 24000 MT/ Annum capacity at plot no. C 6, MIDC
Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist. - Nagpur, Maharashtra.
1.4

IMPORTANCE OF THE PROJECT

Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the simplest and commercially most important aldehyde. It is soluble in water,
alcohols and other polar solvents. Urea- ,Phenol, and melanine formaldehyde resins (UF, PF, and M
resins) accounted for about 63% of world demand in 2011; other large applications include polyacetal
resins, pentaerythritol, methylenebis (4 - phenyl isocyanate (MDI) , 1,4- butanediol
hexamethylenetetramine. Most formaldehyde users are concerned primarily with satisfying captive
requirements for derivatives and/or supplying local merchant sales. Formaldehyde is usually produced

Chapter 1- Introduction

1-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

close to the point of consumption since its fairly easy to make, is costly to transport and can develop
problems associated with stability during transport. As a result, world trade in formaldehyde is minimal.
Construction/remodeling activity, vehicle and furniture production, and original Equipment manufacturer
(OEM) account for the most world consumption of formaldehyde. Demand for these markets is greatly
influenced by general economic conditions. As a result, Demand for formaldehyde greatly follows patterns
for the leading world economies. Formaldehyde resins are used predominantly in the wood products
industry as adhesives. Growth of these resins is strongly correlated to construction/remodeling
activity(which accounts for over 50% consumption), and China is the single largest market for
formaldehyde , accounting for about 34% of world demand in 2015; other large markets include the United
States, Canada, brazil, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Italy Belgium, Poland, Russia ,Japan and the
Republic of Korea. China is forecast to experience fast growth rates (around 7% per year) and significant
volume increases in demand for 37% formaldehyde during 2011-2016.
Asia experiences 5% gap in its demand and supply. Moreover world consumption is forecasted to grow at
an average annual rate of almost 5% during 2011-2016. Continuing significant-to-rapid demand growth in
Asia (Mainly China) for most applications will balance out moderate growth in North America, Western
Europe, Africa and Oceania. central and South America, the Middle East and Central and Eastern Europe
are forecasted to experience a significant growth in demand for formaldehyde during 2011-2016 , largely
as a result of increased production of wood panels ,laminates, MDI and pentaerythritol.
The demand for formaldehyde is based on resin (liquid and power) is constantly increasing to
manufacture Electrical Insulation Board and H.P. decorative laminated sheets & they are widely exported
in domestic market and as well as international market. In recent years, general survey report shows that
laminated sheets are largely exported in huge quantities to develop countries. In India, the production cost
is low due to the availability of good quality raw materials. This increases the profit margin is compared to
other competitors in the world. M/s Paramount Chempro to meet the current and future demand with
export potential and increase foreign exchange reserves for the country.
1.5

PROJECT DETAILS

1.5.1

Nature of the Project

M/s. Paramount Chempro will be mainly involved in the manufacturing of the formaldehyde (24000 MT/
Annum). The project activities falls under Category 5(f) as stated in Environment Impact Assessment
Notification 14th September 2006 and the EC from the SEAC.The nature of the project falls under
synthetic organic chemicals category.
1.5.2

Size of the Project

M/s. Paramount Chempro has proposed organic chemicals manufacturing unit to produce Formaldehyde
of 24000 MT/ Annum capacity. Proposed production quantity of formaldehyde is shown in Table 1.1.
TABLE 1.1
PROPOSED PRODUCTION CAPACITY
Sl.
No.
1

Name of Products
Formaldehyde

Proposed Production Capacity (in MT/M)


24000
Total ( MT/A)

Chapter 1- Introduction

24000
24000

1-6

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

1.5.3

Regulatory Framework

According to the EIA Notification 2006 and its subsequent amendments, the proposed project comes
under the project activity of 5 (f), Synthetic Organic Chemicals Industry under category B and is
located in a notified industrial area and requires environmental clearance from MoEF (SEAC &
SEIAA). Accordingly, M/s. Paramount Chempro has therefore initiated the process of Environmental
Clearance. Project status is as follows:
Sl. No.
1.

Description of Process
Submission of Form I to SEIAA, Maharashtra and ToR
presentation before SEAC for proposed project

Date
th

20 January 2016
st

2.

TOR issued by SEAC, Maharashtra.

th

MoM of 121 SEAC meeting dtd. 18


February 2016

The EIA report for the proposed project is prepared as per the approved ToR by SEAC and will be
submitted for getting environmental clearance.
1.5.4

Cost of the Project

Total project cost of the proposed project is estimated to be Rs. 741 lakhs (app.)
1.6

PROMOTERS AND BACKGROUND

The project proponent is Mr. Kishor Dharmashi Patel aged about 41 years is an B.Com Graduate
with 18 years Business experience of trading in plywood & laminates. He is engaged in the functional
responsibility of marketing of Formaldehyde.
1.7

PURPOSE OF THE REPORT

M/s. Paramount Chempro has proposed to manufacture Formaldehyde at its Industrial unit at plot
no. C 6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist. - Nagpur, Maharashtra
In order to fulfill statutory requirement, application for obtaining approved ToR prior to EC (Form-1)
was considered by the State Expert Appraisal Committee Maharashtra for the said proposed project
for prescribing TORs to undertake detailed EIA/EMP report in the minutes of the 121th meeting of the
State Expert Appraisal Committee held on 18th February 2016. The Committee approved the Terms
of Reference, vide Item no. 6, SEAC, Maharashtra (copy enclosed as Annexure-I).
M/s Paramount Chempro retained M/s. Anacon Laboratories Private Limited, Nagpur to undertake
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) studies as per the Terms of Reference (ToR) approved by
SEAC, Maharashtra, incorporating baseline environmental status w.r.t. air, noise, water, land, biological
and socio-economic components of environment, identification and prediction of impacts, evaluation of
impacts and suggesting environmental management plan with environmental monitoring and risk
assessment studies with disaster management plan.
1.8

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT STUDIES (SCOPE AND METHODOLOGY)

In order to assess the environmental impacts due to the proposed project, through EIA study covering
various environmental attributes and to suggest an effective Environment Management Plan, M/s
Paramount Chempro retained the services of M/s Anacon Laboratories Private Limited (ALPL)
Nagpur.
Reconnaissance of the area was carried out and various sampling locations to monitor environmental
components were identified. Accordingly, primary monitoring was carried out for meteorology, ambient air
quality, surface and groundwater quality in the study, soil characteristics, noise levels and flora & fauna
along with socio-economics.
Chapter 1- Introduction

1-7

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Certain aspects related with establishment of socio-economic profiles of people, land use pattern in the
study area etc. were carried out based on the review of secondary data collected from various Government
and semi-Government organizations.
The ambient air quality monitoring network was set up following the guidelines specified by the CPCB and
the air monitoring locations were selected based on the predominant wind direction recorded in the region
by Indian Meteorological Department (IMD), Nagpur.
The primary environmental data collected, analysed and the results of the same were compared with the
environmental standards prescribed by CPCB. The applicable environmental standards are presented in
Annexure-II.
This Environmental Impact Assessment report is based on collection of baseline data through field
monitoring of relevant environmental attributes during January to March 2016 representing winter season
with secondary data collection as per requirement of the project.
1.8.1

Methodology Adopted in EIA Study

Environmental Impact Assessment study includes identification, assessment, quantitative evaluation and
prediction of possible impacts. To minimize impacts of the proposed project on various environmental
attributes, mitigation measures are suggested. The EIA report includes the following:

Predominant wind directions in the study area as recorded by India Meteorological Department
(IMD) at Nagpur;
Topography, location of surface water bodies like ponds, canals and rivers;
Location of villages/towns/sensitive areas;
Accessibility, power availability and security of monitoring equipment, pollution pockets in the
area;
Areas which represent baseline conditions;
Collection, collation and analysis of baseline data for various environmental attributes;
Identification and quantification of impacts based on mathematical and scientific tools; and
Suggestion of mitigation and management measures based on the best industry practices and
in-line with regulatory norms.

Field studies were conducted to determine existing status of various environmental attributes as outlined in
Table 1.2.
TABLE 1.2
ENVIRONMENTAL ATTRIBUTES AND FREQUENCY OF MONITORING
Sr.
No.

Attributes

Parameters

Frequency

Ambient Air
Quality

SPM, PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NOX,


CO, VOC, NH3.

Meteorology

Water quality

24 hourly samples twice a week for three months


identified at 9 locations. CO, monitored as three 8 hourly
samples in 24 hours.
Continuous with hourly recording through setting up of
automatic meteorological station at site and data from
Secondary sources: i.e. IMD station at Nagpur.
Grab samples were collected once during study period
prepared and brought to the laboratory for analysis.

Soil
characteristics

Terrestrial
Ecology

Chapter 1- Introduction

Wind speed and wind direction,


Temperature, Relative humidity
and Rainfall.
Physical
and
Chemical
parameters.
Soil profile, characteristics, soil
type and texture, heavy metals,
NKP value, organic matter, CEC
and exchangeable cations.
Existing terrestrial and aquatic
flora and fauna

Once during study period at 9 locations within 05 km


radius of study area.
Through field visits and from the district forest
authority.

1-8

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sr.
No.

Attributes

Parameters

Noise levels

Noise levels in dB(A)

Land use

Land use for different categories.

Geology

Hydrogeology

Geological history
Drainage pattern, nature of
streams, aquifer characteristics,
recharge and discharge areas
Socio-economic characteristics:
infrastructure resources, health
status, economic resources.

10

11

1.8.2

SocioEconomic
aspects
Risk
assessment
and Disaster
Management
Plan

Identify the areas where disaster


can occur by fires and explosions
and release of toxic substances.

Frequency
At every location day and night noise level data
monitored hourly for 24 hours, once during EIA study.
Based on data collected from secondary sources like
primary census abstracts of census of India 2011.
Based on data collected from secondary sources.
Hydro-geological data based on data collected from
secondary sources
Based on data collected from secondary sources like
abstracts of census of India 2011 and village directory
2001

Risk assessment and modeling.

Scope of the Study

The scope of work is based on MoEF guidelines. The generic structure of EIA is as per EIA notification
dated 14th September, 2006. The scope of work is to prepare environmental Impact and risk assessment
report incorporating baseline status with respect to various environmental components e.g. air, noise,
water, land, biological and socio-economic, prediction of impacts, evaluation of impacts are carried out
including suggestion for environmental management plan and post-project monitoring studies as per the
Terms of Reference approved by the State Level Expert Appraisal Committee, Maharashtra. The ToR is
attached as (Annexure I).
1.9

DETAILED PLAN OF WORK

1.9.1

Air Environment

Monitoring the existing levels of PM2.5,PM10,SO2, NOx, CO, VOC and NH3 in ambient air as per
CPCB/MoEF guidelines in January-March 2016

Collection of surface meteorological data, viz. wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity,
temperature and cloud cover, concurrently with ambient air quality monitoring.

Estimation of gaseous emission from the existing and proposed units and prediction of Ground
Level Concentrations of gaseous pollutants through appropriate air quality model.

Strengthening of greenbelt and identification of suitable plant species in the green belt.

1.9.2

Noise Environment

Measurement of noise levels in the existing residential/commercial/sensitive zones of the study


area.

Predication and evaluation of impacts due to noise levels arising out of the existing and
proposed units on the surrounding environment.

Recommendations of mitigation measures for control of noise pollution.

Chapter 1- Introduction

1-9

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

1.9.3

Water Environment

Assessment of ground and surface water quantity and quality (primary data base) for physical,
chemical and biological parameters including toxic organics and inorganics in the study area

Impact on water demand vis-a-vis regional water balance (proposed).

Evaluation and recommendations for existing wastewater treatment system and suggestions on
its augmentation.

Assessment of existing and proposed quantity and quality of effluent to be discharged from the
proposed industry.

Delineation of water conservation schemes

Assessment of feasibility of treated wastewater for its recycle and reuse in proposed
manufacturing units and use in greenbelt development.

1.9.4

Land Environment

Study of existing landuse and cropping patterns, vegetation, forestry wastelands using ground
truth

Studies on soil characteristics in the study area

Assessment of impacts on landuse pattern.

Delineation of measures for utilisation of treated wastewater.

1.9.5

Biological Environment

Assessment of flora and fauna in the study area based on secondary data.

Assessment of impacts on flora and fauna.

Assessment of impacts on terrestrial flora and fauna due to gaseous emissions and landuse
changes.

Prediction of biological stress in the study area.

Delineation of measures for abatement/reduction of biological stress.

1.9.6

Socio-economic Environment

Collection of baseline data related to socio-economic profile of the study area with reference to:

Human settlements, health status, occupational, employment and income pattern.

Infrastructure resource base, viz. medical, education, water resources, power supply,
communication and transportation.

Economic resource base, viz. agriculture, industries, forest, trade and commerce.

Projection of economic benefits due to the proposed project plan and delineation of measures to
minimise the adverse impacts

Assessment of impacts on places of historical/archaeological importance and aesthetic


impairment, if any.

Chapter 1- Introduction

1-10

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

1.9.7

Environmental Management Plan

Environmental Management Plan (EMP) was drawn after identifying, predicting and evaluating the
significant impacts on each components of environment with a view to minimizing potential adverse
impacts and maximising the benefits due to the project.
1.10

RAPID RISK ASSESSMENT

1.10.1 Scope of Work


Rapid risk assessment study comprises hazard identification based on Maximum Credible Accident
(MCA) analysis, hazard assessment and evaluation employing techniques of consequence and
vulnerability analysis and delineation of onsite Disaster Management Plan (DMP) of offsite
Emergency Preparedness Plan (EPP) due to worst case scenarios of proposed developments.
1.10.2 Objectives of Study

Hazard identification taking recourse to hazard indices and inventory analysis.

Generation of release scenarios for escape of hazardous materials.

Computation of damage distances through consequence analysis of failure cases identified with
respect to heat radiation and pressure wave to the affected area by the fire, explosion and
hazardous releases.

Maximum credible accident analysis to identify worst case scenarios for release of flammable
substances from the proposed facilities.

Assessment of risk based on above evaluation vis-a-vis risk acceptability criteria.

Formulation of guidelines for Disaster Management and Emergency Preparedness Plans.

Suggestions on risk mitigation measures based on MCA analysis.

1.10.3 Details of Work Plan


1.10.3.1 Hazard Identification

Collection of information on hazardous materials stored and handled.

Study of vulnerable operations and storages using the Maximum Credible Accident (MCA)
analysis.

The study will lead to identification of hazardous prone operations and computation of damage
distances based on probable accident scenarios.
1.10.3.2 Hazard Assessment and Evaluation
Hazard prone operation would be critically examined with an accent on quantification of hazard and
its evaluation. The following techniques shall be used for quantification:

Consequence analysis and vulnerability analysis

Individual risks.

The study will lead to estimation of extent of damage and computation of individual risk curves.
1.10.3.3 Disaster Management Plan (DMP)
Disaster Management Plan will be formulated for onsite emergency. Risk mitigation measures for
improving the existing infrastructure, communication systems, and identification of assembly point,
first aid station, emergency control centre, etc. will form and integral part of the report.
Chapter 1- Introduction

1-11

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

1.11

COST OF THE PROJECT

Total cost of the proposed project is estimated to be Rs. 741 lakh (app.).
1.12

ToR COMPLIANCE

The approved ToR and its compliance is given below:


Sl.
Condition in ToR
Compliance
ToR for EIA studies in respect of the synthetic organic chemicals industry may include, but not limited to
the following:
1
The plant will adopt a Zero Liquid Discharge Process
Provided in Chapter 2, section 2.5.5.2,
Pg.no.2-11
2
The PP shall provide 12% of total plot area for parking Provided in Chapter 2, section 2.6.1, of Table
(including visitors' parking) and 33% of non-built-up area 2.8 Pg. no. 2-12
as a green belt
3
The PP shall clarify in the EIA report whether any specific No specific permission will be required from
permission will be required from the Government for the the Government for the process adoption
process adopted from China
4
The techno-economic feasibility of the project should be The plant machineries are well designed and
analyzed
imported from the China. It is
technoeconomically feasible
5
Water requirement for various activities should be Provided in Chapter 2, section 2.5.5, of Table
3
carefully calculated as 50 m /day water for reactors no. 2.6 Pg.no.2-10
mixing tank and floor washing is too high
6
Since the process is extremely hazardous by virtue of Risk Assessment studies and Disaster
production of Formaldehyde and high Pressured reactors Management Plan is provided in Chapter 7 of
employed, the Risk Assessment studies and Fire Risk the report.
Assessment and HAZOP study based on P & I should be However, the separate HAZOP study has
given as a separate chapter
been conducted and will be provided to the
SEAC during appraisal of the project.
7
How the fugitive emission of Formaldehyde is monitored Provided in Chapter 4 , section 4.1.2.2
Pg.no.4-2
and controlled shall be given in detail
8
The ToR shall be in accordance with the provisions Yes
contained in the Model ToR prescribed by MOEF&CC in
April, 2015
1

Executive summary of the project - giving a prima facie


idea of the objectives of the proposal, use of resources,
justification, etc. In addition, it should provide a
compilation of EIA report, including EMP and the postproject monitoring plan in brief.
Project description:
2
Justification for selecting the proposed product and
unit size
3
Land requirement for the project including its break up
for various purposes, its availability and optimization
4
Details of proposed layout clearly demarcating various un
its within the plant.
5
Product spectrum (Proposed products along with
production Capacity) and processes

7
8

Complete process flow diagram describing each unit,


its processes and operations, along with material
(material balance)
Details on raw materials, source and storage within
the premises.
Details on solvent balance, measures for solvent
recovery

Chapter 1- Introduction

Executive summary of the project covering all


aspects of the report in brief is provided
before the EIA chapter.

Provided in Chapter 1, Section 1.3, Pg. no. 15.


Given in Chapter 2, Section 2.6 of sub-section
2.6.1, Pg. no. 2-12.
Provided in Chapter 2, Figure 2.4 Pg. no. 2-5.
Product spectrum provided in Chapter 2,
under section 2.5 of Table no. 2.4, Pg. no. 28. Proposed product related process is
provided in sub-section 2.5.2 from Pg. no. 2-9
to Pg. no. 2-15.
Provided in Chapter 2, section 2.5 under subsection 2.5.2 from Pg. no. 2-9 to Pg. no. 217.
Provided in Chapter 2, section 2.5 under subsection 2.5.1 on Pg. no. 2-8.
N.A.

1-12

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sl.
9

Condition in ToR
Details on requirement of energy and water along with its
source
and
authorization from the concerned
department.

10

Details on water balance including quantity of effluent ge


nerated, recycled & reused. Efforts to minimize effluent
discharge and to maintain quality of receiving water body.

11

Segregation of waste stream, characterization and quality


with specific treatment
Details of end of the pipe effluent treatment plant, inlet an
d treated water quality with specific efficiency of each
treatment unit in reduction in respect of all
concerned/regulated environmental parameters.

12

13

14

15

Details on volatile organic compounds from the plant


operations and occupational safety and health protection
measures
Details on channelized emissions and control
equipment for each of the source

Control technologies for combustion emissions

16

Details on composition, generation and utilization of


waste from the plant.
17
Management plan for solid/hazardous waste including
storage, utilization and safe disposal. CPCB guidelines in
respect of specific treatment, such as solar evaporation,
incineration, etc., need to be followed.
18
Details of proposed source-specific pollution control
schemes and equipments to meet the national
standards.
19
Details regarding infrastructure facilities such as sanitatio
n, fuel storage, restroom, etc., to the workers
during construction and operation phase.
20
In case of expansion of existing industries, remediation
measures adopted to restore the environmental quality if
the groundwater, soil, crop, air etc., are affected and a
detailed compliance to the prior environmental clearance/
consent conditions.
21
Any litigation pending against the project and /or any
Direction /order passed by any Court of Law against the
project, if so, details thereof.
Description of the environment:
22
The study area shall be up to a distance of 10 km from th
e boundary of the proposed project site.

23

Location of the project site and nearest habitats with dista


nces from the project site to be demarcated
on a toposheet (1: 50000 scale).

Chapter 1- Introduction

Compliance
Details of Energy requirement provided in
Chapter 2, section 2.6 under sub-section 2.6.2
from Pg. no. 2-12
Details of water requirement and other related
details provided in provided in section 2.5
under sub-section 2.5.5 from Pg. no. 2-11 to
Pg. no.2-22.
Provided in Chapter 4 under sub-section 4.1.4
from Pg. no.4-14 to Pg. no.4-15.Water
balance diagram is given in Figure 4.6 on Pg.
no. 4-15.
Provided in Chapter 4 under sub-section 4.1.4
from Pg. no.4-14 to Pg. no.4-16.
There will not be any effluent generation from
the process. The wastewater generation from
3
the plant is estimated to be 22 m /d which will
be sent to R.O. and treated water will be used
in the process.
Further details are provided in Chapter 4
under sub-section 4.1.4 from Pg. no.4-14 to
Pg. no.4-15.
Details are furnished in Chapter 7 from Pg.
no.4-14 to Pg. no.4-16 & Chapter 10, section
10.6 on Pg. no.10-3
Details are provided in Chapter 4 from Pg.
no.4-1 to Pg. no.4-22 and also covered in
Chapter 10 under section 10.8 of Table 10.2
from Pg. no.10-5 to Pg. no.10-8.
Provided in Chapter 10 under section 10.8 of
Table 10.2 from Pg. no.10-5 to Pg. no.10-7.
Provided in Chapter 4, Section 4.1 under
subsection 4.1.5 from Pg. no.4-16
Provided in Chapter 4, Section 4.1 under
subsection 4.1.5 from Pg. no. 4-16
Details are provided in Chapter 4 from Pg.
no.4-1 to Pg. no.4-21
Details are provided in Chapter 2, Section
2.6 from Pg. no.2-12 to Pg. no.2-15
It is Green field Project

Not Applicable

Noted and Complied


Study area map of 10 km radial distance from
project site provided in Chapter 1, Figure 1.3
on Pg. no.1-4
Provided in Chapter 1, Figure 1.3 on Pg.
no.1-4.

1-13

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sl.
24

25
26

27

28
29

30

31

32
33
34
35
36

37

Condition in ToR
Landuse based on satellite imagery including location sp
ecific
sensitivities such as national parks /wildlife sanctuary, vill
ages, industries, etc., for the study area
Demography details of all the villages falling within the st
udy area
Topography details of the project area.

The baseline data to be collected from the study area w.r.


t. different components of environment viz. air, noise
,water land, and biology and socio-economic.
Geological features and geo- hydrological status of the
the study area.
Details of groundwater and surface water quality of nearb
y water sources and other surface drains. Water quality
parameters
may
include
pH*, BOD* (3 days at 27 oC), COD*, toxicity factor*, Nitra
te*(as N), Arsenic*, Chromium*, Hexavalent*, Total Lead*
, Cyanide
as CN*, Zinc*, Mercury*,Copper*, Nickel*, Phenolics* as
C6H5OH, Sulphide, etc. (* - as applicable)
Details on existing ambient air quality and expected,
stack and fugitive emissions for PM10* , PM2.5*, SO2*,
NOx*, VOC*, mercaptans*, solvents*, NH3*,chlorine*,
HCl*, HBr*,H2S*, HF*,
other process

specific
pollutants*, etc., and evaluation of the adequacy of the
proposed pollution control devices to meet standards for
point sources and to meet AAQ standards. (*- as
applicable)
The air quality contours may be plotted on a location map
showing the location of project site,habitation nearby, se
nsitive receptors, if any and wind roses.
Details on noise levels at sensitive/commercial
receptors.
Site-specific micro meteorological data including mixing
height.
One season sitespecific data excluding monsoon season
Proposed baseline monitoring network for the considerati
on and approval of the Competent Authority.
Ecological status (terrestrial and aquatic) of the study are
a such as habitat type and quality, species, diversity,
rarity, fragmentation, ecological linkage, age, abundance,
etc.
If any incompatible landuse attributes fall within thestudy
area, proponent shall describe the sensitivity (distance,
area and significant) and propose the additional points
based on significance for review and acceptance by the
SEAC. Incompatible land use attributes include:
a. Public water supply areas from rivers/surface
water bodies, from ground water
b. Scenic areas/tourism areas/hill resorts
c. Religious places, pilgrim centers that attract over 10 l
akh pilgrims a year
d. Protected tribal settlements (notified tribal areas
where industrial activity is not permitted)
e. Monuments of national significance, World Heritage S

Chapter 1- Introduction

Compliance
Given in Chapter 3, in Figure 3.6 & Figure 3.7
on Pg. no.3-27 &Pg. no.3-29 respectively.

Covered in Chapter 3, Section 3.7 from Pg.


no.3-60 to Pg. no.3-61
Topography of the project area was observed
to be flat, barren with sparse vegetation.
However details are provided in in Chapter 3,
Section 3.5,on Pg. no. 3-22 to Pg. no. 3-36
Provided in Chapter 3, from Pg. no.3-1 to Pg.
no.3-71
Covered in Chapter 3, Section 3.5, under subsection 3.5.5 from Pg. no.3-35 to Pg. no.3-37
Covered in Chapter 3, Section 3.4, from Pg.
no.3-12 to Pg. no.3-21.

Baseline air environment is given in Chapter


3, Section 3.2 from Pg. no.3-1 to Pg. no.3-9.
Air Impact prediction through ISCST3
modeling given in Chapter 4, under subsection 4.1.2.2 on Pg. no.4-2to Pg. no.4-8.

Given in Chapter 4, Section 4.1, under subsection 4.1.2 from Pg. no.4-2 to Pg. no.4-8.
Provided in Chapter 3, Section 3.3, from Pg.
no.3-9 to Pg. no.3-12.
Provided in Chapter 3, Section 3.2, from Pg.
no.3-1to Pg. no.3-3.
Provided in Chapter 3, Section 3.2, from Pg.
no.3-1to Pg. no.3-3.
Provided in Chapter 6, Section 6.3, in Table
6.1 from Pg. no.6-2 to Pg. no.6-3.
Provided in Chapter 3, Section 3.6, from Pg.
no.3-42 to Pg. no.3-60.

Proposed project of organic chemical


manufacturing unit is within the MIDC Butibori,
Notified Industrial Area.

1-14

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sl.

38

Condition in ToR
ites
f. Cyclone, Tsunami prone areas (based on last 25 year
s);
g. Airport areas
h. Any other feature as specified by the State or local go
vernment and other features as locally
applicable,
including prime agricultural lands, pastures, migratory
corridors, etc.
If ecologically sensitive attributes fall within the study are
a, proponent shall describe the sensitivity (distance, area
and significance) and propose additional points based on
significance for review and acceptance by the SEAC.
Ecological sensitive attributes include:
a. National parks

Compliance

b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Five Reserve Forest and other five Jhudupi
Jungle observed in the study area details of
forest w.r.t to distance and direction from
project site are provided in Chapter 3 on Pg.
no. 3-45.
Nil

Wild life sanctuaries Game reserve


Tiger reserve/elephant reserve/turtle nesting ground
Mangrove area
Wetlands
Reserved and protected forests

g. Any other closed/protected area under the Wild Life


(Protection) Act, 1972, any other area locally applicable
h. Any other eco-sensitive areas
39
If the location falls in Valley, specific issues connected to
the natural resources management shall be studied and
presented.
40
If the location falls in CRZ area: A CRZ map duly authenti
cated by one of the authorized agencies
demarcating
LTL, HTL, CRZ area, location of the project and
associate facilities w.r.t. CRZ, coastal features such as
mangroves, if any.
Provide the CRZ map in 1:10000 scale in general cases
and in 1:5000 scales for specific observations. Proposed
site for disposal of dredged material and environmental
quality at the point of disposal / impact areas.
Fisheries study should be done w.r.t. Benthos and
Marine organic material and coastal fisheries.
Anticipated environmental impacts and mitigation measures:
41
Anticipated generic environmental impacts due to this
project.
42
Impact prediction tools used for the appropriate
assessment of environmental impacts.
43
While identifying likely impacts, also include the following
for analysis of significant and required mitigation
measures:
a. Impacts due to transportation of raw materials and
end products on the surrounding
b. Impacts on surface water, soil and groundwater
c. Impacts due to air pollution
d. Impacts due to odour pollution
e. Impacts due to noise
f. Impacts due to fugitive emissions including VOCs /
HAPs
g. Impacts due to workers due to proposed project

Chapter 1- Introduction

Proposed project is within MIDC, Butibori


Notified Industrial Area. No National Park,
Sanctuary, Tiger reserve, etc. within 10 km
study area
Nil

Nil
Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Please refer Chapter 4, from Pg. no.4-1 & Pg.


no.4-21.
Provided in Chapter 4, from Pg. no.4-20 &
Pg. no.4-21.
Covered in Chapter 4, from Pg. no.4-1 & Pg.
no.4-21.

1-15

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sl.
44

Condition in ToR
activities
Proposed odour control measures

46

Action plan for the greenbelt development species,


width of plantations, planning schedule, etc. , in
accordance to CPCB published guidelines
In case of likely impact from the proposed project on the
surrounding serve forests, Plan for the conservation of
wild fauna in consultation with the State Forest
Department.

47

Mitigation measures for source control and treatment

48

49

Comparison of alternate sites considered and the


reasons for selecting the proposed site. Conformity of the
site with prescribed guidelines in terms of CRZ, river,
highways, railways etc.
Details on improved technologies

50

Details on proposed recovery options.

45

Environmental monitoring options


51
Monitoring programme for pollution control at source.
52

Monitoring pollutants at receiving environment for the


appropriate notified parameters air quality groundwater,
surface water, gas quality etc. during operation phase of
the project.
53
Specific programme to monitor safety and health
protection of workers
54
Proposed plan to estimate and monitor fugitive emission
including VOCs from all the sources and appropriated
control measures.
55
Stack and fugitive emission may be monitored for SPM,
PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NOx , HC, CO, VOC and evaluation of
the adequacy of the proposed pollution control devices to
meet gaseous emissions.
56
Monitoring of carbon food print.
57
Appropriate monitoring network has to be designed and
proposed, to assess the possible residual impacts on
VECs
58
Details of in-house monitoring capabilities and the
recognized agencies if proposed for conducting.
Additional Studies:
59
Details on risk assessment and damage control during
different phase of the project and proposed safeguard

Chapter 1- Introduction

Compliance
There will be no odour from the proposed
plant as adequate measures are in place.
However, details are furnished in Chapter 4,
Section 4.1.2 on Pg. no.4-9.
Details given in Chapter 10, Section 10.7 from
Pg. no.10-3 &Pg. no.10-4.
As the project activities is being carried out
within the MIDC, Butibori, Notified Industrial
area, there is no impact envisaged on
surrounding flora & fauna. However, to
improve the habitat of Schedule - I species
Common Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) which is
observed in study area, a site specific
conservation plan suggested. Details of
conservation plan provided in Chapter 10,
Section 10.11 from Pg. no.10-11 &Pg.no.1014.
Provide in Chapter 10, section 10.8 from Pg.
no.10-5 &Pg. no.10-7.
The proposed project facility for organic
chemicals manufacturing will be carried out at
adjacent plot (Plot No. C-6) of proposed unit
(Plot No. C-6).
Since, inception Paramount chempro is
adopting its own processes for manufacturing
of organic chemicals for formaldehyde
through their in house R & D and know-how
Storage tanks will be provided with proper
arrangements for exhausts/vents and breather
valve.
Vapour recovery system will be installed for
process/storage tank vents.
Provided in Chapter 6, Section 6.3, in Table
6.1 from Pg. no.6-2 to Pg. no.6-3.
Please refer Chapter 6, from Pg. no.6-1 to
Pg. no.6-4.

Please refer Chapter 6, from Pg. no.6-1 to


Pg. no.6-4.
Provided in Chapter 6, Section 6.3, in Table
6.1 from Pg. no.6-2 to Pg. no.6-3.
Please refer Chapter 6, from Pg. no.6-1to Pg.
no.6-4.

Not Applicable
Please refer Chapter 6, from Pg. no.6-1to Pg.
no.6-4.
Please refer Chapter 6, from Pg. no.6-1to Pg.
no.6-4.
Furnished in Chapter 7, Section 7.1, under
subsection 7.1.1 from Pg. no.7-1 to Pg. no.7-

1-16

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sl.
60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

Condition in ToR
measures.
Details on socio-economic development activities such
as commercial property values, generation of jobs,
education, social conflicts, cultural status, accidents, etc.
Proposed plan to handle the socio-economic influence on
the local community. The plan should include quantitative
dimension as far as possible.
Details on compensation package for people affected by
the project, considering the socio-economic status of the
area, homestead oustees, land oustees, and landless
labourers.
Points identified in the public hearing and commitment of
the project proposed to the same. Detailed action plan
addressing the issues raised, and the details of
necessary allocation of funds.
Details on plan for corporate social responsibility
including
the
villages,
population
spread,
SC/ST/backward communities, upgradation, of existing
schools, establishing new schools with facilities (such as
laboratories, toilets, etc.), like roads, community halls,
primary health facilities, health camps, etc.
Administrative and technical organizational structure to
ensure proposed post-project monitoring programme for
approved mitigation measures.
EMP devised to mitigate the adverse impacts of the
project should be provided along with item-wise cost of
its implementation (capital and recurring costs).
Allocation of resources and responsibilities for plan
implementation
Details of the emergency preparedness plan and on-site
and off-site disaster management plan

Chapter 1- Introduction

Compliance
6.
Details provided in Chapter 8 from Pg. no.8-1
to Pg. no.8-2.
Not Applicable

Not Applicable

The proposed project falls under Notified


Industrial Area. As per the MoEF circular dtd.
th
10 December 2014, project is exempted
from Public Hearing.
Details provided in Chapter 8 from Pg. no.8-1
to Pg. no.8-2.

Given in Chapter 10, Section 10.3 from Pg.


no.10-1 to Pg. no.10-2.
Given in Chapter 10, Section 10.13 on Pg.
no.10-15.
Details are furnished in Chapter 7, Section
7.1, under subsection 7.1.2 from Pg. no.7-7 to
Pg. no.7-8.
Details are furnished in Chapter 7, Section
7.1, under subsection 7.1.2 from Pg. no.7-6 to
Pg. no.7-10.

1-17

CHAPTER-2
PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

2.0

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

2.1

TYPE OF PROJECT

M/s. Paramount Chempro is an organic chemical manufacturing industry. Organic chemicals are
manufactured through industrial synthesis generally by chemical process. The manufacturing of
compounds using chemical synthesis involves a complex process including many intermediate
stages and chemical reactions performed in step by step.
2.2

PROJECT SETTING

The proposed project will be located at plot no. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist - Nagpur,
Maharashtra of M/s. Paramount Chempro (Land document details enclosed in Annexure III)
The details about the plant location are as follows:
Plot No

: C-6

Industrial Area

: MIDC, Butibori Industrial Area,

Tehsil

: Hingna

District

: Nagpur, Maharashtra.

Plant location shown in layout of the MIDC, Butibori Industrial Area is given in Figures 2.1 & 2.2. The
study area map of 10 km radial distance from the project site is shown in Figure 2.3. Layout of the
proposed manufacturing unit of M/s. Paramount Chempro, Butibori is shown in Figure 2.4. The
environmental setting of the site is presented in Table 2.1.
2.3

MAGNITUDE OF OPERATION

M/s. Paramount Chempro proposes organic chemicals manufacturing unit to manufacture


Formaldehyde of 24000 MT/Annum. Details regarding resources availability with cost of the project
are presented in Table 2.2.
2.4

PROPOSED SCHEDULE FOR APPROVAL AND IMPLEMENTATION

The proposed project from concept stage to commissioning would take about
06 months. Since the project is being set up by the expert personnel, the planning and
implementation of the project is not much difficult. Services of experienced consultants are being
utilized for detailed planning, preparation of techno-economic feasibility report and other associated
activities like discussions with financial institutions, phasing of capital expenditure etc. However, the
implementation primarily will depend upon the statutory environmental clearances.

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area,
Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 2.1: LOCATION OF M/S. PARAMOUNT CHEMPRO IN MIDC BUTIBORI INDUSTRIAL


AREA

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Project Site

FIGURE 2.2: LOCATION OF M/S. PARAMOUNT CHEMPRO IN MIDC, BUTIBORI INDUSTRIAL


AREA
(Source: Wikimapia)

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 2.3: STUDY AREA MAP (10 KM RADIAL DISTANCE)

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 2.4: LAYOUT OF PROPOSED FORMALDEHYDE MANUFACTURING UNIT OF


M/S. PARAMOUNT CHEMPRO

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 2.1
ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING OF THE SITE
Sr. No.

Particular
Plant Location
Nearest Village
Tehsil
District
State

Coordinates

Elevation

Nearest representative IMD station

5
6

Nearest highway
Nearest railway station

Nearest airport

8
9
10
11
12
13
14

District Headquarters
Nearest State/National boundaries
Seismic Zone
Nearest major city with 2,00,000 population
Hills/valleys
Nearest tourist place
Archaeologically important places
Protected areas as per Wildlife Protection
Act,1972 (Tiger reserve, Elephant reserve,
Biospheres,
National
parks,
Wildlife
sanctuaries, community reserves and
conservation reserves)

15

17

Forests land

Water Body

Defence Installations

List of Industries

Notified ECO- Seismicity

Details
Plot nos. C- 6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori.
Pohi (1.3 km, NW)
Hingna
Nagpur
Maharashtra
North latitude 205631.3 & East longitude
785655.5
297 m
Sonegaon, Nagpur, 18 km (NNE) away from project
site
NH-7 (4.6km) ESE
Butibori (6 km ) ESE from project site
Sonegaon, Nagpur (20 Km) North-East from project
site
Nagpur (District- Nagpur) (26km)
Madhya Pradesh (60 km, North)
Seismic Zone-II as per IS-1893: 2002 BIS, GOI.
Nagpur ,35 KM
None
Kelzar 20 Km (SW)
Nil

None

Bid-Sukli RF 2.3 KM (NW)


Degma RF 8.4 (NW)
Ingoli RF 7.3 (SSE)
Junapani RF 6.4 KM (S)
Dogargaon RF 6.2 KM (SE)
River Vena : 3.5 KM (E)
Krishna Nala : 2.9 Km (S)
Shashimar Nala : 7.7 Km (NW)
DRDO, Storage Yard Nr. Borkhedi Village 8.5 km
Moraji textiles Pvt. Ltd., Gammon India Pvt. Ltd.,
Balaji Pre-cast Pvt. Ltd., Arc Tec System Ltd.,
Dinshaws Food Pvt. Ltd., Kasenor Charbuja Ltd.,
Inventetys Research Company Ltd., Indorama, etc.
None in 10km radius

TABLE 2.2
DETAILS ABOUT PROJECT AND RESOURCES AVAILABILITY
Details

Proposed

Project location

Plot no. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist. - Nagpur,


Maharashtra.

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-6

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Details

Proposed

Production capacity

24000 MT/ Annum

Project land area

4050 m

Water requirement

165 m /day
Source: MIDC

Waste water generation

Domestic-2.16 m /day
3
Industrial-82.00 m /day

Power requirement

250 HP

Green belt area

1336 m

Man power requirement

24

Project cost

741.00 Lakhs

M/s. Paramount Chempro is located in notified MIDC Butibori industrial area. Following is the list of
major industries within 10km radius from project site (Table 2.3)
TABLE 2.3
MAJOR INDUSTRIES NEAR PROJECT SITE
Sl.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

Name of
Industries
Gammon India
Ltd.
Morarjee Textile
Ltd.
Dinshaws Foods
Pvt. Ltd.
TKG Industry
Pvt. Ltd.
Cytec India
Harivansh
Packaging
Products
Grindwell
Norton Ltd.
Maa Bhavani
Steel
Indorama
Textile
Cenker Agro
Product
Anand Mine
Tool Pvt. Ltd
VIPL Reliance
Reliance
Cement Plant.

Activity

Latitude

Longitude

Direction

7857'38.28"E

Distance
(km)
.024km

Tower Structure
Projects & Store
Exporter / Manufacturer
/ Supplier of fabrics
Manufacturer Foods
products
Tower Manufacture &
Galvaniser
Chemical plant
Carton boxes of various
types

2056'33.23"N
2056'59.05"N

7857'45.98"E

0.87km

NNW

2056'36.96"N

7857'56.11"E

0.34km

NE

2056'8.60"N

7857'56.20"E

0.75km

SSE

2056'36.10"N
2056'27.40"N

7857'44.10"E
7857'40.40"E

0.17km
0.19km

NNW
SW

Grinding Wheels

2056'9.10"N

7857'32.90"E

0.76km

SSW

Steel Manufacturing
unit
Polyster Staple Fibre,
Texturized yarn, etc.
Agriculture machineries

2055'35.20"N

7857'1.40"E

2.14km

SSW

2055'33.00"N

7857'0.10"E

2.22km

SSW

2055'40.20"N

7856'24.90"E

2.82km

SW

Mining Machineries

2055'40.80"N

7856'24.90"E

2.81km

SW

Coal based power plant


(Capacity 600 MW)
Cement Manufacturing
unit

2055'24.70"N

7856'2.50"E

3.62km

SW

2055'31.50"N

7855'23.50"E

4.50km

SW

Chapter 2- Project Description

WNW

2-7

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

2.5

PROCESS DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED PRODUCTS

M/s. Paramount Chempro propose to set up an Organic Chemical unit to manufacture Formaldehyde
of 24000 MT/ Annum capacity at plot of Plot No C-6, MIDC industrial area Butibori, District Nagpur.
The details about proposed capacity of the products are given in Table 2.4.
TABLE 2.4
PRODUCT LIST (PROPOSED) ALONGWITH PRODUCTION CAPACITY
Sl.
No.
1

Name of Products

Proposed Production Capacity (in MT/M)

Formaldehyde

24000

24000

Total ( MT/M )

2.5.1

24000

Details of Raw Materials

The total consumption of raw materials is given in Table 2.5.


TABLE 2.5
RAW MATERIALS DETAILS
Sr. No.
1
2

2.5.2

Raw Material
Methanol
Water

Quantity (Per month)


890 MT
1110 MT

Details of Manufacturing Process

The manufacturing process is as follows:


Raw Material Inventory:
1. Methanol

- 360 (60 X 6) KL

Procedure:
1. Feed Methanol, air, water vapour
Catalyst: Silver
2. The methanol in the measuring storage tank is pumped up to an elevated tank by a methanol
pump. After being controlled by measuring, the methanol coming out from the elevated tank flows
into an evaporator for vaporization of which the temperature is controlled within 440C ~ 470C and
the liquid level is controlled as 50%,then the vaporized methanol gets into a super heater. The heat
for the vaporization of methanol is provided by the 700C circulating fluid in the formaldehyde
absorber.
3. The air is filtered by a filter before being delivered to the evaporator by a blower. It mixes with the
methanol in the evaporator and enters into then super heater together. The air flow is regulated by
the blower through frequency conversion to control the flow ratio of air to methanol (A/M=1.8
~1.95).
4. When the pressure gets stable, the vapour (0.3 MPa) gets into a mist eliminator for dehumidification
through the pipeline before entering into the superheat. The flow ratio of air to methanol shall be
controlled at desired level. In the Formaldehyde production technique using silver as catalysis, the

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-8

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

water vapour is an inert gas which does not participate in chemical reactions. The added water
vapour changes the explosive range of the methanol and air, the production of formaldehyde
thereby becomes far from the explosive area and stays safe and reliable.
5. After the flow rates are regulated and proportioned, the methanol, air and water vapour enter into
the super heater and the superheating temperature shall be controlled at 120 1300C. Then, these
materials enter into a reactor.
6. In the reactor, under the catalysis of silver at 6500C, the methanol is dehydrated and oxidized,
generating Formaldehyde. Dehydration reaction is an endothermic reaction and oxidation reaction
is an exothermic reaction, but the heat release is more than that can adsorbed, therefore the
reaction system is an state of heat energy surplus. The water vapour is not involved in reactions but
it can absorb a lot of heat of reaction, maintaining the temperature at 6500C.
Chemical Reaction
CH3OH
CH3OH + O2

CH2O + H2 - 20 Kcal --------------------1


CH2O + H2O + 38 Kcal ------2

1-2 = 18 Kcal
The 650 C reaction gas leaves the reaction and gets into heat exchanger. For the heat exchanger,
the medium is water. The outlet temperature of heat exchanger is 1600C. The water absorbs heat,
forming the water vapour of 0.35 MPa which will be used to arranging the raw materials for
production in the super heater after its pressure stabilized.
0

The generated gas of about 160oC enter into 1st and 2nd formaldehyde absorber in proper order and
gets absorbed by the cooled circulating fluid through spraying. The temperature of the circulating fluid
at the bottom of 1st absorber shall be control at 700C and fluid is pumped to the evaporator by
circulating pump to supply the heat for the evaporation of methanol. In the 1st absorber, the
concentration shall be controlled as 37%, and temperature of the top shall be controlled at 45 0 to 500
C. The circulating fluid is also a composition of the Formaldehyde product by this technique. The
temperature of the top of 2nd absorber shall be controlled at 300 to 350C and keep adding water from
top to control the release of formaldehyde. The flow chart of the manufacturing of formaldehyde is
shown is Figure 2.5.

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-9

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 2.5: FLOW CHART SHOWING MANUFACTURING OF FORMALDEHYDE


2.5.3 Mode of Transport of Raw Material
Raw materials and finished goods will be transported by road/rail & sea.
2.5.4 Storage of Raw Materials
Methanol which is being considered as hazardous is used in small quantity i.e. 360 KL/Month and is
stored in six nos. of underground storage tanks at isolated location.
2.5.5 Water
Source of Water Supply and Requirement
The water requirement for the proposed project will be met from the MIDC supply. The proposed daily
water requirement is about 165.6 m3/day. MIDC supplies treated water to all the units established in
the industrial area. Water requirement for proposed project will be fulfilled by Butibori MIDC. The
water requirement breakup is given below Table 2.6.
TABLE 2.6
WATER REQUIREMENT
Sr. No.
1
2
3
5
Total

Purpose
Domestic
Industrial Process
Industrial Cooling Tower
Landscape

Chapter 2- Project Description

Proposed Requirement (m /day)


2.7
44.4
110
8.5
165.6

2-10

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

2.5.5.1 Wastewater generation


A) Domestic waste
The total domestic waste generation is estimated to be 2.16 m3/day from proposed project. Domestic
sewage will be treated in the septic tank & soak pit. The overflow will be used for gardening/ let to
MIDC Sewerage line.
Sr.
No.
1

Domestic

Industrial Effluent

Source

Wastewater
3
Generation (m /d)

Mitigation

2.16

Treatment in Septic Tanks & Soak Pits & treated overflow


will be used for gardening Garden

Zero Discharge

B) Industrial Wastewater
The total water requirement for the plant is estimated to be 165.6 m3/day. The wastewater generation
is expected to be 24.16 m3/day including domestic waste 2.16m3/d. Total effluent generation due to
proposed facility will be NIL. The wastewater generation is shown in Table 2.7.
TABLE 2.7
WASTEWATER GENERATION FROM PROPOSED PLANT
SN

Water Uses
Cooling
Process

Water Required
3
(m /d)
110
44.4

Waste Water
3
Generation (m /d)
22
0

2
3

Domestic

2.70

2.16

Gardening+
Washing
Total

8.5

165.6

24.16

141.44

Evaporation
Losses+ Process
Consumption
165.6

Remarks

No waste water generation from


process, whole water is consumed with
the process
80% domestic waste generation from
domestic requirement sent to septic
tank/soak pit

Treatment through RO and use in


process
Evaporation/ system loss

165.6

2.5.5.2 Effluent Treatment Details:


A) Domestic Effluent
Domestic effluent generated at lavatory blocks is treated in septic tanks followed by soak pits.
Overflow of the soak pits along with water wasted through water taps are taken for green belt
development within factory premises. However provision will be made to install portable sewage
treatment plant (STP) to treat the domestic waste generated from the plant. The treated domestic
waste will be used for plantation.
B)

Industrial Effluent

Wastewater generated from the plant will be going through RO system and recirculated in the
process. No liquid effluent will be discharged in ground/nearby water body. There will be zero
discharge patterns for trade effluent.

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-11

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

2.5.5.3 Wastewater Characteristics


Company shall provide comprehensive treatment system consisting of primary/secondary and/or
tertiary treatment so as to achieve the quality of the treated effluent to the prescribed norms of
CPCB/MBCB.
There will be provision by the industry to recycle/ reuse the treated effluent for gardening/plantation
purpose, so as to adopt zero discharge norms. There will not be any discharges outside the factory
premises.
2.6

BASIC REQUIREMENTS FOR PROPOSED PROJECT

The basic requirement for operating the unit for the production of organic chemicals is availability of
fuel, water and other infrastructure like road, electricity. Details of these requirements are as under:
2.6.1

Land Requirement

The project proponent has acquired total land of 4050 sq. m. and land available for the greenbelt
development will be about 33 % of the plot area. Proposed plantation will be done in approx. 1336.5
m2 area out of 4050 m2.The area details are given in Table 2.8.
TABLE 2.8
LAND (BREAKUP) DETAILS
Sr.No.

Description

Area (Sq.m)

Land/Plot Area

C6

4050 sq.m

1.

12% of total plot area for parking (including visitors'


parking)

486 sq.mt

2.

Greenbelt Area (33% non-built-up area as a green belt)

1336.5 sq.mt

2.6.2

Power and Fuel Requirement

Power Requirement:
The industry has 250 HP proposed power supply from Maharashtra State electricity distribution
corporation Limited (MSEDCL). Thus the total power requirement will be 250 HP.
Fuel Requirement:
Mode of transportation of fuel to site is through Tanker. DG set will be used in case of power failure
The details of fuel requirement are as follows (Table 2.9):
TABLE 2.9
FUEL REQUIREMENT
Sr.
No
1.

2.6.3

Fuel

HSD

Daily Consumption
(TPD/KLD)
Proposed
3000 lit/annum

Calorific
Value (Kcals/kg)
10600-11300

% Ash

0.01

% Sulphur

0.28

Man Power Requirement

Man power requirement for the construction phase is 20-25 Nos. and operation phase will be
estimated as 24 Nos. The company will have one Production Manager, One R&D Manager, Shift
Engineers (6 Nos.) and skilled and unskilled labourers to the extent of 16 Nos. The manpower is
locally and easily available.

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-12

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

2.6.4

Storage of Raw Materials

The storage area shall be provided for storing raw materials required. The raw materials would be
handled and stored in a manner to prevent contamination and cross contamination. Special care is
exercised in handling and storage of these chemicals because of the inherent hazards associated
with them.
Handling Practices & Precautions considered at the plant are as follows:
Flammable Chemicals:

Flammable materials will be stored in places which are cool enough to prevent accidental ignition
of the vapors mixing with the air.

The storage area will be away from any source of heat or fire hazard.

Highly flammable substance will be kept apart from powerful oxidizing agents or from materials
which are susceptible to spontaneous combustion.

Where highly volatile liquids are stored, all electrical light fittings or apparatus are of certified
flame proof construction and the vessels and pipe fittings are bonded for static charge discharge.

No open lights or flames, (smoking, welding, cutting, etc.) will be permitted in or near the storage
space.

The storage room, tanks, installations will be electrically grounded and periodically inspected.

They will be stored at a place having adequate ventilation, so that normal leakage of vapors from
container is diluted enough to prevent a spark from igniting them.

Ample firefighting equipment will be readily available near storage shed.

All metallic structural work and parts in the area will be painted frequently or otherwise rendered
immune to corrosion.

All volatile and flammable bulk storage tanks will be equipped with water sprinkler system

Toxic Chemicals

Storage area will be well ventilated.

All the substances likely to decompose due to contact with heat, moisture, acid etc. will be stored
in a cool, well ventilated place away from direct sunrays, water, heat and ignition sources.

No food stuffs and any edible substances will be allowed to be stored or kept in the chemical
storage area.

Individuals will not be allowed to work alone in a storage area containing highly toxic substance.

Corrosive Chemicals

Materials may cause damage to their containers and leak into the storage area resulting in
corrosion of metal structures. Hence appropriate materials of construction for containers will be
used.

The containers will be checked frequently for any leakage / damage. Any leaking / damaged
container will be immediately repaired or replaced.

Storage area for corrosive substances will be isolated from the rest of the plant, and will be well
ventilated.

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-13

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

The bulk containers are provided with impervious dike wall and floor with provision for the safe
disposal of spillage and stock appropriate spillage collection materials are maintained

Water Reactive Chemicals

Storage area will be well ventilated and for highly moisture sensitive materials, dehumidified
storage condition shall be provided

No water hydrant, water sprinkler will be permitted near to this area.

Oxidizing Chemicals

Such materials will be stored in a cool, well ventilated and isolated area.

They will be stored away from the liquids of low flash point.

The storage area is of fire proof construction.

In case of fire in this area, it is desirable to keep the inflammable fuel away, as normal firefighting
equipment are less effective in this area.

Incompatible materials (strong reducing chemicals) will not stored with these chemicals

General Procedure for Handling of Chemicals


The physical injury and material damage is most often caused during handling of chemicals due to
carelessness, adopting faulty use handling methods & tools, by-passing safety regulations to shortcut, and ignorance of the dangerous properties of chemicals. This will be minimized by adopting
following precautions:

The containers of all hazardous raw materials and products are labeled boldly, so that persons
handling any package could readily ascertain the nature of the associated hazards with that
substance.

Chemicals will be loaded, unloaded, handled and stored under the supervision of a competent
person, who is familiar with risks and precautions to be taken. He will inform the workers about
the associated hazards.

Chemicals are checked for the compliance of labeling as per the national & international
regulations.

Incompatible chemicals will be stored separately.

Wherever necessary, workers engaged in loading and unloading operations will be given the
necessary personaI protective equipment.

As far as possible these substances will be kept in their original containers.

Unauthorized entry at loading, unloading and storage area will be restricted.

Eating, drinking and smoking in and near the storage area will be strictly prohibited.

2.6.5

Environmental Aspects

2.6.5.1 Air Emission


Air pollution sources in the factory include: - i.) Boiler Furnace
ii.) DG Set
2.6.5.1.1 Boiler Furnace: It is proposed to use High Speed Diesel as a fuel for water tube boiler

Chapter 2- Project Description

2-14

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

furnace. Proposed quantity of HSD used will be 25 lit/hr. Initially the boiler will run only 6 hour. As
there is exothermic reaction, the waste heat will be covered and recycled.
The proposed stack details are shown in Table 2.10.
TABLE 2.10
STACK DETAILS
Sr. No.
1
2
3
4
5
5
6
7

Particulars
No. of stacks
Attached to
Capacity
Fuel Type
Fuel Quantity
Material of Construction
Shape
Height

Details
1
Boiler
900 kg/Hr
HSD
25 Litre/hr
M.S
Round
11.0

2.6.5.1.2 DG Set
Diesel will also be used to run the D.G. set for backup power supply and it is estimated that the unit
will need diesel as 3000 lit/annum. The proposed stack details are shown in Table 2.11.
TABLE 2.11
STACK DETAILS
Sr. No.
1
2
3
4
5
5
6
7

Particulars
No. of stacks
Attached to
Capacity
Fuel Type
Fuel Quantity
Material of Construction
Shape
Height

Details
1
D G Set
200 KVA
HSD
As per requirement
M.S
Round
10.00

2.6.5.2 Solid Waste Generation


There are various types of solid wastes generated from the different areas in Paramount Chempro.
The types of wastes generated are:
A. Non-biodegradable : Discarded Containers/Barrels/Liners
B. Bio-degradable : Domestic waste, Sludge from wastewater treatment plant and Gardening waste
The details about the generated solid wastes are presented in Table 2.12.
TABLE 2.12
SOLID WASTE GENERATION AND DISPOSAL
Sr. No. Source
Anticipated Quantity
Biodegradable
1
Domestic Waste
6.0 Kg/day
2
Gardening Waste
4.2 Kg/day
3
Process Waste
Non-Biodegradable
1
Discarded plastic containers/barrels/liners
2 kg/day

Chapter 2- Project Description

Mitigative Measures
Composting
Composting
Sold to authorized parties

2-15

CHAPTER-3
DESCRIPTION OF ENVIRONMENT

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.0

DESCRIPTION OF ENVIRONMENT

3.1

INTRODUCTION

This chapter of the report provides details about the environmental baseline conditions within the
study area. An environmental baseline survey was conducted as a part of EIA study for M/s.
Paramount Chempro Butibori, Nagpur during January - March 2016 and included collection of
primary and secondary data.
3.1.1

Methodology

The methodology for carrying out the baseline environmental monitoring incorporated the guidelines
given in the EIA Manual of the MoEF. The baseline data with respect to air, noise, water, land,
biological and socio-economic components of environment in the study area was collected by
conducting field studies during the study period. The baseline environmental status of study area with
respect to the different environmental attributes is as follows:
Primary data collection included:

Ambient air quality


Noise levels
Groundwater / surface waterquality
Soil quality
Landuse pattern
Flora and Fauna

Secondary data collection


This includes review of secondary published information on;

Socio-economic conditions
Sensitive areas such as biosphere reserve, forests, sanctuaries, places of historical,
Archaeological tourist importance, etc.

3.2

AIR ENVIRONMENT

The baseline status for air environment includes reconnaissance, identification of specific air
pollutants due to the proposed project activity and measuring their existing levels prior to the
implementation of the project. The data required to assess the ambient status was collected,
analysed and evaluated through a well-designed air quality monitoring (AQM) network.
3.2.1

Meteorology

The meteorological data recorded during the study period was very useful for selection of sampling
locations as per upwind and downwind directions for proper on-site monitoring to be undertaken for
various meteorological variables in order to generate the site specific data. Data was collected for
proposed project site on hourly basis continuously from January-March, 2016. The generated data
was then compared with the meteorological data collected by nearest India Meteorological
Department (IMD) station located at Nagpur.
Temperature
The winter season starts from December and continues till the end of February. December is the
coldest month with the minimum temperature at 12.90C. The temperature starts increasing rapidly
during the onset of pre-monsoon season from March to May. During pre-monsoon season, the
maximum temperature was observed 42.70C and the minimum temperature is 19.70C. The maximum
Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

temperature in the monsoon season was observed to be 38.00C, whereas the minimum temperature
was observed 23.20C. In the post-monsoon, day temperature decreases slightly with the maximum
temperature 32.90C. The monthly variations in temperature are presented in Table 3.1.
Relative Humidity
The relative humidity was observed around 19% to 41% during pre-monsoon period. In monsoon
period the relative humidity ranged between 49% to 85%. During the post-monsoon season, the
humidity was observed between 51% to 71% and in winter season, the humidity was observed to be
31% to 67%. The variations in relative humidity are presented in Table 3.1.
Rainfall
The annual rainfall based on the IMD data was recorded as 1100.30 mm. The monsoon generally
sets in during the second week of June. The rainfall gradually decreased after September. The
maximum number of rainy days were observed in the month of July. Annual and monthly variations in
rainfall are presented in 3.1.
TABLE 3.1
CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR IMD, NAGPUR (1981 - 2010)
Month
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
RANGE

Humidity (%)
08:30 hr
67
54
41
33
35
61
82
85
81
71
65
66
19-85

Temperature (c)
Max
Min
29
13.4
31.8
15.6
36.4
19.7
40.7
24.1
42.7
27.8
38
26.5
31.8
24.3
30.7
23.8
32.3
23.2
32.9
20
30.9
15.8
28.9
12.9
12.9-42.7

Monthly Rainfall (mm)


17:30 hr
42
31
24
19
22
49
72
76
71
58
51
47

21.6
15.6
21.7
9.2
21.2
168.8
313.7
267
170.2
64
16
11.3
1100.30

Source: From Climatological Normals Book of 1981-2010


Meteorological condition at site
The weather monitoring station was installed at the site to record temperature, wind speed, wind
direction, relative humidity. Rainfall was monitored by rain gauge. The hourly minimum, maximum
values monitored during January-March, 2016 are presented in Table 3.2.
TABLE 3.2
SUMMARY OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AT SITE
Month
January 2016
February 2016
March 2016
Range

Temperature ( c)
Min
Max
9
35
14
37
24
44
9-44

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Relative Humidity (%)


Min
Max
15
94
16
95
5
73
5-95

Rainfall (mm)
0.0
3.81
0.05
Total-3.86

3-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Wind speed/ directions


The meteorological data with respect to wind speed and direction was collected and presented in the
form of wind roses during study period (January-March, 2016) and shown in Figure 3.1 and the
summary of site specific wind pattern is presented in Table 3.3.
TABLE 3.3
SUMMARY OF SITE SPECIFIC WIND PATTERN
Details
First Predominant Wind Direction
Second Predominant Wind Direction
Calm conditions (%)

Wind Direction
N (17.3%)
E (7.9 %)
17.77 %

FIGURE 3.1: SITE SPECIFIC WINDROSE (January - March 2016)


3.2.2

Baseline Status

The ambient air quality monitoring with respect to parameters of significance was carried out during
January - March 2016. The site is located at Butibori and the major sources of air pollution in the
region are Industrial operations, domestic activities and rural conditions. The prime objective was to
assess the existing air quality of the area.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Methodology for air quality monitoring


Selection of sampling locations
The baseline status of the ambient air quality was assessed through a scientifically designed ambient
air quality monitoring network. The design of monitoring network in the air quality surveillance
program was based on the following considerations:
Meteorological conditions on synoptic scale;
Topography of the study area;
Representatives of regional background;
Population and sensitive areas;
Representation of valid cross sectional distribution in downwind direction
Ambient air monitoring was carried out at 9 locations (project site and surrounding villages). The
details about sampling locations are depicted in Figure 3.2 and presented in Table 3.4. The locations
were identified keeping in view predominant wind directions prevailing during study period, sensitive
receptors and human settlements. The levels of PM10, PM2.5, Sulphur Dioxide (SO2), Oxides of
Nitrogen (NOX), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) and Ammonia (NH3)
were monitored for establishing the baseline status. PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected with the
help of respirable particulate sampler operating 24 hours by drawing air which passes through the
cyclone at the rate of 1.0-1.5 m3/min which collects the particles less than 10 m diameter over glass
fibrefilter paper and the bigger particulates from 10 to 100 m are collected in the receiver provided at
the bottom of the cyclone. The dust deposited over the filter paper was measured as PM10 and the
dust deposited in the receiver was measured as PM2.5 which was computed by gravimetric method.
Due to the high suction of the air, the vacuum was formed into the hopper which was utilized by
providing a nozzle in the hopper for sampling of SO2 and NOX, which was analyzed
spectrophotometrically. Similarly, NH3 and VOCs were analysed through NH3 analyser and gas
chromatographically respectively.
TABLE 3.4
DETAILS OF AIR SAMPLING LOCATION
Sr.
No.

Station
Code

Location

Latitude

Longitude

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

AAQ1
AAQ2
AAQ3
AAQ4
AAQ5
AAQ6
AAQ7
AAQ8
AAQ9

Project Site
Khapri
Mandwa
Kirmiti
Gangapur
Buttibori
Bhansuli
Tembhari
Vadgaon

2056'31.3"N
2054'07.44"N
2056'56.14"N
2056'46.72N
2055'13.16N
2055'52.38N
2056'16.57"N
2056'01.81"N
2058'50.78"N

7856'55.5"E
7855'12.65"E
7855'13.64"E
7858'16.46E
7855'53.95E
7900'19.59E
7854'27.66"E
7857'35.82"E
7858'51.89"E

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Distance(Km)&
Direction w.r.t.
Project Site
--6.1
SW
4.09
WSW
8.66
N
3.0
SW
5.89
SE
6.28
WSW
1.62
SW
4.05
NE

Justification

Project site
Downwind
Crosswind
Upwind
Downwind
Cross Downwind
Downwind
Nearest to project site
Upwind

3-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 3.2: STUDY AREA MAP WITH AMBIENT AIR QUALITY LOCATIONS
Methodology of ambient air monitoring
Sr.
No.
1.
2.

3.

4.
5.
6.

Sampling
parameter
Suspended
particulate matter
Respirable
Suspended
particulate matter
(PM10)
PM2.5
Sulphur dioxide
(SO2)
Notrogen dioxide
(NOx)
NH3

Technique
High Volume sampler
(Gravimetric method)
Respirable Dust Sampler
with Cyclone & Flow
measurement (Gravimetric
method)
Fine Particulate Sampler
with WINS Impactor
(Gravimetric method)
Modified West and Gaeke

Minimum
detectable limit
3
10 g/m

Technique
protocol/Methodology
Gravimetric (HVS)-IS: 5182

5 g/m

Gravimetric (HVS)-IS: 5182:


Part-4

2 g/m

Gravimetric (HVS)-IS: 5182:


Part-4 with cyclone

6 g/m

Jacob and Hochheiser

3 g/m

Nesslerization Method

5 g/m

Clorimetric IS: 5182: (Part2)2001


Clorimetric IS: 5182: (Part6)2006
IS: 5182:and CPCB

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sr.
No.
7.

Sampling
parameter
Fluoride

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

Ozone
CO
Benzene
BaP
As, Ni, Pb

Technique
Ion selective electrode
method
UV spectrophotometer
NDIR
GC
HPLC
Ion Chromatography

Minimum
detectable limit
3
0.1 g/m

Technique
protocol/Methodology
Standard method

0.001 ppm
0.01 ppm
0.001 ppb
0.01 ppb
0.01 ppb

IS: 5182 (Part 9): 1974


IS: 5182 (Part 10): 1999
IS: 5182 (Part 11):2006
IS: 5182 (Part 12): 2004
CPCB new NAAQM ,
Regulations, 2009

Ambient Air Quality Monitoring was carried out 24 hrs a day. PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NOx, NH3 and all other
parameters as mentioned in the above table, were monitored at site and analyzed as per methods
given above. Nine (9) hourly samples were collected for carbon monoxide.
Presentation of primary data
Various statistical parameters like 98th percentile, average, maximum and minimum values have
been computed from the observed raw data for all the AAQ monitoring stations. The results of
monitoring carried out are presented in Annexure IV. The summary of these results representing
January - March 2016 are given in Table 3.5. These are compared with the prevailing environmental
quality standards prescribed by Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) for Industrial, Residential,
Rural and other area.
TABLE 3.5
SUMMARY OF AMBIENT AIR QUALITY RESULTS
Station
code

Location

AAQ1
AAQ2
AAQ3
AAQ4
AAQ5
AAQ6
AAQ7
AAQ8
AAQ9
Range
Ambient

Project Site
KhapriVillage
Mandwa Village
KirmitiVillage
GangapurVillage
Buttibori
Bhansuli Village
TembhariVillage
VadgaonVillage

PM10 (g/m )
Min
Max

Air Quality Standards

44.9
64.8
44.0
56.0
39.0
54.0
46.0
61.3
45.0
57.0
54.0
69.0
48.0
63.0
43.7
64.3
41.0
61.0
39.0-69.0
100(24 hr)

th

Avg

98 %

56.05
50.4
48.3
55.47
51.46
62.6
57.0
54.07
49.8

64.8
55.5
53.5
61.07
56.5
68.5
63
64.07
59.88

PM2.5 (g/m )
Min
Max
17.3
13.1
10.2
10.8
11.8
16.1
12.7
13.8
16.1
10.2-28.1
60 (24 hr)

28.1
17.9
19.8
20.7
19.2
22.9
20.2
22.6
22.9

th

Avg

98 %

21.2
15.3
14.9
17.35
17.15
18.65
15.7
17.8
20.6

26.7
17.6
19.0
20.4
19.2
22.4
20.1
22.4
22.8

Avg
11.2
11.4

98 %
15.12
12.2

TABLE 3.5 (Contd...)


SUMMARY OF AMBIENT AIR QUALITY RESULTS
Station code Location

SO2 (g/m
Min
15.06
12.29

)
th

Max
17.96
14.93

Avg 98 %
16.43 17.85
13.6
14.7

NOx(g/m )
Min
Max
8.6
15.3
10.29
12.33

th

AAQ 1
AAQ2

Project Site
KhapriVillage

AAQ3
AAQ4
AAQ5

Mandwa Village
KirmitiVillage
GangapurVillage

13.34
15.7
15.9

15.49
18.2
19.5

14.5
17.1
18.19

15.5
18.2
19.45

7.16
8.2
8.7

9.7
21.9
15.9

8.4
15.1
12.08

9.7
21.4
15.9

AAQ6
AAQ7

Buttibori
Bhansuli Village

15.8
16.2

18.2
19.7

17.2
18.5

18.2
19.6

12.6
10.3

21.4
19.8

16.8
15.5

20.8
19.7

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-6

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

SO2 (g/m
Min
15.4
10.3
10.3-19.7

Station code Location


AAQ8
AAQ9
Range

TembhariVillage
VadgaonVillage

Ambient Air Quality CPCB


Standards

NOx(g/m )
Min
Max
8.60
23.3
8.89
10.84
8.2-23.3

)
Max
18.2
18.8

Avg
16.4
15.5

th

98 %
17.8
18.8

80 (24 hr)

th

Avg 98 %
17.10 23.1
9.3
10.6

80 (24 hr)

TABLE 3.5 (Contd...)


SUMMARY OF AMBIENT AIR QUALITY RESULTS
Station
code

Location

CO (mg/m )
Min
Max

AAQ 1 ProjectSite
AAQ2 Khapri
AAQ3 Mandwa
AAQ4 Kirmiti
AAQ5 Gangapur
AAQ6 Buttibori
AAQ7 Bhansuli
AAQ8 Tembhari
AAQ9 Vadgaon
Range
Ambient Air Quality
CPCB Standards

0.51
0.67
0.18
0.22
0.61
0.78
0.4
0.6
0.10
0.98
0.5
0.8
0.071 0.112
0.083 0.124
0.076 0.95
0.071-0.98
2000 (8 hr)

Avg
0.61
0.20
0.67
0.50
0.63
0.60
0.08
0.10
0.62

th

98
%
0.67
0.22
0.78
0.60
1.00
0.80
0.11
0.12
1.00

O3 (g/m )
Min
Max Avg

NH3(g/m )
Min Max Avg

th

98
%
15.3 25.6 18.87 24.45
12.9 21.6 17.9 21.6
13.1 21.6 17.5 21.6
12.3 21.6 16.54 21.46
11.0 22.6 18.1 22.28
14.6 22.3 18.3 22.3
16.2 25.6 19.3 25.5
13.2 25.1 19.5 24.9
11.0 25.0 18.4 23.62
11.0-25.6
100 (8 hr)

22.0 46.0
21.6 36.0
22.0 38.0
22.0 35.0
22.0 36.0
25.0 38.0
21.0 39.0
21.0 38.0
21.0 33.0
21.0-46.0
400 (24 hr)

th

98 %

30.50
29.9
30.5
29.79
29.8
30.4
30.9
29.54
29.0

42.32
36.0
38.0
35.0
36.0
38.08
38.54
37.08
33.0

TABLE 3.5 (Contd...)


SUMMARY OF AMBIENT AIR QUALITY RESULT
Station
code

Location

AAQ2
AAQ3
AAQ4
AAQ5
AAQ6
AAQ7
AAQ8
AAQ9

Khapri Village
Mandwa Village
Kirmiti Village
Gangapur Village
Buttibori
Bhansuli
Tembhari Village
Vadgaon Village

Concentration
3
As (ng/m )
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
6 (Annual

Hg
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
-

Pb ( g/m )
0.26
0.18
0.20
0.19
0.18
0.17
0.16
0.14
0.16
1 (24 hr)
3

Ni (ng/m )
3.4
3.3
3.3
3.1
3.0
3.1
2.9
3.1
2.9
20 (Annual)

ND:Not Detectable
TABLE 3.6
LEVELS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC POLLUTANTS
Station Code

Sampling Location

AAQ 1
AAQ 2
AAQ 3
AAQ 4
AAQ 5

Project Site
Khapri Village
Mandwa Village
Kirmiti Village
Gangapur Village

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Benzene
g/m
1.0
0.6
1.0
0.8
0.7

BaP
ng/m
0.18
0.07
0.06
0.07
0.05

THC
ppm
0.85
0.74
0.75
0.60
0.92
3-7

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

AAQ 6
Buttibori
AAQ 7
Bhansuli
AAQ 8
Tembhari Village
AAQ 9
Vadgaon Village
Ambient Air Quality CPCB Standards

1.1
1.0
0.9
0.6
5 (Annual)

0.14
0.03
0.07
0.05
1 (Annual)

0.61
0.61
0.61
0.58
-

THC: Total Hydrocarbons


The overall ambient air quality with respect to parameters of significance was found to be good and
within prescribed AAQMS by CPCB.
Observations of Primary Data
PM10
PM10 concentration ranged from 39.0-69.0g/m3in the study area. The maximum concentration of
69.0g/m3was recorded at Buttibori and minimum concentration of 39.0g/m3 was recorded at
Mandwa village.
PM 2.5
PM2.5 concentration ranged from 10.2-28.1g/m3in the study area. The maximum concentration of
28.1 g/m3 was recorded at Project site and minimum concentration of 10.2 g/m 3 was recorded at
Mandwa village.
SO2
SO2 concentration ranged from 10.3-19.7 g/m3in the study area. The maximum concentration of
19.7 g/m3 was recorded at Project site and minimum concentration of 10.3 g/m3 was recorded at
Vadgaon.
NOx
NOx concentration ranged from 8.2-23.3 g/m3in the study area. The maximum concentration of
23.3g/m3 was recorded at Tembhari and minimum concentration of 8.2 g/m 3 was recorded at
Kirmiti village.
CO
CO concentration ranged from 0.071-0.98mg/m3 in the study area. The maximum concentration of
0.98 mg/m3 was recorded at Gangapur and minimum concentration of 0.071mg/m3 was recorded at
Bhansuli village.
Ozone
Ozone concentration ranged from 11.0-25.6g/m3 in the study area. The maximum concentration of
25.6g/m3 was recorded at Buttibori, Bhansuli and minimum concentration of 11.0g/m3 was
recorded at Gangapur and Vadgaon.
NH3
Ammonia concentration ranged from 21.0-46.0g/m3 in the study area. The maximum concentration
of 46.0 g/m3was recorded at Butttibori and minimum concentrate on of 21.0g/m3 was recorded at
Bhansuli and Tembhari.
Hg/As
Hg and As concentration levels at all the locations monitored in the study area were observed in not
detectable levels.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-8

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

The concentration levels of all the parameters were well within the prescribed limits of CPCB. At the
project site, ambient air quality monitoring was carried out along the boundary towards the highway
for evaluating the concentration levels of pollutants from proposed project to highway and vice versa.
The photographs of the monitoring stations and the equipment are attached at end of the Chapter.
3.3

NOISE ENVIRONMENT

A preliminary reconnaissance was undertaken to identify the major noise generating sources in the
area. Nine (9) locations were identified based on the activities in the village area, traffic and sensitive
areas like hospitals and schools. The noise monitoring locations are shown in Figure 3.3 and details
are given in Table 3.7.
The objective of survey was to assess the noise levels, generated from the existing industrial units
and other related activities.Sound pressure level (SPL) was measured at all nine locations. The
readings were taken for 24 hours. The day time noise levels were monitored during 6 am to 10 pm
and night time levels during 10 pm to 6 am at all the locations within 10 Km radius of the study
area.The monitoring results are shown in Table 3.7.
TABLE 3.7
NOISE MONITORING LOCATIONS
Sr.
No.

Station
Code

Location

Category
of Area / Zone

Latitude

Longitude

N1

Project Site

Industrial

2056'31.3"N

7856'55.5"E

Distance
Direction
(Km)
w.r.t. Project Site
NA
NA

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

N2
N3
N4
N5
N6
N7
N8
N9

Khapri
Mandwa
Kirmiti
Gangapur
Buttibori
Bhansuli
Tembhari
Vadgaon

Commercial
Commercial
Silence
Silence
Industrial Area
Silence
Residential
Residential

2054'07.44"N
2056'56.14"N
2056'46.72" N
2055'13.16" N
2055'52.38" N
2056'16.57"N
2056'01.81"N
2058'50.78"N

7855'12.65"E
7855'13.64"E
7858'16.46"E
7855'53.95"E
7900'19.59"E
7854'27.66"E
7857'35.82"E
7858'51.89"E

6.1
4.09
8.66
3.0
5.89
6.28
1.62
4.05

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

SW
WSW
N
SW
SE
WSW
SW
NE

3-9

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 3.3: STUDY AREA MAP WITH NOISE MONITORING LOCATIONS


3.3.1

Measurement of Baseline Noise Levels

Monitoring Methodology of Noise


Environment
Component

Sampling
Location

Sampling
Parameter

Sampling
Frequency

Ambient Noise
levels

09
locations

DecibelsdB (A)

Once during
the study
(hourly reading
for 24 hrs at
each location)

Sampling Collection
Sampling
Detection
Equipment
Limit
Noise level
0.1 dB (A)
Meter

Methodology

SLM 100
[IS 15575-2
(2005)]

The statistical analysis was done for measured noise levels at 09 locations during January-March
2016 study period, the parameters are monitored for Leqday and Leqnight and compared prescribed
standards. These results are tabulated in Table 3.8.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-10

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 3.8
NOISE LEVELS [dB (A)] IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr. No.

Monitoring Locations

Equivalent Noise Level


LeqDay
LeqNight
55
45
47
40
48
41
47-48
40-41
65
55
57
47
51
43
51-57
43-47
50
40
43
39
43
37
44
38
43-44
37-39
75
70
57
48
56
47
56-57
47-48

Residential Area CPCB Standards dB(A)


1
TembhariVillage
2
VadgaonVillage
Range
Commercial Area CPCB Standards dB(A)
3
KhapriVillage
4
Mandwa Village
Range
Silence Zone CPCB Standards dB(A)
5
Bhansuli
6
Kirmiti
7
Gangapur
Range
Industrial Area CPCB Standards dB(A)
8
Project site
9
Butibori
Range

Source: Field monitoring & analysis by Anacon Laboratories Pvt. Ltd., Nagpur
TABLE 3.9
BACKGROUND NOISE LEVELS IN INDUSTRIAL AREA NEAR HIGHWAYS
Sr. No.

Location

1.
Near NH-7
2.
Near SH-262
3.
Near SH-3
Range
CPCB Standards dB(A)Industrial Area

Distance of Highway
from plant
4.6
5.06
4.29

Direction of
Highway w.r.t
plant
E
SE
SSE

Leqday

Leqnight

60
67
63
63-67

53
55
51
51-55

75

70

Source: Field monitoring and analysis by Anacon Laboratories Pvt. Ltd., Nagpur
Baseline Status
a.

Day Time Noise Levels (Leqday)

Background noise levels were monitored in the villages within the study area. The noise levels at all
locations ranged between 43 dB (A) to 57 dB (A).Noise levels near industrial area ranged between
56-57 dB (A)during day time which was well within the prescribed limit of 75 dB (A) for industrial area.
b.

Night Time Noise Levels (Leqnight)

The night time noise levels ranged between 39 dB (A) to 48dB (A). At residential locations, noise
levels ranged between 40-41dB (A). At commercial area, noise levels were observed to be 43-47 dB
(A) and in sensitive areas noise levels ranged between 37-39 dB(A) which was well within the
prescribed limit of 40 dB (A) for silence zone.
Background noise levels near industrial area ranged between 47-48dB (A) during night time which
was well within the prescribed limit of 70 dB (A) for industrial area.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-11

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

c.

Noise Levels Due to Traffic in the Study Area

The National highway (NH-7) is passing through this region and having major traffic activities.
Agglomeration and congestion of traffic was observed on main roads and at the crossing of important
roads near petrol pumps, market and industrial areas. The vehicular traffic was monitored at different
crossings within the study area during peak hours.
During survey period, the traffic density at these junctions was observed to be very high. The noise
levels monitored at some of the major traffic junctions along with their peak traffic density are listed in
Table 3.10. The Leq at the traffic junctions was observed in the range of 53-67.2 dB (A).
TABLE 3.10
VEHICULAR TRAFFIC AND CORRESPONDING NOISE LEVELS DURING PEAK HOURS
IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr. No.

Traffic Intersection

1
2
3

National Highway-7
State Highway-262
State Highway -3

Traffic Density per peak hours


H
M
L
248
179
184
70
60
25
65
53
31

Sound pressure levels


(peak hours)dB (A)
67.2
53.0
55.5

Observations:
1) Width of the roads was found less than the requirement for accommodating the daily plying traffic,
particularly, during day time. Heavy traffic on the main roads passing through the villages or
townships during day time, contribute significantly to increase in noise levels in the nearby residential
areas. During night time traffic density was found to be less, therefore, noise was mainly due to
industrial activities.
2) The major commercial activities in the region are the local market places. Other than regular
human activities, the traffic, particularly, industrial goods vehicles are the main contributors for noise
in these areas.
3) The noise levels were recorded at some hospitals and colleges/schools. High noise levels were
observed a few places because of parking besides the main road sides.
4) Most of the industries existing in the nearby industrial areas have not been developed with
sufficient green cover surrounding them. Hence, attenuation was not observed in the study region.
3.4

WATER ENVIRONMENT

In general, any industrial project is expected to cause impact on water environment in two ways: one
is stress on water resources (continuous withdrawal of large quantities of water) and other is pollution
through discharge of effluents. These impacts may be related to either both surface and groundwater
resources in the project area depending on the specific situation. To address these issues, it is
necessary to ensure the availability of water resources in project area with respect to their existing
quality as well as their supportive capacity to represent the baseline status of water environment.
Surface and Groundwater Sampling Locations
13 water samples were collected from various locations, comprising nine (9) from groundwater
sources and four (4) from surface water sources. These samples were collected as grab samples,
preserved and analyzed for various parameters. The samples were analyzed as per the procedures
specified in standard methods for the examination of water and wastewater published by American
Public Health Association (APHA/IS 10500).
Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-12

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

The water sampling locations are listed in Table3.11 and are depicted in Figure 3.4.The physicochemical characteristics of surface and groundwater are presented in Tables 3.12-3.13 respectively.
TABLE 3.11
DETAILS OF WATER SAMPLING LOCATION
Code

Location

Surface Water
SW1
Wakeshwar
SW2

Vadgaon

SW3
Near Sirul
SW4
Near Bori
Groundwater
GW1 Project
Site
GW2 Khapri
Village
GW3 Mandwa Village
GW4 Kirmiti
Village
GW5 Gangapur
Village
GW6 Buttibori
GW7 Bhansuli
GW8 Tembhari
Village
GW9 Vadgaon
Village

Source

Latitude

Longitude

Direction Distance(Km)
w.r.t. Project Site

Wakeshwr dam

2058'18.13" N

7902'49.52"E

ENE

9.5

Vadgaon Dam
Reservoir
Wenna river
Wenna River

2058'46.16"N

7858'41.84"E

NNE

4.27

2059'07.22" N
2054'55.68" N

7900'11.96"E
7900'55.68"E

ENE
SE

3.17
5.76

Tap Water

2056'31.3"N

7856'55.5"E

NA

NA

Handpump

2054'07.44"N

7855'12.65"E

6.1

SW

Dugwell
Dugwell

2056'56.14"N
2056'46.72N

7855'13.64"E
7858'16.46E

4.09
8.66

WSW
N

Handpump

2055'13.16N

7855'53.95E

3.0

SW

Dugwell
Dugwell
Dugwell

2055'52.38N
2056'16.57"N
2056'01.81"N

7900'19.59E
7854'27.66"E
7857'35.82"E

5.89
6.28
1.62

SE
WSW
SW

Handpump

2058'50.78"N

7858'51.89"E

4.05

NE

Source: Field monitoring& analysis by Anacon Laboratories Pvt. Ltd., Nagpur


Analytical Procedures for Water Quality Parameters
Following procedures were adopted for analysis of ground and surface water quality
Sr. No.
1
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Parameters
pH
Temperature
Turbidity
Total Dissolved Solids
Electrical conductivity
Chemical Oxygen Demand
Biochemical Oxygen Demand

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

Chloride
Sulphate
Total Hardness as CaCO3
++
Ca Hardness as CaCO3
++
Mg Hardness as CaCO3
Total alkalinity as CaCO3
Nitrate
Fluoride
Sodium
Potassium
Calcium

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Methodology
APHA, Edition 21 (4500 H+B), pH meter
APHA, Edition 21 (2130 B), Standard Thermometer
APHA, Edition 21 (2130 B), Nephethlo photometer
APHA, Edition 21 (2540 C) Gravimetric
APHA, Edition 21 (2510 B), Conductivity Meter
APHA, Edition 21 (5220 B), Tetrameter open reflux
APHA, Edition 21 (03 days IS 3025 part 44, 1993 Iodometric
03daysAPHA Edition 21 (5210 B) Iodometric
APHA, Edition 21 (4500 Cr B) Titrametric
APHA, Edition 21 (4500-SO2 4E) Turbidimeter
APHA, Edition 21 (2340 C) Titrametric (EDTA Method)
APHA, Edition 21 (3500-Ca B)
APHA, Edition 21 (3500-Mg B)
APHA, Edition 21 (2320 B) Titrametric
APHA, Edition 16 (418 D) Colorimetric
APHA, Edition 21 (4500 F D) Colorimetric
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 Na B) Flame emission Photometric
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 K B) Flame emission Photometric
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 Ca B) Flame emission Photometric
3-13

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sr. No.
19.
20
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
26.
27.

Parameters
Magnesium
Salinity
Total Nitrogen
Total Phosphorous
Dissolved Oxygen
Ammonical Nitrogen
SAR
Arsenic (as As)
Cadmium (as Cd)
Chromium (as Cr)
Copper (as Cu)
Lead (as Pb)
Iron (as Fe)
Manganese (as Mn)
Nickel (Ni)
Zinc (as Zn)
Mercury (as Hg)
Total Coliform
Faecal Coliform

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Methodology
APHA, Edition 21 (3500-Mg B), by difference
APHA, Edition 21 (2520 B), Electrical conductivity Method
APHA, Edition 21 (4500-Norg, B)
APHA, Edition 21 (4500-P,C)
APHA, Edition 21 (4500-O,B)
APHA, Edition 21 (4500 NH3) Colorimetric
Calculation through SAR formula
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 As B) Colorimetric
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 Cd), (3111 B), AAS Method
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 Cr B) Colorimetric
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 Cu B), (3111 B), AAS Method, colorimetric
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 Pb A) AAS Method
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 Fe B) Colorimetric
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 Mn A) (3111 B), AAS Method / Colorimetric
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 Ni) AAS Method
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 Zn B) AAS Method
APHA, Edition 21 (3500 Hg) AAS Method
APHA, Edition 21 (9221 B), Multiple Tube fermentation
APHA, Edition 21 99221 E), Multiple Tube Fermetation

3-14

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 3.4: SURFACE AND GROUNDWATER SAMPLING LOCATIONS


3.4.1

Physico-chemical Characteristics

3.4.1.1 Surface Water Quality


The physico-chemical characteristics of the surface water samples collected and analysed are
presented in Table 3.12 and are compared with the IS-10500 standards. The analysis results
indicated that the pH ranged between 6.75 to 7.64 which are well within the specified standard of 6.5
to 8.5. The TDS was observed to be 219 to 272 mg/l which is within the permissible limit of 2000
mg/l. The Total Hardness recorded was in the range of 170 to 240.80 mg/l as CaCO3 which is also
within the permissible limit of 600 mg/l. The nitrate was found to be in the range of 4.23 to 9.59 mg/l.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-15

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

The levels of chloride and sulphate were found to be in the range of 19.57 to 32.18 mg/l and, 12.4 to
24.6 mg/l respectively. Heavy metals content (i.e. As, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Fe, Mn, Zn and Hg) were
found to be very low and within specified standards. The overall surface water quality was found to be
safe for drinking purpose physico- chemically.
3.4.1.2 Groundwater Quality
The physico-chemical characteristics of groundwater are presented in Table 3.13 and compared with
the IS-10500 standards.The analysis results indicated that the pH ranged between 7.4 to 8.17 which
is well within the specified standard of 6.5 to 8.5. TDS was ranging from 193 to 580 mg/l. Total
hardness was found to be in the range of 164-452 mg/l. The fluoride concentrations were varied
between 0.16-0.46 mg/l which is within the acceptable limit of 1 mg/l. The nitrate and sulphate were
found in the range of <2 to 16 mg/l and 9.40-58.32 mg/l respectively. Calcium varied between 35 to
160 mg/l. The heavy metals content (i.e. As, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Fe, Mn, Zn and Hg) were found to be
within permissible limits.
3.4.2

Bacteriological Characteristics

Coliform group of organisms are indicators of faecal contamination in water. Water samples were
analysed for total and faecal coliform deploying membrane filtration technique. Bacteriological quality
of surface and groundwater in winter season is presented in Tables 3.12 and 3.13 respectively.
Bacteriologically, all surface water samples were faecally contaminated and chlorination is needed
before use for drinking purpose, whereas some of the groundwater samples were also found faecally
contaminated and need chlorination before use for drinking purpose. Overall, the surface and
groundwater quality within the study area was found to be good physico-chemically, however
bacteriologically found to be contaminated and need chlorination before use.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-16

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur,
Maharashtra

TABLE 3.12
SURFACE WATER QUALITY
Sr.
No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.

Test Parameter
0

pH value at 25 C
0
Electrical Conductivity at 25 C
Turbidity
Apparent colour
Odour
Taste
Iron (as Fe)
Total dissolved solids (TDS)
Fluoride (as F)
Cyanide (as CN)
Chloride (as Cl)
Total alkalinity (as CaCO3)
Total hardness (as CaCO3)
Calcium (as Ca)
Magnesium (as Mg)
Sulphate (as SO4)
Nitrates (as NO3)
Copper (as Cu)
Manganese (as Mn)
Mercury (as Hg)
Cadmium (as Cd)
Selenium (as Se)
Arsenic (as As)
Aluminium (as Al)
Lead (as Pb)
Zinc (as Zn)

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Measurement
Unit
S/cm
NTU
Hazen units
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l

As per IS 10500 : 2012


(Drinking Water - Specification)
Acceptable
*Permissible
Limit
Limit
6.5 to 8.5
No relaxation
1
5
5
15
Agreeable
Agreeable
Agreeable
Agreeable
0.3
No relaxation
500
2000
1.0
1.5
0.05
No relaxation
250
1000
200
600
200
600
75
200
30
100
200
400
45
No relaxation
0.05
1.5
0.1
0.3
0.001
No relaxation
0.003
No relaxation
0.01
No relaxation
0.01
0.05
0.03
0.2
0.01
No relaxation
5
15

Wakeshwar
(SW1)

Vadgaon
(SW2)

Dam
0
7.54 at 24 C
7.64 at 24 C
429
414
11.2
9.8
Clear
Clear
Agreeable
Agreeable
0.89
0.71
236
228
0.14
0.11
ND
ND
32.18
24.12
142
156
184
178
36.42
32.16
22.30
23.42
12.4
14.6
4.23
6.18
0.05
0.05
< 0.03
< 0.03
ND
ND
< 0.0005
< 0.0005
< 0.001
< 0.001
ND
ND
< 0.01
< 0.01
ND
ND
< 0.001
< 0.001
0

Near Sirul
(SW3)
Wenna River
0
7.54 at 24 C
494
5.1
Clear
Agreeable
0.63
272
0.21
ND
21.52
168
240
61.64
20.82
24.60
9.59
0.05
< 0.03
ND
< 0.0005
< 0.001
ND
< 0.01
ND
< 0.001

Near Bori
(SW4)
0

6.75 at 24 C
398
12.2
Clear
Agreeable
0.24
219
0.24
ND
19.57
142
170
40.44
16.55
18.40
8.64
0.05
< 0.03
ND
< 0.0005
< 0.001
ND
< 0.01
ND
< 0.001

3-17

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur,
Maharashtra

Sr.
No.

Measurement
Unit

Test Parameter

27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32
33.
34
35

Total Chromium (as Cr)


Boron (as B)
Mineral Oil
Phenolic compounds (as C6H5OH)
Anionic detergents
Biochemical oxygen Demand
Chemical oxygen Demand
Dissolved oxygen
Polynuclear Aromatic
Hydrocarbon (PAH)
Total Coliform
Faecal coliform

36
37

mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg / l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
g/l
MPN/100 ml
per 100 ml

As per IS 10500 : 2012


(Drinking Water - Specification)
Acceptable
*Permissible
Limit
Limit
0.05
No relaxation
0.5
1.0
0.5
No relaxation
0.001
0.002
0.2
1.0
Absent
Absent
Absent
Absent
Absent
Absent

Wakeshwar
(SW1)

Absent
Absent

Vadgaon
(SW2)

ND
< 0.03
< 0.1
ND
< 0.001
8
14
5.2
ND

Dam
ND
< 0.03
< 0.1
ND
< 0.001
12
18
4.8
ND

Present
12

Present
6

Near Sirul
(SW3)
Wenna River
ND
< 0.03
< 0.1
ND
< 0.001
6
18
5.1
ND
Present
18

Near Bori
(SW4)

ND
< 0.03
< 0.1
ND
< 0.001
8
12
5.6
ND
Present
12

Source: Anacon Laboratories Pvt. Ltd., Nagpur


ND: Not Detectable
TABLE 3.13
GROUNDWATER QUALITY
Sr.
No.

1
2

3
4

Test
Parameter

pH

Measurement
Unit

Electrical
S/cm
Conductivity at
0
25 C
Turbidity
NTU
Apparent
Hazen units

As per IS 10500 : 2012


(Drinking Water Specification)
Acceptable *Permissible
Limit
Limit
6.5 to 8.5
No relaxation

Project
Site
(GW1)

7.81 at
0
25 C
782

1
5

5
15

0.7
3

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Khapri
Village
(GW2)

Mandwa
Village
(GW3)

Kirmiti
Village
(GW4)

Gangapur
Village
(GW5)

Buttibori Bhansuli Tembhari


(GW6)
(GW7)
Village
(GW8)

Vadgaon
Village
(GW9)

7.6at
0
25 C
656

8.01 at
0
24 C
351

8.0 at
0
24 C
473

<1
3

0.80
4.0

8.04 at
0
24 C
504

8.17 at
0
24 C
498

7.61 at
0
25 C
1054

7.8 at
0
25 C
521

0.70
3

0.70
2

3.6
4

1.2
4

2.6
3

7.40 at
0
24 C
870

1.4
4

3-18

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur,
Maharashtra

Sr.
No.

5
6
7
8
9

10
11
12
13

14

15
16
17

Test
Parameter

colour
Odour
Taste
Iron (as Fe)
Free Residual
chlorine
Total
dissolved
solids (TDS)
Fluoride (as
F)
Cyanide (as
CN)
Chlorides (as
Cl)
Total
alkalinity (as
CaCO3)
Total
hardness (as
CaCO3)
Calcium (as
Ca)
Magnesium
(as Mg)
Sulphate (as
SO4)

Measurement
Unit

As per IS 10500 : 2012


Project
(Drinking Water Site
Specification)
(GW1)
Acceptable *Permissible
Limit
Limit

Khapri
Village
(GW2)

Mandwa
Village
(GW3)

Kirmiti
Village
(GW4)

Gangapur
Village
(GW5)

Buttibori Bhansuli Tembhari


(GW6)
(GW7)
Village
(GW8)

Vadgaon
Village
(GW9)

mg / l
mg / l

Agreeable
Agreeable
0.3

Agreeable
Agreeable Agreeable Agreeable Agreeable
Agreeable
No relaxation 0.18
0.08
0.06
0.19
<0.01
< 0.1
< 0.1
<0.1

Agreeable Agreeable Agreeable


0.11
0.13
0.13
<0.1
<0.1
<0.1

Agreeable
0.12
<0.1

Agreeable
0.10
0.10

mg / l

500

2000

431

278

270

580

286

361

478

193

260

mg / l

1.0

1.5

0.46

0.21

0.21

0.20

0.16

0.23

0.18

0.28

0.26

mg / l

0.05

No relaxation

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

mg / l

250

1000

92.42

53.81

48.92

102

18

58

78

51.24

48

mg / l

200

600

231

124

123

242

246

228

208

123

132

mg / l

200

600

170

171

177

452

236

240

368

171

164

mg / l

75

200

35

58.98

59.79

160.14

53.36

40.18

104.14

59.38

58.42

mg / l

30

100

20

6.39

6.89

39.0

25.0

33.0

26.0

5.2

4.4

mg / l

200

400

18

9.40

9.40

58.32

14.14

18.48

42.16

12.40

11.40

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-19

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur,
Maharashtra

Sr.
No.

18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

32
33

Test
Parameter

Nitrates (as
NO3)
Copper (as
Cu)
Manganese
(as Mn)
Mercury (as
Hg)
Cadmium (as
Cd)
Selenium (as
Se)
Arsenic (as
As)
Aluminium
(as Al)
Lead (as Pb)
Zinc (as Zn)
Chromium
(as Cr +6)
Boron (as B)
Mineral Oil
Phenolic
compounds
(as C6H5OH)
Pesticides
Anionic
detergents

Measurement
Unit

Project
Site
(GW1)

Khapri
Village
(GW2)

mg / l

As per IS 10500 : 2012


(Drinking Water Specification)
Acceptable *Permissible
Limit
Limit
45
No relaxation

15

1.2

mg / l

0.05

1.5

<0.03

mg / l

0.1

0.3

mg / l

0.001

mg / l

Kirmiti
Village
(GW4)

Gangapur
Village
(GW5)

Buttibori Bhansuli Tembhari


(GW6)
(GW7)
Village
(GW8)

Vadgaon
Village
(GW9)

1.8

13

11

16

<2

<2

< 0.03

< 0.03

ND

ND

ND

ND

<0.003

<0.003

0.31

< 0.05

< 0.05

<0.05

<0.03

0.06

<0.05

<0.05

<0.05

No relaxation

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

0.003

No relaxation

<0.001

< 0.001

0.01

0.02

0.04

0.02

<0.001

<0.001

mg / l

0.01

No relaxation

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

mg / l

0.01

0.05

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

mg / l

0.03

0.2

0.09

0.06

0.15

0.02

0.007

0.01

0.02

0.12

0.15

mg / l
mg / l
mg / l

0.01
5
0.05

No relaxation
15
No relaxation

ND
0.14
ND

ND
< 0.1
ND

ND
< 0.1
ND

ND
0.14
ND

ND
0.12
ND

ND
0.08
ND

ND
0.10
ND

ND
<0.12
ND

ND
<0.10
ND

mg / l
mg / l
mg / l

0.5
0.5
0.001

1.0
No relaxation
0.002

ND
ND
ND

< 0.1
ND
ND

< 0.1
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND

0.03
ND
ND

0.14
ND
ND

g/l
PPM

0.2
Absent

1.0
Absent

ND
ND

ND
ND

ND
ND

ND
ND

ND
ND

ND
ND

ND
ND

ND
ND

ND
ND

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Mandwa
Village
(GW3)

ND
< 0.001

3-20

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur,
Maharashtra

Sr.
No.

34

35
36

Test
Parameter

Polynuclear
Hydrocarbon
(PAH)
Total
coliform
Faecal
coliform

Measurement
Unit

Project
Site
(GW1)

Khapri
Village
(GW2)

Mandwa
Village
(GW3)

Kirmiti
Village
(GW4)

Gangapur
Village
(GW5)

Buttibori Bhansuli Tembhari


(GW6)
(GW7)
Village
(GW8)

Vadgaon
Village
(GW9)

(PAH)

As per IS 10500 : 2012


(Drinking Water Specification)
Acceptable *Permissible
Limit
Limit
Absent
Absent

ND

ND

ND

0.001

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

MPN/100 ml

42

16

11

78

42

117

110

16

MPN/100ml

Absent

Present

Absent

Absent

Present

Present

Present

Present

Absent

Source: Source: Anacon Laboratories Pvt. Ltd., Nagpur


ND: Not Detectable

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-21

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Water requirement
Water requirement for the project will be supplied by MIDC-Butibori through MIDCs water distribution
network. The Domestic water requirement for proposed is estimated to be 2.7 m3/day. No subsurface
drawl of water involved in the project activities.
The water requirement will be utilized for the following applications:

Process
Cooling of process equipment and flammable storage tanks
D.M. Water
Drinking and sanitation
House keeping
Landscaping & gardening
Scrubbing etc.

The detail about water requirement is presented in Table 3.14.


TABLE 3.14
WATER REQUIREMENT (BREAKUP)
Sr. No.

Purpose

Proposed Requirement (m /day)

Domestic

2.7

Industrial Process

44.4

Industrial Cooling Tower

110

4
TOTAL

Landscaping

8.5
165.6

Wastewater generation
A) Domestic Waste
The domestic waste generation is estimated to be 2.16 m3/d. The domestic waste generation will be sent to
septic tank / soak pit. The overflow will be used for gardening / let to MIDC sewerage line.
B) Industrial wastewater
The total water requirement for the plant is estimated to be 165.6m3/d. The wastewater generation is
expected to be 24.16 m3/d. The waste water generated will be sent to ETP for treatment of wastewater.
The wastewater generation and its disposal pattern is shown in Table 3.15.
TABLE 3.15
WASTEWATER GENERATION FROM PROPOSED PLANT AND DISPOSAL PATTERN
Sr. Source
No.

Proposed
3
m /day

Total domestic
waste generation
3
m / day

Disposal

Domestic

2.7

2.16

Treatment in septic tanks & Soak pits & treated


overflow will be used for gardening garden

Industrial

Zero Discharge

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-22

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.5

LAND ENVIRONMENT

3.5.1

Drainage of the Study Area

The area as a whole represents a gently slope, drained by a number of north to south east flowing rivers
which debouche into the one Vena River, on which one reservoir has been built up for water circulation for
MIDC industrial area. It is also observed that the Krishna nala and Murjhari nala which are one of the
principle stream flow through the project site in SW area and confluence to one of the principal stream for
Vena river meets at SE direction also there are various channels which flow into the 10 km periphery of the
project area and various reservoir also present such as Nanhi which is built up in Krishna Nala present in
W direction from the project site, Bid-Borgaon which is built up in Sashimar Nala present in NW direction
from the project site & Wakeshwar reservoir which is builtup under the Vena River present in NE direction
from the project site. The distance, direction of River/Streams/Nala found in the surrounding areas of 10
KM radius from the project sites are given in Table 3.16 and Figure 3.15 represents the drainage pattern
of the study area.
TABLE 3.16
DISTANCE AND DIRECTION OF RIVER/STREAM/NALA PRESENT IN PROJECT SITE WITHIN
10 KM RADIUS
Name of the River/Stream/Nala
MurjhariNala
Krishna Nala
SukliNala
Nanhi Reservoir
Bid Borgaon Reservoir
Wakreshwar Reservoir
Vena River

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Distance from Project Site


4.32Km
3.21 Km
2.66 Km
9.92 Km
9.25 Km
9.84 Km
2.6 Km

Direction from Project Site


SW
SW
WNW
W
NW
NE
E

3-23

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

21.02

21

20.98

20.96

20.94

20.92
Murazhari Nala

20.9

20.88

20.86
78.88

78.9

78.92 78.94 78.96 78.98

79

79.02 79.04

Legend
River

10 Km Radius

Project Site

FIGURE 3.5: THE RIVER/STREAMS/NALAS (DRAINAGES) WITHIN THE STUDY AREA

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-24

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.5.2

Remote Sensing and GIS Application

Remote sensing technology has emerged as a powerful tool in providing reliable information on
various natural resources at different levels of spatial details; it has played an important role in
effective mapping and periodic monitoring of natural resources including environment.
With the availability of high resolution remote sensing data, newer areas of remote sensing
applications have been identified, techniques of data processing have been improved and computer
based image processing systems have become more effective.
Based on these application the land use and land cover studies refers to mans activities on land,
utilitarian in nature whereas land cover denotes the vegetation cover, water body cover and artificial
constructions, etc.
The Land use/land cover classification system standardized by Department of Space, for mapping
different agro-climatic zones has been adopted. The classification systems are as follows.
* Build up land:- It is defined as the land developed by human habitation developed due to
non-agricultural use and that which has a cover of building, transport, communication utilities
in association with water, vegetation and vacant lands.
* Land with or without scrub: - They occupy (relatively) higher topography like uplands or
high ground with or without scrub. These lands are generally prone to degradation or erosion.
These exclude hilly and mountainous terrain.
* Fallow land: - It is described as agricultural lands which is taken up for cultivation but is
temporarily allowed to rest un-cropped for one or more seasons, but not less than one year.
These lands are particularly those which are seen devoid of crops at the time when the
imagery is taken of both seasons.
* Dense Evergreen Forest:-It is described as forest, which comprises of thick and dense
canopy of all trees, which predominantly remain green throughout the year. It includes both
coniferous and tropical broad-lived evergreen trees. Semi- evergreen forest is a mixture of
both deciduous and evergreen trees but the latter predominate.
* Water bodies: - Area persistently covered by water such as river and reservoir, lakes.
3.5.3

Land use of Study Area

The land-use & land cover map of the 10 km radial study area from the periphery of project site has
been prepared using Resource SAT-2 , sensor- LISS-3 having 23.5 m spatial resolution and date of
pass 29 May 2014 satellite image with reference to Google Earth data. In order to strengthen the
baseline information on existing land use pattern, the following data covering approx. 205631.3 N
latitude and 785655.5 E longitude and elevation 284 meter are used.
Land use pattern of the study area as well as the catchment area was carried out by standard
methods of analysis of remotely sensed data and followed by ground truth collection and
interpretation of satellite data.The outcome of land use study is presented below in Table 3.17 and
Figures 3.6.
TABLE 3.17
DATA SPECIFICATION USED FOR PRESENTS STUDY
Satellite/ Image

Sensor

Scene-Specification

Spatial resolution

Date of Acquisition

Resource SAT-2

LISS-3

99-57

23.5 m

29 May 2014

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-25

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Objective
The objectives of Land use studies are:

To determine the present land use pattern as per EIA/EMP norms by MoEF.

To determine the drainage pattern present in the study area.

Data Used
A. Remote sensing data

IRS P6 LISS-3 Scene

B. Collateral Data

Survey of India toposheet (OSM) bearing 55P/1,55 L/13, 55 K/16 and 55 O/4 (1:50,000 Scale)

Methodology
The land use pattern of the study area was studied by analysing the available secondary data
published in the District Primary Census abstract of the year 2001 & 2011.
Salient features of the adopted methodology are given below:

Acquisition of satellite data

Preparation of base map from Survey of India toposheets

Data analysis using visual interpretation techniques

Ground truth studies or field checks using GPS

Finalization of the map

Digitization using head up vectorisation method

Topology construction in GIS

Area calculation for statistics generation

Masking

The spatial resolution and the spectral bands in which the sensor collects the remotely sensed data
are two important parameters for any land use survey. IRS P6 LISS III data offers spatial resolution of
23.5 m with the swath width of 141 x 141 km. the data is collected in four visible bands namely green
(Band 2) (0.52-0.59), red (Band 3) (0.62-0.69), near infrared (NIR) (Band 4) (0.77-0.89), short
wave infrared band (Band 5) (1.55-1.75) with orbit repeat period of 24 days (three days revisit). The
shapes, sizes, colours, tone and texture of several geomorphic features are visible in IRS data.
Four spectral bands provide high degree of measurability through band combination including FCC
generation, bands rationing, classification etc. These features of the IRS data are particularity
important for better comprehension and delineation of the land use classes. Hence, IRS P6 LISS-III
data has been used for land use mapping.
The digital image processing was performed on ERDAS IMAGINE 2014 and QGIS 2.2 software
system on high-configured computer. This software package is a collection of image processing
functions necessary for pre-processing, rectification, band combination, filtering, statistics,
classification etc. Apart from contrast stretching, there are large numbers of image processing
functions that can be performed on this station. Arc map 9.3 is used for final layout presentation.
The satellite data from the compact disc is loaded on the hard disk and by studying quick look (the
sampled image of the appropriate area;) the sub-scene of the study area is extracted.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-26

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Supervised classification using all the spectral bands can separate fairly accurately, the different land
use classes at level II on the basis of the spectral responses, which involve the following three steps:
1. Acquisition of ground truth
2. Calculation of the statistics of training area
3. Classification using maximum likelihood algorithm
The training areas for classification were homogeneous, well spread throughout the scene with
bordering pixels excluded in processing. Several training sets have been used through the scene for
similar land use classes. After evaluating the statistical parameters of training sets, the training areas
were rectified by deleting no congruous training sets and creating new ones.
3.5.3.1 Pre-field Interpretation of Satellite Data
The False Colour Composite (FCC) of LISS-3 satellite imagery having 23.5 m spatial resolution
satellite data at 1:50,000 scale was used for pre-field interpretation work. Taking the help of topo
sheets, geology, geo-morphology and by using the image elements, the features were identified and
delineated the boundaries roughly. Each feature was identified on image by their image elements like
tone, texture, colour, shape, size, pattern and association. A tentative legend in terms of land cover
and land use was formulated. The sample area for field check is selected covering all the
physiographic, land use/land cover feature cum image characteristics. Figure 3.6 shows the FCC of
10 KM radius of LISS-3 Imagery.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-27

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

21.02

21

20.98

20.96

20.94

20.92

20.9

20.88

20.86
78.88

78.9

78.92 78.94 78.96 78.98

79

79.02 79.04

Legend
10 KM Radius

FIGURE 3.6: FALSE COLOUR COMPOSITE OF THE STUDY AREA (10 KM RADIUS)

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-28

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.5.3.2 Ground Truth Collection


Both topo sheets and imagery were carried for field verification and a transverse plan using existing
road network was made to cover as many representative sample areas as possible to observe the
broad land use features and to adjust the sample areas according to field conditions. Detail field
observations and investigations were carried out and noted the land use features on the imagery.
3.5.3.3 Post Field Work for Land Use/Land Cover Classification
The base maps of the study area were prepared, with the help of Survey of India Toposheets on
1:50,000 scale. Preliminary interpreted land use and the land cover features boundaries from IRS-2,
sensor LISS-3 having 23.5m spatial resolution, False Colour Composite were modified in light of field
information and the final thematic details were transferred onto the base maps. The final interpreted
and classified thematic map was cartograph. The cartographic map was categorically differentiate
with standard colour coding and described features with standard symbols. All the classes were
identified and marked by the standard legend on the map.The following Land Cover classes were
derived and classified as under:
1. Agricultural land
2. Settlements/Industrial Settlements
3. Dense Forest/Mixed Forest
4. Open scrub
5. Mines/Quarry
6. Water Bodies/River/Nala/Stream
Total area of 10 km radius is about 314 sq. km.
3.5.3.4 Land Use/Land Cover Classification- Interpretation
The Land Cover classes were extracted following a Visual interpretation method or on screen
digitization of the Resource Sat-2 Imagery, sensor LISS-3 having 23.5m spatial resolution image.
These were later verified by using SOI toposheet and Google Earth imagery. Polygon layers for each
class were digitized and the respective areas were calculated. The Land Cover classes and their
coverage can be seen in the following Table 3.18 and its distribution is shown in Figure 3. The
present Land Cover classes are represented in Figure 3.7. Total six major land use/ land cover
classes were demarcated in the study area and a thematic map of 1:50,000 scales were generated
incorporating these classified categories considering the area of the project. The area as a whole
represents a gently slope, drained by a number of north to south east flowing rivers which debouche
into the one Vena River, on which one reservoir has been built up for water circulation for MIDC
industrial area. It is also observed that the Krishna nala and Murjhari nala which is one of the principle
streams flow through the project site in SW area and confluence to one of the principal streams for
Vena river meets at SE direction also there are various channels which flow into the 10 km periphery
of the project area and various reservoirs also present such as Nanhi which is set in Krishna Nala
present in W direction from the project site, Bid-Borgaon which is built up in Sashimar Nala present in
NW direction from the project site & Wakeshwar reservoir which is built up on the Vena River present
in NE direction from the project site.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-29

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

For 00-10 KM Radius-Area (314 Sq. Km)

21.02

21

20.98

20.96

20.94

20.92

20.9

20.88

20.86
78.88

78.9

78.92 78.94 78.96 78.98

79

79.02 79.04

Legend
Agriculture Land

Industrial Settlement

Open Scrub

Settlement

Road

Railway

10 KM Radius

FIGURE 3.7: LU/LC DETAILS OF 00-10 KM RADIUS

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-30

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 3.18
LU/LC CLASSES AND THEIR COVERAGE IN SQ. KM OF 00-10 KM RADIUS
Sr. No.
1
o
o
o
o
2
3

4
5

LU/LC Class
Built up Land Rural/Urban)
Settlement
Industry/other industries
Road Infrastructure
Railway Line/Railway Siding
Agriculture Land
Cropland/Current Fallow Land
Water bodies
River/Nala/Stream
Pond/Tank
Scrub/Waste Land
Land with scrub/Open Scrub
Dense Forest
Open Mixed Jungle
Forest Plantation
Mining/Stone Quarry
Total

Area (Sq.Km)

Percentage (%)

8.99
21.23
1.98
0.59

2.86
6.76
0.63
0.19

212.89

67.80

5.69
2.89

1.81
0.92

39.56
9.65
7.98
1.99
0.56
314

12.60
3.07
2.54
0.63
0.18
100

FIGURE 3.8: PIE CHART REPRESENT THE LU/LC DETAILS OF 00-10 KM RADIUS
From the Table 3.18, it is observed that total eight major land use/land cover classes were demarcated
in the study area. As seen from the land cover classes that were derived agriculture appears to be the
land use pattern that the villagers are engaged, however there is a large area of open scrub land which
can be later developed into a cultivable land. Agriculture has the highest coverage of all the land cover
classes having 67.80% (212.89 sq.km approx) of the total project area and thereafter the open scrub
area covers second highest position having 12.60 % (39.56 sq. km approx). The forest area having a
percentage about 6.25 % (19.62 sq. km), which covers the Junapani Reserve Forest, Bid Sukli Reserve
Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-31

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Forest and open mixed forest (Jhudpi Jungle). The presence of water bodies including the river, dam,
canal and tributaries as seen from the Figure 3.8 is about 2.73% (8.58 sq.km). It is observed that the
Vadgoan Lake which is under the Vena River is being used for the purpose for water supply to additional
MIDC-Phase I project, presently its the main source for supplying of water to M/s VIPL (Reliance
Power). There are total 3 main reservoirs which are present in the study area, these are Nanhi, Bid
Borgaon and Wakeshwar lake. There are certain pockets of area is under the mining of stone quarry in
open cast by the various private players having ancillary units of construction and township projects. The
area covers by these stone quarry/ mining activities, however the portion under this coverage is at a
slight minimal level i.e. 0.18% (0.56 sq. km approx). It is also resembles to the satellite data and LU/LC
map. Settlements occupy a subsequent area, predominantly their presence in bank of Vena river and
spreads all over the adjoining study area. Maximum settlements were seen in NNE, E, SE and SSE parts
of the study area and also the industrial hub which is present in the middle of the study area (MIDCButibori) having maximum percentage (6.76 %) which is shown in Figure 3.8 and the percentage of rest
of the settlement and utility are about 3.68% (11.56 sq. km).The terrain presumably makes it difficult to
visualize some of the other features of the total project area. It is also observed that the study area is well
connected by railway i.e. main railway line connecting from Mumbai-Howrah route and also the two
National Highways are present (NH-7 & NH-204 and also SH-3).
3.5.3.5 Elevation Details of 0 10 km Radius
The contour-map has been prepared by taking the elevation information by using Survey of India
Toposheet No. 55 P/1, 55 K/16, 55 O/4 and 55L/13 and also using the help of satellite data SRTM
with 90 m spatial resolution with respect to google earth imagery information and contour has been
generated at 5m intervals as depicted in Figure 3.9 and the DEM model has been represented in
Figure 3.10. The 10 km radius of the proposed project area is confined within 215 meter to 375 meter
above MSL as derived from DEM data.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-32

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

21.02

21

20.98

20.96

20.94

20.92

20.9

20.88

20.86
78.88

78.9

78.92 78.94 78.96 78.98

79

79.02 79.04

Legend

10 KM Radius

FIGURE 3.9: CONTOUR DETAILS OF 00-10 KM RADIUS

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-33

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 3.10: DEM DETAILS OF 00-10 KM RADIUS WITH PROJECT LOCATION


3.5.4

Forest in the Study Area within 10km Radius

The forest comprises of about mixed forest having 13.32 % of the study area. There is no National Park,
Wildlife Sanctuary, Biosphere Reserve, Tiger Reserve, exist within the 5 km radius of the study area. The
nearest reserve forest is Juna Pani RF about 7.52 km in SW direction, Bid Sukli RF about 2.66 km in NW
direction and Mixed Jungle (Jhudpi Jungle) about 7.59 km in S direction from project site and comes under
10 km radius from the project site.(Shown in Figure 3.6).
The distance, direction of reserve forest found in the surrounding areas of 10 km radius from the project
sites are as follows, however there are two RF found in the study area within the 10 km radius namely
Junapani Reserve Forest and Bid Sukli Reserve Forest.
Name of the Forest

Distance

Direction

Mixed Forest 1

7.59 km

Juna Pani Reserve Forest

7.52 km

SW

Bid Sukli Reserve Forest

2.66 km

NW

3.5.5

Physiography

The study area forms part of Deccan Plateau having flat topped and terraced features. It is a plain
area with the general topography; some areas and its vicinity have higher elevation. Lineaments are
also observed in the study area. Dendrtic to sub dendritic of drainage pattern is observed in study
area. Lithologically, the area comprises formations of Sahyadri group (Deccan Basalt) of Cretaceous
age.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-34

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

DRAINAGE PATTERN
Dendritic to sub dendritic of drainage pattern is observed in study area. Wenna river is the major river
observed in study area, it flows from North to South East direction. Small streamlets join Wenna river
SOIL TYPES:
There are three types of soils found in Nagpur district. The details are as follows:
1) Kali soils: These are black cotton soils which are fine grained clayey in texture and varies in depth
from 1 m to 6 m or more and retain moisture.
2) Morand soils: These are predominant in the district. They are black cotton soils with higher
percentage of lime than the Kali soils. They are black, grey or light to dark brown in colour, clayey in
texture and have a depth of about 1 to 3 m.
3) Bardi soils: They are red gravel covered with boulders found on summits and slopes of trap hills
and are less fertile in nature.
HYDROGEOLOGY AND GEOLOGY:
Regional Stratigraphy:
Recent
Sahyadri Group (Deccan Trap) And Intertrappeans.
Lameta.
Gondwanas
Kamthi Group
Talchir Group
Archaeans
(Metamorphic And Crystalline Series).

GEOLOGY OF BUTIBORI AREA


Geologically Butibori area is composed of basaltic rocks. The basalts are extrusive naturally mined
igneous rock. They are dense fine-grained rocks that are of very dark color- green or black and form
when molten lava from deep in the earth's crust rises up and solidifies. Slightly coarser old sheets of
basalt, now partially altered but still dark in color, are extensively quarried, crushed, and sold as "trap
rock". Basalt is a hard, dense, dark volcanic rock composed chiefly of plagioclase, pyroxene, and
olivine, and often having a glassy appearance. Archeans and the Deccan trap basalts are the two
consolidated formations, which form the Hard rock aquifers occurring in the district. The basaltic
rocks in the study area are differentiated as undifferentiated basalt and 6 flows of basalt of which 3
are complex and 3 compound and alluvium of Vena River is observed. The flows are part of Sahyadri
group having age from Cretaceous to Paleogene.
ARCHAEAN- The crystalline rocks comprising of gneiss, schist, pegmatite and quartzite are the
main formations occurring in north-eastern and south eastern parts of the district. In these rocks,
weathered zone which is down to a depth of 25 m.bgl, forms the important shallow aquifer for
dugwells. In unweathered crystalline rocks, the occurrence of ground water is mainly controlled by

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-35

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

joints and fractures. Higher yields are generally associated with lineaments. Ground 6 water at places
occurs in fractured zones at depth in semi-confined to confined conditions.
B) DECCAN TRAPS- Basalt is the main formation of the district and occupies an area of about 4300
sq. km. Ground water occurs under phreatic conditions in the exposed lava flows and in semiconfined to confined state in the subsurface flows. Ground water is present in pore spaces in the
vesicular unit of each flow and in the jointed and fractured portions of massive unit. However,
secondary porosity and permeability developed on account of weathering, fracturing and joints play a
very important role in the storage and movement of ground water. This has given rise to good
aquifers. Weathering not only produces granular materials but also widens the fractures, joint and
shear zones.

FIGURE 3.11:GEOLOGICAL MAP OF STUDY AREA


Geology of Study Area
Site specifically the area comprises Undifferentiated Basalt which could be identified by presence of
dark grey, fine grained compact, massive, and clinker surface rocks. It is overlain by 18 simple flows
of basalt which could be differentiated in field as they are sparsely to moderately porphyritic in nature.
Some patches of inter trappean beds occur in the area which could be identified by presence of
limestone and sandstone. The basalt identified in the study area comes under Sahyadri Group.
HYDROGEOLOGY
Hydrogeologically, the aquifer is unconfined to semi-confined type. In the Deccan Traps and
Archeans, the rocks do not have primary porosity. Secondary porosity has been developed due to
Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-36

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

vesicles, weathering, jointing and fracturing. The water bearing capacity depends on the degree and
depth of weathering, intensity of jointing and fracturing and thickness of sheared zones. The
groundwater is used through open dug wells, primarily used for domestic use by the inhabitants
whereas the deep bore wells are used for irrigation purpose. Depth of groundwater level has been
varied from 1 27m during pre-monsoon and up to >20 m in overexploited areas. It has come up to
less than 10 m (bgl) during study period.. The aquifer yield in the study area varies from 60 liters/min
to 300 liters/min. The study area of MIDC Butibori is under 41.52 % of groundwater development. It is
considered as safe category for groundwater withdrawal (CGWB, 2009).
No groundwater would be utilized for plant related activity. Water from MIDCs water distribution
network would be used for plant activities. In view of this, there would not be any impact on
groundwater status of the area.
PHYSIOGRAPHY: The study area forms part of Deccan Plateau having flat topped and terraced
features It is a plain area with the general topography some areas and its vicinity have higher
elevation. Lineaments are also observed in the study area. Dendrtic to sub dendritic of drainage
pattern is observed in study area. Lithologically, the area comprises formations of Sahyadri group
(Deccan Basalt) of Cretaceous age.
DRAINAGE PATTERN: Dendritic to sub dendritic of drainage pattern is observed in study area.
Veena river is the major river observed in study area it flows from North to South East direction. Small
streamlets join Veena River
3.5.6

Soil characteristics

Soil may be defined as a thin layer of earths crust which serves as a natural medium for the growth
of plants. It is the unconsolidated mineral matter that has been subjected to, and influenced by
genetic and environmental factors parent material, climate, organisms and topography all acting
over a period of time. Soil differs from the parent material in the morphological, physical, chemical
and biological properties. Also, soil differs among themselves in some or all the properties,
depending on the differences in the genetic and environmental factors. Thus, some soils are red,
some are black; some are deep and some are shallow; some are coarse-textured and some are finetextured. It serves in varying degree as a reservoir of nutrients and water for crops, provide
mechanical anchorage and favorable tilth. The components of soils are mineral materials, organic
matter, water and air, the proportions of which vary and which together form a system for plant
growth; hence there is a need to study the soils in perspective manner.
3.5.6.1 Data Generation on Soil
For studying soil profile of the region, sampling locations were selected to assess the existing soil
conditions in and around the project site representing various landuse conditions. The physical,
chemical and heavy metal concentrations were determined. The samples were collected by ramming
a core-cutter into the soil up to a depth of 20 cm. Total 12 samples were collected from different
locations within the study area and analyzed. The details of the soil monitoring locations are given in
Table 3.19 and shown in Figure 3.12. The monitoring was carried out once in the study period during
January-March 2016. The international pipette method (Black, 1964) was adopted for determination
of particle size analysis. The physical parameters such as bulk density, porosity and water holding
capacity were determined by following KR box method (Keen and racekowski) 1921.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-37

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 3.19
DETAILS OF SOIL SAMPLING LOCATIONS
Sr.
No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Location
Code
S1
S2
S3
S4
S5
S6
S7
S8
S9

Locations

Latitude

Longitude

Project Site
Khapri Village
Mandwa Village
Kirmiti Village
Gangapur Village
Buttibori
Bhansuli
Tembhari Village
Vadgaon Village

2056'31.3"N
2054'07.44"N
2056'56.14"N
2056'46.72N
2055'13.16N
2055'52.38N
2056'16.57"N
2056'01.81"N
2058'50.78"N

7856'55.5"E
7855'12.65"E
7855'13.64"E
7858'16.46E
7855'53.95E
7900'19.59E
7854'27.66"E
7857'35.82"E
7858'51.89"E

Direction
Distance (Km)
w.r.t. proposed project site
NA
NA
6.1
SW
4.09
WSW
8.66
N
3.0
SW
5.89
SE
6.28
WSW
1.62
SW
4.05
NE

FIGURE 3.12: SOIL SAMPLING LOCATIONS

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-38

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.5.6.2 Physical Characteristics of Soil


Physical characteristics of soils were determined through specific parameters viz. particle size
distribution, bulk density, porosity, water holding capacity, texture and are presented in Table 3.20.
TABLE 3.20
PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL
Sr.
No.

Location

1.
Project Site
2.
Khapri Village
3.
Mandwa Village
4.
Kirmiti Village
5.
Gangapur Village
6.
Buttibori
7.
Bhansuli
8.
Tembhari Village
9.
Vadgaon Village
Range

Bulk
Porosity
Density
(g/cc)

Water
Holding
Capacity

1.12
1.15
1.14
1.17
1.14
1.58
1.21
1.15
1.17
1.121.58

72.86
28.92
27.68
26.24
25.40
48.29
32.20
22.39
24.20
22.3972.86

24.87
25.10
24.40
11.44
20.10
32.91
20.20
17.52
22.34
11.4432.91

Particle Size Distribution


Sand
Silt
Clay
(%)
18.00
51.00
67.00
65.00
55.00
38.00
54.00
51.00
53.00
18.0067.00

54.00
32.60
21.00
26.00
26.60
21.00
26.50
28.16
29.50
21.0054.00

28.00
16.40
12.00
09.00
18.40
48.00
19.50
11.52
17.50
09.0048.00

Texure

Silty loam
Sandy
Sandy
Sandy
Sandy
Sandy
Sandy
Sandy
Sandy
sandy clay to
silty loam to
clayey

Source: Anacon Laboratory Pvt. Ltd.


Regular cultivation practices increase the bulk density of soils thus inducing compaction. This results
in reduction in water percolation rate and penetration of roots through soils. The soils with low bulk
density have favourable physical conditions whereas those with high bulk density exhibit poor
physical conditions for agriculture crops. The bulk density of the soil in the study area ranged
between 1.12 to 1.58 g/cc which indicates favourable physical condition for plant growth. The porosity
was found in the range of 11.44-32.91 % as shown in Table 3.20, water holding capacity was
observed between 22.39-72.86 % whereas the texture of soil in the area was found to be sandy clay
to silty loam to clayey.
3.5.6.3 Chemical Characteristics of Soil
Data collected for chemical characteristics of soils through selected parameters viz. pH, soluble
cations and anions, organic content and fertility status in the form of NPK values and organic matter
are presented in Tables 3.21& 3.22 respectively.
pH is an important parameter indicative of alkaline or acidic nature of soil. It greatly affects the
microbial population as well as solubility of metal ions and regulates nutrient availability. Variation in
the pH of the soil in the study area is presented in Table 3.21 and it was found to be slightly neutral to
alkaline (6.87 to 7.97) in reaction.
The important cations in the soil are calcium and magnesium whose concentration levels ranged from
65.20 to 309.92 mg/kg and 16.70 to 94.33 mg/kg respectively. Chloride was in the range of 94.30 to
209.05 mg/kg. Electrical conductivity, a measure of soluble salts in the soil was in the range of
117.92- to 792.90 S/cm as shown in Table 3.21.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-39

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 3.21
CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL IN STUDY AREA (SOIL-WATER EXTRACT)
Sr.
No.

Location

pH at
25C

1.
Project Site
7.96
2.
KhapriVillage
7.73
3.
Mandwa Village 7.29
4.
Kirmiti Village
7.49
5.
Gangapur Village 7.97
6.
Buttibori
6.87
7.
Bhansuli
7.91
8.
Tembhari Village 7.47
9.
Vadgaon Village 7.92
Range
6.877.97

Electrical
Conductivity at
0
25 C (S/cm)
255.1
472.70
334.50
402.20
426.00
117.92
601.60
540.20
792.90
117.92-792.90

--

++

++

Org % Cl
SO4
Ca
Mg
Carbon Solublecations and anions (SoilWater Extract 1:2) mg/kg
1.71
209.05 73.77
309.92 94.33
2.36
99.60
328.89 99.40
20.00
2.60
108.20 203.91 86.20
21.10
2.36
121.39 426.05 77.20
20.80
1.57
97.02
234.60 86.10
16.70
0.17
116.82 151.64 158.29 27.16
2.05
94.30
235.43 92.20
24.40
2.52
117.06 315.94 75.10
18.31
2.08
102.04 219.04 65.20
19.50
0.1794.3073.77- 65.20- 16.702.60
209.05 426.05 309.92 94.33

CEC
(meq/100g)
10.80
13.10
10.90
10.40
9.10
37.10
11.90
9.58
11.70
9.1-37.10

3.5.6.4 Nutrient Status


Organic matter and organic carbon present in the soil influences its physical and chemical properties
and is responsible for stability of soil aggregates. The organic matter content is presented in Table
3.22. Organic matter and nitrogen were found in the range of 0. 17 to 4.47 % and 107 to 608.2 kg/ha.
This showed that soil was moderate to fertile in organic and nutrient contents.
TABLE 3.22
FERTILITY STATUS
Sr.
Location
No.
1.
Project Site
2.
Khapri Village
3.
Mandwa Village
4.
Kirmiti Village
5.
Gangapur Village
6.
Buttibori
7.
Bhansuli
8.
Tembhari Village
9.
Vadgaon Village
Range
Classification of fertility status
Level in poor soil
Level in moderate soil
Level in fertile soil

Organic
Matter (%)
1.71
4.06
4.47
4.06
2.71
2.10
3.52
3.35
0.17
0.17-4.47

N
(kg/ha)
107
198.10
213.20
342.20
298.10
608.2
245.20
567.43
217
107-608.2

Phosphorus

Potassium

54.08
119.60
112.10
99.60
70.00
120.24
109.09
112.34
111.84
54.08-120.24

129.97
8.48
11.48
11.46
20.01
5.48
5.97
9.51
66.50
5.48-129.97

0.5
< 0.5 0.75
> 0.75

< 280
280-560
> 560

< 23
23-57
> 57

< 133
133-337
> 337

The relationship of CEC with productivity and absorptivity are presented in Tables 3.23 & 3.24
respectively.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-40

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 3.23
RELATIONSHIP OF CEC WITH PRODUCTIVITY
Sr. No.
1
2
3
4

CEC Range (meq/100g)


< 10
10 20
20 50
> 50

Productivity
Very Low
Low
Moderate
High

Location (Sr. No.)


5,8
1,2, 3,4,7,9
6
-

TABLE 3.24
RELATIONSHIP OF CEC WITH ABSORPTIVITY
Sr. No.
1
2
3
4

CEC Range (meq/100g)


<10
10 20
20 30
30 40

Absorptivity
Low
Moderate
Moderately high
High

Location (Sr. No.)


5,8
1,2,3,4,7,9
6

3.5.6.5 Heavy metals content in the soil-water extract


Plant requires some of the heavy metals at microgram levels for their metabolic activities. Some
heavy metals are also called as macronutrients. Their efficiency becomes a limiting factor in the plant
growth. Levels of heavy metals in soil water extracts are presented in Table 3.25.
TABLE 3.25
LEVELS OF HEAVY METALS IN SOIL-WATER EXTRACTS
Sr.
No.

Locations

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Project Site
Khapri Village
MandwaVillage
Kirmiti Village
Gangapur
Village
6.
Buttibori
7.
Bhansuli
8.
Tembhari
Village
9.
Vadgaon
Village
Range

Cd

Cr

As

Cu

Pb

Ni

Co

Fe

Mn

Zn

Se

(mg/kg)
ND 0.11
ND 0.08
ND 0.11
ND 0.07
ND 0.11

ND
ND
ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND
ND
ND

0.1
0.08
0.10
0.09
0.10

1.07
1.28
1.49
0.89
2.01

0.21
0.19
0.23
0.18
0.26

2.45
2.48
2.51
2.46
2.48

ND
ND
ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND

0.08
0.11
0.10

ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND

ND
ND
ND

0.10
0.11
0.09

1.05
1.15
1.20

0.18
0.31
0.14

2.50
2.50
2.48

ND
ND
ND

ND

0.10

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

0.11

1.16

0.22

2.57

ND

ND

0.070.11

ND

ND

ND

ND

ND

0.080.11

0.892.01

0.140.31

2.452.57

ND

ND: Not Detectable


It was observed that metals like As,Cd,Cr,Cu,Pb,Ni and Se were found in non detectable levels in
the soil- water extracts whereas levels of B,Co,Fe, Mn and Zn were found to be in the range of 0.070.11mg/kg, 0.08-0.11 mg/kg, 0.89-2.01 mg/kg, 0.14-0.31 kg/kg and 2.45-2.57 mg/kg respectively.This
indicates that most of the metals are non detectable, however some metals like Fe, Mn, B and Zn
may be used as a micro nutrient for the plant growth.No toxic metals are observed in the soil-water
extract.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-41

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.6

BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT

3.6.1

Introduction

Biological environment of any area constitute all living beings of that area, it is an integral part of the
environment. Biodiversity is often considered synonymous with species richness of the area.
Identifying, measuring, and monitoring biodiversity is a complex exercise. The Biodiversity
assessment generally concern with, conducting biodiversity inventories, inventories for assessing
existing biodiversity. This provides the information on the biodiversity richness of the area under
consideration. The selection of indicators differs for each biodiversity monitoring and is entirely based
on the output required from such biodiversity inventory. Any change in the surrounding environment
could cause loss of species or decrease in biodiversity of the area.
Therefore, the present study is proposed to assess the impact of the proposed farmaldehyde project
on biological environment of the project site and surrounding area within 10 km radius. Accordingly,
mitigation measures are evolved to sustain the biological diversity. In general, biological environment
is represented by flora and fauna.
Objectives of the study
The ecological study of the area was conducted in order to understand the existing status of the flora
and fauna to generate baseline information and evaluate the possible impacts on biological
environment. The present study highlights the various issues pertaining to floristic diversity and faunal
wealth in the surrounding area up to 10 km radius from the proposed project sites.
Study Area
The proposed farmaldehyde manufacturing unit is located at MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori of District
Nagpur. As per the bio-geographical classification, the project area comes under Bio-geographic
province (6D) Deccan Peninsula-Central Plateau region. However, as per Champion & Seth, 1968
vegetation types of the area can be grouped as Tropical Dry Deciduous Forest. The average annual
rainfall of the region is 1091 mm. Soil of the area is black cotton soil and the texture of the soil varies
from clay to sandy. Winter is moderately cold and the summer is very hot.
Study Approach & Methodology adopted
The baseline study for existing ecological environment was carried out during winter 2016. A
participatory and consultative approach was followed. Field visits were under taken for survey of the
vegetation and animals in the study area. The study area is divided into two parts as project area
along with MIDC Butibori industrial area and the buffer area as the 10 km radius of the project site.
Methodology:
Flora: Floral status was assessed in different habitat types and project site of the study area.
Quantitative data was collected using standard methods of quadrate method. Floral enumeration was
done following standard sampling techniques. Random quadrates were laid in order to quantify the
vegetation of the study area. Quadrate size for trees was 10 x 10 m, for shrubs it was 5 x 5 m and for
herbs it was 1 x 1m. Plots of 1 x 1 m were laid within the tree quadrate at each corner to record
grasses. In each of the quadrates, species and their number were recorded.
The data collected in the field was analyzed for secondary parameters such as density, frequency
and abundance following standard phyto-sociological methods.
The study area was devoid of any natural forest, stratified sampling and observation was made in the
study area as per Forest Survey of India 1992. Besides core area, trees available in the study area

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-42

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

as non-forest area were classified into 8 categories for the purpose of data processing and analysis.
These categories are:
Category of Plantations
(i) Farm forestry: Trees along the farm bunds and in small patches
(ii) Roadside plantation: Trees planted along the road side
(iii) Village woodlot: Naturally growing or planted trees on community /private land
(iv) Block plantation: Compact plantations covering an area of more than 0.1 ha. and not falling in any
of the above
(v) Pond side plantation: Trees planted in and around water ponds
(vi) Railway side plantation: Trees planted along the railway lines
(vii) Canal side plantation: Trees planted along the canals
(viii) Others: Trees not falling in any of the above categories.
Fauna:
Fauna Avifauna: Standard methods were followed to monitor the avifauna. The point count method
was followed for counting the birds. Opportunistic survey was also carried out with respect to
avifaunal checklist. Identification by calls was also made for species identification which was not
directly encountered or was hidden in the vegetation or canopy (Sridharan 1989, Bhupathy1991,
Bibby et al., 1992 and Hutto et al., 1986).
Herpetofauna: Area searches were done in the circular plots of 10 m radius to inventory all terrestrial
habitats for reptiles and amphibians. Area searches consisted of turning cover objects like logs,
boulders etc (Welsh, 1987). Sampling for these species involved through binoculars and aural
surveys.
Mammals: Presence of mammals was documented by using both direct and indirect evidences.
Opportunistic sightings were also included. Transect line were used to search indirect evidence i.e.
animal burrows / holes, scat, pellets, feeding signs, and tracks. Photographic (colored pictorial guide)
field guide were used for interviews with local residents (Burnham et al. 1980, Rodgers 1991, Sale
and Berkmuller, 1988, Daniel, 1992)
Threat Status Assessment/evaluation Criteria:
The biodiversity aspects in the form of endemic status, conservation status and life form were
enumerated for all the plant species found in the area during ecological survey. The Red Data Book
of the Botanical survey of India was screened to verify their conservation status. For wild animal
species schedule of the Wildlife Protection Act (1972) was screened.
Ecosystems/ Habitat & Vegetation of the study area:
The terrain was found to be almost plain without much undulation; river Wenna is only Major River
passing through the study area in (2.6 Km from project site) in E direction. Krishna Nallah meets
River Wenna near Bid Ganeshpur village. Land use pattern of this region was dominated by
agricultural fields (67.80%) followed by land with scrub/Open Scrub (12.60%) and Reserve Forest &
Open mixed Jungle/Jhudupi Jungle (6.24%).
Details about Forest type in the study area:

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-43

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

The forests in the study area belong to the Sub Group 5A Southern Tropical Dry Deciduous Forests
as per the revised classification of Champion and Seth. Underneath this sub group the forest types
found in the study area are as follows:
Type Notation
Group 5
Sub-group 5 A

Types

Type Description
Tropical Dry Deciduous
Southern Tropical Dry Deciduous Forests.
Dry Teak Bearing Forests
Dry Deciduous (Mixed) Scrub Forests

5A/Ci
5/D S1

Dry Teak Bearing Forest: This type of forest is predominantly confined to the hilly & undulated
region of Degma Reserve Forest which is about 8.9 Km in (NW) direction from the project site. Teak
in high proportion which ranged 50-60 % in some patches of the said RF.
The over-wood consists of teak, Ain (Terminalia tomentosa), Dhaora (Anogeissus latiflolia), Salai
(Boswellia serrata), Tendu (Diospyros melanoxylon), Bel (Aegle marmelos), Phyllanthus emblica
(aonla), etc.
The middle story consisting of Khair (Acacia catechu), Ghot (Zizyphus xylophyra), Achar (Buchanania
lanzan), Karai (Miliusa velutina), etc. Bamboo were also observed in few patches.
The under story consisted of main shrubs like Bharati (Maytenus emarginata), Tarota (Casia tora),
etc. and The common climbers found are Combretum ovalifolium (piwarbel), Smilax macrophylla
(ramdatun), Mimosa hamate (Chilati) and Bauhinia vahlii (Mahulbel). Forest floor is comprise of
various grasses like Kusal (Heteropogan contortus), Sheda (Sehima nurvosum), Ghonal (Themada
trianora), Rusa (Cymbopogan martini) Bhurbhusi (Erogostis tenella), etc
Dry Deciduous (Mixed) Scrub Forests:
These type of forest were observed in Junapani RF, Ingoli RF, Bid Sukli RF and part of Jhudupi
Jungle within study area. Majority of trees in these forests were found in the crooked and stunted
form may be due to unregulated felling, lopping, grazing and fires. The main species found in these
forests are Acacia catechu (Khair), Acacia leucophlea (Hiwar), Zizyphus jujuba (Bor), Ghot (Zizyphus
xylophyra), Butea monosperna (Palas), Nirgudi (Vitex negundo) and Cassia scrub etc. These forests
have ill-defined under story. Forest floor comprised grasses like Bhurbhusi (Erogostis tenella), Kusal
(Heteropogan contortus), Doob grass, etc.
Details of forest in the study area
There are five Reserve Forest & five open mixed Judupi Jungle observed in the study area. No
National Park, Wildlife Sanctuary, Biosphere Reserve, Tiger Reserve, within the 10 km radius study
area.The nearest wildlife sanctuary is Bor Wildlife Sanctuary is about ~21.5 km in W direction from
project site. Following are the list of forest along with the nearest villages w.r.t. distance and direction
from the project site.
The distance, direction of Reserve Forest and various Judupi jungle found in the surrounding areas of 10
km radius from the project site is as follows:
Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Forest
Bid Sukli RF
Degama RF
Ingoli RF
Junapani R.F
Dongargaon RF

Nearest Village
Pohi
Mandwa
Wathoda
Junapani
Khairi Buzurg

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Distance (Km)
3.5
8.9
7.2
6.9
5.44

Direction
WNW
NW
SSE
SSW
SE

3-44

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sr. No.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Forest
Jhudupi Jungle
Jhudupi Jungle
Jhudupi Jungle
Jhudupi Jungle

Nearest Village
Pohi
Khadki
Bhansuli
Katandhara

Distance (Km)
1.16
8.5
5.15
8.2

Direction
NW
W
WSW
NW

Habitats Description of the Project Site and its Immediate Surrounding:


Vegetation within the MIDC Butibori Industrial Area:
The proposed project of M/s. Paramount Chempro plant is within the notified MIDC Butibori industrial
area. The total area of MIDC Butibori is covered with 2428.14 Hect. Around 36 trees belonging to
differnent species were observed at proposed site. The species like Teak, Jamun, Awala, Sisam,
Mango and Eukaliptus sp. were grown at site. Shrubs include Nirgudi, Ghaneri and Rantulsi, Rui
along with seasonal herbs and doob grass. The project not envolved tree cutting.
Beside proposed project site (4050 m2) the entire industrial area is well covered with thick green
vegetation. The plantation was observed along the roadside within the industrial area. The details of
species are as under:
Trees: The main tree species observed within the industrial area are Azadirachta indica (Neem),
Terminalia arjuna (Arjun), Cassia fistula (Cassia), Bauhinia racemosa (Asta), Mangifera indica (Aam),
Emblica officinalis (Aawla), Tamarindus indica (Emali), Bauhinia variegata (Apta), Delbergia sissoo
(Sisam), Syzizium cumini (Jabhul), Acacia nilotica (Babul), Mangifera indica (Aamba), Tacoma stans,
Lucina leaucociphala, Peltophorum pterocapum, Samania saman, Pongamia pinnata (Karanj),
Cassia siamea (Kashid), Albizzia lebbek, Acacia catechu (Khair), Phoenix sylvestris (Khajur Sindi ),
Zizyphus xylopyra (Ghont), Butea monosperma (Palash), Acacia nilotica (Babul), Zizyphus mauritiana
(Ber), Ailanthus excels(Maharukh), Acacia leucophloea (Hivar), Tectona grandis (Sagaun), Anona
squamosa (Sitafal).
Shrubs: Calotropis gigantea (Rui), Helicteres isora (Marodfalli), Lantana Camera (Ghaneri), Nerium
indicum (Kanher), Boganvelia sp. &Thevetia peruviana (Ghanti).
Herbs: Parthenium hysterophorus (Gajar gawat), Acanthospermun hispidum (Gokharu), Xanthium
strumarium (Gokharu), Cassia tora (Travad), Tridax procumbens (Kambarmodi), Alternahtera sessilis
(Bechkusal Garundi) &Aerva laneta (kapurmadhuri) Kapurijadi) &Cissus quadrangularis (Hadjodi)
Grasses and Bamboos: Dendrocalamus stricutus (Bans), Eragrostis tenella (Bhurbhusi) &Cynodon
dactylon (Durva)
Climbers: Cuscuta reflexa (Amarbel), Momordica dioica (Kakad Bel) & Abrus precatorius (Gunj)

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-45

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

SITE SPECIFIC PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE PROJECT

Existing
Plantation
Formaldehyde unit

within

the

proposed View of Degma Reserve Forest in the buffer


zone of study area

Butia monosperma (Palash) observed along the


fringes of protected forest within study area

Agriculture Crop (Herbacium


Cotton observed in study area

gossypicum)

Hanuman Langur (Presbytis entellus) observed in White breasted kingfisher (Halcyon smyrnensis)
the study area
PLATE 3.1: VEGETATION COVER, CROPS, AGRICULTURE FIELD AVIFAUNA AND ANIMALS
WITHIN THE STUDY AREA

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-46

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Enumeration of Terrestrial flora in the study area


The tree species, herbs and shrubs and major crops, were documented during this baseline study. The list
of floral species documented in the study area is enlisted inTable 3.26 to 3.32.
Trees:
The species enlisted from the study area are given in the Table 3.26 Total 63 species were enlisted
from the study area
TABLE 3.26
LIST OF FLORA IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.

Botanical Name
Acacia catechu
Acacia leucophloea wild
Acacia nilotica
Adina cordifolia
Aegle marmelos
Ailanthus excelsa
Albizzia lebbek
Albizzia odoratissima
Albizzia procera
Annona squamosa
Anogeissus latifolia
Azadirachta indica
Bauhinia racemosa
Bombax ceiba
Boswellia serrata
Bridelia retusa
Buchanania Ianzan
Butea monosperma
Careya arborea
Casearia elliptica
Miliusa velutina
Casearia tomentosa
Cassia fistula
Cassia siamea
Cassine glauca
Dalbergia paniculata
Dalbergia sissoo
Diospyros malanoxylon
Dolichandrone falcata
Erythrina variegate
Ficus benghalensis
Ficus glomerata
Gardeinia latifolia
Garuga pinnata
Gmelina arborea
Grewia tiliaefolia
Holarrhena anthidysentrica
Ixora arborea
Kydia calycina

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Local Name
Khair
Hiwar
Babul / Babhool
Haldu
Bel
Maharukh
Siras (Black)
Chichwa
Siras (White)
Sitaphal
Dhaora /Dhawada
Neem
Apta / Kachnar
Katsawar / Semal
Salai
Kateain / Kasai
Char / Chironji
Palas
Kumbhi
Kalakarai
Karai
Tondri
Amaltas / Bahawa
Kashid
Aran
Dhoban
Sissoo
Tendu
Medsing
Pangara
Wad
Umbar
Ghogar
Kakad
Shiwan / Siwan
Dhaman
White kuda / Kuda
Lokhandi
Warang / Baranga

Family
Mimoseae
Mimoseae
Mimoseae
Rubiaceae
Rutaceae
Simaroubaceae
Mimoseae
Mimoseae
Mimoseae
Annonaceae
Combretaceae
Meliaceae
Caesalpiniaceae
Bombaceae
Burseraceae
Euphorbiaceae
Anacardiaceae
Fabaceae
Lecythidiaceae
Fabaceae
Annoceae
Samydaceae
Caesalpiniaceae
Caesalpiniaceae
Calastraceae
Fabaceae
Fabaceae
Ebenaceae
Bignoniaceae
Fabaceae
Moraceae
Urticaceae
Rubiaceae
Burseraceae
Verbenaceae
Tiliaceae
Apocynaceae
Rubiaceae
Malvaceae

3-47

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sr. No.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.

A.

Botanical Name
Lagerstroemia parviflora
Lannea coromandelica
Leucaena leucocephala
Madhuca indica
Manilkara hexandra
Mitragyna parviflora
Phyllanthus emblica
Pongamia pinnata
Pterocarpus marsupium
Salix tetraperma
Schleichera oleosa
Schrebera swietenioides
Semecarpus anacardium
Soymida febrifuga
Sterculia urens
Stereospermum saveolens
Tamarindus Indica
Tectona grandis
Terminalia arjuna
Terminalia bellerica
Terminalia chebula
Terminalia tomentosa
Ziziphus mauritiana
Ziziphus xylopyra

Local Name
Lendia / Lenda
Moyen / Mowai
Subabul
Moha / Mahuwa
Khirni
Karam/Mundi
Aonla
Karanj
Bija
Wandra / Bainsa
Kusum
Mokha
Biba / Bhilawa
Rohan
Kullu / Kulu
Padar
Chinch
Sag / Sagwan / Teak
Arjun / Kahu
Behada
Hirda / Harra
Saja / Ain
Bor / Ber
Ghoti / Ghot

Family
Lythraceae
Anacardiaceae
Mimoseae
Sapotaceae
Sapotaceae
Rubiaceae
Euphorbiaceae
Fabaceae
Fabaceae
Salicaceae
Sapotaceae
Aristolochiaceae
Anacardiaceae
Meliaceae
Sterculiaceae
Bignoniaceae
Caesalpinaceae
Verbenaceae
Combretaceae
Combretaceae
Combretaceae
Combretaceae
Rhamnaceae
Rhamnaceae

Shrubs/Under Trees

Shrubs encountered during the present survey are given in the Table 3.27. Total 26 species were
enumerated from the study area, Most dominant shrubs in the study area were Abutulon indicum,
Cassia auriculata, Datura metal,Holarrhena antidysentrica,.Cassia pumila, Cassia tora, Calotropis
gigantea, Lantana camera, Zizyphus sp. and Zizyphus mauritiana and Carissa spinarum.
The shrubs species enlisted from the study area are given in the Table 3.27.
TABLE 3.27
LIST OF SPECIES IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

Botanical Name
Abutulon indicum
Agave Americana
Barleria prionites
Cassia auriculata
Calotropis procera
Datura metal
Dodonaea viscosa
Ficus hispida
Gardenia gummifera
Grewia hirsute
Holarrhena antidysentrerica
Hamlitonia suaveolens
Helicteres isora

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Local Name
Petari
Ketki
Katekoranti
Tarwad
Rui
Kaladhotra
Kharata
Katumber
Dikamali
Gautri
Indrajawa/Kuda
Bhawarmal
Muradsheng/Marophal

Family
Malvaceae
Agavaceae
Acanthaceae
Caesalpiniaceae
Asclepiadaceae
Solanaceae
Sapinadaceae
Moraceae
Rubiaceae
Tiliaceae
Apocyanaceae
Rubiaceae
Sterculaceae

3-48

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sr. No.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.

B.

Botanical Name
Indigofera tinctoria
Lantena Camera
Martynia annua
Maytenus emarginata
Solanum xanthocarpum
Lantana camera
Cassia auriculata
Jetropha gossipifolia
Nyctanthes arbortristis
Phoenix sylvestris
Vitex negundo
Woodfordia fruticosa
Wrightia tinctoria

Local Name
Neel
Ghaneri / Ulta
Waghnakhi
Bharati
Kateringani
Ghaneri
Tarwad
Ratanjoyti
Kharasani/Kharasi
Sindhi/Chhindi
Nirgudi
Jilbili
Dudhi / Kalakuda

Family
Fabaceae
Verbenaceae
Martyniaceae
Celastraceae
Solanaceae
Verbinaceae
Fabaceae
Euphorbiaceae
Astraceae
Areacaceae
Verbanaceae
Lythraceae
Apocyanaceae

Herbs:

The herbaceous cover observed in this region is given in the Table 3.28, 19 species were enlisted
from the study area
TABLE 3.28
HERBS & GRASSES IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.

Botanical name
Tribulus terristris
Atylosia sp.
Tridax procumbense
Alternanthera sessilis
Aerva laneta
Euphorbia jeniculata
Xanthium strumarium
Achyrantes aspera
Croton sparsiflorus
Tephrosia hamiltonil
Parthenium hysterophorus
Tribulus terrestris
Stylosanthes hamata
Argemone mexicana
Cleome viscosa
Hyptis suaveolins
Atylosia scarabaeoides
Euphorbia geniculata
Parthenium hysterophorus

Local Name
Gokru
Rantur
Kamarmodi
Koypa/bechkusal
kapurmadhuri
Dudhkena
Gokhru
Aghada
---Divali
Gajargawat
Gokru
Hamata
Pivla dhotra
Pivilitilwan
Rantulasi/Bantulasi
Rantur
Bhurbusi
Gajargawat

Family
Zygophyllaceae
Fabaceae
Asteraceae
Amaranthaceae
Amaranthaceae
Euphorbiaceae
Asteraceae
Amaranthaceae
Euphorbiaceae
Fabaceae
Astraceae
Zygophyllaceae
Fabaceae
Papaveraceae
Cleomaceae
Lamiaceae
Fabaceae
Euphorbiaceae
Asteraceae

Bamboo & Grasses:


The bamboo & Grasses observed in this region is given in the Table 3.29, 15 species were enlisted
from the study area

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-49

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

A)

Bamboo and Grasses


TABLE 3.29
BAMBOO & GRASSES IN THE STUDY AREA

Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Botanical name
Dendrocalamus strictus
Eragrostic tenella
Andropogan pumilus
Cynodon dactylon
Chrysopogon fulvus
Themeda quadrivalvis
Bamboosa arundinacea
Vetiveria zizaniodes
Hetropogon contortus
Dicanthium annulatum
Dicanthium aristaum
Schima sulcatum
Apluda mutica
Sehima nervosum
Cymbopogon martini

Local Name
Bans/Bamboo
Bhurbhusi
Diwartan
Durwa/Hariyalli/Doob
Gadasheda
Ghonad
Katang bamboo
Khas
Kusal
Marvel (small)
Marvel (Big)
Paonia
Phulkia
Sheda
Tikhadi

Family
Poaceae
Poaceae
Poaceae
Poaceae
Poaceae
Poaceae
Poaceae
Poaceae
Dicanthium
Poaceae
Poaceae
Poaceae
Poaceae
Poaceae
Poaceae

Climbers and Twiners


Majority of Climbers were observed in the moist patches. The main species were Bauhinia Vahlii,
Milletia auriculata Butea superba, Acacia pennata, Zizphus oenoplia and Smilax Zeylanica, and a few
others. Details are given in the Table 3.30 species of climbers/ twiners were recorded from the area.
B)

Climber
TABLE 3.30
CLIMBERS AND TWINERS IN THE STUDY AREA

Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

Botanical name
Olax scandens
Mimosa hamate
Celastrus paniculata
Zizyphus oenoplia
Abrus precatorius
Tinospora cordifolia
Mucuna pruriens
Bauhinia vahlii
Combretum ovalifolium
Smilax macrophylla,
Cocculus hirsutus
Amarvel
Bandha/Bandh

Local Name
Aradphari
Chilati
Dhimarwel/Malkagni
Eruni
Gunj
Gulvel
kajkuri
Mahulbel
Piwarvel
Ramdaton
Vasanvel
Cuscuta reflexa
Vanda tessellate

Family
Olacaceae
Mimoseae
Celasreaseae
Rhamnaceae
Fabaceae
Menispermaceae
fabaceae
Caesalpiniaceae
Combretaceae
Smilaceae
Menispermaceae
Cuscutaceae
Orchidaceae

Vegetation near Human Habitation


Near the villages, the vegetation pattern was found to be abruptly changed from that what was observed in
the forest areas. The common species are those which are useful to the human beings. The species
commonly found were Mangifera indica, Madhuca longifolia, Syzigium cumini, Tamarindus indica,
Terminalia bellerica, Ficus bengalensis, Ficus religiosa, Psidium guajava, Azadirachta indica, etc.
Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-50

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Agriculture
The details pertaining to agriculture and horticulture crops within the study area are presented in
Table 3.31 and Table 3.32 respectively.
TABLE 3.31
AGRICULTURE CROPS GROWN IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr. No.
Botanical Name
Food Grains
Pannisetum americanum
1.
Sorghum Vulgare
2.
Triticum aestivum
3.
Cereals
Cajanus cajan
1.
Cicer arietinum
2.
Pisum sativum
3.
Oil Seeds
Glycine max
1.
Cash Crop
Herbaceum gossypium
1.
Vegetables
Abelomoschus esculentus
1.
Amaranthus tricolor
2.
Brassica oleracea
3.
Dolichos lablab
4.
Memordia charantia
5.
Solanum melongena
6.
Spinacia oleracea
7.
Spices
Capsicum sp.
1.
Coriandrum sativum
2.

Local Name

Family

Bajri
Jawar
Gahu

Poaceae
Poaceae
Poaceae

Tur
Herbara
Watana

Fabaceae
Fabaceae
Fabaceae

Soyabean

Fabaceae

Cotton

Malvaceae

Bhendi (Lady finger)


Chavli
Gobi
Val
Bitter Gourd (Karela)
Wangi (Brinjal)
Palak

Malvacese
Amaranthaceae
Criciferae
Fabaceae
Cuccurbitaceae
Solanaceae
Amaranthaceae

Mirchi
Kothimbir

Solanaceae
Umbelliferae

Source: Field Survey and discussion with local villagers


TABLE 3.32
PROMINENT HORTICULTURAL TREES IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Botanical Name
Citrus aurantifolia
Annona squamosa
Carica Papaya
Citrus sp.
Psidium guava

Local Name
Limbu
Sitaphal
Papaya
Orange
Peru

Family
Rutaceae
Annonaceae
Cariaceae
Rutaceae
Myrtaceae

Source: Field Survey and discussion with local villagers

Phytosociological Survey (Quantitative Assessment):


Phyto-sociological study of any vegetation, whether tree layer, shrub or herbaceous layer, is an important
aspect of an ecological study, which deals with social interaction of these plant species among themselves.
This study also reflects about the totality of vegetation at any particular site. The interaction of species and
its totality always varies with space and time lapse and alteration in factors such as edaphic, climatic and
other stresses.
Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-51

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

The stratified random sampling approach was followed for phytosociological survey in the present study.
The phytosociological data from these forests were quantitatively analysed to work out the species
richness, diversity, evenness, dominance, importance value, stand density and the basal area (Table
3.33to 3.35).
TABLE 3.33
SUKLI RF
SPECIES
Acacia catechu
Zizyphus sp.
Casia fistula
Azadirachta indica
Butea monosperma
Acacia leucophloea
Acacia nilotica
Tamarindus indica

F
80
60
20
40
40
60
40
20
360

D/ha
120
80
20
40
40
60
60
20
440

A/ha
150
133
100
100
100
100
150
100
933

IVI
70.57
44.30
21.87
34.14
33.01
43.57
36.23
16.32
300

SWI
0.354
0.310
0.141
0.218
0.218
0.272
0.272
0.141
1.925

A/ha
125
100
100
100
133
100
100
100
858

IVI
71.99
17.02
35.52
38.80
59.04
33.82
16.67
27.15
300

SWI
0.351
0.155
0.237
0.237
0.328
0.237
0.155
0.237
1.937

TABLE 3.34
JUNAPANI RF
SPECIES
Acacia catechu
Tectona grandis
Casia fistula
Azadirachta indica
Butea monosperma
Acacia nilotica
Annona squamosa
Acacia Leucophloea

F
80
20
40
40
60
40
20
40
340

D/ha
100
20
40
40
80
40
20
40
380

TABLE 3.35
DEGMA RESERVE FOREST
SPECIES
Tectona grandis
Terminalia tomentosa
Albizzia odoratissima
Madhuca indica
Bombax ceiba
Diospyros melanoxylon
Anogeissus latifolia
Terminalia arjuna
Buchanania lanzan
Careya arborea
Wrightia tinctoria
Butea monosperma
Acacia Leucophloea
Ixora parviflora
Lagerstroemia parviflora

F
100
80
40
40
20
40
20
20
40
20
40
60
40
20
20

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

D/ha
300
120
40
60
40
40
40
20
60
20
40
100
40
40
40

A/ha
300
150
100
150
200
100
200
100
150
100
100
166
100
200
200

IVI
47.82
29.08
26.17
13.36
13.11
14.34
11.02
15.35
11.88
6.00
9.97
20.32
12.90
7.34
12.60

SWI
0.35
0.23
0.11
0.15
0.11
0.11
0.11
0.15
0.15
0.07
0.11
0.21
0.11
0.11
0.11

3-52

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

SPECIES
Azadirachta indica
Bowsellia serrata
Acacia catechu
Annana squamosa
Acacia nilotica

3.6.2

F
40
40
20
20
40
760

D/ha
40
40
20
40
60
1200

A/ha
100
100
100
200
150
2967

IVI
11.65
11.14
7.54
7.12
11.28
300.00

SWI
0.11
0.11
0.07
0.11
0.15
2.77

Interpretation of Phytosociological Study of Vegetation

The IVI table of trees for Sukli RF (site I) indicated that the Acacia catechu (Khair) was the sole dominant
species in the area with Acacia leucophloea as almost the second dominant species.
The IVI table of trees Junapani RF (Site II) indicated that similar trend of first dominant species i.e. Acacia
catechu (Khair) followed by Butea monosperma as second dominant species.
The IVI table of trees Degma RF (Site III) indicated that true teak bearing dry deciduous forest in which
Teak is sole dominant species followed by its companion Terminalia tomentosaas second dominant tree.
From the above table, density of species per hector was observed highest in Degma Reserve Forest. The
diversity indices were observed to be low in Junapani RF & Sukli RF as compared to Degma Reserve
Forest may be due to human perturbation, edaphic factors and illegal cutting of trees in past.
3.6.2.1 Rare and Endangered Flora in the Study Area
The IUCN Red List is the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of
plant and animal species. It uses a set of criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of thousands of
species and subspecies. These criteria are relevant to all species and all regions of the world. With its
strong scientific base, the IUCN Red List is recognized as the most authoritative guide to the status of
biological diversity. Among the enumerated flora in the study area, none of them were assigned any
threat category, by RED data book of Indian Plants. (Nayar and Sastry, 1990) and Red list of
threatened Vascular plants (IUCN, 2010; BSI, 2003)
3.6.2.2 Endemic Plants of the Study Area
De Candolle (1855) first used the concept of Endemic, which is defined as an area of a taxonomic
unit, especially species which has a restricted distribution or habitat, isolated from its surrounding
region through geographical, ecological or temporal barriers. Among recorded plant species none
were assigned the status of endemic plant of this region.
3.6.3

Fauna

The 10 km radius study area was found to be a home to several species of mammals, reptiles, Aves
and other lower invertebrates. As described earlier, the part of study area is covered with forest. Big
animals like Wild boar, Sabhar, Nilgai, Barking deer, spotted deer as well as small sized fauna like
Jackal, Monkey, Fox, etc. were found abundantly in the Degma Reserve Forest area. Most significant
wild fauna Panthera pardus (Leopard) which was not directly sited during the field survey in the study
area however after consultative approach with local people come to know that, leopard (Panthera
pardus) visited in search of water and food especially in forest adjacent to the Kanholi Talav
(Reservoir) during summer season which is about 8.1 km in West direction from the project site.
Birds were observed throughout the study area mostly near the forest area and water bodies.
Reptiles and amphibians were also observed in the study area. Fresh water fishes were found in the
Wenna river and water reservoir.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-53

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Major Fauna Observed in Butibori MIDC Industrial Area


Mammals: Funambulus pennati, Cynopterus sphinx,
Herpestesedwardsi, Macaca mulata & Presbytis antellus.

Mus

booduga,

Rattus

rattus,

Reptiles: Vipera russelli, Bungarus caerulens, Calotes versicolor, Hemidactylus domestica,


Hemidactylus flaviviridis, Ptyas mucosa & Naja naja
Birds: Though the industrial area is covered with sufficient green belt and plantation, however
diversity of birds species was observed to be low, might be due to local distrubances, vehicular
movement, devoid of agriculture fields and unavailability of water resources, cluster of industries and
aggregation, non avaibility of conducive/ aesthetic environment within the industrial area for attraction
of birds. The common birds observed in industrial area are Acrido therestristis (common myna),
Ploceus philipinus, Pycnonotus cafer, Dicrurus adsimilis (Kotwal), Vanellus indicus (Red Wattled
Lapwing), Passer domesticus (sparrow), Bubo bubo (Owl), Corvus splendens (Common crow),
Dicrurus adsimilis (Drongo), Centropus sinensis (Bharadwaj), Psittacula krameri (parakeet) etc.
The fauna observed through enquiry from local people of the study area are as follows:
3.6.3.1 Faunal Biodiversity of the Study Area
For the documentation of the faunal biodiversity of the study area with respect to mammals,
reptiles, birds, butterfly and fishes species, a baseline survey was conducted on JanuaryMarch 2016.
3.6.3.2 Mammals
The wild mammals observed other than domesticated ones from the core zone and the study area
are documented in the Table 3.36.
TABLE 3.36
MAMMALS FROM THE STUDY AREA
S. No.

Scientific Name

Mammals
Canis aureus
1.
Felis chaus
2.
Boselaphus tragocamelus
3.
Cervus unicolor
4.
Axis axis
5.
Muntiacus muntjak
6.
Sus cristatus
7.
Presbytis entellus
8.
Funambulus palmarum
9.
Hystrix indica
10.
Lepus nigricollis
11.
Vulpes bengalensis
12.
Herpestes edwardsi
13.
Bandicota bengalensis
14.
Rattus rattus
15.
Pteropus vampyrus
16.

English Name

Common Name

Schedule as per WPA

Jackal
Jungle cat
Blubull
Sambhar
Cheetal
Barking deer
Wild boar
Common langur
Palm squirrel
Indian Porcupine
Indian hare
Indian fox
Common Mongoose
Field rat
Common house rat

Kolha
Ranmanjar
Nilgai
Bhekad
Harin
Randukkar
Bandar
Khar
Sayal
Sasa
Kolha
Mongoose
Undir
Undir
Watwaghul

II
II
III
III
III
III
III
II
IV
IV
IV
II
II
V
V
V

Fruit bat

3.6.3.3 Herpetofauna
The Herpetofauna observed in the study area are presented in Table 3.37.
Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-54

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 3.37
REPTILES IN THE STUDY AREA
Reptiles
Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Scientific Name
*Bungarus caeruleus
*Ptyas mucosus
*Naja naja
Calotes versicolor
Mabuya carinata
Bufo parietalis
*Daboia russelli

English Name
Common Indian Krait
Common Rat Snake
Indian Cobra
Garden Lizard
Keeled Indian Mabuya
Indian Toad
Russells viper

Common Name
Karait
Dhaman
Nag
-----

Schedule as per WPA


IV
II
II
IV
II

Viper

Note: * Indicates not sighted but recorded based on consultative approach with villagers and forest
officials
3.6.3.4 Birds of the Study Area
The most commonly spotted bird species of this area were; Indian Roller, Green bee eater, Jungle
babbler, Plum-headed parakeet, Cattle Egret, Crow pheasant, Red-wattled Lapwing , Red-vented
bulbul, Orienal magpie-robin, black-winged kite, etc. Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus) not sighted but
enlisted based on communication with villagers. Systematic list of the birds in the study area with the
status of occurrence is given in Table 3.38.
TABLE 3.38
LISTS OF BIRDS IN THE STUDY AREA WITH ITS DISTRIBUTION & MIGRATORY STATUS
Sr.
No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

Scientific Name

English Name

Common Name

Accipiter badius
Acridothere stristis
Anastomus oscitans
Bubo bubo
Bubulcus ibis
Columba livia
Coracias bengalensis
Corvus splendens
Corvusmacrorhynchos
Coturnix coturnix
Cuculus varius
Elanus caeruleus
Francolinus francolinus
Gallus gallus
Milvus migrans
Passer domesticus
Pavo cristatus
Pericrocotusflammeus

Shikra
Common Maina
Openbilled Stork
Ghubad
Cattle egret
Blue rock pigeon
Indian roller
Common crow
Jungle crow
Common or gray
Common Howk
Black winged kite
Black partridge
Jungle fowl
Common pariah kite
House sparrow
Indian peafowl
Scarlet minivet

19.
20.
21.

Phalacrocorax fuscicollis
Psittacula krameri
Psittacula cyanocephala

22.

Pycnonotus cafer

Indian Cormorant
Parrot
Plum headed
parakeet
Redvented Bulbul

Shikra
Maina
Stork
Eurasian Eagle-owl
Gai Bagla
Kabutar
Chukar
Kavla
Junglee Kavla
Bater
Papiha/ Papiya
Kapasi
Kala Titar
Jangli Kombdi
Ghar
Chimni
Mor
Pahari
Bulbul/Chasm
Shag
Popat
Popat

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Bulbul

Schedule as
per WPA
IV
IV
IV
IV
IV
IV
IV
V
-IV
IV
-IV
IV
--I
--

Distribution

IV
IV
IV

R
R
R

IV

R
R
R
r
R
R
R
R
R
RW
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R

3-55

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sr.
No.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.

Scientific Name

English Name

Common Name

Distribution

Laughing Dove
Sat Bhai
Nadi Surai
Deshi tutari
Haldya
Vedha Raghu
Khandya

Schedule as
per WPA
IV
IV
IV
IV
IV
IV
IV

Streptopelia senegalensis
Turdoides striatus
Sterna aurantia
Actitis hypoleucos
Oriolus oriolus
Merops orientalis
Halcyon smyrnensis

30.

Centropus sinensis

31.
32.
33.
34.
35.

Dicrurus adsimillis
Sturnus pagodarum
Acrido tristis
Perdicula asiatica
Copsychus saularis

ChotaFakhta
Jungle babbler
River Tern
Common Sandpiper
Golden oriole
Green Bee Eater
White Breasted
Kingfisher
Crow Pheasant
(Greater Caucal)
Black drongo
Brahminy Myna
Common Myna
Jungle Bush Quail
Oriental Magpie
Robin

Bharadwaj

IV

Kotwal
Bhangpadi Myna
Myna/Salunki
Jungle zudupi lava
Dayal

IV
IV
IV
IV
IV

R
R
R
R
R

R
R
RM
W
R
R
R

Nomenclatures follow An Annotated Checklist of the Birds of the Oriental Region by Tim Inskipp,
Nigel Lindsey and William Duckworth (1996)
Note: R = Widespread Resident, r = Very Local Resident, RW = Resident Winter visitor, as per the
distribution given in WCMC &Oriental Bird Clubs Check list of Indian Birds
3.6.3.5 Butterflies from the Study Area
During survey period, butterflies were rarely observed in early morning in study area but enlisted
below based on consultative approach with villagers Table 3.39.
TABLE 3.39
BUTTERFLIES IN THE STUDY AREA
List of butterflies observed in the study area
S. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Scientific Name
Papilio demoleus
Papilio polytes
Catopsila pomona
Eurema hecabe
Chiladeslaius
Danaus genutia

Local Name
Lime Butterfly
Common Mormon
Common Emigrant
Common Grass yellow
Lime Blue
Stripped Tiger

3.6.3.6 Fishes in the Study Area


Species of fishes mainly observed in Wenna river were confirmed through the consultative approach
with villagers and documented in the Table 3.40.
TABLE 3.40
FISHES IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr. No.
1.
2.

Fish
Catla catla
Labeo Rohita

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

Common Name
Catala
Rohu

3-56

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sr. No.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Fish
Cirrhinus mrigala
Cyprinus carpio
Caridina sp.
Eriocheir sinensis

Common Name
Mrigala
Common carp/Cyprinus Carp
Shrimp
Crab

Source: Communication with local people and primary survey conducted by Anacon Team.
Rare and Endangered fauna of the study area:
As per IUCN RED (2013) list
The IUCN Red List is the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of
plant and animal species. It uses a set of criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of thousands of
species and subspecies. These criteria are relevant to all species and all regions of the world. With its
strong scientific base, the IUCN Red List is recognized as the most authoritative guide to the status of
biological diversity.
Among the reported animals, all are categorized under least concern except Cervus unicolor
(Sambhar) is protected under vulnerable category as per IUCN.
As per Indian Wild Life (Protection) Act, 1972
Wild Life (Protection) Act, 1972, as amended on 17th January 2003, is an Act to provide for the
protection of wild animals, birds and plants and for matters connected therewith or ancillary or
incidental thereto with a view to ensuring the ecological and environmental security of the country.
Some of the sighted fauna were given protection by the Indian Wild Life (Protection) Act, 1972 by
including them in different schedules. Among the Avifuana in the study area, Pea fowl (Pavo
cristatus) is included in schedule I of Wild life protection Act (1972), while many other birds are
included in schedule IV.
Among the reptiles, Indian Cobra (Naja naja), and Common Rat Snake (Ptyas mucosus), Russells
Viper (Vipera russelli) were provided protection as per Schedule-II of Wild life protection act, (1972)
and Common Krait (Bungarus caerulus) were provided as per Schedule IV of Wildlife protection act.
Among mammals; Fox (Canis aureus), Felis chaus (Jungle cat), Presbytis entellus
(Hanuman/Common Langur), Herpestes edwardsi (Common Mongoose) are protected in scheduleII
Blubull (Boselaphus tragocamelus), Sambhar (Cervus unicolor), Cheetal (Axis axis), Barking deer
(Muntiacus muntjak),Wild Boars (Sus scrofa) are provided protection by incorporating them in
scheduleIII whereas Porcupine & Hare and five stripped squirrels are included in schedule IV of Wild
Life Protection act 1972.
3.7

SOCIO-ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT

3.7.1

Introduction

The initiation, growth and development of plant activities and infrastructure development associated with it
are intended to create impact on the socio-economic profile of the communities near by the industrial area.
The impact could be positive or negative depends on the development activities adopted and carried
out by the company/industry. An assessment of socio - economic environment forms an integral part
of the EIA/EMP study. In order to improve the quality of life of the people affected by the industrial
activities, it is necessary to understand the socio- economic aspects and its trends in the study area.
The project area is falling in MIDC Butibori industrial area .Socio-demographic features/ surveys are
very useful for understanding social and economic problems and identifying potential solutions. To
Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-57

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

understand the socio demographic status and the trends of the communities in the 10 km radius
census 2011 & village directory 2001 has been contemplated and necessary data collected and
compiled from it.
3.7.2

Methodology Adopted for the Study

Desk research is the major methodology adopted for the study which involves researching, compiling
and analysing the data. Finally the sociological aspect including human settlements, demography,
and infrastructure aspect for education, health, drinking water, power supply, communication and the
land use aspect has been collected compiled and analysed with the help of census data 2011 &
village directory 2001 of Maharashtra state.
3.7.3

Demographic Highlights of the Study Area

The demographic aspects of the study area consist of the various features of the population across to the
study area. The population composition is described here in term of basic demographic features like,
household status, age, social composition, education, etc. The distribution of population has been reflected
here based on the geographic boundaries.
Dwelling units explain the geographical composition of the area. The table depicts the number of
villages within the 10 km radius area from the project site. The 10 km radial map covers total 49
villages, 35 villages from Hingana taluka and 14 villages from Nagpur Rural taluka in Nagpur district.
Population size of the villages is given in Table 3.41.
TABLE 3.41
POPULATION SIZE OF VILLAGES
Sr. No
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Total

Population size
< 50
50-99
100-199
200-499
500-1999
2000-4999
5000-9000
9000+

0-10 km
6
1
6
13
17
3
1
2
49

In %
12
2
12
25
35
6
4
4
100

Source: Primary census abstract 2011, District Nagpur, State Maharashtra


Above given table shows population size of the villages. Most of the villages had population size in
between 500-1999.
TABLE 3.42
POPULATION DETAILS IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr.
No

No of
household

Total
Population

Total
Male

Total
Female

Population
0-6 child

Male
06
Child

Female
06
Child

Population
SC

Population
ST

41472

22110

19362

5190

2719

2471

5808

6158

In Nagpur Rural taluka


2.
4289
18291
14407
Total
59763

9460
31570

8831
28193

2554
7744

1311
4030

1243
3714

2739
8547

2512
8670

In Hingna taluka
1.
10118

Source: Primary census abstract 2011, District Nagpur, State Maharashtra

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-58

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Population Details
Total 14407 household residing in the study area and average family size was 4 persons in per
family
Total population in the study area was 59763
Total male population was 31570
Total female population was 28193
Total 0-6 child population was 7744
Total male 0-6 child population was 4030
Total female 0-6 child population was 3714
Total Scheduled Cast population was 8547 (14%) of total population
Total Scheduled Tribe population was 8670(15%) of total population
Population details are shown in Table 3.42 and Annexure V.
Details of Sex Ratio
The sex ratio is the ratio of female to male in the population (normalize to 1000). The sex ratio in the
study area showed unevenly distributed trends. Overall sex ratio is 893 female to thousand male.
Child 0-6 sex ratio was 922 female to 1000 male. In SC category, 917 and in ST category, 901
female to 1000 male. Details are presented in Figure 3.14.

3.14: SEX RATIO IN THE STUDY AREA

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-59

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Details of Literacy Rate

TABLE 3.43
LITERATE & ILLITERATE POPULATION IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr. No

P_LIT

M_LIT

F_LIT

P_ILL

M_ILL

F_ILL

17425

13656

10391

4685

5706

13695

7443

6252

4596

2017

2579

44776

24868

19908

14987

6702

8285

In Hingna taluka
1.

31081
In Nagpur Rural taluka

2.
Total

Source: Primary census abstract 2011, District Nagpur, State Maharashtra


Note: P_LIT: Population Literate, M_LIT: Male Literate, F_LIT: Female Literate, P_ILL: Population
Illiterate, M_ILL: Male Illiterate, F_ILL: Female Illiterate
Literacy Details
Total literate population was 44776(75%)
Out of total literate population, male literate population was 24868(56%)
Out of total literate population, female literate population was 19908(44%)
Total illiterate population was 14987(25%)
From the above given data, it is revealed that literacy rate is improving in the study area. Only (25%)
population is illiterate in the study area. Literacy rate is given in Table 3.43 and Figure 3.15

FIGURE 3.15: LITERACY RATE IN THE STUDY AREA


Details of Employment Pattern
The identification of the current economic characteristics of the study area is also an important part of
defining the employment pattern of the study area. There are different types of employment pattern, that
may be classified as: Those persons who had worked for at least six months or 183 days are treated as
Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-60

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

main workers, on the other hand if persons categorized as workers participated in any economic or
productive activity for less than six months or 183 days during the last one year are treated as marginal
workers and non workers are those who have not worked any time at all in the year.
Employment pattern in the study area is given in Table 3.44 and depicted in Figure 3.16.
TABLE 3.44
EMPLOYMENT PATTERN IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr. No

Total Workers

In Hingana taluka
1.
18854
In Nagpur Rural taluka
2.
7721
Total
26575

Total main
Workers

Total Marginal
Workers

Total Non Workers

16009

2845

22618

6274
22283

1447
4292

10570
33188

Source: Primary census abstract 2011, district Nagpur , State Maharashtra


According to census 2011, total worker population was 26575(44%) of total population in the study
area
Main worker population was 22283(37%)
Total marginal worker population was 4292 (7%)
Total non worker population was 3318856 (56%)
Above given statistics indicates that non worker population are more than working population.

FIGURE 3.16: EMPLOYMENT PATTERN IN THE STUDY AREA

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-61

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.7.4

Infrastructures Facilities

The socio-economic well being of the area and its people is represented by the infrastructure and the
social assets available in the area. The study area constituted of various infrastructures related to
education, health care, communication, transportation, drinking waters etc. Butibori comes under
urban are, therefore details of infrastructure facilities of 47 villages given in (Annexure VI) and
presented in Figure 3.17.

FIGURE 3.17: INFRASTRUCTURE FACILITIES AVABILITY IN NUBER OF VILLGES


ZONEWISE
EDUCATIONAL
Out of total 47 villages, 9 villages deprived from education facility. College facility was available in the
study area. Most of the villages were availing primary education facility.
MEDICAL
Out of total 47 villages 9 villages deprived from education facility. College facility was available in the
study area. Most of the villages were availing primary education facility.
POWER SUPPLY
Electricity facility was available for domestic purpose.44 villages availing electricity, for agricultural
purpose.
DRINKING WATER
Major drinking water sources were tap water, well water, hand pumps and tube wells in the study area.
TRANSPORTATION
Roads are the only means of communication founds in the study area. Out of total 47 villages, 30
villages were connected through bus facility.
ROAD
Majority of the villages were connected with paved roads.
BANK
Only 10 villages were availing bank facility in the form of cooperative and commercial bank and
Society.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-62

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.7.5

Landuse Pattern

The study of land-use of the project area is an integral part of the EIA. Baseline data on landuse was
generated using information available with census data, which is presented in details in AnnexureVII. Details of land use pattern of the study area are given in Table 3.45. The following prominent
land use classes have been observed in the study area.
TABLE 3.45
LAND USE PATTERN (In ha)
Sr.
No.

Total
Geographi
cal Area

Forest
Area

Area
under
NonAgricul
tural
Uses

Barren
& Uncultivab
le Land
Area

Permanent
Pastures
and Other
Grazing
Land Area

Land
Culturable
Under
Waste Land
Miscella Area
neous
Tree
Crops
etc.
Area

Fallows
Land other
than
Current
Fallows
Area

Current
Fallows
Area

Net Area
Sown

In Hingana taluka
1

14677.16

1468.33

In Nagpur Rural taluka


5099.28
217.75
2
0-10 19776.44
km

1834.73

206.17

926.53

70.08

767.5

774.48

776.91

7852.43

726.19

405.99

427

309.11

231.23

473.59

2308.42

612.16

1353.53

70.08

1076.61

1005.71

1250.5

10160.85

1686.08 2560.92

Source: Village directory 2001, district Nagpur, State Maharashtra


Forest Land
This includes all land classified either as forest under any legal enactment, or administered as forest,
whether State-owned or private, and whether wooded or maintained as potential forest land. The
area of crops raised in the forest and grazing lands or areas open for grazing within the forests
remain included under the forest area. Forest area occupies about 1686.08 hectares land, which
was (8.52%) of total land
Area under non-agricultural Uses
This includes all land occupied by buildings, roads and railways or under water, e.g. rivers and
canals, and other land put to uses other than agriculture. 2560.92 (12.95%) hectare land was comes
under non agricultural uses.
Barren & un-cultivable land area
This includes all land covered by mountains, deserts, etc. Land, which cannot be brought under
cultivation except at an exorbitant cost is classified as unculturable whether such land is in isolated
blocks or within cultivated holdings. 612.16 hectare (3.09%) of total land was under this category.
Permanent Pastures and Other Grazing Land Area
This includes all grazing land whether it is permanent pasture/meadows or not. Village common
grazing land is included under this category.1353.53 hectares (6.84%) land comes under this
category.
Land under Miscellaneous Tree Crops, etc.:
This includes all cultivable land, which is not included in Net area sown but is put to some
agricultural use. Land under casuring trees, thatching grasses, bamboo bushes and other groves for

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-63

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

fuel, etc. which are not included under Orchards are classified under this category. 70.08 hectare
land (0.35%) comes under in this category.
Culturable Waste Land:
This includes land available for cultivation, whether taken up or not taken up for cultivation once, but
not cultivated during the last five years or more in succession including the current year for some
reason or the other. Such land may be either fallow or covered with shrubs and jungles, which are not
put to any use. They may be accessible or inaccessible and may lie in isolated blocks or within
cultivated holdings.1076.61 hectare (5.44%) land included in this category.
Fallow Lands other than Current Fallows:
This includes all land, which was taken up for cultivation but is temporarily out of cultivation for a
period of not less than one year and not more than five years.1005.71 hectare (5.44%) land comes in
this category.
Current Fallow Land:
This represents cropped area, which is kept fallow during the current year. In this category total
1250.5 hectare land (6.32%) was under current fallow land.
Net Area Sown:
This represents the total area sown with crops and orchards. Area sowed more than once in the
same year is counted only once. 10160.85 hectare land (51.37%) was under net sown area in the
study area.Land use pattern is presented in Figure 3.18.

FIGURE 3.18: LAND USE PATTERN IN THE STUDY AREA


3.7.6

Socio-Economic Survey Methodology

The study was carried out with a participatory approach by involving the stakeholders, particularly the
project beneficiaries and probable affected persons through a series of consultative process. The
population groups that were consulted include beneficiary group of people in the project influence
area, particularly the shopkeepers, farmers, school teachers, gram panchayat Sarpanch/members
and village elders etc. This has been helped to know the exact situation and views of the people
about the project.
Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-64

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Proportionate and purposive sampling methods were used for selecting respondents (male and
female) for household survey. For official information of village, sarpanch/grampanchyat members
were chosen. Structured questionnaire were used for survey. For group discussion, panchyat
bhavan, Aanganwadi bhavan, community halls were used. Household survey & group discussion
carried out is shown in Plates 1 & 2. Out of total 49 villages, total 10(20%) were surveyed. List of
surveyed villages is given in Table 3.46.
TABL 3.46
VILLAGES SURVEYED
Sr. No
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Village Name
Taklaghat
Murzhari
Katandhara
Bhansuli
Mandawa
Dhawalpeth
Pipardhara
Kanholi
Tarsi
Bori (CT)

Source: Primary Survey

PLATE 3.2:HOUSEHOLD SURVEY IN


DHWALPETH VILLAGE

PLATE 3.3: DISCUSSION WITH WOMEN


GROUP IN MAHAR MANDWA VILLAGE

3.7.7 Salient Observation of the Survey/ Study Area


House pattern: Types of housing varied from thatched to puccahouses.50% houses were in
pakka form, 40% in semi pakka and 10% houses were observed in kaccha form
Employment: Main occupation in the study area was labour work and agriculture and its
allied activities eg. Cattle rearing, dairy farming etc. Agricultural activity was mainly depending
on monsoon season. Other income generation sources of the area, were observed to be
small business; private jobs etc. The labours were getting daily wages in the range of Rs.
100-250, depending on type of work they get
Fuel: The primary sources of cooking fuel were firewood, cow dung cake, coal etc. Very few
villagers were using LPG facility

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-65

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Main crops: The major crops grown in agricultural farm were wheat, soyabean, pulses,
wheat, gram, jowar, bajra, linseed, cotton etc.
Language: Official language as well as mother tongue of the study area was Marathi. In
addition Hindi language was also spoken by large population
Sanitation: Toilet facility is one of the most basic facilities required in a house. It was
observed that more than 70% of the households were not having toilet facilities in their
houses. There was no proper drainage line in the villages. Open defication was in practice in
most of the villages
Drinking water Facilities: During the survey, it was observed diverse sources of drinking
water supply in villages. Major source of drinking water in the study area was ground water
(hand pumps, tap water and dug wells. During survey people from some villages in core zone
reported shortage of water in summer season
Education facilities: Most of the villages had education facilities in the form of Aanganwadi
and primary schools. Higher education facilities were available in the range of 5-10 km.
Colleges and other diploma courses were available at Butibori town and Nagpur city.
Transportation facility: For transportation purpose auto, jeep and private bus services were
available in the study area; however villagers reported that transportation facilities were not
frequently available. Private vehicles like bicycles & motor cycles were also used by villagers
for transportation purpose
Road connectivity: Most of the roads were pucca and the few pucca roads were badly in
need of repair and maintenance. More than half the households reported that roads they
frequently used were semi pucca
Communication facilities: For communication purpose mainly mobile phones, news papers
& post offices were present in the villages
Medical facilities: There were few healthcare facilities available in the study area. In some of
the villages primary health sub centres were available. Hospitals and other better health
centres were available in the range of 5-10 km at town/city place
Electricity: All villages were availing electricity facility for domestic and agriculture purposes.
Solar Street lights were seen in some of the villages.
Gram Panchyat facility: Most of the villages were having gram panchayat building and
Community halls and building found well maintained
Market facility: Study area was predominantly rural. In villages, small shops were available
for daily need things. Weekly market facility was available in some villages. Wholesale market
was available at Taklaghat, Butibori and Nagpur city
Recreation facilities: Television and radio were the main recreation facilities in the study
area. Taklaghat village found main attraction in the study area for temple of sant Viktu Baba.
3.7.8 Awareness and Opinion of the Respondents about the Project
Public opinion is the aggregate of individual attitudes or beliefs. It is very important to take opinion of
the villagers about the project. The awareness will not only promote community participation but also
enable them to understand the importance of the project and encourage them to their there views. To
know the awareness and opinion of the villagers about the project, group discussion, meeting with
school teachers/village leaders were carried out in the study area.
During survey, it was observed that majority of the respondents were aware about the MIDC Butibori
industrial area but they were unaware about the proposed project/industry.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-66

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.7.9

Quality of Life

Definition of Quality of life


Quality of life (QoL) is a term, which indicates overall status of socio-economic environment in a given
area. Quality of life (QoL) is defined as a function between objective conditions and subjective
attitudes involving a defined area of concern.
Quality of life index is based on a unique methodology that links the results of subjective life
satisfaction surveys to the objective determinants of quality of life across countries. The objective
conditions are defined as numerically measurable artifacts of a physical, sociological event or
economic event. Objective conditions may be defined as any number, which stands for a given
quantity of a variable of interest so long as it is independent of subjective opinion. Subjective attitude
is primarily concerned with affective and cognitive dimensions. It is specifically concerned with how
aspects of cognition vary as objective conditions vary.
Once objective measures are obtained for each factor, they are transformed to a normal scale
varying from 0 to 1 (value function curve) in which 0 corresponds to the lowest or least satisfaction.
Actuary measure and 1 corresponds to the highest satisfaction level. The weights are assigned to
each factor by ranked-pair wise technique (by the expert group) based on the secondary data and
general observations.
For each objective measure, a corresponding subjective measure is developed for each individual of
the sample population by asking him to rate his satisfaction scale (value function curve). In addition, it
is used such that 0 corresponds to the lowest level of attitudinal satisfaction and 1 corresponds to the
highest level of satisfaction. Weights are assigned to each factor using ranked - pair wise comparison
techniques.
The Socio-economic Indicators for QoL assessment are:
1. Income

2. Water Supply

3. Communication

4. Employment and Working Conditions

5. Sanitation

6. Education

7. Housing

8. Health

9. Environment and Pollution

10. Food

11. Energy & Fuel

12. Recreation

13. Clothing

14. Transportation

15. Social Security

16. Human Rights

Subjective QoL

calculations are as follows:

QoL(s) = 1/p
i =1

QIij X Wi

j=1

Where,
QoL(s) =

Subjective quality of life index

No. of respondents, j = 1... p

No. of factors,

QIij =

i = 1... m

Subjective quality index for ith factor assigned by jth respondent

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-67

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Qiij =

Subjective quality index for ith factor assigned by all respondents in an area

Wi

Relative weightage of the ith factor

Objective QoL

calculations are as follows:


I

QoL(o) =
I

QIi X Wi
1

Where,
QoL (o) = Objective quality of life index
n

No. of QoL Factors

1... n

QIi

Satisfaction level (assigned by the expert group) for the ith objective
indicator

Wi

Normalized weight for its factor

The cumulative index of QoL calculations is as follows:


QoL(c) = QoL o + QoL s
2
Thus, the average QoL index values are estimated as:
QoL (s)

0.58

QoL (o)

0.59

QoL (c)

0.58

The average QoL index value for the study area is leading to satisfactory level due to satisfactory
economic status, educational facilities, road, and transportation facilities and also availability of basic
needs viz., food, clothing, medical and housing etc.

Chapter 3- Description of the Environment

3-68

CHAPTER-4
ANTICIPATED IMPACTS
AND MITIGATION MEASURES

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

4.0

ANTICIPATED ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND MITIGATION MEASURES

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an activity or an attempt to identify, evaluate and


communicate the environmental impacts of an existing project on the environment. For, any proposed
project, impacts are predicted dependingupon the inputs from source, efficacy of pollution control
equipment and capacity of receiving environment.
The details are provided by the proponent about the proposed project, (technical data, policy matters,
approach to environmental protection etc.) and the preproject (baseline) environmental status monitored
through field surveys. Baseline environmental conditions of study area of the proposed project site are
described in Chapter 3. An attempt was made to identify and predict impacts due to proposed project
activities.
Environmental Impact Assessment study for the proposed project includes:
Identification of all components of the project and the environmental impact associated by the existing
project as well as prediction of impacts that may be caused by the proposed project

Classification of the probable impacts i.e. positive or negative, reversible or irreversible, short
term or long term.
Evaluation of the impacts i.e. quantitative & qualitative assessment of the impacts

4.1

IMPACTS DURING CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION PHASE

4.1.1

Land Environment

4.1.1.1 Prediction of Impact during Construction Phase


M/s. Paramount Chempro proposes organic chemicals manufacturing unit to produce
Formaldehyde of 24000 MT/Annum. Hence, minor construction work will be required for the
installation of new/additional machineries for the proposed project. The area of the plant is almost flat
terrain.
During construction activity, the impact on soil will be limited to the construction site only; no impact is
envisaged on the topography. Impact on soil during construction would be mainly due to the left out of
construction materials used. Hence, proper care shall be taken so that minimum amount of waste is
produced and most of it gets recycled. The topsoil removed during the levelling will be stacked
separately and will be used during the greenbelt development.
4.1.1.2 Prediction of Impact during Operation Phase
There may be some pollution, which may affect the soil adjacent to the plant area, if proper care is
not taken. The anticipated pollution to soil environment due to plant activities is as follows:

Changes in soil texture due to settling of air borne dust or due to wash off solid particulates by
surface or ground water. This will lead to change in porosity, permeability & other such physical
characteristics of soil of the area.
Changes in soil chemistry due to addition of foreign materials from polluted air and water due to
plant activities in the area.

Proper mitigative measures like use of efficient pollution control systems, proper stack height and use
of top soil in plantation results in no significant impact on soil of the project site. There will be no
impact on soil of the study area located beyond the working area of the proposed project.
Soil samples will be collected and tested at regular intervals from the nearby areas.This will help in
mitigation of any harmful impact on soil due to the project activity, if any.

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

4.1.2

Air Environment

4.1.2.1 Prediction of Impact during Construction Phase


Impact of construction activities on air quality is a cause for concern mainly in the dry months due to
settling of dust particles. The main sources of emission during the construction period are the movement of
equipment at site and dust emitted during the leveling, grading, earthworks, foundation works and other
construction related activities. The dust emitted during the above mentioned activities is depending upon
the type of soil being excavated and the ambient humidity levels. The impact is likely to be for short
duration and confined locally to the construction site itself. The composition of dust in this kind of operation
is, however, mostly inorganic and non-toxic in nature. Exhaust emissions from vehicles and equipment
deployed during the construction phase also result in marginal increase in the levels of SO2, NOX, SPM,
CO and unburnt hydrocarbons. The impact will, however, be marginal, and temporary in nature.
4.1.2.2 Prediction of Impact during Operation Phase
Impact on Air Quality
*

Fugitive Emissions

As the entire proposed project will be covered with good landscaping and tree/grass cover,
generation of fugitive dust within the premises is not anticipated. Even the dust, outside the project
will be minimal due to the proposed compound walls, and plantation which will function as barriers
along the boundary. Further, all fugitive emissions are likely to be controlled to a great extent, through
proper maintenance of tree plantation and the green belt development undertaken within the project.
The proposed project utilities like steam boiler will be required for production process, which may
have emission due to the combustion of fuel used in utility operation. D.G. sets are also proposed for
emergency power generation to meet the major requirements of power during failure of supply from
electricity department. Hence, considering these, it is envisaged that during the operation phase,
impacts on air would arise due to the fugitive emission mainly from operation of boiler, thermic fluid
heater and occasionally from DG set. Hence, the study of impacts for the fugitive & stationary
emissions have been conducted to assess the potential impacts as well as to cite the efficiency of
planned mitigation measures and to suggest further mitigation requirements.
*

Gaseous Emissions

The sources of gaseous pollutants within the proposed project are DG set & Boiler. The emissions of
Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) and Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) will be due to operation of DG set, in case of the
failure of the power grid.
In order to control emission of particulates during operation of the DG set, adequate control
equipment will be installed and adequate stack height will be provided as per CPCB norms.
There will not be any type of process emission from the proposed activities. The main source of air
pollution will be flue gas stacks attached to the boiler in which HSD will use as fuel. The most
probable emitted pollutants will be PM, SO2 and NOx.
No process emission, as most of the raw materials/products shall be in liquid/semi liquid phase and
there will not be any fugitive emissions of PM. All powder/solid materials will be handled in closed
system to prevent any fugitive emissions of PM. All solvents shall also be handled by closed system
to prevent fugitive emissions of VOCs.

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

These sources of emission are further studied for determination of incremental rise of GLC level with
the estimated quantity using mathematical simulation software ISCST-3. The details of the modelling
& outcomes are described below under respective heading.
It is emphasized that the mitigation measures discussed in this chapter and elaborated in the
Environmental Management Plan given in Chapter 10; will be followed to maintain ambient air quality
within norms. The details of air modelling for ground level concentration (GLC) of various pollutants
are carried out using ISCST3 Model.
Pacca road will be made to control the fugitive emission. Water sprinkler will be provided to reduce
the dusting from road transportation. Unit will have D.G. set backup within premises to meet power
requirement in which HSD will use as fuel. D.G. set will be used only in case of emergency and in
case of power failure.
Air pollution control facilities
The flue gases will be generated from operation of boiler and D.G. set operation. The flue gases from
which boiler and thermic fluid heater will be cleaned in well designed cyclone separator and scrubber.
These clean gases will then discharge into atmosphere through 11 meter stack for proper dispersion
into the atmosphere. The D.G set will be operated only in case of emergency power requirement and
used as standby power source. As the diesel will be used in D.G. Set, the flue gas emission with be
within prescribed standards.
4.1.2.3 Modeling Studies
The mathematical Model ISCST-3, 1996 was used for predicting the GLCs, which is entirely in line
with the requirement of central pollution control board, New Delhi.
Details of air dispersion model
The air quality impact of a source or group of sources is evaluated by the use of mathematical
models. The widely accepted interpretation models simulate the relationships between air pollutant
emissions and its impact on air quality. For the present study, this model is used for the prediction of
maximum ground level concentrations (GLCs).
Assessment of air pollution was carried out for stack attached to D.G. set and boiler. The ISCST-3
(Industrial Source Complex short term-3) from Lakes and Environment is an hour-by-hour steady
state Gaussian Plume Model. This model is widely recognized as predictive tool in impact
assessment for air environment. The ISCST-3 model was applied with the consideration of elevated +
flat terrain, gradual plume rise and buoyancy induced dispersion options in the present study.
Stack details
The proposed unit will operate steam boiler to generate steam required during manufacturing
process. The stack details viz, height, diameter, temperature, velocity, volumetric flow and emission
rates are presented in Table 4.1. Total 2 stacks were considered which will be attached to the
respective equipment through which the emissions are like to come out. TABLE 4.1

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 4.1
PROPOSED STACK DETAILS
Sr.
No.

Height
(m)

Dia
(m)

Temp
(K)

Velocity
(m/s)

Volumetric
3
Flow Nm /hr

PM10

1.

Stack
attached
to
Boiler

SO2

NOx

11.0

0.35

443

1862.991

0.0075

0.0031

0.11

2.

D.G Set

6.0

0.25

453

18

2091.427

8.95E-05

3.53E-06

0.002

(gm/sec)

Meteorological data
The meteorological data required for the modelling studies was collected from IMD Nagpur for the
period of January-March 2016.The windrose diagram for winter (January-March 2016) is shown in
Figure 4.1

FIGURE 4.1: WINDROSE DIAGRAM JANUARY-MARCH 2016


Presentation of Results
The simulations were made to evaluate particulate matter, SO2 and NOx incremental rise due to
proposed activity. These results are based on considering the emission due to Boiler and D.G. set. In
the short-term simulations, the incremental concentrations were observed to obtain an optimum
description of variations in concentrations within the study area of 10 km radius.
Resultant Concentrations
The maximum incremental ground level concentrations (GLCs) for PM10, SO2 and NOx due to
proposed developmental activities were carried out. The predicted 24 hourly maximum
concentrations for proposed scenario, PM10, SO2 and NOx are found to be 0.13 g/m3, 0.054 g/m3
and 1.9 g/m3 respectively. The proposed concentration levels of PM10, SO2 and NOx are presented
Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and
Mitigation Measures

4-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

in Table 4.2. The isopleths of PM10, SO2 and NOx representing the GLCs for proposed scenario are
shown in Figures 4.2 to 4.4 respectively.
The cumulative concentration levels (Ambient + predicted incremental rise) revealed that the
concentration levels for PM10, NOx and SO2 likely to be encountered in the operation of the project
are respectively occurring at a distance of about 1 km, 1 km, 1 km in the South & West direction with
a concentration levels (cumulative) of 69.13 g/m3, 19.754 g/m3 and 25.2 g/m3 respectively which
is well within the NAAQM levels prescribed by CPCB. Hence it is inferred that considering cumulative
concentration levels, the pollution load exerted due to proposed project will be insignificant.
TABLE 4.2
SHORT TERM MODELLING RESULTS
Scenario

Pollutant

Proposed

PM 10
SO2
NOx

Incremental concentration
3
(g/m )
0.13
0.054
1.9

Distance (km)

Direction

1
1
1

South & West


South & West
South & West

TABLE 4.3
RESULTANT CONCENTRATIONS DUE TO PROPOSED PROJECT
Scenario

Pollutant

Maximum Baseline
Concentration
3
(g/m )

Incremental
concentration
3)
(IC) (g/m

Proposed

PM 10

69.0

0.13

SO2

19.7

0.054

NOx

23.3

1.9

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

Resultant
Concentration
3
(g/m )

Limits (Industrial/
Residential, Rural)
Concentration
3
(g/m )
69.13 100
19.754 80
25.2

80

4-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 4.2: INCREMENTAL RISE OF PARTICULATE MATTER FOR PROPOSED SCENARIO

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-6

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 4.3: INCREMENTAL RISE OF SO2 FOR PROPOSED SCENARIO

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-7

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 4.4: INCREMENTAL RISE OF NOx FOR PROPOSED SCENARIO

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-8

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

4.1.2.4 Impact Study Due to Proposed Traffic Density


All the major raw materials will be transported by road ways. A road network will be provided up to
site. All the tippers/ trucks will be covered by tarpaulin. Hence there will not be much fugitive dust
generation during transportation of raw materials for construction. Pucca road exists up to the site.
The existing road is capable of absorbing this additional truck movement. The total raw materials
required for proposed project is 360 KL/month. The increase in traffic load is very less. So there will
be insignificant effect on the nearby surrounding and there will not be generation of fugitive dust
during transportation of raw materials and products. The receptor villages are far away from project
site so there will not be any adverse impact on vehicular traffic.
Vehicular Emission
The national highway (NH-7) and state highway (SH-262, SH-3) are passing from the 10 km radius of
the project location. Heavy traffic was observed on the national highway. It was observed that nearly
611 vehicles were plying on NH-7 and vehicles on SH-264 and SH-3 were nearly 155,149.The total
proposed traffic details due to project activities are given in Table 4.4. The noxious pollutants emitted
due to vehicular activities are SPM, SO2 and NOx and CO.
TABLE 4.4
VEHICULAR TRAFFIC DURING PEAK HOURS IN THE STUDY AREA
Sr.
No
1
2
3

Traffic Intersection
National Highway-7
State Highway-262
State Highway -3

H
248
70
65

Trafic Density per peak hours


M
L
179
184
60
25
53
31

4.1.2.5 Odour Management


There will be no odour from the proposed plant as adequate measures will be implemented as given
below:

4.1.3

All solvent transfer will be in closed pipeline hence there will be no open handling leading to
fugitive emission and it will prevent odour nuisance
All reactor vents will be with double stage vent condenser to prevent fugitive emission into
atmosphere and prevent odour nuisance
All solvents with low flash points will be provided with nitrogen blanketing which prevent fugitive
emissions and odour nuisance
Provision of scrubbing system for reactor vents and stripping of effluent streams before
treatment will result into effective odour control in the area
Provision of greenbelt around the premier of the industry will also help in controlling fugitive
emissions
Noise Environment

4.1.3.1 Prediction of Impact during Construction Phase


During construction, construction equipment, including dozer, scrapers, concrete mixers, generators,
vibrators and power tools, and vehicles will be the major noise sources. Noise during construction is
difficult to predict because the level of activity will constantly change. Most of construction activities
are expected to produce noise levels within the prescribed limit. The noise generated from various

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-9

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

sources will be of short duration. Therefore, no significant impact is envisaged in the construction
phase.
4.1.3.2 Prediction of Impact during Operation Phase
Impacts due to Noise Levels in the Proposed Plant
The noise level at various locations within the study area due to a noise source can be computed by
using Wave Divergence Model as given below:
L2 = L1 - 20 log (r2/r1) - Ae1,2,3
where,
L2 and L1 are the noise levels at the distances r2 and r1 from the source and Ae1,2,3
environmental attenuation factor.

is the

Total noise level Lp due to all sources can be determined as follows :


Lp(Total) = 10 log (10Lp1/10 + 10Lp2/10+ ----------+10Lp10/10 )
where,
Lp1, Lp2, are the noise levels at a sampling point due to sources a, b etc.
Noise levels have been predicted at 500m and 1 km from the proposed noise sources in Paramount
Chempro are presented below:
Noise Sources
Blowers, Compressors, F.D. Fans, I.D. Fans, and Generators etc. are the main sources of noise in a
chemical plant. The equivalent noise levels measured at these locations varied from 75dB (A) to 90
dB (A). There is noise from industrial process continuously during day time. One DG set of 25 KVA is
used in plant in case of power failure generating the maximum noise levels of 75 dB(A) was
considered for predicting ambient noise levels.The equivalent noise levels measured in the
commercial area varied from 51 dB(A) to 57dB(A). In the silent zone, equivalent noise level measured
was 43 dB(A) and in residential area was 47-48 dB(A). However, since the industrial operation are
far away from the habitation, adverse impacts are not anticipated by the increase in the noise levels
due to the proposed activities.
In Plant Noise Generating Sources
Sr.No.
1
2
3
4

Sources
DG set
Boiler
ID fan
FD fan

Noise level in dB(A)


75
90
80
80

It is predicted that the noise levels at a distance of 500m will be increased by approx 2 dB(A) and at
a distance of 1000 m, the increase in the noise level will be approx 1 dB(A). The isopleths showing
predicted cumulative noise levels due to noise generating sources at Paramount Chempro Pvt. Ltd,
Nagpur are shown in Figure 4.11. It is observed that the incremental noise level due to the noise
generating sources would be in the range of 0.5dB (A) for the proposed project. In order to reduce
noise levels, the industry will take necessary steps to reduce/mitigate noise levels at source by
isolating these processes at the work environment to meet necessary standards.

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-10

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Presentation of Results
The incremental noise levels were observed at proposed project site considering 100m x 100m grid
intervals over an area of 1 km x 1 km study area. As per the predicted results, noise levels at the
plant boundaries are given below in Table 4.6. The predicted noise levels at the boundary due to
various plant activities will be ranging in between 34dB (A) to 36 dB (A).The isopleths of noise levels
predicted are shown in Figure 4.11.
However since the industrial operation are far away from the habitation, adverse impacts are not
anticipated by the increase in the noise levels due to the proposed activities.
Workers maintaining and operating Boilers, Feed Pumps, Cooling Tower Fans etc. are exposed to
noise levels in the range of 71.6-92.7 dBA (Leq-1 hr.).
In order to reduce noise levels, the industry will take necessary steps to reduce/mitigate noise levels
at source by isolating these processes at the work environment to meet necessary standards.
Impact due to Transportation
The equivalent noise level due to traffic is estimated using FHWA Noise Model, as follows:
Leq(h)i = Loei+10 log [Ni/(Si*Ti)]+10 log (15/D)(1+a) + So - 13
Where,
Leq(h)i

Leq at hour h for ith vehicle type

Loei

Reference mean energy level for ith vehicle type

Ni

No. of i type vehicles passing during the time T

Si

Average speed for the ith vehicle type in km/hr

Ti

Duration for which Leq is desired class responding to Ni

=
Perpendicular distance in meter from the center line of the traffic lane to
the location of the observer

Factor relating to absorption characteristics of ground cover between the


roadway and then observer

So

Shielding factor provided by a noise barrier

Noise levels from light, medium and heavy vehicles on the roads are calculated by using the above
model and cumulative effect is computed, using the following model:
Leq(Total) = 10 log [10Leql/10 + 10Leqm/10 + 10Leqh/10]
Where,
Leql, Leqm and Leqh are equivalent noise levels for light, medium and heavy vehicles
respectively.Presently, equivalent noise level due to present traffic near the proposed site is observed
to be 35-40 dBA. Around 5 heavy vehicles are likely to ply for transporting raw materials and finished
products. A traffic load of heavy, medium and light vehicles is agglomerated in front of main gate
during the peak hour. After commissioning of the proposed project, due to traffic equivalent noise
level near the proposed site is expected to increase by 2 dB(A). Thus the noise levels due to traffic
will be within the Industrial Noise Standards.The equivalent levels measured during the peak hour on
major highways/roads and traffic junctions within the study area are reported in Table 3.8.
Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and
Mitigation Measures

4-11

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Impact on Community
Equivalent noise levels for day-night are often used to describe community noise exposures. The Leq
(day) and Leq (night) calculated for these areas is generally found to be well within the prescribed
limits promulgated by CPCB.
There will not be any significant direct impact of noise due to the plant on the human settlements
around it. It is observed that the noise levels due to plant operation reach ambient levels at about
500m from the plant.
Impact on Occupational Health
Equivalent sound pressure level averaged over 8 hours, Leq. (8 hrs) is used to describe exposure to
noise in work places. The damage risk criteria for hearing, as enforced by OSHA (Occupational
Safety and Health Administration) stipulates that the noise levels upto 90 dBA are acceptable for
eight hour exposure per day. Ministry of Labour, Government of India also has recommended similar
criterion vide factories Act, Schedule No. XXIV (Government Notification FAC/1086/CR-9/Lab-4 dated
8-2-1988).
It is proposed by the project authorities to meet the 85 dB (A) norms at 1 m from the high noise
making equipment. Necessary sound proof enclosures / isolation equipment installation would be to
bring the noise levels within the stipulated norms. The workers working in the high noise zones will be
provided with ear plugs / ear muffs to avoid occupational health hazard
TABLE 4.5
INCREMENTAL NOISE LEVELS
Sr. No.
1

Direction
N

Incremental noise level in dB(A)


36

2
3

NE
E

34
36

4
5

SE
S

34
36

6
7

SW
W

34
36

NW

34

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-12

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

1800
dB(A)

1600

81
76
71

1400

66
61
56

1200

51
46
41

1000

36
31
26

800

21
16
11

600

6
1

400

200

0
0

200

400

600

800

1000

1200

1400

1600

1800

FIGURE 4.5: CUMULATIVE NOISE LEVELS DUE TO DG SETS

Noise Pollution Management


As per the model results, the noise levels due to the proposed plant will be in the range of 34 dB (A)
to 36 dB (A) near the plant boundaries in all directions. The ambient noise levels will be within the
permissible limits after the commissioning of the proposed facilities.
The criteria for the environmental noise control is that the design of the proposed plant will not
exceed, in any continuous mode of operation, the level stipulated by MoEF and /or Pollution Control
Board at any point on the site boundary.
Noise Control Measures

Noise levels due to DG-sets could be reduced by proper sitting and control measures.

Proper routine and preventive maintenance procedure will be followed in consultation with the
DG-sets manufacturer.

Acoustic enclosure at DG-sets will be provided and also a suitable exhaust muffler will be
provided.

The construction equipment will be required to use available noise suppression devices and
properly maintained mufflers

Use of proper personal protective equipment shall further mitigate any adverse impact of noise to
the workers.

The green belt development will help in reducing noise levels in the campus as a result of
attenuation of noise generated due to plant operations and transportation

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-13

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

4.1.4

Water Environment

The main sources of impact on water environment will be due to withdrawal of additional fresh water
from the ground during construction and operation phase. These are discussed below:
4.1.4.1 Prediction of Impact during Construction Phase
Since the proposed project will be in MIDC industrial area of Butibori where, no major construction
activities will be carried out, there will not be any adverse impact on the ground water as no drawl of
ground water envisaged in the project activties. Water will be sourced from MIDC, Butibori Industrial
Area. No disposal of construction waste outside the plant and no leaching are anticipated. Thus the
quality and quantity of ground water will not have any adverse impact.
4.1.4.2 Prediction of Impact during Operation Phase
Water required for the project will be supplied by MIDC-Butibori through MIDCs water distribution
network. The water requirement is 165.6 m3/day for proposed project. Water requirement for
proposed project will be fulfilled by Butibori MIDC. The water requirement breakup is given below
Table 4.6.
TABLE 4.6
WATER REQUIREMENT (BREAK-UP)
3

Sr. No.

Purpose

Proposed Requirement (m /day)

1
2

Domestic
Industrial Process

Industrial Cooling Tower

110

4
TOTAL

Landscaping

8.5
165.6

2.7
44.4

Wastewater Generation
A) Domestic Waste
The domestic waste generation is estimated to be 2.16 m3/day for proposed project. Domestic
sewage will be treated in the Septic Tank & soak pit. The overflow will be used for gardening/ let to
MIDC Sewerage line.
B) Industrial wastewater
The total water requirement for the plant is estimated to be 165.6 m3/d The wastewater generation is
expected to be 24.16m3/d including domestic waste 2.16m3/d). The wastewater generation is shown
in Table 4.7.
TABLE 4.7
WASTEWATER GENERATION FROM PROPOSED PLANT
SN

Water Uses
Cooling
Process

Water Required
3
(m /d)
110
44.4

Waste Water
3
Generation (m /d)
22
0

2
3

Domestic

2.70

2.16

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

Remarks

No waste water generation from


process, whole water is consumed with
the process
80% domestic waste generation from
domestic requirement sent to septic
tank/soak pit
4-14

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Gardening+
Washing
Total

8.5

165.6

24.16

Treatment through RO and use in


process
Evaporation/ system loss

141.44

Evaporation
Losses+ Process
Consumption
165.6

165.6

Effluent Treatment Details:


A) Domestic Effluent
Domestic effluent generated at lavatory blocks is treated in septic tanks followed by soak pits.
Overflow of the soak pits along with water wasted through water taps are taken for green belt
development within factory premises. However provision will be made to install portable sewage
treatment plant (STP) to treat the domestic waste generated from the plant. The treated domestic
waste will be used for plantation.
B) Industrial Effluent
There will not be any effluent generation from the process. The wastewater generation from the plant
is estimated to be 22 m3/d which will be sent to R.O. and treated water will be used in the process.

Total
Requirement
3
165.6 m /d

Cooling
110 m3/d

22 m3/d

Process
44.4 m3/d

Completely
consumed with
the process, no
wastewater
generation

Domestic
2.70 m3/d

Gardening
8.5 m3/d

2.16 m3/d
Soak pit /septic
tank overflow

7 m3/d

R.O treatment
22 m3/d
RO required

RO required to
evapourate pond
2.2 m3/d

TSDF

FIGURE 4.6: WATER BALANCE

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-15

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Rain Water Harvesting


Rainwater harvesting can serve as a solution to the water problem in the water crises area by
capturing the runoff. The details about rainwater harvesting at plant site is provided in Chapter 10.
4.1.5

Solid/Hazardous Waste Management

Solid &Hazardoues Waste Generation:


There are various types of solid wastes generated from the different areas in Paramount Chempro.
The types of wastes generated are:
A. Non-biodegradable : Discarded Containers/Barrels/Liners
B. Bio-degradable : Domestic waste, Sludge from wastewater treatment plant and Gardening waste
The solid wastes generation and mitigation measures to be taken are given below:
TABLE 4.8
SOLID/HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATION
Sr. No.

Source

Biodegradable
1
Domestic Waste
2
Gardening Waste
3
Process Waste

Total
Quantity anticipated

Mitigative Measures

6.0 Kg/day
4.2 Kg/day
-

Composting
Composting
-

Non Biodegradable
1
Discarded
plastic 2 Kg/day
containers/barrels/liners

Sold to authorized parties

Waste Segregation
Segregation or sorting of wastes at its source will be practiced in order to encourage reuse/
recycling and to minimize the negative effects of the waste and increase its economic value. With
segregation at source, recyclables do not lose their commercial value due to cross contamination.
At every floor dedicated bins will be placed to collect biodegradable and non-biodegradable wastes
in the residential area.
At parking areas and other open areas dedicated bins will be placed
Waste Collection Treatment and Disposal (by industries)

Daily collection of wastes shall take place from all the bins.
Daily sweeping and collection of waste from roads and other common facility area would also be
done daily in the morning by the same operator.
For waste collection either carts or dedicated trucks will be used. Separate collection for
biodegradable and non-biodegradable wastes will be ensured.
Large storage bins will be placed in the residential and buildings areas for final storage of waste
before disposal.

4.1.6

Biological Environment

4.1.6.1 Prediction of Impact during Construction Phase


Around 36 trees belonging to differnent species were observed at proposed site. The species like
Teak, Jamun, Awala, Sisam, Mango and Eukaliptus sp. were grown at site. Shrubs include Nirgudi,
Ghaneri and Rantulsi, Rui along with seasonal herbs and doob grass. During site preparation for the
proposed project clearing of vegetation will be involved only in the form of shrubs and seasonal herbs
Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and
Mitigation Measures

4-16

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

only, no tree cutting involved in the project. Hence, marginal impact envisaged during construction
phase.
4.1.6.2 Prediction of Impact during Operation Phase
Impact on ecological environment during operational phase is not envisaged. There are no potential
sources of impacts hence no impact on terrestrial biological environment is envisaged during the
operational phase.
In the industrial area, there are few major industries existing like Vidharbha Industrial Power Ltd. and
Indorama Textiles, therefore the cumulative pollution load are restricted to greater extent. Hence, the
quantification of cumulative pollution load and its impact on biological environment is not envisaged.
Based on study conducted for ecology in the study area,no rare or endangered flora/fauna were
recorded in the study area except Pavo cristatus(Common Indian Peafowl)(Schedule I) species as
per Wildlife Protection act, 1972 and subsequent amendments and least concerned species as per
IUCN classification. There is no direct impact on Pavocristatus (Common Indian Peafowl) species
however, in order to improve the habitat, species conservation plan is suggested and incorporated in
Chapter 10.
M/s Paramount Chempro Pvt. Ltd is within the notified industrial area. The project activities do not
involve destruction of forest land. Thus, there will not be adverse impact on flora, fauna and there will
not be loss of habitats such as vegetation and water bodies.
Impact related to Migratory route of Birds, Animals due to project activities
The existing ecological conditions in the project area have been established based on review of
secondary information and by conducting detailed primary ecological field surveys. The study
revealed that, there are no wildlife sanctuaries or wildlife protected areas within 10 km study area
from the project site. There is no identified migratory route/path of birds or major wild fauna. Birds
observed during the study period are locally common in observation.
The major wildlife confined to the RF of the study area. During consultative approach with the
locals/villagers, it has come to know that, Nilgai, Wildboar, Sabhar, deer are often raid to the adjacent
agriculture area of RF and destroyed the crops during harvesting period. The proposed project does
not envisage any significant impact on wildlife in the study area.
Plantation/Greenbelt Development
M/s. Paramount Chempro proposes to have a green belt programme for the proposed unit. Total plot
area is 4050 sq. mt. (i.e. 0.4 Ha.) out of which proposed plantation will be carried out in approx.1336
sq. mt. (i.e. 0.1 Ha). The green belt will be developed in 1336 sq. mt (0.1 Ha) of land which is about
33 % of the total area.
Since, the area available for plantation is small; M/s Paramount Chempro will take the initiative to
carry out plantation programme in part of MIDC, Butibori Industrial area. The details about green
belt/plantation are given in Chapter 10.
4.1.7

Socio-Economic Environment

The proposed project would create certain impacts with beneficial as well as adverse effects on the
socio economic environment. The impacts due to proposed project on parameters of human interest
have been assessed.

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-17

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

4.1.7.1 Prediction of Impact during Construction Phase


Impact on employment opportunities
During construction phase, direct/ indirect employment opportunities will generate in the form of
skilled, semi skilled and labour work. Employment opportunities will be given to local population;
therefore there will not be any additional strain for shelter and sanitation facility.
Impact on land
Proposed project is in MIDC industrial area of Butibori, it will be done in the industrial premises;
therefore no adverse impact on land is envisaged.
Impact on places of historical importance
No historical monuments or places of historical importance are present near the project site/study
area. Hence no adverse impact will be resulted.
In order to mitigate the adverse impact likely to arise in social, cultural and economical aspects in the
surrounding region and the project is expected to contribute towards enlistment of local people and
improvement in quality of life, following measures will be takeup:
Ensure that roads are properly demarcated,vehicles are well maintained and drivers are well
trained and safety conscious
Cohesive relationship will be maintained with the concerned community so that in future any
event may not disturb the harmony of the region
The Proposed manpower requirement for the construction phase is 20-25 Nos. and operation
phase will be estimated as 24 Nos. The company will have one Production Manager, One R&D
Manager, Shift Engineers (6 Nos.) and skilled and unskilled labourers to the extent of 16 Nos. The
manpower is locally and easily available.
4.2

OVERALL IDENTIFICATION OF MATRIX

The overall Impact Identification Matrix is shown in the Table 4.9 (for construction phase) and Table
4.10 (for operation phase).
For simplicity, the entire project has been divided into two phases.
1. Construction Phase
2. Operational Phase
Various activities belonging to industrial project have been grouped and arranged inrows. The
environmental factors, which are being potentially impacted, have been arranged in columns. A
preliminary scrutiny has been done and the cells, which fall at the junction of the Activity and
Factor that have possible interaction with each other, have been crossed.
The Matrix, thus, established the possible cause-effect relationship and identifies the environmental
factors being impacted and activities responsible for the same.
A. Construction Phase
Generally construction phase involves following activities:

Site Cleaning
Excavation
Construction
Installation of Equipment

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-18

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Transportation
Material Handling
Employment of Labour
Greenbelt Development

Green belt development is proposed to be taken up at the initial stage and hence, it has been
considered in this phase.
Generally, Air, Noise level and Soil are likely to be affected by these activities.Although Flora &
Fauna factors are also identified but impacts are marginal.
B. Operational Phase
This phase of project is important as it generates long term impact. The primary impact causing likely
deterioration will be on Air, Water, Noise, Soil and Flora Fauna due to gaseous emission,
wastewater discharge, transportation etc.
This phase includes following activities:
Raw Materials Storage & Handling
Product Storage & Handling

Transportation
Gaseous Emission
Wastewater Discharge
Solid & Hazardous Waste Generation
Employment
Infrastructure Development
Greenbelt Development
TABLE 4.9
PREDICTION OF IMPACTS
(Cause Effect Relationship) during Construction Phase
Parameter

Air

Water

Soil

Flora

Fauna

Socio
Economic

Heatlh&
Safety

Site Cleaning

Excavation

Construction

Installation of
Equimpent

Transportation

Activity

NoiseGeneration
Material Handling

Employment

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-19

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 4.10
PREDICTION OF IMPACTS
(Cause Effect Relationship) during Operation Phase
Parameter
Activity
Raw Material
Storage & Handling
Production
Product Storage & Handling
Transportation
Gaseous Emission
NoiseGeneration
Wastewater Generation
Solid Waste Generation
HazardousWasteGeneration
Employment
InfrastructureDevelopment
Greenbelt Development

4.3

Air

Water

Soil

Flora

Fauna
-

Socio
Economic

Heatlh&
Safety

OVERALL ASSESSMENT OF IMPACTS

This section describes the assessment of impacts, which is the most important component of EIA.
Assessment involves determination of nature and extent of impacts due to the industrial activities or
the actions involved. Here, it is determined whether the environmental impacts are:
1. Positive or Negative impact
2. Short term or Long term impact
Based on Environmental Impact Analysis, the Environmental Impacts under this step are
quantitatively and qualitatively assessed as shown in Table 4.11 (Construction phase) and 4.12
(Operation phase).
Quantitative assessment, with the help of a mathematical model, has been done wherever possible.
In other cases, the impact assessment has been qualitative which is based on available scientific
knowledge and judgment.
The mathematical model was used for prediction of impacts Industrial Source Complex Short Term
(ISCST-3) Dispersion Model was used for air quality modelling. For other cases i.e. Water, Noise,
Land / Soil, Ecology, Socio-economic, etc. the available scientific knowledge & judgment was used.

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

4-20

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 4.11
ASSESSMENT OF PREDICTED IMPTACTS DURING CONSTRUCTION PAHSE
Parameter
Activity
Site Cleaning
Excavation
Construction
Installation of
Equimpents
Transportation
Noise
Generation
Material
Handling
Employment
(-ve) : Negative

Air

Water

(-)S.T.
(-) S.T.
(-) S.T.
(-) S.T.

(-) S.T.

Soil

Flora

Fauna

(-) L.T.
(-) S.T.
(-) S.T.
(-) S.T.

(-) L.T.

(-) L.T.
(-) S.T.
(-) S.T.

(-) S.T.

(-) S.T.
(-) S.T.

(-) S.T.

(-) S.T.

(+ve): Positive

S.T: Short Term

Socio
Economic
(+) S.T.
(+) S.T.
(+) S.T.
(+) S.T.

Heatlh&
Safety
(-) S.T.
(-) S.T.
(-) S.T.
(-) L.T.

(+) S.T.

(-) S.T.
(-) S.T.

(+) S.T.

(-) S.T.

(+) S.T.
(+) S.T.
L.T: Long Term

TABLE 4.12
ASSESSMENT OF PREDICTED IMPTACTS DURING OPERATION PAHSE
Parameter
Activity
Raw Material
Storage &Handling
Production
ProductStorage&
Handling
Transportation
GaseousEmission
NoiseGeneration
WastewaterGeneration
Solid WasteGeneration
HazardousWaste
Generation
Employment
Infrastructure
Development
Greenbelt
Development
(-ve) : Negative

Air

Water

(-) L.T.
(-) S.T.
(-) S.T.

(+) L.T.

Flora

Fauna

(-) L.T.

Socio
Economic
(+) L.T.

Heatlh&
Safety
(-) L.T.

(-) S.T.

(+) L.T.
(+) L.T.

(-) L.T.
(-) L.T.

(+) L.T.

(-) S.T.
(-) L.T.
(-)L.T
(-) L.T.
(-) L.T
(-) L.T

(+) L.T.
(+) L.T.

(+) L.T.
(+) L.T.

(-) L.T.

(-) S.T.
(-) L.T.

(-) S.T.
(-) L.T

Soil

(-) S.T.
(-) L.T.
(-) L.T.
(-) S.T.
(-) L.T

(+) L.T.

(-) S.T.
(-) L.T.

(-) S.T.
(-) L.T.
(-)L.T

(-) L.T.
(-) L.T
(-) L.T

(-) L.T.

(-) S.T.

(+) L.T.

(+) L.T.

(+ve): Positive

Chapter 4- Anticipated Environmental Impacts and


Mitigation Measures

(+) L.T.

S.T: Short Term

(+) L.T.
L.T: Long Term

4-21

CHAPTER-5
ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVES

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

5.0

ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVES

Study of Analysis of Alternatives Related to Site


The proposed project facility for organic chemicals manufacturing will be carried out at plot (Plot No.
C-6, MIDC industrial area Butibori, Nagpur. The land was already acquired by the project proponent
and it is in the MIDC area. Thus, site alternatives were not analyzed.
Analysis of Alternatives Related to Technology
M/s Paramount Chempro has proposed organic chemicals manufacturing unit to produce
Formaldehyde. The technology for the manufacture of formaldehyde is procured from china and the
details regarding manufacture process is given in Chapter 2 of this EIA report.

Chapter 5 Analysis of Alternatives

5-1

CHAPTER-6
ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING
PROGRAMME

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

6.0

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PROGRAMME

6.1

INTRODUCTION

An environmental monitoring program provides a delivery mechanism to address the adverse


environmental impacts of a project during its execution and operation, to enhance project benefits
and to introduce standards of good practice to be adopted for all project works. An environmental
monitoring programme is important as it provides useful information and helps to:

6.2

Assist in detecting the development of any unwanted environmental situation and thus, provides
opportunities for adopting appropriate control measures.
Define the responsibilities of the project proponent, contractors and environmental monitor and
provides means of effectively communicating environmental issues among them.
Evaluate the performance and effectiveness of mitigation measures proposed in the Environment
Management Plan (EMP) and suggest improvements, if required.
Identify training requirement at various levels.
ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEM

The monitoring programme has been formulated to take care of impact of the proposed project. The
emission levels from the stack and the ambient air quality around the proposed project will be
periodically monitored. Further, noise levels will also be regularly monitored.
It is recommended to have a full-fledged environmental monitoring cell for the Project. The post
operational programmer will be under the supervision of the Environmental Management Cell.
The limits for particulate matter emission and minimum stack heights will be maintained for keeping
the Nitrogen Oxide and Sulphur Di-oxide levels within the air quality standards.
The characteristics of the treated effluent, which would be ultimately disposed off, will be maintained
such as to meet the requirements of the MPCB/CPCB.
The various items to be monitored are stack emission, ambient air quality, and liquid effluent quality
and noise levels. Post project monitoring programme which will be undertaken by the Project
Proponent for various environmental components is detailed below:
A.

Ambient Air Quality

To determine the impact of the proposed project on air quality, a network of ground level monitoring
stations are proposed. PM concentrations from the stack will also be carried out for proper control of
the pollutants at the emission source.
Ambient air quality will be monitored twice in a week for PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NOX, etc. 24-hourly
samples of ambient air quality at 9 locations within 10 km radius (inside and outside) of plant will be
monitored twice a week at uniform interval. Following are the equipment recommended for air quality
monitoring
High Volume Sampler
Blower: 1.5 m3/min capacity with adopter for uniform suction through filter
Voltage Stabilizer: A properly calibrated monometer assembly for the determination of flow rate
through filter pater
Rotameter: Calibrated rotameter (0.1-2.0 l/min) to maintain flow rate for gaseous sampling
Main Housing: Rectangular main housing (29 cm x 36 cm)

Chapter 6- Environmental Monitoring Programme

6-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

RDS (Respirable Dust Sampler)


PM2.5 (Fine Particulate Sampler for particles less than 2.5 micron)
SO2: Impingers, absorbing media, chemicals, spectrophotometer
NOx: Impingers, absorbing media, chemicals, spectrophotometer
B.

Water Quality (Surface and Groundwater)

Surface water as well as ground water including primary treated wastewater quality will be analyzed.
The frequency for monitoring surface and groundwater will be quarterly.
Domestic and process wastewater: Following parameters will be monitored from inlet and outlet of the
ETP.

Physical Parameters: TSS, TDS


Chemical Parameters: pH, Alkalinity, Chloride, Sulphate
Demand Parameters: COD, BOD, Oil and grease
Nutrient Parameters: Total Nitrogen, Nitrate, Nitrogen, Total Phosphate
Heavy Metals: Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Fe, Mn, Ni, Co and Zn.

C.

Noise Environment

Noise will be monitored for day and night-time at plant area and nearby villages.
D.

Occupational Health

Health checks, especially for diseases of eye, ear and chest for all plant personnel will be carried out
yearly. Other monitoring systems are given in action plan of environmental monitoring programme.
The unit also proposes to undertake social upliftment activity in the surrounding area. The budgetary
provision for the said activities is described in Chapter 10.
The action plan for environmental monitoring programme is presented in Table 6.1 and 6.2. The
equipment, laboratory setup and budget required to carry out the environmental monitoring is given in
Table 6.2.
The Project will be based on latest state of art technology which will help in reducing the pollution
from the plant. The Project is also equipped with pollution monitoring systems to help the plant
operators. These measures will help in minimizing the adverse impact on the environment during the
operational phase.
6.3

ACTION PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

6.3.1

Environmental Monitoring Programme


TABLE 6.1
ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PROGRAMME

SL No.

Environmental Parameters

1.
1.1

AIR ENVIRONMENT
Air quality
Ambient air quality monitoring stations will be established inside
the factory area as well outside for PM2.5, PM 10, SO2, NOx, HCs
and VOCs. Selection of monitoring stations will be done in
consultation with State Pollution Control Board based on the
metrological conditions of the area.

Chapter 6- Environmental Monitoring Programme

Schedule & duration of


monitoring

Quarterly in association with


MPCB or as
prescribed by
SPCB/CPCB/ MoEF by third party

6-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

SL No.

Environmental Parameters

1.2

Stack monitoring
Stack monitoring will be carried out for PM10, SO2, NOx, HCs
and VOCs

1.3

Fugitive emissions
Hydrocarbons, VOCs, Particulate matter

2.
2.1

WATER ENVIRONMENT
Water quality (surface and ground water)
All physico-chemical and bacteriological
specified in IS 10500 for drinking purpose.

2.2

2.3
3.

4
4.1

Once every 3 months or as


prescribed by SPCB/CPCB/
MoEF

parameters

as

One composite sample per batch

Effluent from ETP outlet (After Primary Treatment) for pH, TSS
BOD, COD, Oil and grease and Heavy metals.

Two 8 hourly composite sample


per week (flow based)

NOISE ENVIRONMENT
Noise levels will be monitored within premises near equipment
installation, outside the premises and road side with frequency
of vehicles during day and night time.
LAND ENVIRONMENT
Soil quality
pH, EC, Bulk density, ESP, NPK values, CEC, Organic Carbon
and Heavy metals
HAZARDOUS WASTE

5.1

pH, Organic matter, Moisture content,


Total inorganic matters and Heavy metals
BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT
Plantation
- Survival rate of planted species within the plant premises
and outside
- Study of practical Implementation of conservation plan
SOCIO-ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT
(Demographic structure, local employment profile, quality of life,
Health status of workers through periodic medical checkup,
implementation of CSR with periodic budgetary provision,
infrastructure availability with respect to amenities)

6.4

Grab sampling, Once in three


months or as prescribed by
MPCB/CPCB/ MoEF

Wastewater quality
Raw effluent from inlet for pH, SS, BOD, Heavy metals and
Phenolics.

5.

6
6.1

Schedule & duration of


monitoring
Once every 3 months or as
prescribed by MPCB/CPCB/MoEF

As prescribed by
MPCB/CPCB/MoEF by third party

Every year in dry season, in all


plantation areas and parking area

Monthly or as
prescribed by
MPCB/CPCB/MoEF by third party
Twice in a year

Once in 4 years

BUDGET FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN

An effective Environmental Monitoring Plan is proposed during the construction and operational
phases of the project to conserve the environment at site. The following capital expenditure will be
incurred for implementing the Environmental Monitoring Plan.

Chapter 6- Environmental Monitoring Programme

6-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 6.2
BUDGETARY PROVISIONS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PROGRAMME
Capital Cost

Recurring Cost

Sr. No.

Environmental Component

Air Monitoring

2.5

0.25

Noise Monitoring

0.5

0.05

Water Monitoring

2.5

0.25

Land Monitoring

0.5

0.05

Biological Monitoring

1.5
7.5

0.15
0.75

5
Total =

6.5

Budget (in Lakhs)

LABORATORY FACITILIES

An independent laboratory with facilities for chemical and biochemical analysis will be setup at central
locations away from the crowded and commercial areas. Necessary sampling equipment Viz. Niskin type
water sampler, soil sampler and means of storage, preservation and transportation of samples will be
provided. The laboratory will have a provision for fume-hood and cold room. A separate air conditioned
and dust proof room will be provided for installing analytical instruments.
Following instruments need to be incorporated:
pH meter, Conductivity meter, Turbidity meter, flame photometer, spectrophotometer, Hot plate, incubator,
Metller balance and water analysis kit.
In case, if it is not feasible to set up laboratory, then third party contract will be given for monitoring of above
environmental components in association with the state pollution control board.

Chapter 6- Environmental Monitoring Programme

6-4

CHAPTER-7
RISK ASSESSMENT AND DISASTER
MANAGEMENT PLAN

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

7.0

RISK ASSESSMENT AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN

7.1

INTRODUCTION

Accidental risk involves the occurrence or potential occurrence of some accident consisting of an
event or sequence of events resulting into fire, explosion or toxic hazards to human health and
environment. Risk assessment (RA) provides a numerical measure of the risk that a particular facility
poses to the public. It begins with the identification of probable potential hazardous events at an
industry and categorization as per the predetermined criteria. The consequences of major credible
events are calculated for different combinations of weather conditions to simulate worst possible
scenario. These consequence predictions are combined to provide numerical measures of the risk for
the entire facility.
MCA stands for maximum credible accident or in other words, an accident with maximum damage
distance, which is believed to be probable. MCA analysis does not include quantification of the
probability of occurrence of an accident. In practice the selection of accident scenarios for MCA
analysis is carried out on the basis of engineering judgement and expertise in the field of risk analysis
especially in accident analysis.
Detailed study helps in plotting the damage contours on the detailed plot plan in order to assess the
magnitude of a particular event. A disastrous situation is the outcome of fire, explosion or toxic
hazards in addition to other natural causes that eventually lead to loss of life, property and ecological
imbalances.
7.1.1

Methodology of MCA Analysis

The MCA analysis involves ordering and ranking of various sections in terms of potential vulnerability.
The data requirements for MCA analysis are:

Operating manual

Flow diagram and P& I diagrams

Detailed design parameters

Physical and chemical properties of all the chemicals

Detailed plant layout

Detailed area layout

Following steps are involved in the MCA analysis:

Identification of potential hazardous sections and representative failure cases

Visualization of release scenarios considering type and the quantity of the hazardous material

Damage distance computations for the released cases at different wind velocities and
atmospheric stability classes for heat radiations and pressure waves.

Drawing of damage contours on plot plan to show the effect due to the accidental release of
chemicals

7.2

HAZARD IDENTIFICATION

Identification of hazards is an important step in risk assessment as it leads to the generation of


accidental scenarios. The merits of including the hazard for further investigation are subsequently
determined by its significance, normally using a cut-off or threshold quantity.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Once a hazard has been identified, it is necessary to evaluate it in terms of the risk it presents to the
employees and the neighbouring community. In principle, both probability and consequences should
be considered, but there are occasions where it either the probability or the consequence can shown
to be sufficiently low or sufficiently high, decisions can be made on just one factor.
During the hazard identification component, the following considerations are taken into account.

Chemical identities

Location of process unit facilities for hazardous materials.

The types and design of process units

The quantity of material that could be involved in an airborne release and

The nature of the hazard (e.g. airborne toxic vapours or mists, fire, explosion, large quantities
stored or processed handling conditions) most likely to accompany hazardous materials spills or
releases

7.2.1

Hazard Survey

This is a formal systematized approach using a rotary form the final rating number provides a relative
ranking of the hazard. Inventory analysis and Fire and Explosive Toxicity Index (FEI) are the two
techniques employed for hazards identification process.
7.2.1.1 Inventory Analysis
Inventory analysis requires the holdup quantities in process vessels associated, intermediate and main
storages. All process materials which are capable of producing major accident hazards owing to their
physical and chemical properties are identified. Large or substantial inventories in storage or process
streams are indicative of the potential hazards to the plant and its surrounding. Flammability and toxicity
factors of these inventories can lead to unpredictable incident.
The list of all the major inventory of chemicals is marked on the plot plan to show the relative significance
and interactive effect. Each inventory is evaluated based on its hazards nature, temperature and pressure
in relation to the flash point, auto ignition characteristics, LD 50 value and its location in the complex.
In case of pipeline, the flow rates and the total material handled are also considered since these dynamic
inventories may or may not be isolated effectively during accident.
7.2.1.2 Material Inventory and Storage
The plant maintains adequate inventory of raw material and others utility items (fuels, solvent etc.) to
ensure uninterrupted production. Actual average monthly inventory indicate the fairly medium storage
requirements for solvents i.e. methanol stored in six nos. of underground tanks of capacity 60 KL each.
In addition high speed diesel are procured locally and stored in 300 KL (HSD) capacity tanks.
7.2.1.3 Inventory and Mode of Storage of Raw Materials
The mode of storage of raw material and their storage and tank farm are presented in Table 7.1 and
tank farms are shown in Figures below:

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 7.1
INVENTORY OF RAW MATERIAL
Sr.
No.
1

Name of raw material


Methanol
Total

Quantity
(KL)
60 X6
360

Mode of
storage
M. S. Tank

Grade
Commercial Grade

For consequence analysis few likely accidental scenarios are considered and subjected to
consequence analysis. The purpose of this listing is to analyze the failures individually and in
combination. The flammable chemicals stores in explosive tank farm area are much more hazardous
and flammable than liquid a fuel that is HSD.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

PLANT LAYOUT FOR PROPOSED UNITS

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster Management Plan

7-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

7.2.2

Fire and Explosion Index (FEI)

Fire and Explosion Index (FEI) is useful in identification of areas in which the potential risk reaches a
certain level. It estimates the global risk associated with a process unit and classifies the units
according to their general level of risk. FEI covers aspects related to the intrinsic hazard of materials,
the quantities handled and operating conditions. This factor gives index value for the area which
could be affected by an accident, the damage to property within the area and the working days lost
due to accidents. The method for evaluation of FEI involves following stages.

Selection of pertinent process unit which can have serious impact on plant safety

Determination of Material Factor (MF): This factor for a given substance in the process unit gives
intrinsic potential to release energy in case of fire or an explosion. Material Factor can be directly
obtained from Dows Fire and Explosion Index Hazard classification Guide of American Institute of
Chemical Engineers, New York. The factor can also be evaluated from NFPA indices of danger,
health, flammability and reactivity.

Determination of Unit Hazard Factor: The Unit Hazard Factor is obtained by multiplication of
General Process Hazard (GPH) factor and Special Process Hazard (SPH) factor. GPH factor is
computed according to presence of exothermic actions and loading and unloading operations.
The penalties due to each of these reactions / operations are summed up to compute GPH factor.
Similarly, SPH factor can be evaluated for the operations close to flammable range or pressures
different from atmospheric. Penalties of these operations for both factors can be obtained from
Dows EFI index form.

Fire and explosion index is then calculated as the product of Material Factor (MF) and Unit Hazard
Factor. Degree of hazards based on FEI is given in the following Table 7.2.
TABLE 7.2
DEGREE OF HAZARDS BASED ON FEI
FEI range
0 60
61-96
97 - 127
128 - 158
159 and Above

Degree of hazard
Light
Moderate
Intermediate
Heavy
Severe

Preventive and protective control measures are recommended based on degree of hazard.
Therefore, FEI indicates the efforts to be taken to reduce risks for a particular unit. FEI computed for
various chemicals in Plant are given in Table 7.3
TABLE 7.3
FIRE AND EXPLOSION INDEX
Si. No.
Unit Name
Paramount Chempro
1.
Methanol

7.2.3

FEI

Category

82.46

Moderate

Toxicity Index (TI)

The TI value is computed from Maximum Allowable Concentration (MAC), General Process Hazard
and Special Process Hazard by use of DOW's hazard classification guide. The scale for TI is given
below:

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Ti range
06
6 - 10
Above 10

7.3

Degree of hazard
Light
Moderate
High

MCA ANALYSIS

MCA analysis encompasses defined techniques to identify the hazards and compute the consequent
effects in terms of damage distances due to heat radiation, toxic releases, vapour cloud explosion
etc. A list of probable or potential accidents of the major units in the plant arising due to use, storage
and handling of the hazardous materials are examined to establish their credibility. Depending upon
the effective hazardous attributes and their impact on the event, the maximum effect on the
surrounding environment and the respective damage caused can be assessed. Flow chart of
accidental release of hazardous chemicals is presented in Figure 7.1.

FIGURE 7.1: ACCIDENTAL RELEASE OF CHEMICALS: A SCENARIO

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-6

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Hazardous substance, on release can cause damage on a large scale. The extent of the damage is
dependent upon the nature of the release and the physical state of the material. In the present report
the consequences for flammable hazards are considered and the damages caused due to such
releases are assessed with recourse to MCA analysis.
Flammable substances on release may cause Jet fire and less likely unconfined vapour cloud
explosion causing possible damage to the surrounding area. The extent of damage depends upon
the nature of the release. The release of flammable materials and subsequent ignition result in heat
radiation wave or vapour cloud depending upon the flammability and its physical state. Damage
distances due to release of hazardous materials depend on atmospheric stability and wind speed. It
is important to visualize the consequence of the release of such substances and the damage caused
to the surrounding areas. Computation of damage distances are carried out at various atmospheric
stability conditions for various wind velocities and the result is tabulated. Pasquill-Giffard atmospheric
stability classes with corresponding weather conditions are listed in Table 7.4.
TABLE 7.4
PASQUILL GIFFARD ATMOSPHERIC STABILITY
Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

7.3.1

Stability class
A
A/B
B
B/C
C
C/D
D
E
F
G

Weather conditions
Very unstable sunny, light wind
Unstable - as with A only less sunny or more windy
Unstable - as with A/B only less sunny or more windy
Moderately unstable moderate sunny and moderate wind
Moderately unstable very windy / sunny or overcast / light wind
Moderate unstable moderate sun and high wind
Neutral little sun and high wind or overcast / windy night
Moderately stable less overcast and less windy night thand
Stable night with moderate clouds and light / moderate wind
Very stable possibly fog

Fire and Explosion Scenarios

Combustible materials within their flammable limits may ignite and burn if exposed to an ignition
source of sufficient energy. On process plants, this normally occurs as a result of a leakage or
spillage. Depending on the physical properties of the material and the operating parameters, the
combustion of material in a plant may take on a number of forms like jet fire, flash fire and pool fire
etc.
7.3.1.1 Jet Fire
Jet fire occurs when flammable material of a high exit velocity ignites. In process industries this may
be due to design (flares) or an accidental. Ejection of flammable material from a vessel, pipe or pipe
flange may give rise to a jet fire and in some instances the jet flame could have substantial reach.
Depending on wind speed, the flame may tilt and impinge on pipeline, equipment or structures. The
thermal radiation from these fires may cause injury to people or damage equipment some distance
from the source of the flames.
7.3.1.2 Flash Fire
A flash fire is the non-explosive combustion of a vapour cloud resulting from a release of flammable
material into the open air, which after mixing with air, ignites. A flash fire results from the ignition of a
released flammable cloud in which there is essentially no increase in combustion rate. The ignition
source could be electric spark, a hot surface, and friction between moving parts of a machine or an
open fire.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-7

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Flash fire may occur due to its less vapour temperature than ambient temperature. Hence, as a
result of a spill, they are dispersed initially by the negative buoyancy of cold vapours and
subsequently by the atmospheric turbulence. After the release and dispersion of the flammable fuel
the resulting vapour cloud is ignited and when the fuel vapour is not mixed with sufficient air prior to
ignition, it results in diffusion fire burning. Therefore the rate at which the fuel vapour and air are
mixed together during combustion determines the rate of burning in the flash fire.
The main dangers of flash fire are radiation and direct flame contact. The size of the flammable cloud
determines the area of possible direct flame contact effects. Radiation effects on a target depend on
several factors including its distance from the flames, flame height, flame emissive power, local
atmospheric transitivity and cloud size. Most of the time, flash combustion lasts for no more than a
few seconds.
7.3.1.3 Pool Fire
Releases of hydrocarbons in the absence of immediate ignition would form an unconfined pool, which
on ignition would result in a pool fire. Radius of pool depends upon mass flow rate, ambient
temperature; heat of vaporization of material released, vapour pressure of material released and
discharge duration. Emissive power generated from the pool surface depends upon pool burning rate,
heat of combustion of release material, atmospheric transitivity and area of pool.
The pool fire being either tank or bund fire consists of large volumes of flammable material at
atmospheric pressure burning in an unconfined space. The flammable material will be consumed at
the burning rate depending on factors including the prevailing winds. During combustion heat will be
released in the form of thermal radiation. Temperatures close to the flame centre will be high but will
reduce rapidly to tolerable temperatures over a relatively short distance. Any plant building or persons
close to the fire or within the intolerable zone will experience burn damage with the severity
depending on the distance from the fire and the time exposed to the heat of the fire.
In the event of a pool fire the flames will tilt according to the wind speed and direction. The flame
length and tilt angle affect the distance of thermal radiation generated.
7.3.1.4 Vapour Cloud Explosion
The Vapour Cloud Explosion (VCE) begins with a release of a large quantity of flammable vaporizing
liquid or gas from a storage tank, transport vessel or pipeline producing a dangerous over pressure.
These explosions follow a well-determined pattern. There are basically four features, which must be
present for an effective vapour cloud explosion to occur with an effective blast. These are:
First, the release material must be flammable and at a suitable condition of temperature and pressure
which depends on the chemical. The materials which come under this category range from liquefied
gases under pressure, ordinary flammable liquids to non-liquefied flammable gases.
Second, before the ignition, a cloud of sufficient size must have been formed. Normally ignition
delays of few minutes are considered the most probable for generating the vapour cloud explosions.
Third, a sufficient amount of the cloud must be within the flammable range of the material to cause
extensive overpressure.
Fourth, the flame speed determines the blast effects of the vapour cloud explosions, which can vary
greatly.
The flammable content of a gas cloud is calculated by three-dimensional integration of the
concentration profiles, which fall within the flammable limits. If the gas cloud ignites, two situations
can occur, namely non-explosive combustion (flash fire) and explosive combustion (flash fire +
explosion).
Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster
Management Plan

7-8

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

7.3.2

Models for the Calculation of Heat Load and Shock Waves

If a flammable gas or liquid is released, damage resulting from heat radiation or explosion may occur
on ignition. Models used in this study for the effects in the event of immediate ignition (torch and pool
fire) and the ignition of a gas cloud will be discussed in succession. These models calculate the heat
radiation or peak overpressure as a function of the distance from the torch, the ignited pool or gas
cloud. The physical significance of the various heat loads is depicted in Table 7.5.
TABLE 7.5
LIST OF DAMAGES ENVISAGED AT VARIOUS HEAT LOADS
Sr. No.
1

Heat Loads
(kw/m)
37.5

Type of damage intensity


Damage to equipment
Damage to process equipment

25.0

19.0

12.5

4.0

Minimum energy required to ignite


wood
Maximum
thermal
radiation
intensity allowed on thermally
unprotected equipment
Minimum energy required to melt
plastic tubing
--

Damage to people
100% lethality in 1 min. 1% lethality in 10 sec
50% Lethality in 1 min. Significant injury in 10
sec
--

1% lethality in 1 min

First degree burns, causes pain for exposure


longer than 10 sec
6
1.6
-Causes no discomfort on long exposures
Source: World Bank (1988). Technical Report No. 55: Techniques for Assessing Industrial Hazards. ,
Washington, D.C: The World Bank.

7.3.3

Model for Pressure Wave

A pressure wave can be caused by gas cloud explosion. The following damage criteria are assumed
as a result of the peak overpressure of a pressure wave:
0.03 bar over pressure wave is taken as the limit for the occurrence of wounds as a result of
flying fragments of glass
Following assumptions are used to translate an explosion in terms of damage to the
surrounding area:
Within the contour area of the exploding gas cloud, Casualties are due to burns or
asphyxiation. Houses and buildings in this zone will be severely damaged.
In houses with serious damage, it is assumed that one out of eight persons present will be
killed as a result of the building collapse. Within the zone of a peak over pressure of 0.3 bar
the risk of death in houses is 0.9 x 1/8 = 0.1125, and in the zone with a peak over pressure of
0.1 bar the probability of death is 0.1 x 1/8 = 0.0125, i.e. one out of eighty people will be killed.
The significance of the peak over pressure 0.3 bar, 0.1 bar, 0.03 bar and 0.01 bar are depicted in
Table 7.6.
TABLE 7.6
DAMAGE CRITERIA FOR PRESSURE WAVES
Human injury
Peak over pressure
(bar)
5-8
3.5-5
2-3

Type of damage
100% lethality
50% lethality
Threshold lethality

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

Structural damage
Peak over pressure
(bar)
0.3
0.1
0.03

Type of damage
Heavy (90% damage)
Repairable (10% damage)
Damage of Glass

7-9

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Human injury
Peak over pressure
(bar)
1.33-2

Type of damage

Structural damage
Peak over pressure
(bar)
0.01

Type of damage

Severe lung
Crack of windows
damage
1-1.33
50% Eardrum
rupture
Source: Marshall, V.C. (1977) How lethal is explosives and toxic escapes.

7.3.4

Vulnerability Models

Vulnerability models are used in order to determine how people are injured by exposure to heat load.
Such models are designed on the basis of animal experiments or on the basis of the analysis of
injuries resulting from accidents, which have occurred. Vulnerability models often make use of a
probit function. In this function, a link is made between the heat load and the percentage of people
exposed to a particular type of injury.
It is assumed that everyone inside the area covered or gas cloud will be burnt to death or will
asphyxiate. Human fatality is a function of heat flux and exposure time. The probit expressions for the
prediction of mortality due tot thermal radiation from fire scenarios are proportional to the product of t
and q4/3. The probit equation usually used is that proposed by Eisenberg and co-workers*
Pr

= -14.9 + 2.56 In (10-4 q4/3 t)

In which,
Pr = Probit the measure of the percentage of people exposed to a particular injury
t = exposure time in seconds
q = thermal load in W/m
For 1% lethality in the exposed persons the corresponding probit value is 2.67. Table 7.7 gives time
is seconds for percentage of fatality at various heat radiations.
TABLE 7.7
RANGE OF THERMAL FLUX LEVELS AND THEIR POTENTIAL EFFECTS
Heat Flux (Kw/M)
1.6
4
12.5
37.5

Seconds Exposure For % Fatality


1%
50%
500
1300
150
370
30
80
8
20

99%
3200
930
200
50

*Eisenberg, N. A., Lynch C. J. and Breeding, R. J. (1975) Vulnerability Model. A Simulation System
for Assessing Damage Resulting from Marine Spills. National Technology Information Service Report
AD-A015-245, Springfield, MA

7.4

BASIS OF SELECTING MATERIAL TO BE STUDIED FOR CONSEQUENCE


ASSESSMENT

Following points are considered while selecting the release scenarios


1) Flammability of material and flash point
2) Phase of material liquid or gas
3) Threshold quantity as per MSIHC rule

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-10

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

4) Operating temp and pressure of the material


5) Inventory of material
7.4.1

Failure rate

A leak or rupture of the tank / pipe, releasing some or all of its contents, can be caused by brittle
failure of the tank walls, welds or connected pipe work due to use of inadequate materials, combined
with loading such as wind, earthquake or impact. The failure rates are the deciding factor for selecting
the MCLS. The failure rates for selected MCLS are given in below table.
Categories

Catastrophic Rupture Frequency


(Per Tank Per Yr )

Atmospheric Storage
Tank

3.0 10

-6

Pressure Vessels

4.7 10

-7

Leak Frequency
(Per Yr )
-3

2.8 10

-5

1.2 10 (for Hole Size 3 to 10mm)


-6
7.1 10 (for Hole Size 10 to 50mm)

Reference: International Association of Oil & Gas Producers (OGP); Report No. 434-3, March 2010

FAILURE FREQUENCIES FOR PIPE WORK


Leak Size
3 mm dia
4 mm dia
25 mm dia
1/3 Pipe work dia
Guillotine / Full
Bore Rupture

7.4.2

Failure Rates (Per Meter Per Year) For Pipe Work Diameter (Mm)
0 49
50 149
150 - 299
300 499
-5
-6
1x10
2x10
-6
-7
1x10
8x10
-6
-6
-7
-7
5x10
1x10
7x10
5x10
-7
-7
4x10
2x10
-6
-7
-7
-8
1x10
5x10
2x10
7x10

500 1000
-7

7x10
-7
4x10
-7
1x10
-8
4x10

Hazardous Event Classification

Hazards that can lead to accidents in operations due to MCLS are discussed in this section.
Important hazardous events are classified in table:
EVENT CLASSIFICATION
Type Of Event
BLEVE

Deflagration
Detonation
Explosion
Fire
Fireball
Flash Fire
Jet Fire
Type of event
Pool Fire
Spill Release

Explanation
Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapour Explosion; may happen due to catastrophic failure of
refrigerated or pressurized gases or liquids stored above their boiling points, followed by
early ignition of the same, typically leading to a fire ball
Is the same as detonation but with reaction occurring at less than sonic velocity and
initiation of the reaction at lower energy levels
A propagating chemical reaction of a substance in which the reaction front advances in
the unreacted substance at or greater than sonic velocity in the unreacted material
A release of large amount of energy that form a blast wave
Fire
The burning of a flammable gas cloud on being immediately ignited at the edge before
forming a flammable/explosive mixture.
A flammable gas release gets ignited at the farthest edge resulting in flash-back fire
A jet fire occurs when flammable gas releases from the pipeline (or hole) and the released
gas ignites immediately. Damage distance depends on the operating
Explanation
Pressure and the diameter of the hole or opening flow rate.
Pool fire is a turbulent diffusion fire burning above a horizontal pool of vaporizing
hydrocarbon fuel where the fuel has zero or low initial momentum
Loss of containment. Release of fluid or gas to the surroundings from units own

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-11

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Type Of Event
Structural Damage
Vapour Cloud
Explosion

7.4.3

Explanation
equipment / tanks causing (potential) pollution and / or risk of explosion and / or fire
Breakage or fatigue failures (mostly failures caused by weather but not necessarily) of
structural support and direct structural failures
Explosion resulting from vapour clouds formed from flashing liquids or non-flashing liquids
and gases

Consequences of Hazardous Event due to Release of Material into Environment

Consequences of Fire/Heat Wave


Radiation Kw/M2
1.6
4.0

Damage To Equipment
-

12.5

Minimum energy to ignite wood


with a flame; melts plastic tubing.
Sufficient to cause damage to
process equipment

37.5

Damage To People
Will cause no discomfort to long exposure
Causes pain if duration is longer than 20 sec.
But blistering is unlikely.
1% lethality in one minute. First degree burns in
10 sec.
100% lethality in 1 min.
50% lethality in 20 sec.
1% lethality in 10 sec.

The effect of thermal radiation on people is mainly a function of intensity of radiation and exposure
time. The effect is expressed in term of the probability of death and different degree of burn. The
main consequence is a heat wave that results in heat being exerted on the surrounding life and
property, causing damage. The term used to define excess heat is called radiation and is expressed
in kilowatt per m2 or kW/m2. The dose is the amount of heat radiation received in unit time and is
expressed as kilowatt-hour/m2 or kWh/m2. Some important damage thresholds, expressed as
radiation dose include:
7.4.4

Consequences of Explosions
OVER PRESSURE DAMAGE

Overpressure bar
1
0.41
0.2
0.02

Damage
Fatality
Ear Drum Rupture to humans
Structural Damage to buildings
10 % Glass Damage

(Reference: World Bank Technical Paper no. 55- Technical Ltd. for assessing hazards- A manual)

CONSEQUENCES ANALYSIS
The consequences of the release of hazardous substances by failures or catastrophes and the
damage to the surrounding area can be determined by means of models. Models help to calculate.
The physical effects resulting from the release of hazardous substances and to translate the physical
effects in terms of injuries and damage to exposed population and environment. To assess the
damage level caused by the various accidental events, it is essential to firm up the damage criteria
with respect to different types of accidents e.g. thermal radiation, toxicity, explosion overpressure etc.
Consequence analysis involves the application of mathematical, analytical and computer models for
calculation of effects and damages subsequent to a hydrocarbon release accident.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-12

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Consequence models are used to predict the physical behavior of the hazardous incidents. The
techniques used to model the consequences of hydrocarbon and other hazardous material releases
cover the following:

Modeling of the size and shape of flammable and toxic gas clouds from releases in the
atmosphere

Modeling of the flame and radiation field of the releases that are ignited and burn as jet fire, pool
fire, flash fire and BLEVE/Fire ball

Modeling of the explosion fields of releases, which are ignited away from the point of release

The information normally required for consequence analysis includes meteorological conditions,
failure data of equipment and components, ignition sources, population characteristics within and
outside the plant, acceptable levels of risk etc.
7.4.5

Maximum Credible Risk Scenario (MCLS)

Emergency situations involving loss of containment of hazardous materials. For the proposed facility,
the following containment loss scenarios may be envisaged and are listed below in Table. Emergency
situations not involving loss of containment are generally more likely to occur and the following are
possible:

Falls due to working at heights (during construction/repair and maintenance)

Electric shock caused by contact with faulty electrical equipment, cables, etc.

Chronic health issues related to inhalation or ingestion of dust or chemical vapour

Falls on floors made slippery by aqueous solutions or solvents

Burns by splashes of liquids, by steam or hot vapours, by contact with hot surfaces

Exposure to adverse environmental factors (for e.g. high temperature)

Chemicals
Methanol

7.5

Flammability class
A

Worst case scenario


Catastrophic Rupture of Truck Tanker

COMPUTATION OF DAMAGE DISTANCES

Damage distances for the accidental release of hazardous materials have been computed at F, B and
D weather conditions. F, B and D are atmospheric stability classes. These weather conditions have
been selected to accommodate worst case scenarios to get maximum effective distances. The
software and authentic text has been used to carry out consequence analysis. Damage distances
computed for the chemicals are given with reference to various scenarios generated based on the
chemicals / solvents used and presented in following Tables

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-13

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 7.8
VCE SCENARIO - CLOUD DRIFTING, DILUTION & QUANTITY OF METHANOL WITHIN
UEL & LEL FOR INSTANTANEOUS RELEASE OF METHANOL FROM CATASTROPHIC
FAILURE OF THE TANK TRUCK (20 KL)
Distance
From
Source
75

Very Stable Wind (V = 1 m/s)


Percent Qnty.
Max.
%
(Kg)
Conc.
3
3
(m /m )
41.1
6517
1.09E-00

Very Stable Wind (V = 2 m/s)


Percent Qnty.
Max.
%
(Kg)
Conc.
3
3
(m /m )
57.2
9064
6.54E-01

Very Stable Wind (V = 4 m/s)


Percent Qnty.
Max.
%
(Kg)
Conc.
3
3
(m /m )
49.3
7810
1.92E-01

100

47.7

7556

8.80E-01

66.8

10575

4.72E-01

28.4

4491

1.18E-01

125

54.0

8556

7.22E-01

68.5

10851

3.53E-01

8.8

1392

7.82E-02

150

59.8

9477

6.02E-01

61.2

9696

2.72E-01

175

64.8

10266

5.09E-01

53.4

8457

2.15E-01

Maximum Concentration is
Below the lower limit

200

68.4

10842

4.35E-01

45.2

7154

1.73E-01

225

69.7

11039

3.76E-01

36.7

5812

1.42E-01

250

66.5

10537

3.27E-01

28.2

4462

1.18E-01

275

62.8

9954

2.87E-01

19.8

3143

9.89E-02

300

59.0

9351

2.54E-01

12.1

1909

8.40E-02

325

55.1

8730

2.26E-01

5.3

839

7.21E-02

350

51.1

8095

2.02E-01

375

47.0

7448

1.81E-01

Maximum Concentration is
Below the lower limit

400

42.9

6791

1.64E-01

425

38.7

6128

1.48E-01

450

34.5

5462

1.35E-01

475

30.3

4798

1.23E-01

500

26.1

4141

1.13E-01

525

22.1

3494

1.03E-01

550

18.1

2865

9.53E-02

575

14.3

2260

8.80E-02

600

10.7

1688

8.15E-02

625

7.3

1159

7.56E-02

650

4.3

689

7.04E-02

675

1.9

298

6.56E-02

Maximum Concentration is
Below the lower limit

The hazard distances for overpressure and flash fire due to Tank Truck and failure for wind velocities
1m/s and very stable atmosphere, 2m/s & Neutral atmosphere, 4m/s & unstable atmosphere are
given in below table.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-14

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 7.9
HAZARD DISTANCES DUE TO FAILURE OF TANK TRUCK OF CAPACITY 18 MT
Failure cases
Tank truck Failure (20 MT)

Wind speed/
Stability
1m/s/A

Hazard distances (m)


LFL
0.3bar
0.1bar
6517
15
66

2m/sD

9064

4m/sF

7810

0.03bar
220

0.01bar
662

Wind Conditions:
I
Very Stable Atmosphere (Pasquill
Stability Class A)
Velocity = 1 m/s

II
Neutral Atmosphere (Pasquill
Stability Class D)
Velocity = 2 m/s

III
Un-stable Atmosphere (Pasquill
Stability Class F)
Velocity = 4 m/s

TABLE 7.10
DAMAGE DISTANCE DUE TO VCE FOR FAILURE OF TANK TRUCK (20 KL MT)
S. No.
1.

Unit
Service

Methanol Tanker
Methanol

2.

Max. Outflow quantity (MT)

3.

Accident Scenario

4.

Quantity within UEL & LEL (KG)

6517

9064

7810

5.
6.

Effect of Wind:
Chosen wind condition
Duration of fire ball (s)

I
8.4

II
9.1

III
8.8

7.

Dia. of cloud (m)

112.5

125.2

119.3

Max. Intensity of Heat Radiation at center of


90.1
2
the cloud (KW/m )
Damage Distance (m) for heat radiation (from center of fireball)

90.1

90.1

Severe damage to life & property (100%


Lethality)

56.25

62.6

59.65

100% Lethality (37.5 KW/m2)

77.46

85.93

81.83

50% Lethality (25 KW/m2)

95.44

105.71

100.88

1% Lethality (12.5 KW/m2)

134.62

149.17

142.16

First degree burns (4.5 KW/m 2)

210.49

332.29

222.7

8.
9.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

15840 KG
VCE

7-15

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

FIGURE 7.2: DAMAGE DISTANCES DUE TO FAILURE OF TT

7.5.1

Consequence Assessment due to Release of Material into the Environment

Consequence Analysis Summary

The center of effective distances of Maximum Credible Loss Scenarios of Catastrophic rupture
(worst case scenario) of tank which is release into environment, such as Methanol, is lying
within the site boundary. The risk contour of late explosion (Overpressure) of tank, which is
release into environment, Site layout clearly indicates that the center of radiation is lying
within the site, the explosion center of worst case scenarios crossing the site boundary
(pictorial depiction done on plan )

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-16

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Vapour cloud explosion is one of the other scenario having damage potential. Upon analysis it
is estimated and established that it has damage contours exceeding plant boundary in the
worst scenario.

Spillage will be transferred to vacant tank to restrict the spreading of pool

The centre of effective distances of maximum credible Loss Scenarios for heat radiation and
worst case scenarios are marginally crossing the site boundary which are practically possible
scenarios for all Maximum Accidents Hazards (MAH) industries(Drawing provide).

The consequences analyses are considered for worst case failure modes. But the possibility
of catastrophic rupture is rarest of rare and the frequency of heat loss radiation is very less.

Hence additional recommendations are given for to control possible heat loss radiation and
catastrophic rupture.

Some of the ways of preventing emergencies are as follows:

Establishment of a Non Destructive Testing (NDT) system as necessary. This may not be
feasible in-house but there are specialized organizations who undertake the work, and the
same may be used.

Importantly, it is of great importance to collect and analyze information pertaining to minor


incidents and accidents at the site, as well as for recording near-misses or emergencies that
were averted. This information gives an indication of how likely or unlikely it is for the site to
face actual emergencies and what should be further done to prevent them from occurring. The
details regarding this are mentioned in the disaster management plan.

Establishment of an ongoing training and evaluation program, incorporating the development


of capabilities amongst employees about potential emergencies and ways and means of
identifying and averting the same. Most emergencies do not occur without some incident or an
abnormal situation. So there is always sometime of few seconds to few minutes to arrest an
incident of abnormal situation from turning in to an emergency.
Note: This is a peripheral text blended in a RA report, we have carried out the calculation part
with the help of distances and heat radiation data. From this data we have picked distances
with respect to standard heat radiation (4.5,12.5,25 and 37.5 kw/m2) to see the minimum
radiation lies within or marginally crossing the boundary.

7.6

RISK MITIGATION MEASURES

The scope of the risk assessment study covers risk mitigation measures based on Maximum Credible
Accident (MCA) Analysis. The Fire and Explosion Indices were computed for the identification and
screening of vulnerable sections. Consequence analysis was carried out for the accidental release
scenarios of hazardous chemicals at various weather conditions leading to the computation of
damage distances. The following general and specific risk mitigation measures are suggested based
on the study.
7.6.1

General Recommendations

Fire prevention and code enforcement is one of the major areas of responsibility for the fire service.
Hence the facility should be equipped with following measures,

Water supply

Fire hydrant and monitor nozzle installation

Foam system

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-17

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Water fog and sprinkler system

Mobile Fire Fighting equipment

First aid appliances

Surrounding population (includes all strata of society) should be made aware of the safety
precautions to be taken in the event of any mishap within the plant. This can effectively be
done by conducting the safety training programs (Its DMP compliance as MAH unit as there is
storage of hazardous material inventory crossing threshold limit.

Safety escape routes should be provided at strategic locations and should be easily
accessible

Grating and vent panels should be provided to minimize Domino Effects

Critical switches and alarm should be always kept in line.

Fire extinguishers should be tested periodically and should be always kept in operational
mode Its OISD and statutory compliance.

Hydrocarbon detectors to be installed at strategic locations near the units and pipelines
handling hydrocarbons at higher temperatures and pressures to assess any leak.

Periodical mock drills should be conducted so as to check the alertness and efficiency of the
DMP and EPP and records should be maintained

Proper training should be given to staff to handle any emergency situation

Signboard including phone numbers, no smoking signs and type of emergencies should be
installed at various locations

The chain-driven conveyor system should be installed for the transportation of heavy goods
with an even bearing surface.

Automated storage/retrieval systems (AS/RS) store and retrieve products from an inventory
location. These systems should be used for unloading, sorting, put-away, storage, orderpicking, staging, and loading.

7.6.1.1 Storage Tanks

Storage areas must be adequately separated from buildings process areas and flammable
materials (as per OISD)

Separate dike area must be provided for the different products. Do not store the different
products in the same dike

The separation /space in the storage areas such that sufficient to escape from fire, at the
same time it should allow emergency procedures to be mobilized

Proper dyke area should be provided for the storage of chemicals. In the event of a fire, the
fire in the dyke area should be addressed first so as to minimise the heat input to the tank

The fire proofing material/coating should be resistant to weather effects such as chalking and
erosion. Top coat, wherever provided, must be resistant to solar ultra violet radiation

The fire proofing materials should have adequate adhesion, strength and durability

In case of accidental release, shut-off leaks without risk. Prevent spillage from entering drains
or water sources

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-18

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

After spills wash area with soap and water preventing runoff from entering drains.

For small spills, take up with sand or other non-combustible material and placed into closed
containers for later disposal

For large liquid spills, build dyke far ahead of the spill to contain the spilled material for later
reclamation or disposal

Seal all the waste in vapour tight plastic bags for eventual disposal or incineration.

Provide proper ventilation

Use respiratory protection if ventilation is improper

Use face shield, PVC gloves, safety boots while handling. Contaminated clothing to be
immediately removed

7.6.1.2 Control Rooms

Control rooms shall be blast proof and shock proof

The building shall be located upwind of the process storage and handling facilities. The
building shall not be at a lower level than the tank farm. The recommended distances are 30
m for more than two process units

Adequate number of doors shall be provided in the control room for safe exit

Halon / Its proven Equivalent shall be used for control rooms and computer rooms

Smoke detectors system shall be provided for control rooms at suitable locations

To resist fire spread through ducts, dampers shall be installed in ducts

One hydrant (minimum) for every 45 m per wall of the building shall be positioned all around
the building

7.6.2

Mitigation Measures for Natural Disasters

7.6.2.1 Earthquake

Personal structural mitigation in earthquake prone areas includes seismic retrofits of property
and the securing of items inside a building to enhance household seismic safety. It may
include the mounting of furniture, refrigerators, water heaters and breakables to the walls.

7.6.2.2 Cyclones and Severe Storms

Land use management should provide protection from wind and storm surge.

Engineering of structures should withstand wind forces and water damage (including storm
surge).

Building should be constructed with higher wind-resistant capacity.

Securing of elements such as metal sheeting, roofing, and fences should be done to avoid
severe damages.

Safety shelters are to be arranged to tackle cyclones and storms.

Cyclone and severe weather warning systems should be installed.

Community awareness regarding cyclone risk and evacuation plan should be properly
addressed.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-19

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

7.6.3

Preventive Measures of the Electricity Hazard

All electrical equipment shall be provided with proper earthing. Earthed electrode shall
periodically tested and maintained

Emergency lighting shall be available at all critical locations including the operators room to
carry out safe shut down of the plant, ready identification of firefighting facilities such as fire
water pumps and fire alarm stations.

All electrical equipment shall be free from carbon dust, oil deposits, and grease.

Use of approved insulated tools, rubber mats, shockproof gloves and boots, tester, fuse tongs,
discharge rod, safety belt, hand lamp, wooden or insulated ladder and not wearing metal ring
and chain.

Flame and shock detectors and central fire annunciation system for fire safety should be
provided.

Temperature sensitive alarm and protective relays to make alert and disconnect equipment
before overheating.

Prevent higher humidity and temperature near electric insulations.

Danger from excess current due to overload or short circuit should be prevented by providing
fuses, circuit breakers, thermal protection

Carbon dioxide, halon or dry chemical fire extinguishers are to be used for electrical fires

7.6.4

Preventive Maintenance Inspection Schedule for Pumps

All the following items shall be checked / recorded after the specified period:
After 1000 running hours or 3 months whichever earlier

Bearing lubricant (for water contamination and sediments)

Oil ring for performance

Deflector for looseness

Constant level oiler for leakage

Mechanical seal for leakage

Seal flushing/quenching system (of Mechanical Seal) for clogging and chocking.

Cooling water flow in both the bearing housings

Condition of bearing by sound and temperature (in running condition)

Performance of all measuring instruments (Pressure/Temperature gauges and Flow meters)

After 4000 running hours or 1 year whichever earlier

Repeat all checks given above

Flushing of bearing with lube oil and refilling of oil to required level, whether carried out or not

Flushing of cooling water lines and strainers to ensure proper flow of cooling water.

Foundation, foundation bolts and supports

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-20

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Replacement of old packing with new ones and condition of gland follower, lantern ring and
sleeves (in case of gland packing)

Condition of coupling, coupling bolts, nuts, spring washers and their conformity to uniform
size. Change grease in half coupling in case of gear type

After 8000 hours or 2 years whichever earlier

Repeat all checks given above

Condition of outboard bearing, lock nut and lock washer (in case lock washer found damaged
and lock nut loose, shaft axial play shall be checked)

Following items of Journal bearings:

Clearance of I/B and O/B bearings

High spot (High Spots shall be scrapped)

Condition of thrust bearing, lock nut and lock washer (in case lock washer found damaged
and lock nut loose, shaft axial play shall be checked)

Pump float (adjust, if necessary)

Condition of mechanical seals

Alignment (Misalignment shall not be more than 0.05 mm)

Painting of equipment, whether carried out or not

After completing the checks listed above the pump shall be started and the following shall be checked
during the trial run (the trial run duration shall be half to one hour for electric driven and 3 to 4 hours
for diesel driven):

Discharge pressure

Suction pressure

Condition of Mechanical Seal/Gland Packing

Electric Motor load current at discharge valve shutoff and open condition

Condition of bearing by sound and temperature

Any leakage

Vibration and shock pulse reading.

7.6.5

On-site Disaster Management Plan

Onsite Emergency/disaster is an unpleasant event of such magnitude which may cause extensive
damage to life and property due to plant emergencies resulting from deficiencies in Operation,
Maintenance, Design and Human error, Natural Calamities like Flood, Cyclone and Earthquake; and
deliberate and other acts of man like Sabotage, Riot and War etc. An Onsite Disaster may occur all of
a sudden or proceeded by a Major Fire. Purpose for the on-site disaster management plan is

To protect persons and property of processing equipment in case of all kinds of accidents,
emergencies and disasters

To inform people and surroundings about emergency if it is likely to adversely affect them

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-21

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

To inform authorities including helping agencies (doctors, hospitals, fire, police transport etc.)
in advance, and also at the time of actual happening

To identify, assess, foresee and work out various kinds of possible hazards, their places,
potential and damaging capacity and area in case of above happenings. Review, revise,
redesign, replace or reconstruct the process, plant, vessels and control measures if so
assessed.

Following fire protection facilities are available to combat the emergencies and depending upon the
type of emergencies any one or combination of the facilities are applied.

Fire Water System

Carbon Dioxide System

Foam System

First Aid Fire Fighting Equipment

Mobile Fire Fighting Equipment

Gas / Fire Detection and Alarm System.

Fire Protection Systems

Fire Hydrant System and Other Facilities

A fire Hydrant System has been provided for the premises. The system comprises of an underground
water storage tank with make-up facility through Bore wells & water storage tanks. The system is kept
pressurized all the time with the help of a Jockey Pump. Whenever a fire hydrant outlet is opened
and the line pressure drops, the fire hydrant pump starts automatically.
Main Plant Hydrant System Consist with:
Underground water storage tank
Fire Pump (Electrical Driven)
Fire Pump (Diesel Driven)
Jockey Pump
Pumps Head
Single Hydrant point
Double Hydrant point
Water monitor
Hydrant Riser

Prills Plant Hydrant System Consist with


Underground water storage tank
Fire Pump (Electrical Driven)
Fire Pump (Deisel Driven)
Jockey Pump
Pumps Head
Single Hydrant point
Double Hydrant point
Water monitor
Hydrant Riser

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-22

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

For use with the Fire Hydrant System, the following firefighting equipments / facilities are available:

1.

Fire Hoses

5.

Foam Compound (AFFF & ARFFF)

2.

Branch Pipes & Nozzles

6.

Breeching & adaptors

a) Gunmetal Branch-pipe

7.

Fire Blankets

b) Triple Purpose

8.

Fire Suits

c) Diffuser

9.

Portable Water Monitor

d) Foam Making Branch pipes

10. Emergency Ladder

3.

Fire Hooks

11. Portable foam Trolley

4.

Fire Mans Axe

12. Smoke Extractors

Fire Buckets/Fire Extinguishers

Fire Buckets and portable Fire Extinguishers are provided in all the areas depending upon the
specific needs of the area. Some spare equipments are maintained in the inventory at an identified
Fire & Safety Equipment Store. The following table shows the number of various types of Fire
Extinguishers available in the premises.
Sl. NO
1
2
3
4
5

7.6.6

TYPE OF FIRE EXTINGUISHERS


No. of Water Foam Monitors
No. of Mobile Foam Unit
Foam Carrying capacity
No. of Foam making branches
Storage of AFFF

NUMBERS AVAILABLE
As per OISD
As per OISD
As per OISD
As per OISD
As per OISD

Emergency Safety Cupboards & PPES

To have adequate tools, tackles & PPEs during emergency handling, stock of these items has been
maintained in emergency cupboards. ESM can take the required items from these cupboards.
Emergency safety cupboards are available inside factory premises at various locations. Checklist of
safety cupboard is maintained and frequency of checking in monthly basis. Followings are the
particulars available in the safety cupboard.
Following items are maintained in cupboards.
Note: Number of item & items in cupboards may vary in different areas.
7.6.7

Occupational Health and Safety

For large industries, where multifarious activities are involved during construction, erection, testing,
commissioning, operation and maintenance; the men, materials and machines are the basic inputs.
Along with the boons, industrialization generally brings several problems like occupational health and
safety.
The industrial planner, therefore, has to properly plan and take steps to minimize the impacts of
Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster
Management Plan

7-23

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

industrialization and to ensure appropriate occupational health and safety including fire plans. All these
activities again may be classified under construction and erection, and operation and maintenance.
7.6.7.1 Occupational Health
Occupational health needs attention both during construction and erection and operation and
maintenance phases. However, the problem varies both in magnitude and variety in the above phases.

Construction And Erection

The occupational health problems envisaged at this stage can mainly be due to constructional accident,
dust and noise. To overcome these hazards, in addition to arrangements to reduce it within TLV's,
necessary protective equipment will be supplied to workers.

Operation and Maintenance

The problem of occupational health, in the operation and maintenance phase is primarily due to noise,
dust etc., and the necessary personal protective equipment will be given to all the workers. The working
personnel will be given the following appropriate personnel protective equipment

Industrial Safety Helmet

Face shield with replacement acrylic vision

Zero power plain goggles with cut type filters on both ends

Zero power goggles with cut type filters on both sides and blue color glasses

Welders equipment for eye and face protection

Cylindrical type earplug

Ear muffs

Canister Gas mask

Self-contained breathing apparatus

Leather apron

Aluminized fiber glass fix proximity suit with hood and gloves

Boiler suit

Safety belt/line man's safety belt

Leather hand gloves

Asbestos hand gloves

Acid/Alkali proof rubberized hand gloves

Canvas cum leather hand gloves with leather palm

Lead hand glove

Electrically tested electrical resistance hand gloves

Industrial safety shoes with steel toe/ Electrical resistance safety shoes with fiber toe In order to
ensure safety of the employees including contract workmen, the following measures will be taken

Ensuring use of Personal Protective Equipment by the employees and the contract workmen

Following Work Permit System

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-24

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Induction, Regular Awareness and Refresher Training Program on Safety and Special Safety
Training Program to specifically address various jobs

Pep Talk/Group Discussion of safety

Safety Audit

Safety Committee Meeting

Mock Drills/Training on Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan

Fully fledged medical facilities will be available round the clock for attending emergency arising out of
accidents, if any. All working personnel will be medically examined at least once in every year and at the
end of his term of employment. This is in addition to the pre-employment medical examination.
7.6.7.2 Safety Plan
Safety of both men and materials during construction and operation phases is of concern. The
preparedness of an industry for the occurrence of possible disasters is known as emergency plan. The
emergency in the plant is possible due to collapse of structures and fire/explosion etc.
The plant will formulate safety policy, keeping in view the safety requirement during construction,
operation, maintenance phases, which will address the following points

Allocation of sufficient resources to maintain safe and healthy conditions of work

Taking steps to ensure that all known safety factors are taken into account in the design,
construction, operation and maintenance of plants, machinery and equipment;

Ensuring adequate safety instructions are given to all employees;

Providing all necessary protective equipment, safety appliances and clothing and to ensure their
proper use

Informing employees about materials, equipment or processes used in their work which are known
to be potentially hazardous to health or safety

Keeping all operations and methods of work under regular review for making necessary changes
from the point of view of safety in the light of experience and up to date knowledge

Providing appropriate facilities for first aid and prompt treatment of injuries and illness at work

Providing appropriate instruction, training, retraining and supervision to employees in health and
safety, first aid and ensuring adequate publicity is given to these matters

Ensuring proper implementation of fire prevention methods and an appropriate firefighting service
together with training facilities for personnel involved in this service

Organizing collection, analysis and presentation of data on accident, sickness and incident involving
people injury or injury to health with a view to taking corrective, remedial and preventive action

Promoting through the established machinery and joint consultation effective participation by all
employees in health and safety matters.

Publishing /notifying regulations, instructions and notices in the vernacular language of employees.

Preparing separate safety rules for each type of occupation/processes involved in a plant ensuring
regular safety inspection by a competent person at suitable intervals of all buildings, equipment, work
places and operations.

7.6.7.3 Safety Organization


Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster
Management Plan

7-25

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Construction and Erection Phase

A qualified and experienced safety officer is to be appointed. The responsibilities of the safety officer will
include identification of the hazardous conditions and unsafe acts of workers and advice on corrective
actions, conduct safety audit, organize training programs and provide professional expert advice on
various issues related to occupational safety and health. He is also responsible to ensure compliance of
Safety Rules/ Statutory Provisions.

Operation And Maintenance Phase

When the construction is completed the posting of safety officers will be in accordance with the
requirement of Factories Act and their duties and responsibilities will be as defined thereof.
7.6.7.4 Safety Circle
In order to fully develop the capabilities of the employees in identification of hazards in the processes
and improving safety and health, safety circles will be constituted in each area of work. The circle will
consist of five to six employees from that area. The circle normally will meet for about an hour every
week.
7.6.7.5 Safety Training
Safety training will be provided by the Safety Officers with the assistance of faculty members called from
Professional Safety Institutions and Universities. In addition to regular employees, contractor labors will
also be provided safety training. To create safety awareness safety films will be shown to workers and
leaflets will be distributed.
Some precautions and remedial measures proposed to be adopted to prevent fires are:

Compartmentalization of cable galleries, use of proper sealing techniques of cable passages and
crevices in all directions will help in localizing and identifying the area of occurrence of fire as well as
ensure effective automatic and manual firefighting operations;

Spread of fire in horizontal direction will be checked by providing fire stops for cable shafts;

Reliable and dependable type of fire detection system with proper zoning and interlocks for alarms
are effective protection methods for conveyor galleries;

Housekeeping of high standard helps in eliminating the causes of fire and regular fire watching
system strengthens fire prevention and firefighting; and

Proper fire watching by all concerned will be ensured.

7.6.7.6 Health and Safety Monitoring Plan


The health of all employees will be monitored once in a year for early detection of any ailment/
abnormality due to exposure to heat /dust.
The company will have a well-defined Emergency Preparedness & Response Plan (ERPR) in place
and made for risk assessment of all probable risks with mitigation measures.
-The organization will be capable of handling any adverse situation arising out of unforeseen
circumstances. At company there will be well trained rescue persons and required equipment in
sufficient number to deal with any emergency including fire.
7.6.8

Precautionary Measures for Falling Objects

Provide safety helmets to protect workers below against falling objects

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-26

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Barriers like a toe boards or mesh guards should be provided to prevent items from slipping or
being knocked off the edge of a structure
Secure objects to the structure like lashing of scaffold boards
Ensure that there are no loose objects and all tools are properly secured
Create an exclusion zone beneath areas where work is taking place.
Danger areas should be clearly marked with suitable safety signs indicating that access is
restricted to essential personnel wearing hard hats while the work is in progress.

7.7

APPROACHES TO DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN

7.7.1

Emergency Preparedness & Response Plan (EPRP)

Safety in the premises is ensured by means of engineering design and construction, use of recent
technology and sophisticated equipment, reliable safety systems, careful personnel selection and
training. Paramount Chempro Pvt Ltd. give priority for Safety, Health and Environment through all
phases of activities. Lot of emphasis is given on preventing personal injuries and damage to
environment.
Thus Safety Department is one of the important departments in the organization. Presently Sr.
Manager - Safety heads the department. He is having direct access to VP- Manufacturing, Executive
Vice President -Manufacturing (Location head) & Corporate EHS head. Executives & Technical staff
members Safety, assists Sr. Manager -Safety in departmental activities. Manager and Executives
are qualified and having experience in Safety field.
Occupational Health center (OHC) equipped with required facility is also a part of safety department.
Qualified doctor (Factory Medical Officer) is appointed on retainer ship basis & visits daily on working
days. He looks after the OHC. Male nurse is available round the clock and gives first aid to the
injured. In Occupational Health Center all required facilities and medicines are available. Stock is
updated periodically. Ambulance van along with driver is available round the clock.
Safety is one of the most important aspects in all activities. Consideration for safety is given
throughout all stages of production activities. Safety department is involved in decision making
related to safety. Safety department conducts trainings to increase safety awareness amongst all the
employees. MSDS for the chemicals handled at this site are made available in respective department
to make employees aware about the hazards & necessary precautions required to be taken. Good
housekeeping is ensured all the time in the department. Adequate ventilation, illumination & hygienic
conditions are maintained at workplace. Safety department is responsible for setting up safety
systems, procedures & their effective implementation. Safety executives take safety rounds & gives
recommendation to improve work environment related to safety. It is ensured through work permit
system that all the jobs are carried out safely. Suggestions from employees regarding safe work
environment are accepted positively & efforts are taken to implement them.
7.7.2

Objectives of the Plan

The plan is developed to make the best possible use of the resources available at Plant and/or the
agencies available outside to provide help/assistance in case of an emergency in the factory
premises. The activities will include;
1.

To control and contain loss.

2.

To safeguard employees, visitors and public in the vicinity.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-27

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3.

To minimize damage to property and / or the environment.

4.

To inform employees, the general public and the authorities about the hazards/risk assessed,
safeguard provided, risk if any and the role to be played by them in the event of emergency.

5.

To inform authorities and emergency services for additional help, if required.

6.

Rescue victims and give them the necessary medical attention in the shortest possible time.

7.

To identify and list out the casualty, if any.

8.

Provide necessary information to families/relatives of affected persons

9.

To secure the safe rehabilitation of affected area and to restore normalcy.

10.

To provide necessary information to outside agencies including media and statutory bodies.

11.

To preserve evidences, records, equipments, etc, and to organize investigation for the root
cause of the emergency and develop necessary preventive measure avoid its recurrence.

12.

To ensure safety of the employees before re-entry and resume the work.

13.

To work out a plan with all provisions to handle emergencies and to provide for emergency
preparedness and the periodical rehearsal of the plan.

Responsibilities should be clearly assigned and should be practicable. For clear understanding and
quick action, the action (Role) by each individual (his emergency duty) shall be defined &
communicated clearly.
Small or Localized emergency situation, this is an emergency situation that will have small fire,
explosion, toxic gas release or chemical spill in small or controlled area. This will be limited to specific
small area or department section. These situations get normally controlled by individual or by group of
people with or without initiating emergency alarm.
Local Emergency is a state of emergency consisting of situation which may affect one or more plant
/ department, but the effects are contained within the premises and it is possible to bring the
emergency situation under control using own resources. This includes activation of emergency plan
of site.
Major Emergency is defined as that event may affect one or more operating areas of plant and
possibly extend beyond the factory premises. It may cause injuries, loss of life or extensive property
damage. It may require use of additional resources than what we have available with us in-house.
The areas where possible major accidents may happen are solvent storage tanks of warehouse and
plant.

Possible Emergencies

The types of emergencies which can happen at plant are as listed below. These emergency
situations can be of one of the above or combination from above three type i.e. Small or Localized
emergency situation, Local Emergency and Major Emergency
a) A large fire and / or explosion in chemical tank farm areas, manufacturing areas, warehouse and
other service department/ offices.
b) Sudden emission of flammable or toxic gases/vapours to the atmosphere.
c) Spillage or release of chemical from vessels / containers.
d) Earth Quake Not possible -Least active zone as per seismic zone map of India
e) Flood Due to Heavy rain.
Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster
Management Plan

7-28

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

f) Terrorist attack.
Various actions which need to be followed and taken to control these emergency situations are
covered in this plan.

Fire

Flammable solvents are used in process & hence fire hazard is always there if the safety norms are
not followed. There could be a spillage/ leakage of flammable solvent from containment & if it gets
accidents ignition source from anywhere then it will catch fire.
Possible ignition sources could be spark from electrical equipment, if their flame proofness is not
maintained properly. Accumulation of static charge creating spark if earthing & bonding is not proper.
Hot work jobs in plant area without proper precautions etc.

Spillage of Chemical

Another probable danger is leakage of flammable and / or corrosive chemicals from storage tanks in
tank farms. This could be possible from flange joints, tank shell, through vent due to overfilling, line
rupture etc.

Flood / Earthquake

Due to Heavy rain water accumulation problem will be there but there is no possibility of flood as
nearby river is around 3.0 kms. The river bed in on lower side. In past there is no any evident where
flood occurred in industrial area.
Industrial area of butibori lies in seismic zone III. This region is liable to low probability and is
classified as the Low Damage Risk Zone.
7.7.3

Emergency communication

Procedure for raising emergency alarm and communication:


A reliable and prompt communication system is extremely important in controlling a major
emergency. Corrective actions can be initiated in time only, if information can be passed on to key
personnel quickly. If necessary have a runner in case of electrical or phone failure.
An emergency gets communicated to emergency control center through. A dedicated phone is
maintained at emergency control center for receipt of emergency calls. Intercom telephone has been
provided at all areas of operations.
An audible fire alarm and siren system is installed throughout the working area of the factory and can
be activated from any MCP provided at various places throughout the factory
Manual Call points are fast communication of emergency situation. Manual call points are provided in
factory premises at various locations. This is the enclosure consist with the breakable glass having
switches inside. Any emergency communication can be done by breaking the glass of MCP through
attached hammer. Breaking of cover glasses on the manual call points will actuate the audio visual
indication on the fire alarm panel located at the Main Security Gate and Fire Sirens will also blow
automatically in the veiling mode.
The wailing siren is having typical rising and lowering sound (10 to 15 sec). This wailing sound
signifies to the employee the onset of emergency.
After controlling the emergency situation Incident controller informs to security officer on duty
regarding declaration of all clear announcement.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-29

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

The evacuation is declared by multiple announcements on public address system. At the time of
evacuation, the employees are expected to leave their work place after bringing the operations to the
safe working conditions, to assembly point area.

Siren tone (sound)


What it means
Duration of siren sound
Wailing mode (Up & Down)
Emergency Siren
45 sec.
Continuous tone (Long siren)
All Clear
60 sec.
Evacuation at site through continuous announcement via public address system

7.7.4

Roles And Responsibilities In Emergency

Person First Noticing Fire / First Observer:


Following actions must be taken in case of emergency

He/ She are first person who observes the incidence. He shall press the nearby MCP (Manual
call point) of the fire alarm system and / or Inform to main security gate & give following
information:

His name

Type of emergency

Location of emergency If first observer is a squad member then after informing /


communicating security, he should perform his duties as squad member and if not then stand
by the Incident controller for next instruction. If he/she feels to control the situation, will initiate
required actions.

If he is familiar with plant, machinery or equipment affected, isolate as necessary for


containment purpose.
In case of fire observer should attempt to extinguish the fire with the nearest portable
firefighting equipment without exposing himself to undue risk
Attempt to be made to restrict access of personnel and vehicle until the arrival of the fire team.
Action by Person discovering gas leak / spillage:
first seek to protect himself by moving to a safe location ( it is safer to travel across wind)
He should alert persons in the immediate area of the danger and raise the alarm & inform his
department head.
He should use the nearest emergency telephone or dial fire station.
He should not run, but walk quickly.
He should cover his nose with wet cloth and breathe through it.
He should remain up wind of the leak and restrict of persons in that area.
Security Supervisor / Guards
Breaking glass of manual call point will automatically actuate the audiovisual indication on fire alarm
panel located at main security gate along with blowing of fire siren in wailing mode for about 30-45
seconds.
If emergency is communicated through intercom number 333 then security supervisor / officer shall
initiate siren in manual mode. Call on intercom 333 doesnt initiate siren in auto mode.
Security supervisor on duty will acknowledge & confirm the emergency location & nature of
emergency and switch on the public address system and make announcement three times through

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-30

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

public address system consist with mike & Speaker, regarding the Type & Location of emergency.
Announcement happens in Hindi language.
Note all employees should go nearest speaker available in area and listen announcement being
made for further actions as per individual role laid down in procedure.

Do work allotment to security guards as follows:


i)

Send Ambulance with one security guard and megaphone.

ii) Ensure security guard available in the area of emergency scenario has opened the lock of fire
hose box.
iii) Ensure entry / exit in OR outside from factory is stopped from the gates of the
factory.
iv) Stop vehicle movement on roads.
v) Ensure traffic clearance for emergency vehicle.

Affected Area In charge / SSPO


Immediate rush to the emergency location and initiate necessary actions as per judgement on
the gravity of emergency.
Ask to evacuate unwanted persons (employee and contract workers) from the site of
emergency.
To take decision on the actions such as shut down, transfer of material, removal of drums/
materials ON/ Off of AHU, electrical isolation of equipments, stop the plant operations based
on situation.
Try to control situation with the help of emergency squad members reached at site & available
resources,
Get the megaphone & Guide ESM for handling emergency Arrangement for shifting patient.
Ensure no-body is trapped inside affected area.

Perform head count of plant persons including contract casuals & other engineering
personals, refer shift log book, work permit system to verify it.

After arrival of SSPO handover charge to him and then he will act as Incident controller.
Take necessary help of maintenance person & electrician for isolation / provision of pipelines,
Electrical energy if required.
Concern plant SSPO will voluntarily provide information which in relevant to incident controller
Inform to ETP officer in case any spillage / leakage of chemicals in drain effluent pit. ETP
officer will then plan necessary actions required at effluent treatment plant in sudden shock
load.

Incident Controller:
a)
i.
b)
c)

Incident controller defined for;


Main plant
Rush to the site of emergency and acknowledge the situation.
Consult with the respective Shift in-charge

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-31

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

d) Arrange with the help of safety squad, for removing the casualties, if any, from the spot & their
first aid/ treatment.
e) Guide ESM for effective use & application of safety appliances & ensure action taken is
satisfactory.
f) Direct Plant operations/shut-down operations as needed to control situations.
g) Direct for the rescue operation if required and ensure the effective & timely rescue operation
under his control.
h) He will communicate through megaphone for the complete plant evacuation, if required.
i) Ensure no person trapped inside the affected area and verify the head count done by the
respective shift in charge as per evacuation & headcount procedure.
j)

Arrange for any additional firefighting/safety equipments that may be required at the site.

k) After controlling the emergency, he will ensure and take a walk through around the site along
with respective shift in charge and ensure no reappearance of the emergency situation.
l)

Informed to security in charge to declare ALL CLEAR siren and announcement.

m) Give permission for the reentry to the affected area.


n) Take action to restore operations as required under the circumstances
o) Inform and seek guidance from higher authorities
p) Preserve records/evidences that may be required for investigation.
q) Carry out preliminary investigation into the accident with the help of concerned personnel.

Emergency Squad Member (ESM)

Paramount Chempro, Butibori, Nagpur facility has combined team of ESM, First aider. Same team
shall be utilized in rescue and evacuation purpose.
At the incident spot incident controller will assign the responsibilities to ESM for controlling situation or
of first aid to injured person & accompany injured person till OHC.
a) ESM should rush to the site of emergency immediately after hearing emergency siren &
location of emergency on PAS speaker.
b) Carry BA set, Fire extinguisher, according to the scenario heard on speaker
c) Follow instruction of SPO till arrival of incident controller.
d) Wear the required personal protective equipments.
e) Know the emergency situation & engage to control the emergency with the help of available
resources.
Duties of assigned First Aiders
f) On hearing the fire siren, members of first aiders squad should reach the location of incident.
g) 1f any one body found injured, immediately they will give first aid treatment at site and bring
injured person to Occupational Health Center.
h) If required, one or two first aiders will remain at Occupational Health Center, otherwise they
will return to the emergency site.
i)

Fire & safety equipments brought from various locations but not used, are kept back on their
place.
Welfare Arrangement (HR / Admin Manager)

a) Arrangement shall be made to communicate the necessary information to relatives/ family of


the victims.
Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster
Management Plan

7-32

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

b) Welfare arrangement Water, snacks, Cold drinks, Tea for the employees reported at
emergency site and participated to control the emergency.
c) Make necessary arrangement at emergency site.

Advisory Team

(Safety Manager, Plant Managers, engineering managers, Managers)


a) This includes Safety Manager, Plant Managers, engineering managers, Managers and there
second line in silent hrs.
b) Keep in touch with the Emergency controller for information that will help firefighting/rescue
operations.
c) Keep in touch with the other coordinators for requirement of any services like external help,
communication, transportation etc.
d) Carry out investigation of the accident and assist in filing of statutory reports as required.
e) Each plant Manager / Area manager has to ensure the uniform distribution of ESM & First
aider in each shift & this shall be checked & verified randomly by safety team.
Duties of Engineering Manager or executive
f) He will provide necessary help to Incident Controller such as cutting off, startup electrical
supply / steam supply / water supply and other services.
g) Ensure utility operators are at fire pump house, to ensure that the pump remains running till
the fire is extinguished and get information regarding the same.

Utility Operator - Hydrant Pump House


Boiler operator rush to the hydrant pump house Main Plant & Utility operator for PRILLS area
and ensure:

Pressure in hydrant system,


Smooth startup of fire hydrant main pump (1st Electrical, if not, then Diesel Engine)
Water level in underground water tank & water make up.
Stop fire pump after getting instruction from Incident controller or after hearing ALL CLEAR siren.

Electrician

Electrician should be present at respective PCC room /D. G. house to take care of power failure.
If more than one electrical personnel are available; then one should remain at PCC/D. G. room &
other should go to Incident Spot and act as per the instructions of Incident Controller.
Ensure Emergency backup system for emergency equipments, lighting is ready & working
properly.

Other Persons / Visitors

People from the affected area, who are not members of the above squads / teams, should stand
by to incident controller for next instruction.
If complete evacuation is declared then all people should go and stand at the nearest, chosen as
per wind direction.
People from other areas, who are not members of the above squads / teams should not leave
their workplace and do their work normal, till further instruction on public address system or
respective area in charge or incident controller.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-33

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Instructions to Employees

Do not get panicky.


Do not approach emergency site as a spectator.
Do not engage phones ( internal& external ) unless it is in connection with the emergency.
Do not move about unnecessarily.
Remain at your working places unless called and be attentive to instructions.
When told to evacuate, do it in orderly manner and proceed to the area.
Ensure that all contract labors working in the premise and visitors also follow the above stated
instructions.
Do not leave the working place without informing your immediate supervisor / subordinate /
monitor. Production officer in each plant will act as a monitor in his plant.
No visitors will be allowed to come during emergency
7.7.5

Drills & Exercise

To ensure the level of emergency preparedness amongst the employees, a mock drill plan has been
established & conducted on a periodical basis (Quarterly).
This will conducted to cover the full range of possible scenarios, different shift, and odd hrs & on
holidays.
Safety procedure no.13 describes the more details about the mock drill procedure, defined observers,
location and briefing / debriefing / finding/recording methodology along with action tracking. As per
the gaps identified, appropriate changes in the hardware and business plan shall be done.
7.7.6

Evacuation, Rescue, Head Count, All Clear & Re-Entry

Evacuation

Objective
Provide the guidance for the evacuation, if on site emergency is beyond control and converted into
major or offsite emergency. When need turn in to the complete evacuation of the plant / area during
emergency situation,
Scope
Evacuation is done for the safety of human lives working in the department / in the factory.
Evacuation means withdrawal of the personnel from place of work in an emergency. Evacuation can
be departmental or total.
ALL EMERGENCIES LIKE FIRES OR DANGEROUS OCCURANCE NEED NOT NECESSARILY
BE FOLLOWED BY AN EVACUATION.
If a fire or dangerous occurrence (explosion, spread of gases / vapours etc.) is of minor nature (i.e.
very quickly and easily controllable), evacuation is not necessary.
If a fire or dangerous occurrence is of a serious nature, goes out of control and is likely to endanger
the lives of the people in a section or in a department, evacuation of the people of only that particular
section / department and the adjoining department is necessary.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-34

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

If a fire or a dangerous occurrence is likely to spread over a large area, goes out of control and is
likely to endanger the lives of people of the entire factory, a total evacuation is necessary.
The following procedure has been drawn mainly with a view to moving personnel from their place of
work to a safe place as quickly as possible and in an orderly manner, when a situation arises where
evacuation becomes necessary
Following are the key steps shall be taken by the site incident controller:
1.

Assess the situation for the potential severity & probability of the situation may lead to a major
catastrophic situation.
2. Initiate & raise the evacuation need, based on emergency scenario.
3. Evacuation of specific area shall be initiated through announcement in PAS.
4. Incident controller should give necessary instructions to security supervisor for making
announcement of evacuation. He shall tell the /Location in details to security.
5. Security supervisor after getting communication from incident controller shall make
announcement regarding evacuation for multiple times (5-6 times) at the frequency of two
minutes.
6. Incident controller if required shall also make parallel announcement at incident area through
megaphone.
7. Sectional / departmental evacuation :
8. Whenever a fire or a dangerous occurrence takes place , the department head or the plant
manager or the shift in charge or the floor management staff will immediately
o Make an on the spot assessment whether the situation warrants evacuation by the people of that
particular area.
o ensure that all operations have been brought to a satisfactory STANDSTILL STATE (SAFE )
o Order evacuation through megaphone / orally and communicate this message to the people of
that area.
o Ensure that the visitors / contractors men are also evacuated.
o THE EMPLOYEE OF THE DEPARTMENT WILL,
o When an order has been given to evacuate, move quickly to the Area through the safe exit in an
orderly manner by the route which is notified separately in the department.
o Not leave the area until advised to do so
9. The headcount Shall be done through ESM or person available at incident spot, he should
o Ensure that no one enters in the section / department which are to be evacuated.
o After the evacuation, take a roll call of the members of the concern department in the assembly
point area.
o Report the missing names to the at Incident controller, detail about his work place to incident
controller.
o Incident controller should search missing person if any.
o If required, arrange the facility for First Aid / Transport / Canteen etc.
10. Incident controller will do following,
o After receiving message, he will instruct ESM (rescue) team to find out the person or casualty in
that affected area.
o Give feedback about casualty / missing persons to Security so that he can do further
communication to Admin head, safety head, HR head and Location head.
o If required, take the help of First Aider for the treatment & send the injured person / casualty to
Occupational Health center for further treatment.
11. Contractor or visitors are present in the dept. then staff of the respective dept. will take the
responsibility of them and take them along with him the assembly point Area.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-35

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

12. Dept. Management staff must ensure that total evacuation of their dept. and reach to the area.
13. Incident controller will check that all employees are evacuated by performing head count at
assembly point.
14. He shall verify that all employees are evacuated through concerned employees /ESM of affected
area.
15. He should instruct to employees to be alert and if required, he can declare total site evacuation.
16. Employees / Visitors should follow the evacuation routes. When evacuation is declared, Plant
employee will take the colleagues, contractors and visitors along with them and move towards
assembly point.
17. Ensure adequate & clear communication at the site for the evacuation.
18. Direct & ensure the peoples are gathered at a defined place at chosen assembly point.
19. Ensure chosen assembly point is in correct direction as per wind direction.
20. Clear communication to the shift incharge/ area incharge /supervisors to ensure peoples under
him was evacuated safely.
21. Ensure peoples from services department engaged through work permit procedures were
communicated effectively & evacuated.
22. Ask Shift in charge to refer log book, work permit & ensure nobody trapped inside the plant area.
23. He shall also check visitor entry at gate to check details of visitors.
7.7.7

Assembly Point

In the event of emergency in one operating area, it may be essential to evacuate the personnel from
the affected area. Total eight assembly points have been identified in the premises. Employees, who
are required to evacuate from their respective area,
HEAD COUNT PROCEDURE:

Incident controller has to assign the responsibility to a Plant employee (ESM/Shift in charge) for
head count of the members gathered at assembly point.
Ensure all chosen assembly points were covered for head count.
Cross verification by referring the log book, muster roll, Gate pass, Card punching system, work
permit system shall be done.
This shall also be done agency wise contract employees and direct Plant employees department
wise if required.
Any missing person shall be identified & initiate the search & rescue operation
SEARCH & RESCUE PROCEDURE:

This will be initiated as soon as need identified.


Rescue need will be confirmed before initiating the action of rescue operation, who are trapped,
where trapped and nature of risk during rescue.
Before starting the rescue operation, incident controller will give necessary instruction to ESM.
Instruction / Plan shall include the entry & exit route, PPEs required, Back-up support in terms of
man power, tools, equipment & facility required.
Incident controller shall ensure adequate illumination and back-up of power for lighting.
Incident controller will direct the rescue team actively & involved directly in rescue operation.
Ensure vehicles, Ambulance with required items available at site.

ALL CLEAR & RE- ENTRY PROCEDURE

After controlling the emergency, incident controller will ensure that emergency situation is under
control and no further propagation of emergency situation is possible at the place. He will take a visit
Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster
Management Plan

7-36

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

of emergency area and ensure the situation is up to the acceptable limit to initiate all clear & re- entry
procedure.
Incident controller shall pass a communication by Walkie-Talkie And /OR Intercom no. to the main
security in charge at control center to initiate ALL CLEAR siren (Long siren for 60 sec.) with
announcement as EMERGENCY UNDER CONTROL
Followings are the steps to be followed towards Re-entry procedure:
Ensure all clear siren after clearance by incident controller, before proceeding to re-entry to the
area.
Employee selected for re-entry should be familiar with the area & Hazard involved and trained in
emergency handling procedure.
Predefined route to be followed during reentry.
Ensure compliance of required PPEs during reentry.
Possible hazards in the area shall be assessed and evaluated.
Ensure adequate illumination in the area OR portable device with the person.
Ensure source of energy is controlled for the area.
Initial walk through shall be conducted by incident controller along with respective area in charge
to ensure the area is safe for the normalization of activities.
Security in charge has to recommence the man movement / vehicle movement through gate.
7.7.8

Facilities and Infrastructure


Emergency Response Centre

The place identified as Emergency Response Centre at present, is the Main Security Gate Office
where the Fire Alarm Control Panel is installed. The facilities available at the Emergency Response
Centre include:
1. Internal Telephone
2. External telephone, STD.
3. Fire alarm panel
4. Manual Fire Siren
5. Fire Alarm System with Public Address System
6. Important Addresses & Telephone No.
7. Ambulance Van
8. Megaphone
9. A copy of On-Site Emergency Plan.
All communications after General Shift Working hours and on Sundays/Holidays are routed through
the Security Gate Office.
7.7.9

Emergency Communication Facilities:

internal communication:

Intercom telephone points have been provided at all critical areas of operations. An emergency
telephone is available at the Emergency Response Centre.

Fast communication of emergency situation using manual call points MCP.

Walkie Talkie, Mobile as well as virtual no. have been provided to ensure immediate contact.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-37

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Smoke Detector: Smoke detectors provided at identified

MANUAL CALL POINTS (MCPS):


This is the enclosure consist with the breakable glass having switches inside. Any emergency
communication can be done by breaking the glass of MCP through attached hammer. Breaking of
cover glasses on the manual call points will actuate the audio visual indication on the fire alarm panel
located at the Main Security Gate and Fire Sirens will also blow automatically in the veiling mode.
Fire Alarm Panels
There are two panels installed in main security office to get the location of emergency after raising the
siren. Visual indication on panel activated. Zone wise identification of plant area displayed on panel to
know the exact location of the emergency.
Siren- sirens are located at various identified places to ensure adequate sound level during
emergency. Following is the detail for the type of sound:
Public Address System
Public address system consists with Mike & Speaker. After hearing the emergency siren, Security
Supervisor on duty at the main gate will see the visual indication on fire alarm panel to acknowledge
the exact location of emergency, and then make an announcement on the Public Address System
(PAS).
He will announce the nature of emergency & Location of emergency on PAS. Speakers are installed
at all over the premises. All employees on hearing the siren reach the nearest speaker, hear the
announcement and act according their role as per Fire Fighting Procedure.
After the emergency is brought under control and confirmation received from the incident controller
for the all clear siren, the Security Supervisor will blow the All Clear Siren and makes suitable
announcement on the Public Address System. The audio visual indication on the panel will remain
there until and unless the broken glass is repaired and replaced. This system is aimed at expediting
the communication process in the event of an emergency situation so as to save valuable time and
effective emergency preparedness.
Megaphone
It can be used by incident controller to give instructions to safety squad members and other
employees. It is kept at Security gate Main Plant & PRILLS area. During emergency, Security
guards collect it from security office and hand over it to incident controller.
Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA)
These sets are very useful to tackle the emergency situation like working in oxygen deficient
atmosphere. Similarly it is very much necessary to use these sets by the ESM where toxic gases are
evolved during fire.
Emergency Ladder
During emergency, if need arises to reach at height then there are three emergency ladders provided
at conspicuous places. One ladder is at prills main gate and other two area at emergency cupboard
kept at safety building in main plant.
Monitoring Equipment
The following monitoring equipments are available in the premises. These can be used on need
basis.

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-38

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

a) Explosive cum Oxygen meter


b) H2S meter
c) Dragger Detection kit and Detection Tubes.
d) Multi-gas Detector.
e) Static Charge Meter
f)

Smoke detectors

7.7.10 Resources Available


The following resources available at Paramount Chempro, with respect to Emergency Preparedness:
EHS Management Team
There is a full-fledged Safety, health & Environment department to provide all types of inputs in the
areas of Industrial Safety, Health & Environment related issues. Safety & Health department has
strength of around seven persons and is headed by a Manager Safety. All references, data sheets
and information which may be required in the event of an emergency are readily available with the
Safety Department. Besides other related functions of the department, this team provides valuable
and comprehensive inputs in terms of training to employees.
Emergency Squad Members
This is a group of personnel who have been identified to handle any emergency situations. These
personnel are taken from various operating areas including offices and are imparted training in
handling of possible emergencies at site. This includes fire, fire, toxic gas release, spill etc, the
firefighting, rescue operations, first aid and other related functions. The members are so chosen that
at any given time, at least 30-40 members of Emergency Squad are available in the premises.
3. The following basic facilities are available in the Occupational Health Centre.
a) Equipment /items as specified for an Ambulance Room
b) Oxygen administering equipment as well as spare cylinders
c) A Refrigerator for keeping critical medicines.
d) Stretchers for handling casualties.
e) Bed for casualty till shifted for further medical attention.
f)

Facilities for carrying out routine medical examination.

g) Antidotes, Medicines, bandages etc., for necessary first-aid.


h) Proper washing facility and an attached toilet.
An Ambulance Van with necessary first-aid equipment is available in the premises round the clock to
take care of any medical emergencies.
7.7.11 Training & Mock Drill
All the rescue and firefighting teams must be properly trained to carry out their duties in an
emergency. Similarly, the key personnel and essential personnel will be trained in the operations.
As emergency preparedness is an important part of planning in Industrial Emergency Management,
practice drills will be carried out once in every six months to ensure that persons are fully conversant
with their duties and can carry them out efficiently when the need arises. Personnel will be trained

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-39

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

suitably and prepared mentally and physically in emergency response through carefully planned,
simulated procedures. A record of all such drills and meetings will be maintained.
7.7.12 Offsite Emergency Preparedness Plan
The offsite plan in detail will be based on those events, which are most likely to occur, but other less
likely events, which have severe consequence, will also be considered. Incidents which have very
severe consequences yet have a small probability of occurrence will also be considered during the
preparation of the plan. However, the key feature of a good offsite emergency plan will be the flexibility in
its application to emergencies other than those specifically included in the formation of the plan.
The roles of the various parties who will be involved in the implementation of an Offsite Plan/Disaster
Management Plan are described below. The plan will identify an emergency coordinating officer, who will
take the overall command of the offsite activities. As with the onsite plan, an emergency control center
will be setup within which the emergency coordinating officer can operate.
An early decision will be required in many cases on the advice to be given to people living "within
range" of the accident - in particular whether they should be evacuated or told to go indoors. In the
latter case, the decision can regularly be reviewed in the event of an escalation of the incident.
Although the plan will have sufficient flexibility built in to cover the consequences of the range of
accidents identified for the onsite plan, it will cover in some detail the handling of the emergency to a
particular distance from each spot of disaster.
Aspects Proposed to be considered in the Offsite Emergency Plan
The main aspects, which should be included in the emergency plan, are:

ORGANIZATION

Detail of command structure, warning systems, implementation procedures, emergency control centers.
Names and appointments of incident controller, site main controller, their deputies and other key
personnel.

COMMUNICATIONS

Identification of personnel involved, communication center, call signs, network, list of telephone numbers.

SPECIALIZED KNOWLEDGE

Details of specialist bodies, firms and people upon whom it may be necessary to call e.g. those with
specialized fuel knowledge, laboratories.

VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS

Details of organizers, telephone numbers, resources etc

INFORMATION ON HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES STORED

Details of the hazardous substances stored and a summary of the risk associated with them.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Arrangements for obtaining details of weather forecasts and weather conditions prevailing at that time

HUMANITARIAN ARRANGEMENTS

Transport, evacuation centers, emergency feeding, treatment of injured, first aid, ambulances and
temporary mortuaries.

PUBLIC INFORMATION

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

7-40

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Arrangements for (a) Dealing with the media press office; (b) Informing relatives, etc

ASSESSMENT OF EMERGENCY PLAN

Arrangements for:
(a)

Collecting information on the causes of the emergency; and

(b)

Reviewing the efficiency and effectiveness of all aspects of the emergency plan.

7.7.12.1 Role of the Emergency Coordinating Officer


The various emergency services will be coordinated by an Emergency Coordinating Officer (ECO), who
will be designated by the District Collector. The ECO will liaison closely with the site Main Controller.
Again depending on local arrangements, for very severe incidents with major or prolonged offsite
consequences, the external control will be passed to a senior local authority administrator or even an
administrator appointed by the central or state government. The ECO will be equipped with address and
phone numbers of important agencies.
7.7.12.2 Role of the Local Authority
The duty to prepare the offsite plan lies with the local authorities. The emergency planning officer (EPO)
appointed will carry out his duty in preparing for a whole range of different emergencies within the local
authority area.
It will be the responsibility of the EPO to ensure that all those organizations which will be involved offsite
in handling the emergency, know of their role and are able to accept it by having for example, sufficient
staff and appropriate equipment to cover their particular responsibilities. Rehearsals for offsite plans will
also be organized by the EPO.
7.7.12.3 Role of Police
Formal duties of the police during an emergency include protecting life and property and controlling
traffic movements.
Their functions will include controlling bystanders, evacuating the public, identifying the dead and dealing
with casualties, and informing relatives of death or injury.
7.7.12.4 Role of Fire Authorities
The control of a fire will be normally the responsibility of the senior fire brigade officer who will take over
the handling of the fire on arrival at the site. The senior fire brigade officer will also have a similar
responsibility for other events, such as explosions. Fire authorities in the region will be appraised about
the location of all stores of flammable materials, water and foam supply points, and firefighting
equipment. They will be involved in off-site emergency rehearsals both as participants and, on occasion,
as observers of exercises. The flow chart for offsite emergency plan is given in Figure-7.10.
7.7.12.5 Role of Health Authorities
Health authorities, including doctors, surgeons, hospitals, ambulances and so on, will have a vital part to
play following a major accident, and they will form an integral part of the Disaster Management Plan
Major off site incidents are likely to require medical equipment and facilities additional to those available
locally, and a medical "mutual aid scheme should exist to enable the assistance of neighboring
authorities to be obtained in the event of an emergency.
1.7.12.6 Role of Government Safety Authority
This will be the factory inspectorate available in the region. Inspectors are likely to satisfy themselves
that the organization responsible for producing the Disaster Management Plan has made adequate
Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster
Management Plan

7-41

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

arrangements for handling emergencies of all types including major emergencies. They may wish to see
well documented procedures and evidence of exercise undertaken to test the plan.
In the event of a Disaster, local arrangements regarding the role of the factory inspector will apply. These
may vary from keeping a watch, to a close involvement in advising on operations. The action plan
suggested for control of the offsite emergencies is given in Table 7.11

FIGURE 7.3 OFFSITE EMERGENCY PLAN


TABLE 7.11
OFFSITE ACTION PLAN
SI.
No.

Action Required to be taken to Mitigate


Disaster by Aid giving agency

A 1

Arrangements for evacuation/ rescue of


persons from zone of influence to
predetermined camps
Caution to public by announcement
Traffic and Mob control by cordoning of the
area
Law & order
Request to railway authority for keeping the
nearest railway gate open & to stop the trains
at the nearest railway station
Control of fire

2
3
4
5

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

Responsible
Agencies
for taking action
Police
Department

Equipments
/Material
facilities Required at site to
mitigate Emergency
Self-Breathing apparatus with
spare
Cylinder Chemical gas mask
with spare canister
Vehicle
with PA system
Transportation for evacuation of
people

District

Self breathing apparatus with


7-42

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

SI.
No.
1
2
3
4
5
C

D
E
F1
2
3
G1

2
H1

I1

Action Required to be taken to Mitigate


Disaster by Aid giving agency
Scrubbing of the flashed off gas cloud with
water curtain
To rescue trapped persons
If fire is big, keep surrounding area cool by
spraying water
Communication to State Electricity Board to
continue or cut off electric supply
Communication to water supply department for
supplying water
Medical facilities for affected persons (first aid
and treatment)
Identification of concentration of gas in zone of
influence
Removal of debris and damaged structures
Monitor the incoming and out going
transports
Arrange emergency shifting of affected persons
and non-affected person to specified area
Arrange diesel/petrol for needed vehicles
Give all information related to meteorological
aspects for safe handling of affected area for
living beings
Forecast important weather changes, if any
Representatives of all departments are in the
local crisis group; therefore they are expected
to render services available with them. Since it
is a group of experts with authority, the
Mitigating measures can be implemented
speedily. The representatives from locals are
also there so that communication with local
people is easy and quick.
The district emergency or disaster control
officer / collector will be the president and he
will do mock drill etc so that action can be
taken in right direction in time
Collector will be the President of District Crisis
Group therefore all district infrastructure
facilities are diverted to affected zone
All other functions as mentioned for local crisis
group

Chapter 7- Risk Assessment & Disaster


Management Plan

Responsible
Agencies
for taking action
Fire Brigade

Equipments
/Material
facilities Required at site to
mitigate Emergency
spare cylinders
Foam/water fire tenders
Gas mask with spare canisters
Lime water
Neck to toe complete asbestos
suit,
PVC
hand
gloves,
gumboots, safety goggles
Mobile scrubbing system along
with suction arrangement.

Hospital
and public
health
Pollution
Control Board
Municipal
corporation
Transport
department

Ambulance
resuscitation
stretchers
Gas detector

Meteorological
Department

Local Crises
Group

Wind direction, temperature and


velocity measuring instruments
Mobile van for meteorological
parameter measurements
Disaster Management Plan and
its implementation method.
Information
related
to
hazardous industry with crisis
group
Newspaper
editor/reporter

District
Group

All necessary facilities control


of law and order situation

Crisis

with
unit,

onboard
first aid,

Bulldozers
Cranes
Traffic Police
Emergency shifting vehicles
Fuel for vehicles

7-43

CHAPTER-8
PROJECT BENEFITS

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

8.0.

PROJECT BENEFITS

The proposed project of organic chemicals unit will result in improvement of infrastructure as well as
overall socio-economic development in the area. The people residing in the nearby areas will be
benefited directly and indirectly as well. It is anticipated that the proposed project will provide benefits
for the locals during operational phase of the activity.
Corporate Social Responsibility
As a part of Corporate Social Responsibility, M/s. Paramount Chempro is planning to provide the
following welfare schemes to the nearby community

Health Care

- Medical Clinic
- Ambulance
- Free Medicines
- Medical Camps

Education

- Scholarship
- Tuition/Coaching Centers
- Evening Classes
- Distribution of Books/Note Books& School furniture
- School Uniform

Infrastructure

- Drinking water supply through tanker for nearby villages during summer season
- Village roads maintenance
- Welfare activities
- Construction of Bus Shelters
A budget of Rs.10 lakhs will be allocated for CSR.
8.1

CONSTRUCTION PHASE

During construction phase, the proposed project will benefit the region in following manner.
8.1.1

Employment Generation

The proposed project will generate employment opportunities to the local people during construction
phase. An employment for about 50-100 (including both direct & indirect) persons will be generated
by the proposed project during the construction phase.
8.1.2

Community Service

M/s. Paramount Chempro will provide necessary facilities like drinking water supply during summer

season, sanitation and medical facilities etc. to the project personnel and their families during the
construction phase.

Chapter 8- Project Benefits

8-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

8.1.3

Transportation

The construction phase will involve movement of materials. The material to be transported includes
earthwork, concrete, steel and other materials. The company will create transportation activities and
roads for transportation of the materials required for the manufacture of Formaldehyde.
8.2

OPERATIONAL PHASE

8.2.1

Population

During the operational phase, number of local people will be employed directly or indirectly. Most of
the families will settle nearby villages in the area. Moreover the colony and market will be established
and there will be increase in population in the study area.
8.2.2

Education

Unskilled people and limited skilled people (depending on availability) will be hired from local
population. Skilled persons expected to come in the study area from outside. In addition, some
secondary developments like books stall, school dresses shops, furniture stalls etc. will be
established. These facilities will be beneficial to locals residing in the study area.
8.2.3

Employment

The proposed manpower engaged in the production and other activities on regular basis at M/s
Paramount Chempro, Butibori, requirement is approximately 24 Nos. Man power requirement for the
construction phase is 20-25 Nos. and operation phase will be estimated as 24 Nos. The company will
have one Production Manager, One R&D Manager, Shift Engineers (6 Nos.) and skilled and unskilled
labourers to the extent of 16 Nos.
8.2.4

Other Benefits

As a part of the Corporate Social Responsibility M/s Paramount Chempro proposes to take steps in
developing education, health, and infrastructure development. These will be taken up as part of social
development of the neighboring villages.
8.2.5

Economic Development

The organic chemicals that will be manufactured by M/s Paramount Chempro will have a high market
potential.
The manufacturing of these products and their supply in India and also abroad will boost to increase the
economy of the state and thereby the country.

Chapter 8- Project Benefits

8-2

CHAPTER-9
ENVIRONMENTAL COST
BENEFIT ANALYSIS

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

9.0

ENVIRONMENTAL COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS

M/s Paramount Chempro has proposed organic chemicals manufacturing unit to produce
Formaldehyde of 24000 MT/ Annum at plot no. C 6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur,
Maharashtra. All the basic requirements for the production are in placed including infrastructure
availability. The increase in production of chemicals will available to the needy industries. It will
definitely boost the economic growth of the country; develop region and quality of life of the people in
a sustainable manner without creating any environmental damage.
The project site is well connected to railways, roadways and airways. The proposed project is
planned in the notified Butibori Industrial area. Therefore, it will not involve loss of vegetation and
biodiversity. The vegetation is similar in the whole area with no sensitive ecosystem or rare and
endangered flora or fauna, hence no environmental loss will be there in terms of net productive value.
The total project cost is estimated to be 741 lakhs and expenditure on implementation of the
Environmental Management Plan (EMP) is presented in Chapter 10 of this report. Besides tangible
benefits, the proposed project has got number of intangible benefits like minimum emission of the
generated gases, no adverse impact on environment as far as air, noise and water environmental
components are concerned. Individual industry will take care of environmental management. With the
establishment of proposed project, there will be socio-economic development in the area and thereby
the improvement in the quality of life of the people. More employment opportunities will be there for
the local people, moreover the proposed project will help for enhancement of the economy of the
country. The proposed project will provide temporary and permanent job opportunities to the local
people in the neighboring area. The industry management has complete focus on quality, quantity,
promptness, safe delivery and best services through 3 MS Man, Machine and material
management.
The establishment of proposed project when in operation will definitely provide significant supply of
products to the industries, not only in the region, state but also in India and help to increase the
economic status of the country.
The developmental activities due to proposed project will increase economy of the country and also
help to increase the economy of the state through products transportation, taxes, supporting
economy for nations growth.
9.1

ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS

Proposed project shall benefit environment in following ways:

To create an environment that could support the culture of good standards.


To emphasize the policy of afforestation/landscape and rainwater harvesting to create a better
micro-climate in the area
A well designed drainage system to control flooding/overflow of water during the rainy season
The continuous inflow of people will require local transport system like autos, taxis, etc. which
would help local transport business.
Considerable number of people will be benefited by provision of job opportunity to local people.
Thus, the direct and indirect employment generation by this project.

Chapter 9- Environmental Cost Benefit Analysis

9-1

CHAPTER-10
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
PLAN

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

10.0

ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN

10.1

INTRODUCTION

Any industrial development is associated with certain positive as well as negative impacts on the
environment.
However, negative or adverse impacts cannot be possibly ruled out scientific development. At the
same time, adverse impacts cannot be neglected.
An Environmental Management Plan (EMP) has been formulated for the mitigation of adverse
impacts. It is based on the present environmental conditions and the environmental impact appraisal.
This plan helps in formulating, implementing and monitoring the environmental parameters during
and after commissioning of the project.
The Environmental Management Plan describes in brief, the management's plan for proper and
adequate implementation of treatment and control system for pollutants and for maintaining the
environment. It also includes development of green belt around the plant, proper safety of the
workers, noise control, fire protection systems and measures.
10.2

OBJECTIVES OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

The main objectives in formulating this environmental management plan are:


To treat all the pollutants viz. liquid and gaseous those contribute to the degradation of the
environment with appropriate technology.
To comply with all regulations stipulated by the Central / State Pollution Control Boards related to
air emission and liquid effluent discharge as per air and water pollution control laws.
To handle hazardous wastes as per the Hazardous Waste (Management & Handling Rules)
Rules 2012 and subsequent amendments.
To encourage support and conduct developmental work for the purpose of achieving
environmental standards and to improve the methods of environmental management.
To create good working conditions (avoidance of air and noise pollution) for employees.
To reduce fire and accident hazards.
Perspective budgeting and allocation of funds for environment management expenditure.
Continuous development and search for innovative technologies for a cleaner and better
environment.
10.3

ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT CELL

Apart from having an EMP, it is also necessary to have a permanent organizational set up charged
with the task of ensuring its effective implementation. Conscious of this, M/s. Paramount Chempro
will create a department consisting of officers from various disciplines to co-ordinate the activities
concerned with management and implementation of the environmental pollution measures.
Basically, this department will undertake to monitor the environmental pollution levels by measuring
stack emissions, ambient air quality, wastewater quality, noise level etc., either departmentally or by
appointing external agencies wherever necessary. The main purpose of the monitoring is to ensure
the pollution is limited to the allowable values and to take corrective action by either providing new
equipment or by improving the performance of the installed pollution control equipment.
In case, monitored results of environmental parameters are found to exceed the allowable values, the
Environmental Management Cell will suggest remedial action and get these suggestions

Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

10-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

implemented through the concerned plant authorities. The actual operation and maintenance of
pollution control equipment of each unit will be under the respective plant managers.
The Environmental Management Cell will also co-ordinate with all the related activities such as
collection of statistics of health of workers and population of the region, afforestation and greenbelt
development. Proposed Environmental Management Cell of the company is shown in Figure 10.1.

FIGURE 10.1: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT CELL


10.4

FIRE AND SAFETY

The company will provide sufficient fire extinguishers and fire hydrant systems for protection of the
plant building against fire due to electrical spark and short circuit. Automatic type fire extinguishing
system will be provided to protect the control and computer rooms areas from fire hazards. For
storage of water for fire fighting in case of emergency, a separate provision of 15000 liter/capacity will
be provided. This will serve the fire fighting need of the project.
Qualified and trained officers will manage the environment and safety department. All persons in
operation and maintenance of the plant will be given basic fire fighting training.
To avoid short-circuiting an earthing system will be designed and installed for a ground fault short
circuit for proposed project. Grid resistance will be decided based on soil resistively and allowance for
corrosion. Electrical equipment will be flame proof.
Good housekeeping, proper and adequate ventilation and lighting will be arranged for better
workplace area as per guidelines of Factory Act. Personal protective equipment like helmets,
goggles, hand gloves, safety shoes, nose masks and ear protecting devices like ear plugs/ear muffs
will be provided to all the workers.

Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

10-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

10.5

NOISE AND COMMUNICATION

Care will be taken during selection of the equipment like compressors, pumps and other machinery
so that noise generation can be reduced. In addition to this, effective earplugs will be provided and
their use will be made obligatory in specified areas where noise levels are high and unavoidable.
Sufficient number of dial type telephones will also be provided in sound proof cabin with suitable
flasher indication to indicate incoming calls.
10.6

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

All precautionary methods will be adopted by the company to reduce the risk of exposure of hazards
to employees.
Pre-employment and periodical medical examinations will be carried out to assess the health
status of the workers and medical records for the same will be maintained for each employee.
A qualified doctor will be appointed on casual basis and required medicines, antidotes and firstaid box will be procured under the guidance of appointed doctor as per guidelines of Factory Act.
Personal protective equipment like helmet, goggles, hand gloves, safety shoes, nose masks and
ear protecting devices like ear plugs/ear muffs will be provided to all the workers.
Adequate numbers of fire fighting equipment and extinguishers will be installed as per
requirement of the fire risk in the proposed plant.
Proper training will be imparted to employees for use of safety appliances & first aid.
All workers will be trained on respective Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) so as to enable
them to prevent any possible mishaps.
All loading/unloading will be carried out under technical guidance as per the Standard Operating
Procedure (SOP) generated for the particular raw materials/products.
All pollution control equipment are periodically checked and maintained.
The work place area monitoring will be carried out for Particulate Matters (PM), VOCs & Noise on
regular basis.
Good housekeeping, proper and adequate ventilation and lighting will be arranged for better
workplace area as per guidelines of Factory Act.
Water purification and water cooler will be provided for safe drinking water.
10.7

GREENBELT DEVELOPMENT

A Green Belt will be developed based on the following principles:


Plants that grow fast will be preferred.
Preference for high canopy covers plants.
Perennial and evergreen plants will be preferred.
Plants which have a high Air Pollution Tolerance Index (APTI) will be preferred.
The development of Green Belt is an important aspect for any plant because:
It acts as a 'Heat Sink'.
It improves the ambient air quality by controlling Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) in air.
It helps in noise abatement for the surrounding area.
Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

10-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

It helps in settlement of new birds and insects within itself.


It maintains the ecological balance.
It increases the aesthetic value of site.
10.7.1 Design of Greenbelt
M/s. Paramount Chempro proposes to have a green belt programme for the proposed unit. Total plot
area is 4050 sq. mt. (i.e. 0.4 Ha.) out of which proposed project will be carried out in approx.1336 sq.
mt. (i.e. 0.1 Ha). The green belt will be developed in 1336.5 sq. mt (0.1 Ha) of land which is about 33
% of the total area.
Around 36 trees belonging to different species were observed at proposed site. The species like
Teak, Jamun, Awala, Sisam, Mango and Eucalyptus sp. were grown at site.
Since, the area available for plantation is small; M/s. Paramount Chempro will take the initiative to
carry out plantation programme in part of MIDC, Butibori Industrial area.
TABLE 10.1
RECOMMENDED SPECIES FOR PLANTATION
Sr. Scientific name
No
.

Common
name

Height Growth rate


(m)

Evergreen/
Deciduous

Crown
Shape

1. Aegle marmelos

Bel

12

Slow growing

Evergreen

Oblong

No. of
plant
species
to be
planted
4

2. Ailanthus excelsa

Mahraruk

20

Quick growing

Deciduous

Round

3. Alstonia scholaris

Saptaparni

15

Evergreen

Round

4. Azadirachta indica

Neem tree

20

Moderately
growing
Quick growing

Evergreen

Spreading

5. Bauhinia variegate

Kachanar

Quick growing

Deciduous

Oblong

6. Cassia siamea
7. Dalbergia sisoo
8. Delonix ragia

Kassod
Sisam
Gulmohar

12
10
15

Quick growing
Moderate
Quick growing

Evergreen
Evergreen
Deciduous

Oblong
Round
Spreading

5
4
4

9. Mangifera indica
10.Pongamia pinnata

Amba
Karanj

8
3-5

Moderate
Quick growing

Evergreen
Evergreen

Oblong
Round

4
3

Royal Palm
Jambhul

20
20

Quick growing
Quick growing

Evergreen
Evergreen

Round
Oblong

4
5
50

11.Roystonia regia
12.Syzygium cumini
Total =

10.8

POLLUTION CONTROL ARRANGEMENT/MITIGATION MEASURES

Environmental Management Plan would specifically consist of the following and M/s. Paramount
Chempro committed to follow the said plan physically as well as in spirit. Pollution control
arrangements/mitigative measures for different types/sources of pollution are presented in the Table
10.2.

Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

10-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

TABLE 10.2
POLLUTION CONTROL ARRANGEMENTS/ MITIGATION MEASURES
Sr. No.

Types of Pollution

1.

Air pollution
Construction Phase

Operation Phase

Mitigation measures incorporated/ to be provided for the proposed


project

Excavation
Excavation will be carried out only for to develop the particular
facility for proposed project.
During excavation, care shall be taken that the excavator will not
release the sand from higher elevation. The piling of sand will be
done uniformly and proper storage will be maintained to avoid dust
generation because of wind. If required, temporary windshield
barrier shall be provided with the help of galvanized sheets and
bamboos.
Mechanical Erection
Fume generation will be there due to welding and allied activities;
this impact will be negligible and restricted to project site. The
workers would be trained to use weling shield and safe practice will
be followed.
Vehicular Movement
The proper maintenance of construction machines will be ensured
and the engine oils after filter will be replaced regularly.
When the machinery is not in use, the engine shall be switched off.
All vehicles will be properly maintained and should have valid PUC
registration. This has to be checked periodically.
During operation phase 33 Trucks/ Month will be expected for
transportation of raw materials as well as finished product.
Flue Gas Emission
Sr.
Stack Attached to
Air pollution Control
No.
Measures
1.

Boiler

Multi-cyclone scrubber

2.

DG Set

Used in case of power


failure

It is a green field project based on chemical reaction for the synthesis of


Formaldehyde. No emission envisaged through the manufacturing
process, hence no stack will be required.
Stack will be required for the boiler to start the reaction and it continues
for six hrs and the cycle will end upto 90 days.
Dust Generation during Storage & Handling
Tarpaulin sheet will be covered on the material during the
transportation. Adequate stockpile height will be maintained. Noise
masks will be provided to all workers.
Evaporation Loss from Storage Tanks
All the storage tanks will be provided with proper dip arrangements
for exhausts/vents and breather valve.
Loading & Unloading of Materials
Loading and unloading of materials from tankers may lead to

Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

10-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sr. No.

Types of Pollution

2.

Water Pollution
Construction
Phase

Operation Phase

Mitigation measures incorporated/ to be provided for the proposed


project
fugitive emissions. To avoid the same, the materials transfer will be
done through fixed piping connections through pumps.
Few raw in barrels which can be unloaded by company personnel,
safety precaution will be followed.

3.

4.

Domestic Effluent
Domestic effluent will be treated through septic tank/soak pit
system. However provision will be made to install portable sewage
treatment plant (STP) to treat the domestic waste will be used for
plantation.
Domestic Effluent
Domestic effluent will be treated through septic tank/soak pit system
Industrial Effluent
Wastewater generted through process will be 50 KL which is going
through to recirculate from RO/Process.
No liquid effluent will be discharged in ground/nearby water body.
Zero Discharge Pattern
This is green project, plant will be running based on Zero discharge
pattern

Noise Pollution
Construction as
well as Operation
Phase

The following measures will be taken to reduce the noise level to


acceptable limits:
All the vibrating parts will be checked periodically and serviced to
reduce the noise generation. Sound producing equipments will be
enclosed in the sound proofing enclosure to give residual sound
pressure level of 75 dB (A).
To minimize the adverse effects on health suitable ear protecting
devices will be provided for working personnel.
To reduce the noise generation during the transportation activities;
the vehicle will be kept periodically serviced and maintained as per
the requirement of latest trend in automobile industry.
The vehicles having PUCs and spark arrestors will only allowed for
the transportation.
Sources of high noise level such as D.G. set etc. will be provided
adequate sound enclosures.
2
The industry will develop greenbelt in 1336 m (33%) within the
industrial premises for the abatement of noise pollution.
Solid & Hazardous Waste
Construction Phase
During construction phase major solid waste generated is
construction and domestic solid wastes. The construction wastes will
be utilized for leveling and road construction in plant premises. About
6.0 Kg/day domestic wastes will be generated and will be used for
composting
About 4.2 Kg/day Gardening waste will be generated and will be
used for composting
Used oil generated from construction machinery will be collected,
stored separately and sold to authorized recyclers.
Operation Phase
Used Oil will be collected in drums and reused for low grade
lubrication of machinery and for rust proofing or sold to registered

Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

10-6

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sr. No.

10.9

Types of Pollution

Mitigation measures incorporated/ to be provided for the proposed


project
recyclers
Packing Materials discarded carboys/ drums/
HDPE barrels will be stored and sold to MPCB authorized
recyclers/vendors.
It may be noted that the company will provide separate storage area
for hazardous waste proposed to be generated from the unit.
The hazardous waste storage area will have RCC flooring and
asbestos roof covering on the top so as to avoid rainwater mixing
with the same. The leachate if any, will be discharged to holding tank
of Effluent Treatment Plant.

CLEANER PRODUCTION

M/s Paramount Chempro anticipates the following re-use /recycling probabilities and shall focus our
attention on these as cleaner production alternatives which are given in Table 10.3.
TABLE 10.3
CLEANER PRODUCTION ASPECTS
Sr. No.
1.

Focus Area
Control of reactants used

2.

Evaporation loss from storage


tanks

3.

Loading / Unloading of
materials

Analysis of flue gas


Use of renewable source of
energy in boiler

Equipment cleaning

House keeping

Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

Probability of incorporation of cleaner production activity


Liquid raw materials will be charged by pumping & closed
loops and dosing will be done by metering system to avoid
fugitive emissions. Dedicated measuring tanks will be
provided for each reactor.
Suitable stoichiometric calculations will be done and followed
to regulate the quantity of reactants to be charged to reaction
vessels in order to avoid use of excess chemicals, which in
turn will minimize organic load in the effluent.
Storage tanks will be provided with proper arrangements for
exhausts/vents and breather valve.
Vapour recovery system will be installed for process/storage
tank vents.
Loading / unloading of materials from tankers may lead to
fugitive emissions. To avoid the same, the material transfer
will be done through fixed piping connections.
Flue gas analysis will be carried out at regular intervals and
based on the results; necessary actions will be taken.
Cost of production of heating energy will be reduced as
compared to conventional fuels.
It is eco-friendly source of fuel as compared to conventional
source of energy.
The use of bio-mass for power generation enhances the
economy of the industry and plant.
Use of these fuels will be very helpful in meeting the future
and present power demand for India because India has very
high availability of these fuels. Hence power production by
these fuels in India is very beneficial and good at present
and as well as for future.
Use of high pressure hoses for equipment washing / cleaning
to reduce wastewater generation.
It would not be out of place to mention that we will put our
continuous efforts to maintain and improve housekeeping
practices will be followed as presented below:
Follow safe work procedures and the requirements of the law.
10-7

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Sr. No.

Focus Area

Probability of incorporation of cleaner production activity


Keep work areas clean.
Keep aisles clear.
Keep exists and entrances clear.
Keep floors clean, dry and in good condition.
Stack and store items safely.
Use proper waste containers.
Store all materials in approved, clearly labeled containers in
designated storage areas only.
Keep sprinklers and fire extinguishers Clear
Clean up spills and leaks off any type quickly and properly.
Fix or report broken or damage tools, equipment etc.
Keep lighting sources clean and clear.
Follow maintenance requirements.

The above are the primary focus areas that are envisaged to study. Further focus areas will be
identified on continuous basis
10.10 RAIN WATER HARVESTING
Rainwater harvesting can serve as a solution to the water problem in the water crises area by
capturing the runoff. Rainwater harvesting helps in utilizing the primary source of water to prevent the
runoff from going into sewer or storm drains, thereby serving dual purpose making water available for
future use and reducing the load on treatment plants as well as other service lines.
Recharging water into the aquifers help in improving the quality of existing groundwater through
dilution. Rainwater harvesting comprises of two components:
Storing rainwater in groundwater reservoirs for beneficial use in future
Rain water harvesting for artificial recharge of ground water.
Amount of water that can be effectively harvested is called the harvesting potential of the site.
Efficiency of rainwater harvesting and recharging groundwater can be increased by following
methods:
Use vegetated swales and depressions to reduce runoff.
Reduce and filter surface runoff.
Catch drainage all along the periphery of plot to prevent surface runoff.
Rain water harvesting structures will be provided to recharge the groundwater resources in the
region. The run-off water from the roof structure and paved areas will be collected through storm
water drainage system and led to rain water harvesting structure. Rain water harvesting scheme is
given in Figure 10.2.
STORM WATER MANAGEMENT
Rainwater runoff comprises of storm water, which flows into both surface water and groundwater.
Proper management of this resource ensures that storm water discharge is free of contamination. A
detailed Storm Water Management Plan will be developed. The plan consists of best management
practices, which include consideration of the following:

Good housekeeping in the above areas.


Conducting routine inspections to ensure cleanliness
Secondary containment and dykes in fuel/oil storage facilities
Preparation of spill response plans, particularly for fuel and oil storage areas.

Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

10-8

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Annum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Provision of silt traps in storm water drains.


Regular inspection and cleaning of storm drains.
Natural Water Drainage Pattern in M/s Paramount chempro is having slope from East to West and
Size of SWD is 300 mm
Rain water Harvesting (RWH)
Peak Rainfall per day = 0.2 mtrs.
Sl.
1.
2.
3.

Description
Terrace Area
Road & Open Space
Landscape
Total

Area (m )
870.45
1178.54
1336.5

Co-Eff
0.90
0.80
0.80

Max. Rain (m/Day)


0.20
0.20
0.20

Volume (m /Day)
156.68
188.55
213.84
559.07

Maximum quantity of rainwater that can be harvested = 559.07 m3 per day.


No. of Recharge Pits: 2 (3m x 3m x 3m)

Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

10-9

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur,
Maharashtra

1200

2500

200

AS PER
SITE

1200


3.0 M. DIA

D (EFFECTIVE DEPTH)
3.5 M.

1.2 M

2000

3.0 M. DIA

FIGURE 10.2: RAIN WATER HARVESTING SYSTEM

Chapter 10 - Environmental Management Plan

10-10

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

10.11 BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION


Peacock or Indian peafowl one of the birds reported from the study area falls under the scheduled-I
category. The rest of the fauna reported from the study area, falls under either in schedule-II,
Schedule-III or Schedule-IV of the Wild Life Protection Act 1972. Few of them like Nilgai and Wild
Boar has become threat to the farmers as they are invading their cops very frequently in Northwest
part this region. Hence conservation measures are not provided for these animals.
Conservation Measures for Peacock or Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) Schedule I bird
species
A Indian peafowl or Peacock or Mor (Pavo cristatus) is a large pheasant justifiably declared as the
National Bird of India in 1963 due to its flagship value founded on its glorious position in mythology
and its widespread distribution and grandeur. In India, it is given the utmost protection by inclusion in
Schedule I of Indian Wildlife Act, 1972. Being a wide spread species, apart from the various urban
habitats, it is also found in agriculture fields, along streams with good vegetation and close to human
habitations in a semi-feral condition (Johnsgard 1986). In the present study area, these species have
been confirmed from North West part of the study area, various habitats located near the village
periphery subsisted near Degma Reserve Forest.
Appearance
Male peacock has a spectacular glossy green long tail feathers that may be more than 60 percent of
the birds total body length. These feathers have blue, golden green and copper colored ocelli (eyes).
The long tail feathers are used for mating rituals like courtship displays.
The feathers are arched into a magnificent fan shaped form across the back of the bird and almost
touching the found on both sides. Females do not have these graceful tail feathers. They have the fan
like crest with whitish face and throat, chestnut brown crown and hind neck, metallic green upper
breast and mantle, white belly and brown back rump and tail. Their primaries are dark brown.
Study Approach
Since the buffer zone of the proposed site reported with Schedule I species Pavo cristatus commonly
known as peacock, a systematic study was conducted to assess their status in term of movements
and habitat use of the species. At first, a detailed biological survey of the proposed project site along
with MIDC, Butibori Industrial area considered as core zone and buffer zone (10 km radius from
periphery of the Industry) was carried out to understand the status distribution of the species in the
study area. Also, questionnaire survey was carried out to understand the recent status of peacock
sightings and their movements.
Primary survey along with consultative approach with villagers was followed to study the wild fauna.
Villagers from Mandva, Borgaon, Katandhara, Saongi, Nanhi, Kirmiti villages were interviewed
randomly. The conclusion of the survey discussed the potential sightings & habitat use, and
movement and food habits of peacock in the study area.
Sightings and Habitat Use
In core zone (Project site & MIDC Butibori Industrial area), no any peacock was sighted/reported.
However, direct sightings of the peacock were observed near villages in the vicinity of Degma
Reserve Forest which is about 8.9 Km in (NW) direction from the project site. The habitats of
Peacock were observed in Degma Reserve Forest, nearby villages and associated surround habitats
like agricultural fields and near village water bodies. These species are well adapted to natural village

Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

10-11

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

environment setting. According to the villagers (interview), during day time, they temporarily move
towards the surrounding areas like agriculture hedges, orchards and nearest water bodies for feeding
while during night time roosts on the trees present in vicinity of the human settlements near Degma
RF and also road side trees.
Food and Feeding Habits
Peafowls are omnivores, eating plant parts, flower petals, seed heads, insects and other arthropods,
reptiles and amphibians. In the study area, dense tree canopy cover supports good insect diversity
which is very common food for peafowls.
Threats in the Study Area
In the study area, no any threat was observed for peacock or its habitats. However, habitat
improvement programme is recommended for improvement of population status of this national bird
Peacock.
Habitat Improvement Action Plan
Habitat improvement programme will include plantation of various plant species like, Madhuca indica
(Maha), Mangifera indica (Amba), Lagerstroemia parviflora (Seja), Tamarindus indica (Chinch),
Tectona grandis (Sagaon), Terminalia arjuna (Arjun), Anogeissus laifolia (Dhaora), Anogeissus
pendula (Kardhai), Butea monosperma (Palas), Aegle marmelos (Bel) and other species reported
from the study area should be taken in to priority. In order to improve vegetation cover, it is suggested
to carry out extensive afforestation program in different phases. These species will help to provide
habitat for faunal species, and also increase the species diversity and maintain the naturalness of the
surrounding area.
Seed distribution among the villagers: During this habitat improvement programme, the seeds of
local fruit bearing trees like Mango, Jamun, Sitafal will be distributed in the various villages of the
study area. Compost packets will be also provided at the intervals of the every six months by the
proponent (in consultation of forest department).
Water feeling in the existing water bodies during summer: Water will be filled in the existing
(selected by forest department) water bodies through water tankers (six numbers in each water
body).
Inference - Buffer Zone as a Peacock Habitat
Present survey of the peafowl in the buffer zone of the project site shows that, peafowl is well
adapted within the RF as well as fringes of forest of the study area. However, the following points can
give an insight on the overall status of peafowl in the study area and thereby plan for better
management strategies related to proposed project activities.
Local residents of the study area were well aware of the movement, pattern of peafowl in their
surrounding habitats.
Peafowl uses agriculture and various rural habitats as a feeding ground during day time while
during night time they take shelter on the trees as well as on the roof of the houses. It clearly
indicates peafowl normally uses ecosystems or habitats adjacent to village.
From the above said facts, it can be inferred that, some villages of the buffer zone provide
roosting and feeding ground for the peafowl, while core zone do not have potential habitat for
roosting or feeding ground for peacock. Therefore, it has been visualized that, the proposed
project will not have any significant impact on peacock in terms of their normal movements and
Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

10-12

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

other activities. However, it is necessity to take some management options like habitat
improvement in the villages located in the immediate vicinity of the project site.
So, habitat improvement programme (plantation of recommended and local plant species) will be
undertaken in (consultation of forest department) different villages located in the close vicinity of
the project area. Under this programme, saplings will be distributed in the nearby villages with the
consultation of the local forest department.
In consultation of the forest department, following conservation measures will be adopted for peacock
conservation:
1. Habitat improvement programme in different villages will be undertaken in the buffer zone area for
shelter and roosting of peacocks. This will be achieved by plantation of local varieties of the tree
species near villages in buffer area. Plantation will also be carried in some forest patches
identified by local forest department.
2. School level awareness programmes will be conducted for conservation of peacocks by
organizing competitions during Wildlife Week and Van Mahotsav celebrations.
Further Suggestions/recommendations
Restricting use of pollutants in their habitat.
Stopping the increased vehicle pollution, wildlife road fatalities and damage to precious
habitat by people to start movement towards these areas.
To carry annual census research projects to ecology and habitat use by peacock.
By making provision of veterinary care and cages for injured or sick deformed birds.
The proponent has proposed a sum of Rs. 1,30,000/- for the Peacock conservation plan under the
following heads up to three years in consultation of local forest department.
EXPENDITURE BUDGET FOR FIVE YEARS FOR PEACOCK CONSERVATION
S. No.

st

nd

rd

th

th

Work or
1 year
2 year
3 year
4 year
5 year
Budget
Activity
(INR)
1.
Plantation approximately 200 tree/year plants of local plant species for five years
Amount Rs. 12,000
12,000
12,000
12,000
12,000
12,000
60,000/2.
Small water hole 10 in numbers in 5 villages situated in close vicinity of the Degma RF
Amount Rs
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
6,000
30,000/3.
Awareness programme for Peacock conservation will be scheduled in a year in five schools
every year
Amount Rs. 5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
25,000
4.
Water Supply and seed distribution
Villages
Mandva
Borgaon
Katandhara
Saongi
Nanhi
Kirmiti
Amount Rs. 3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
15,000
Total Budget
Rs.1,30,000
(One Lakhs and Thirty Thousand Rupees)

1. Plantation- approximately 400 tree/year up to five years.


Plants species / verities will be suggested by the local forest department and plant saplings will be
distributed in project villages as per the above mentioned schedule (year wise)
2. Small water hole 10 in number in 5 villages situated in close vicinity of the Degma Reserve
Forest
Water hole will be constructed at the area where Peacocks movement is available (nearby habitat).
Location of water holes will be suggested by the local forest department in consultation with the
Grampanchayt (Sarpanch).
Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

10-13

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

3. Awareness programme for Peacock conservation will be scheduled in a year in five


schools every year.
During awareness programme following activities will be arranged at the various village level schools
as mentioned above (year wise),
Essay writing on Peacock
Drawing competition (Peacock picture)
4. Water Supply and seed distribution
Water will be supplied during summer season to the various villages as mentioned above (year wise).
Water will be catered through tankers in the village ponds or water holes. Seeds of local plant varities
such as Madhuca indica (Maha), Mangifera indica (Amba), Lagerstroemia parviflora (Seja),
Tamarindus indica (Chinch), Tectona grandis (Sagaon), Terminalia arjuna (Arjun), Anogeissus laifolia
(Dhaora), Anogeissus pendula (Kardhai), Butea monosperma (Palas), Aegle marmelos (Bel), Annona
squamosal (Sitaphal), Sygygium cumini (Jabhul), etc. will be distributed above mentioned villages (as
per year wise schedule).
10.12 BUDGETARY ALLOCATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN
The management of the unit will keep adequate funds aside to meet with regular expenses for the
environmental control measures. The budgetary allocation towards pollution control arrangements for
the proposed project is presented in the Table 10.4.
TABLE 10.4
BUDGETARY ALLOCATION TOWARDS ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGMENNT PLAN
Sr. No.

Description

1
2
3
4
5
6

ETP (Pretreatment)
Rain Water Harvesting
Landscaping/plantation
Solid Waste Management
Health Care & Safety
Environmental Monitoring plan
Total

Chapter 10- Environmental Management Plan

Capital Cost
Proposed
6.00
0.60
2.00
1.00
1.50
7.50
18.6

Recurring Cost
0.600
0.06
0.20
0.10
0.15
0.75
1.86

10-14

CHAPTER -11
SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

11.0 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS


The proposed project will be located at plot no. C 6, in MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist. Nagpur, Maharashtra in 4050 sq. m. area for the manufacturing of organic chemical Formaldehyde.
The total capacity is 24000 MTA.
The site is selected based on the resources availability like water, raw materials, transportation etc.
The land acquired is in the notified industrial area and therefore no change in land use pattern is
envisaged. The organic chemicals manufacturing is also based on the need of the products and
market availability. The raw materials will be transported through the existing network. The product
will be manufactured based on the green chemistry concept so that minimum emission and
wastewater generation will produce during the manufacturing process. The details regarding process,
water requirement, wastewater generation, emissions and solid and hazardous waste generation are
described in Chapter 3 & 4 subsequently.
The baseline data to know the existing status of the environment with respect to Air, Noise, Water,
Land, Biological and Social environment aspects are described in Chapter 3. The proposed daily
water requirement will be about 165.11 m3/day. The project does not involve groundwater extraction;
water will be sourced from MIDC, Butibori. The gaseous emission will be marginal in the form of
PM10, SO2, NOx, VOCs based on the manufacturing process. Solid wastes generated through
process wise will be segregated and disposed as per applicable norms. Hazardous wastes in the
form of spent oil, empty barrels, etc. will be recycled through authorized vendors.
The hazardous waste generation will be handled as per hazardous waste management rule 2008.
There will not be any impact on the biological environment, since the plant location is within the
notified industrial area. Socio-economically there will be positive impact in the form of economic
growth, employment and other developmental activities due to project. Marginal negative impacts are
envisaged due to the influx of people and stress on the local people. The anticipated impact and
mitigation measures are suggested and detailed in Chapter 4.
The post project monitoring programme is also suggested in length for the implementation of the
management plan suggested during the operation phase. The technology adopted for the synthesis
of the product with green chemistry concept is also highlighted with the site selection criteria in the
subsequent chapters.
The benefit of the project will generate economic growth through export and generating foreign
exchange to increase the economy of the country and also availability of the product in the cheaper
rate to the locals, as per their needs is also presented in the report with cost benefit analysis. The risk
assessment, disaster management plan, corporate social responsibility (CSR), Corporate
responsibility for environment pollution (CREP) with budgetary provision and HSE policy of the
company is also described in the EIA report.
In view of the possible exposure of the operations to VOCs/ Hydrocarbons and other volatile solvents
and heat radiation at the work place, a properly scheduled periodic diagnostic and health checkups
shall be undertaken for the employees, especially for operators and lower level workers engaged at
the critical work places. If required, based on the health records, suitable rotation of duties for workers
may be implemented at critical work to use. Potential hazards, safety procedures, emergency
measures etc. shall be deployed at suitable locations at all workplaces to mitigate occupational
hazards.
The environment cell headed by a senior executive who will report to the head of the department. The
environment cell consists of environmental professions with experience in various aspects of
environmental management ranging for 7 years to 10 years. This cell to be set up during the
Chapter 11- Summary and Conclusions

11-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

construction of plant under management and has adequate expertise and competency in handling
and implementing the environment management systems and practices. The environment cell will
monitor and measure the environment performance of the company.
The environment cell is responsible for implementing and maintaining environment management
systems in the whole plant area which includes ambient air quality monitoring, meteorological
observations, check emission wise level measurements, treated effluent characteristics, controlling
ground water pollution from leachates, greenbelt development and 3rd party environmental audit etc.
Risk assessment was carried out for plant activities in operations under abnormal conditions. MCA
(Maximum Credible Accident) analysis was worked out for all various wind velocities and atmospheric
stability classes to estimate the maximum effective distances in case of heat radiation, toxic releases,
vapour cloud explosive etc. A list of probable or potential accidents of the process units under
operation arising due to use, storage of handling of the hazardous as materials are examined to
establish their credibility, mitigation measures are recommended to tackle the emergencies. Disaster
management plan (DMP) has been delineated including the roles and responsibilities of key persons.
The plant does not have much pollution involved under routine operations. There may be risk only
under extreme conditions which the project authority will be capable of handling through its
emergency. Disaster management plan (DMP) is delineated including the roles and responsibilities of
key persons. The plant does not have much pollution involved under routine operations. There may
be risk only under extreme conditions which the project authority will be capable of handling through
its emergency responses procedures and disaster management plan as per the guidelines imposed
upon to safe guard the project.
Conclusion:The proposed project is environmentally, technically and economically feasible with respect
to followings.

All activities are confined to notified industrial area and minimum possible emission is allowed to
enter the environment. Thus environment will not be adversely affected in any way.
Wastewater will be pre-treated in full-fledged primary treatment plant. Primarily treated water will
be sent to CETP Butibori.
The development of green belt and plantation will help to attenuate the noise levels and restrict air
pollution and will increase the aesthetics.
Apart from this, the environmental management plan delineated may help to reduce pollution by
implementation.
The enterprise social commitment policy (formerly CSR) will work further to bring out the
development of the surrounding villages and thus area and quality of life of people will be
improved.
The cost of environmental control and monitoring measures are computed and provision for
capital & recurring is made by the management.

Concluding Remarks:
Thus it can be concluded on a positive note that after the implementation of the mitigation measures,
Environmental Management and Monitoring Plans as enumerated above the normal operation of M/s.
Paramount Chempro will have no significant impact on environment and the project will be
benefitted to local people to some extent with an economic growth in state/ country level.

Chapter 11- Summary and Conclusions

11-2

CHAPTER -12
DISCLOSURE OF CONSULTANTS

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

12.0

DISCLOSURE OF CONSULTANTS

12.1

INTRODUCTION

Anacon established in 1993 as an analytical testing laboratory and now a leading Environmental
Consultancy firm backed by testing lab for environment and food in Central India region. The lab is
well equipped with basic infrastructural facilities and manpower. We are rendering our services in this
field to various industries since last 20 years. We are a group of experienced former Scientists from
the Government Institutions and recognized by Ministry of Environment & Forests, New Delhi for
carrying out environmental Studies & accredited by Quality Council of India (QCI) for conducting
Environmental studies vide 44th NABET Accreditation Committee Meeting for Re-Accreditation held
on Mar 04, 2015 as category A consultant organization in 14 Sectors, viz. Mining projects, River
Valley, Hydel, Drainage and Irrigation projects, Thermal Power Plants, Coal Washeries, Mineral
beneficiation including pelletisation, Metallurgical Industries, Cement Plants, Petro-chemical
complexes, Synthetic Organic Chemical Industries, Oil & gas transportation pipeline, Isolated
storage & handling of hazardous chemicals, Highways, Railways, transport terminals, mass
rapid transport systems, Building and large construction projects and Townships and Area
development projects.
Our organization is also certified by ISO 9001:2008 and 14001:2004, OHSAS 18001:2007 & our Lab
division is accredited by National Accreditation Board for Testing & Calibration Laboratories
(NABL, Govt. of India) for Chemical, Biological & Mechanical Testing vide certificate No. T1550, T-1826 & T-2344 respectively for 900 parameters for Water, Food & Agricultural
products, Cereals, Pulses, Bakery products, Spices & Condiments, Milk & Dairy products &
Chemical Testing of Ores & Minerals, Coal/Coke & Cosmetic products. We are also approved by
'Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS). We are recognized by Indian Bureau of Mines (IBM) as a RQP for
preparation of Mine Plan / Scheme. We are pleased to inform you that we have received MSME
National Award 2010 for Outstanding Entrepreneurship Performance on 2nd Sept. 2011 at
Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi.
We are also working for various industries in the sectors of Steel, Cement, Power, Distilleries, Textile
and Pharmaceuticals. Our activities are spread in the states of Assam, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand,
Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Orissa & Maharashtra. Our esteemed client groups include many large
scale industries from private as well as the Public Sector Units. National Productivity Council,
BALCO, MECON, TATA STEEL, LAFARGE, GRASIM, Ultra Tech Cement Ltd., RAYMONDS, LUPIN,
Ranbaxy, GAIL, Seagram & Sagar Distilleries and Sponge Iron are our major clients. To know more
about our Group and the assignments completed please visit us at www.anaconlaboratories.com.
We have expanded and commissioned laboratory at Butibori Food Park, Nagpur at Plot Nos. FP 34,
35 equipped with highly sophisticated imported equipments, like GC MSMS, LC MSMS (both triple
quad), HPLC, ICP, AAS, UVVis, FTIR etc. for chemical analysis for the samples viz. Water, Air,
Chemical, Fertilizer, Mineral, Metal, Coal, Food, Agricultural Products, Pesticides, Insecticides, Ores,
etc.,
We have successfully carried out studies related to Air, Noise, Water, Waste Water, Hazardous
Waste, Land Environment, Ecology, Risk & Hazard management and Socio-economy as a part of
EIA studies of various industries. We have also carried land use and land cover studies based on the
satellite imageries.
Our operations are spread over in six different states in Central India region with branches at
Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Odisha, Maharashtra and Delhi.

Chapter 12- Disclosure of consultants

12-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

12.2

CREDENTIALS OF TESTING LAB

Our laboratory is registered with following Govt. departments for providing technical services in the
field of environment. The registration numbers are as follows;
1. Recognized by Ministry of Environment & Forests (MoEF) vide Notification No. D.L-33004/99
dt.24.10.2007 under EPA. http://moef.gov.in/legis/env/so1811e.pdf & subsequent renewal wide
notification SO 21 (E) dtd. 3rd January 2014.
2. National Accreditation Board for Testing & Calibration Laboratories (NABL) has granted us
Accreditation vide Certificate No.T-01550 w.e.f. 04. 10.2014.
3. National Accreditation Board for Testing & Calibration Laboratories (NABL) has granted us
Accreditation vide Certificate No.T-1826 w.e.f. 04. 10.2014
4. National Accreditation Board for Testing & Calibration Laboratories (NABL) has granted us
Accreditation vide Certificate No.T-2344 w.e.f. 04. 10.2014.
5. Approved by Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) for ISI mark certification vide No. CL/CQAPD/OSL
(7124116) dt.16.12.2011 for package drinking water, milk and its products.
6. Authorised by Food Safety & Standards Authority of India under FSS Act.
7. ISO 9001:2008 vide Registration No. 44 100 124446-E3, ISO14001:2004 vide registration No.44
104 124446-E3 and OHSAS 18001:2007 vide registration No. 44 116 124446-E3.
8. Accredited as EIA Consultant Organization under NABET-QCI, vide 44th NABET Accreditation
Committee Meeting for Re-Accreditation held on Mar 04, 2015 as category A consultant
organization in 14 Sectors.
9. Mah. Govt.WQM2003/PK26(2)PP12 Dt.1.9.2004 Drinking water quality monitoring
10. Mah. Govt.JSP 2004/PK3715 PP11Dt.28.04.2004 Hydrogeological survey
11. RQP/NGP/328/2005/B dt.01.02.2005 Indian Bureau of mines for preparation of mine plan, mine
closure plan.
12. SPCB, Odisha No.3091 dt.13.02.2008
13. RSPCB, empanelment of environment consultant & analytical laboratory in continuation to
Boards circular no. F.14 (3) Corres/RPCB/Plg/3491-3514 dt.14.12.2009 & Dt.25.3.2010 as
testing lab under EPA & Env. Consultant.
14. RSPCB recognition of laboratory for Air pollution studies vide notification dated May 20, 2009 and
published in Rajasthan Gazette Extraordinary dated June 22, 2009
For the organizational statutory requirement the registration numbers are as follows;
1. Company Law Board Registered
2. Provident Fund Registered
3. Professional tax Registered
4. ESIC Registered
5. Service Tax Registered
6. Income Tax - Registered
7. MSMED Registered

Chapter 12- Disclosure of consultants

12-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

12.3

SERVICES OFFERED

Air
(Monitoring / Survey / Modeling etc., Pl.
specify)
Water : Surface, sea, inland & ground water
(Monitoring / Survey / Modeling etc., Pl.
specify) Geohydrological Survey
Soil
(Analysis, Remediation, Salt water intrusions,
Water Harvesting etc)
Plant
(Effect of pollution, Treatment Technologies,
Pollution Indicators etc.)
Assessment
&
impact
studies
on
Biodiversity (Flora and Fauna)
Municipal
Solid
Wastes
(Analysis, Management Handling, Storage,
Transportation, Treatment and Disposal, Site
Identification,
remediation,
Development/
Evaluation of Technology etc.)

Hazardous Wastes (Quantification, Site


Assessment, Designing / Monitoring of
Treatment
Facilities,
Technology
Assessment etc., Pl. specify)

Noise
(Monitoring/Survey, Modeling etc)
Bio-Medical Wastes (Quantification, Site
Assessment, Designing / Monitoring of
Treatment
Facilities
Tech. Assessment etc., Pl. Specify)
Hazardous Chemicals (Site assessment,
Inspection of Storages,
Major Accident
Hazards,
Preparation / assessment of Safety Report, risk
assessment
/
Onsite / offsite Emergency Plan preparation
etc.)
Plastic Wastes
(Management, recycling/reuse technology
evaluation etc.)
Electronic
Waste
(Management,
recycling/reuse, technology evaluation etc.)
Environmental
Education/Awareness
(Projects
approved/
grants
received
/campaigns carried out etc.)

Chapter 12- Disclosure of consultants

Yes - Stack and Ambient Air Quality Monitoring, Survey /


Modeling as per MoEF requirements. Specific gas
monitoring like PM 10, PM 2.5,HC, CO, O2, CO2 & VOCs
using state of art microprocessor based portable kits.
Yes - Monitoring of Water Environment in EIA projects,
hydrogeological survey and water shed development.
Yes Monitoring of land environment in EIA projects.

Yes - The effect of pollutant from various industrial sectors


has been evaluated in terrestrial ecology of EIA project.
Yes Studies on biodiversity has been reported in EIA
projects.
Yes National Productivity Council is utilizing our services for
monitoring and analysis of solid waste samples, which
includes sampling and analysis of solid waste samples.
Anacon lab can undertake the consultancy project on solid
waste management for municipal corporation, resorts and
newly developed cities. Preparation of detailed feasibility
report is an expertise of Anacon lab.
Yes The project on development of landfill site including
Engineering
design,
Hydrogeological
studies
and
Environmental quality in respect of the Air, Water and Soil
have been successfully completed for Force Motors (Bajaj
Tempo), Kinetic Motors and Pratibha Syntex, Pithampur,
Indore (MP)
Yes The monitoring of the Noise Environment in the
Impact zone of the industries and in plant have been carried
out by Anacon Lab.
Yes The survey of Hospital waste management have been
carried out in few cases.
Yes The storage of the hazardous chemicals have been
assessed in respect of fugitive emissions and risk
assessment for Pharmaceutical Industries at Lupin,
Mandideep, Bhopal (M.P.). Four dumping sites developed
maxi cap 8000 Tons for BALCO, Korba, Chhattisgarh.
Yes On the similar line of solid waste management,
studies on the plastic waste management could be
undertaken by Anacon Laboratories Pvt. Ltd.
No
Yes - Conducted Workshop at Raipur on 14.2.04 Theme Latest Trends in Mining Technical and Legislative
requirements, 67 participants attended. ; Conducted several
Environment Awareness programs for PCB on different
topics and also at Educational institutions/P.G. Departments.
College students along with HOD have visited Anacon
Laboratories Pvt. Ltd., for Educational tour. Anacon
Laboratories Pvt. Ltd., has participated as a Key participant
at CII seminar in the field of mining industries at Raipur Dt.
22.03.2006.

12-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Environmental
Impact
Assessment
(EIAs carried out/ sector wise expertise in EIA/
clearances
obtained from MoEF / State Government etc )

Yes - Successfully completed 105 EIA studies and 48 EIA


presented before MoEF & environmental clearance is
granted; remaining 57 presented at State level & the
environmental clearance is granted, till end of 2013.

Environmental Audit/s (Details of the audits


conducted along with client list and Purposes
of such audits)
Energy
Audits
/
Water
Audits
(Expertise available, list of the clients and
details on such audits)
Environmental Planning & Management
(Projects undertaken/ expertise for actual field
implementation of the EMP)

Yes for various types of Industries.


Conducted water audits for 17 Reserve banks in India

Others
(R&D
Projects)
(State briefly the other activities of your
organization
and
the
success
Stories, if any)

12.4

Yes - Energy Audit for L & T Hirmi, Raipur on STP to


conserve energy. In this exercise saving of the 40 % energy
is suggested.
Yes - The special efforts have been put up by Anacon for
Seagram Distilleries Pvt. Ltd., and Sagar Industries &
Distilleries Pvt. Ltd., Nashik for planning and implementation
of EMP. Other projects also have been executed on
Environmental Planning and Management.
Yes 1.Conducted feasibility studies for pyrite recovery
plant for 1000 TPD Cap for GHCL Lignite mine to reduce
Sulphur from 7 % to 2 %
2. Identification of route cause for river bed drying (300 m
width) for Lafarge, Raipur

FACILITIES

Anacon offer vide range of services in indoor and outdoor monitoring and analytical characterization
in the field of Environment. Further, it is ably supported by highly skilled and experienced team of
professionals in the fields of Science, Engineering, Ecology, Meteorology, Social Planning, Geo &
Hydro-geology, and Environmental Planning.
Besides the regular monitoring equipment such as Respirable Dust Samplers, PM 2.5 Automatic
Weather Monitoring Stations, Stack Monitoring Kits, Personal Samplers, Noise Meters, Portable
Water Kits etc, the other major specialized equipment include:
Anacon Laboratories has well equipped with sophisticated instrument such as Thermo ICAP 6300
ICP UK make OES Radial View Spectrometer with Standard Gas System for analysis of heavy
metals, required for the analysis of water (130 parameters as per various categories of IS standards
for water ), waste water & Hazardous waste. + Gas Chromatograph.
We have expanded and commissioned biggest state of art Environment and Food testing laboratory
in Central India region at Butibori Food Park, Nagpur at Plot Nos. FP 34, 35 equipped with highly
sophisticated imported equipments, like GC MSMS, LC MSMS (both triple quad), HPLC, ICP, AAS,
UVVis, FTIR etc. for chemical analysis for the samples viz. Water, Air, Chemical, Fertilizer, Mineral,
Metal, Coal, Food, Agricultural Products, Pesticides, Insecticides, Ores, etc., kindly visit us at
www.anaconlaboratories.com.
Anacon Laboratories has established the facilities for Ambient Air Quality by using US Make
Meteorological Station and High Volume Sampler. Stack Monitoring is also undertaken. The
methodology for estimation of SO2, NOx, SPM, PM10, P.M.2.5 has been established along with project
specific pollutant e.g. HM, CO, O3, CO2 VOC, HC etc.

Chapter 12- Disclosure of consultants

12-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

12.5

QUALITY SYSTEMS

12.5.1 National Accreditation Board for Testing & Calibration Laboratories (NABL) has granted us
Accreditation vide Certificate No.T-01550 w.e.f. 04.10.2014.
12.5.2 National Accreditation Board for Testing & Calibration Laboratories (NABL) has granted us
Accreditation vide Certificate No.T-1826 w.e.f. 04.10.2014.
12.5.3 National Accreditation Board for Testing & Calibration Laboratories (NABL) has granted us
Accreditation vide Certificate No.T-2344 w.e.f. 04.10.2014.
(NABL for 900 parameters)
12.6

ACHIEVEMENTS

1.

Anacon laboratory recognized under Environment Protection (EP) Act by GOI in 2007,
Environment Division with its best mind power and industrial knowledge competency that
allows it to compare with the standards set by GOI as a Competent Organization.

2.

Anacon has organized 10 days training program for the FDA officials, Government of
Maharashtra from 16.08.2010 to 27.08.2010 on newly announced Food Safety & Standards
Act, 2011

3.

Anacon has received MSME National Award 2010 for Outstanding Entrepreneurship
Performance in service sector on 2nd Sept. 2011 at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi.

4.

Anacon has signed MOU with Nagpur University, Nagpur to Promote Academic and Research
Cooperation in Feb2012. Under this program Post Graduate i.e. post M.Sc., M. Tech students
professional training programs and R&D projects are undertaken on regular basis to meet
Industry Academia requirements for human resource development.

5.

Dr. (Mrs.) Sugandha Garway, Director, ANACON Laboratories Pvt. Ltd. has been selected on
the panel of the National food standards harmonization / development process for our country
by Food Safety Authority of India.

6.

Anacon has signed the MOU dtd. 26th Dec. 2012 for soil testing for a period of two years from
Agriculture Department, Government of Chhattisgarh, season wise soil samples are collected
for each farm and analyzed, fertilizer dosing is advised on appropriate time in order to
increase crop yield and Soil health cards are issued to every farmer of different districts of
Chattisgarh.

7.

Anacon has executed the work of water Quality monitoring to maintain overall residual
chlorine in the entire city of Nagpur for period from 16.06.2007 to 31.01.2012 and in the period
Anacon team has worked sincerely to the best of our ability by utilizing all Technical expertise
to the entire satisfaction of the Municipal authorities concerned. Anacon has delivered
consistent results from last 5 years as a result which water borne deceases i.e. jaundice &
gastro have been reduced to the extent of 70 %. Nagpur Municipal Corporation is leading in
India for successful implementation of 24 x 7 water supply scheme under JNURM scheme,
GOI and Anacon contributed for improving water quality in the entire city of Nagpur. Anacon
has also designed & developed dedicated website for tracking the Water quality of the city.

8.

Anacon has executed the work of "Source apportionment studies "of National Environmental
Engineering Research Institute (NEERI), Nagpur vide Order No. Outsource/S.A (APC)/2007GL dt.22.01.2008 & Order No. Outsource/S.A (APC)/2007-GL dt.02.05.2008 for 236 Air Dust
Samples for 33 elements using ICPA instrument, all results submitted as per Internationally

Chapter 12- Disclosure of consultants

12-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

approved procedures and standards, and also Quality Assurance & Quality Control (QAQC)
procedures were followed strictly during analysis.
9.

Anacon Lab is executing the project of Rajiv Gandhi Science and Technology commission,
Government of Maharashtra, for" Evaluation studies of water purification systems in 16
schools of the rural areas nearby Nagpur.

10.

Anacon has completed the TRANSIT SURVEY of SEONATH RIVER, M/s Lafarge India Pvt.
Ltd., Sonadih Cement Plant, Raipur (C.G.) Sonadih river width 300 M, bed was drying, route
cause analysis was identified and corrective measures suggested were implemented by
Lafarge and the solution was provided successfully.

11.

Training has been imparted on "Pesticide residue analysis" to scientists of National Test
House, Mumbai & "Coal analysis" to scientists of NALCO, Orissa.

12.

ANACON has signed MOU with Nagpur University & Kada College Ahmednagar to undertake
joint collaborative projects, imparting training to students & staff & to provide incubation centre
for research projects undertaken by academicians.

13.

ANACON has also completed mapping of water quality of 2 districts of Madhya Pradesh.

Chapter 12- Disclosure of consultants

12-6

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Chapter 12- Disclosure of consultants

12-7

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Chapter 12- Disclosure of consultants

12-8

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (80 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra

Chapter 12- Disclosure of consultants

12-9

ANNEXURE I
ToR LETTER

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
Annexure I: ToR Letter

ToR Letter

Annexure-I

AN.I-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
Annexure I: ToR Letter

Annexure-I

AN.I-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
Annexure I: ToR Letter

Annexure-I

AN.I-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
Annexure I: ToR Letter

Annexure-I

AN.I-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
Annexure I: ToR Letter

Annexure-I

AN.I-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
Annexure I: ToR Letter

Annexure-I

AN.I-6

ANNEXURE II
ALLOTMENT LETTER

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-6

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-7

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-8

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-9

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-10

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-11

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-12

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE II Allotment Letter

Annexure-II

AN-II-13

ANNEXURE III
CCOE (PETROLEUM & EXCLUSIVE)

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Anuum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE III CCOE (Petroleum & Exclusive)

Annexure-III

AN-III-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Anuum), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE III CCOE (Petroleum & Exclusive)

Annexure-III

AN-III-2

ANNEXURE IV
ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IV ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

LIST OF INSTRUMENTS USED FOR SAMPLING & ANALYSIS


Sr.
No.

Instrument Name

Make

Model

Parameters

Respirable particulate
sampler

Aero Vironment
Engineers Inc.

RDS- 9000

RPM, SPM, SO2, NOX

2.

Weather Technologies data


acquisition system
microprocessor system for
automatic monitoring of
weather parameters.

Weather
technologies
(India Pvt. Ltd.,
Pune)

WDL 1002

Wind speed, direction,


temperature, relative
humidity, rain gauge &
solar radiation.

3.

Spectrophotometer

Systronics

166

Spectrophotometric
Methods.

4.

Inductive Coupled Plasma


analyser (ICPA- AE 5)

Thermo Electronics
UK

6300

Metal elements in air,


water, soil samples.

5.

Gas Chromatograph

Ashco

Neon Pro

PAH, organic
compounds.

6.

Sound level meter

Lutron, Taiwan

SL 4001

Noise Monitoring

7.

pH Meter

Systronics

361

pH values in water and


soil samples.

8.

Conductivity meter

Systronics

308

Conductivity
measurement in water
samples.

9.

Turbidity Meter

Systronics

132

Turbidity Measurement
in water samples

10.

Flame Photometer

Systronics

128

Sodium Potassium in
Water and Soil analysis.

11.

Ion-selective electrode meter

Thermo Electronics
UK

Orion star

Specific Ions
measurement in Water
and Soil analysis.

Annexure-IV

AN. IV-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IV ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

AIR ENVIRONMENT

Annexure-IV

AN. IV-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IV ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

MONITORED PARAMETERS AND FREQUENCY OF SAMPLING


Parameters
Suspended Particulate Matter
Respirable Particulate Matter
PM2.5
Sulphur dioxide (SO2)
Oxides of Nitrogen (NOX)
Ozone
Carbon Monoxide (CO)

Sampling frequency
24 hourly sample twice a week for Three months
24 hourly sample twice a week for Three months
24 hourly sample twice a week for Three months
24 hourly sample twice a week for Three months
24 hourly sample twice a week for Three months
8 hourly samples for 24 hour twice a week for three months
8 hourly samples for 24 hour twice a week for three months

TECHNIQUES USED FOR AMBIENT AIR QUALITY MONITORING


Sr.
No.

Parameter

Techniques

Technical
Protocol

Minimum
Reportable Value
(g/m3)

Total Suspended
Particulate Matter

Respirable Dust Sampler


(Gravimetric Method)

IS - 5182
(Part IV)

5.0

Respirable
Particulate Matter

Respirable Dust Sampler


(Gravimetric Method)

IS - 5182
(Part IV)

5.0

PM 2.5

Fine particulate sampler using


WINS Impactor with low flow rate
16.7 lpm (Envirotech)

IS - 5182
(Part IV)

5.0

Sulphur Dioxide

Modified West and Gaeke


Method

IS - 5182
(Part II)

4.0

Oxide of Nitrogen

Jacob &Hochheiser Method

IS - 5182
(Part VI)

4.0

Ozone

Spectrophotometer

ASTM
D5011-92

1.0

Carbon Monoxide

Gas Chromatography Method

IS - 5182
(Part X)

12.5

Annexure-IV

AN. IV-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IV ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

Sr.
No.

Parameter

Techniques

Technical
Protocol

Minimum
Reportable Value
(g/m3)

Mercury

ICP-AAS

IS - 5182
(Part - X)

1.0

VOC

Absorption / Adsorption over


Char Coal By GCMS

10

Hydro Carbon
(Methane, Non
Methane & THC)

Flame Ionization Detection

0.05 ppm

SENSITIVITY OF METEOROLOGY MONITORING EQUIPMENT


Sr. No.

Sensor

Sensitivity

Wind Speed Sensor

+ 0.02 m/s

Wind Direction Sensor

+ 3 degrees

Temperature Sensor

0.2 C

Relative Humidity

3%

Rain gauge

0.5mm

Solar radiation

4mV/KW/m2

Annexure-IV

AN. IV-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IV ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

WATER ENVIRONMENT
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP)
FOR WATER AND WASTEWATER SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS
Sr.
No.
1

Parameter

Sample Collection

pH

Electrical
Conductivity
Total Suspended
Solids (TSS)
Total Dissolved
Solids (TDS)
COD

Residual Chlorine

Hardness

Chlorides

Sulphates

10

Sodium, Potassium

11

Nitrates

12

Fluorides

13

Alkalinity

14

Ammonia

15

Hexavalent
Chromium, Cr+6

Grab sampling Polyurithane


Plastic / glass container
Grab sampling Polyurithane
Plastic / glass container
Grab sampling Polyurithane
Plastic / glass container
Grab sampling Polyurithane
Plastic / glass container
Grab sampling Polyurithane
Plastic / glass container
Grab sampling Polyurithane
Plastic / glass container
Grab sampling Polyurithane
Plastic / glass container
Grab sampling Polyurithane
Plastic / glass container
Grab sampling Polyurithane
Plastic / glass container
Polyurithane Plastic / glass
container
Polyurithane Plastic / glass
container
Polyurithane Plastic / glass
container
Polyurithane Plastic / glass
container
Polyurithane Plastic / glass
container
Polyurithane Plastic / glass
container rinse with 1 : 1
HNO3
Polyurithane Plastic / glass
container 1 : 1 HNO3

3
4

16

Sample
Size
50 ml

Storage / Preservation

50 ml

On site analysis

100 ml

Refrigeration, can be
stored for 7 days
Refrigeration, can be
stored for 7 days
Add H2SO4 to pH <2,
refrigeration; 28 days
On site analysis

100 ml
100 ml
50 ml
100 ml

On site analysis

50 ml

Add HNO3 to pH<2,


refrigeration; 6 months
Not required; 28 days

100 ml

Refrigeration; 28 days

100 ml

Not required; 6 months

100 ml

Refrigeration; 48 hrs

100 ml

Not required; 28 days

100 ml

Refrigeration; 14 days

100 ml

Add HNO3 to pH<2,


refrigeration; 28 days
Grab sample;
refrigeration; 24 hrs

100 ml

Heavy Metals ( Hg,


500 ml
Filter, Add HNO3 to pH<2;
Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Zn,
Grab sample; 6 months
Pb, etc.)
Source : Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, Published by APHA,
AWWA, WEF 19th Edition, 1995.

Sr. No.
1
2
3
4
5

ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR WATER AND


WASTEWATER SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS
Parameter
Method
pH
APHA 4500 H+
Colour
APHA 2120 C
Odour
IS : 3025, Part- 4
Temperature
APHA 2550 B
Dissolved Oxygen
APHA 4500 O

Annexure-IV

AN. IV-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IV ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

BOD, 3 day @ 27 C
COD
Electrical Conductivity
Turbidity
Chlorides
Fluorides
Phosphates
Cyanides
NH3 -N
Nitrate NO3-N
NO2-N
Phenolic Compounds
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS)
Total Suspended Solids (TSS)
Total Hardness
Sulphates as SO4
Arsenic
Calcium
Magnesium
Sodium
Potassium
Manganese
Barium
Mercury
Silver
Selenium
Lead
Copper
Cadmium
Iron
Zinc
Nickel
Boron
Coliform Organisms
Total Organic Carbon
Oil and Grease
Pesticides
PAH
Alkalinity as CaCO3

APHA 5210 B
APHA 5220 C
APHA 2510 B
APHA 2130 B
APHA 4500 CI
APHA 4500 F
APHA 4500 P
APHA 4500 CN
APHA 4500 NH3
APHA 4500 NO3
APHA 4500 NO2
APHA 5530 D
APHA 2540 C
APHA 2540 D
APHA 2340 C
APHA 4500 SO4 -2
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3114 B/ APHA 3500 AS
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 CA
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Mg
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Na
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 K
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Mn
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Ba
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Hg
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Ag
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3114 B/ APHA 3500 Se
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Pb
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Cu
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Cd
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Fe
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Zn
APHA 3120 B/ APHA 3500 Ni
APHA 4500 B
APHA 9215 D
APHA 5310 B
APHA 5220 B
APHA 6630 D
APHA 6440 C
APHA 2320 B

GROUND WATER QUALITY STANDARDS


Sr. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Parameter
pH
Color
Taste
Odor
Dissolved Oxygen
Electrical Conductivity
Turbidity
Chlorides

Annexure-IV

Units
Hazen
mg/l
S/cm
NTU
mg/l

Limits of IS : 10500 : 1993


6.5 to 8.5 (NR)
5 (25)
Agreeable
UO
4 minimum
#
5 (10)
250 (1000)

AN. IV-6

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IV ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

Sr. No.
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39

Parameter
Units
Limits of IS : 10500 : 1993
Fluorides
mg/l
1.0(1.5)
Cyanides
mg/l
0.05 (NR)
Nitrate NO3-N
mg/l
45(NR)
Phenolic Compounds
mg/l
0.005
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS)
mg/l
500 (2000)
Total Hardness
mg/l
300(600)
Sulphates as SO4
mg/l
200(400)
Arsenic
mg/l
0.01(NR)
Calcium
mg/l
75(200)
Magnesium
mg/l
30(100)
Sodium
mg/l
#
Potassium
mg/l
#
Manganese
mg/l
0.1(0.3)
Mercury
mg/l
0.001(NR)
Selenium
mg/l
0.01(NR)
Lead
mg/l
0.05(NR)
Copper
mg/l
0.05(1.5)
Cadmium
mg/l
0.01(NR)
Iron
mg/l
0.3(1.0)
Zinc
mg/l
5(15)
Boron
mg/l
1
E.coli
Absent
Coliform Organisms
MPN/100ml
10
Oil and Grease
mg/l
0.1
Pesticides
mg/l
absent
Alkalinity as CaCO3
mg/l
200(600)
Chromium
mg/l
0.05(NR)
Aluminium
mg/l
0.03 (0.2)
Phenolic Compounds
mg/l
0.001(0.002)
Anioionic Detergents
mg/l
0.2(1.0)
Mineral Oil
mg/l
0.01(0.03)
Note : #: Limits not specified, Ag : agreeable, UO : Un- objectionable.
(): Permissible limit in absence of alternative source.
WASTE WATER DISCHARGE STANDARDS

Sr. No.

List of Parameter

Units

Color and Odor

--

2
3

Suspended Solids
Particle size of Suspended
Solids
pH value
Temperature
Oil and grease, Max.

mg/l
--

Standard
(On Land Irrigation)
All efforts should be made to remove
colour and upleasunt odor as far as
pracativable.
200
Shall pass 850 micron IS sieve.

-C
mg/l

5.5 to 9.0
#
10.0

4
5
6

Annexure-IV

AN. IV-7

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IV ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

Sr. No.

List of Parameter

Units

7
8

mg/l
mg/l
mg/l

mg/l
mg/l

#
100.0

mg/l

mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l

0.2
#
#
#
#

mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l

#
#
#
#
#
0.2
#
#

mg/l
mg/l

#
#

29

Total residual chlorine, Max.


Ammonical nitrogen (as N),
Max.
Total Kjeldhal nitrogen (as N),
Max.
Freeammonia (as NH3), Max.
Biochemical Oxygen Demand
(3 days at 27C)
Chemical Oxygen Demand,
Max.
Arsenic (as As), Max.
Mercury (as Hg), Max.
Lead (as Pb), Max.
Cadmium (as Cd), Max.
Hexavalent chromium (as Cr
+6), Max.
Total chromium (as Cr), Max.
Copper (as Cu), Max.
Zinc (as Zn), Max.
Selenium (as Se), Max.
Nickel (as Ni), Max.
Cyanide (as CN), Max.
Fluorides as F
Dissolved phosphates (as P),
Max.
Sulphides (as S), Max.
Phenolic compounds (as
C2,H5,OH), Max.
Radioactive Materials
Alpha Emitters, Max.
Beta Emitters, Max.
Bio-assay test

Standard
(On Land Irrigation)
#
#

mg/1
mC/ml
mC/ml
--

30
31
32
33

Manganese (as Mn)


Iron (as Fe)
Vanadium (as V)
Nitrate nitrogen

mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l

#
10-7
10-7
90% survival of fish after 96 hours in
100% effluent.
#
#
#
#

9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28

Note: 1. # Limits not specified


2. These standards shall be applicable for industries, operations or processes other than
those industries, operations or process for which standards have been specified in
Schedule of the Environment Protection Rules, 1989.

Annexure-IV

AN. IV-8

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IV ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

SOIL ENVIRONMENT
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR SOIL ANALYSIS
Sr. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

Parameter
Grain size distribution
Textural classification
Bulk density
Sodium absorption ratio
pH
Electrical conductivity
Nitrogen
Phosphorus
Potassium
Copper
Iron
Zinc
Boron
Chlorides

Method
Sieve analysis (D 422 63)
Chart developed by Public Roads Administration
Sand replacement, core cutter
Flame colourimetric (D 1428-82)
pH meter (D 1293-84)
Conductivity meter (D 1125-82)
Kjeldahl distillation ( D 3590-84)
Molybdenum blue, colourimetric (D 515-82)
Flame photometric ( D 1428-82)
AAS ( D 1688-84)
AAS ( D 1068-84)
AAS ( D 1691-84)
Surcumin, colourimetric (D 3082-79)
Argentometric (D 512-81 Rev 85)

SOIL ANALYSIS PARAMETER AND UNIT


Sr. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23

Annexure-IV

Parameter
pH (1 : 5 Aq. Extract)
Conductivity (1 : 5 Aq. Extract)
Texture
Sand
Silt
Clay
Bulk Density
Exchangeable Calcium as Ca
Exchangeable Magnesium as Mg
Exchangeable Sodium as Na
Available Pottassium as K
Available Phosphorous as P
Available Nitrogen as N
Organic Matter
Organic Carbon
Water Soluble Chloride as Cl+
Water Soluble Sulphate as SO4
Sodium Absorption Ratio
Aluminium
Total Iron
Manganese
Zinc
Boron

Units
--S/cm
--%
%
%
mg/cc
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
Kg/ ha
Kg/ ha
Kg/ ha
%
%
mg/kg
mg/kg
--%
%
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg

AN. IV-9

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IV ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

STANDARD SOIL CLASSIFICATION


Sr. No.
1

Soil Test
pH

Salinity Electrical Conductivity ( mhos/cm)


(1ppm = 640 mhos/cm)

Organic Carbon (%)

Nitrogen (Kg/ha)

Phosphorus (Kg/ha)

Potash (Kg/ha)

Annexure-IV

Classification
< 4.5 Extremely acidic
4.51- 5.50 Very strongly acidic
5.51- 6.00 moderately acidic
6.01- 6.50 slightly acidic
6.51- 7.30 Neutral
7.31- 7.80 slightly alkaline
7.81- 8.50 moderately alkaline
8.51- 9.0 strongly alkaline
9.01 very strongly alkaline
Upto 1.00 Average
1.01-2.00 harmful to germination
2.01-3.00 harmful to crops
(sensitive to salts)
Upto 0.2 : very less
0.21-0.4 : less
0.41-0.5 medium,
0.51- 0.8: on an average sufficient
>1.0 more than sufficient
Upto 50 very less
51-100 less
101-150 good
151-300 Better
>300 sufficient
Upto 0.2 : very less
16-30 less
31-50 medium,
51-65 on an average sufficient
66-80 sufficient
>80 more than sufficient
0-120 very less
120-180 less
181-240 medium,
241-300 average
301-360 Better
>360 more than sufficient

AN. IV-10

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IV ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS

NOISE ENVIRONMENT
AMBIENT NOISE STANDARDS
Area Code

Category of Area

Industrial Area

Noise Level dB (A) eg


Day time *
Night Time
75
70

Commercial Area

65

55

Residential Area

55

45

Silence Zone **

50

40

Note :*Day time is from 6 am to 10 pm.


** Silence zone is defined as area up to 100-m around premises of hospitals, educational institutions
and courts. Use of vehicle horns, loud speakers and bursting of crackers are banned in these zones.
STANDARD FOR OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE
Total Time of Exposure per Day in Hours
(Continuous or Short term Exposure)
8

Sound Pressure Level in dB (A)

92

95

97

100

3/2

102

105

107

110

115

Never

>115

90

Note:
1. No exposure in excess of 115 dB (A) is to be permitted.

For any period of exposure falling in between any figure and the next higher or lower figure as
indicated in column (1), the permissible level is to be determined by extrapolation on a proportionate
scale.

Annexure-IV

AN. IV-11

ANNEXURE V
DEMOGRAPHIC DETAILS

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE V Demographic Details

ANNEXURE V
DEMOGRAPHIC DETAILS

Sr. No

Taluka

Villages

Hingna

Hingna

Takalghat
(CT)
Sukali

Hingna

Hingna

TOT_
M
6210

TOT_
F
5153

304

TOT_
P
1136
3
1123

P_S
C
250
6
148

P_S
T
644

P_LI
T
8913

P_IL
L
2450

TOT_WO
RK_P
5089

MAINWOR
K_P
4064

MARGWO
RK_P
1025

NON_WO
RK_P
6274

537

P_0
6
139
8
208

586

97

784

339

429

301

128

694

Khapa

304

1128

Gangapur

26

104

650

478

154

54

916

212

380

377

748

50

54

15

19

73

31

37

17

20

67

Hingna

Amgaon

378

1687

846

841

196

512

126

1220

467

761

645

116

926

Hingna

Hingna

Bidganeshpur
Chicholi

665

2399

1345

1054

363

307

265

1720

679

1036

935

101

1363

204

930

480

450

105

120

142

679

251

442

437

488

Hingna

Kohala

52

165

103

62

31

113

58

107

69

45

24

96

Hingna

Murzari

65

267

154

113

55

23

136

131

127

115

12

140

10

Hingna

240

1040

548

492

112

272

215

777

263

532

485

47

508

11

Hingna

Khapri
(Moreshwar)
Pipri

190

761

409

352

112

93

385

552

209

418

339

79

343

12

Hingna

Devali

48

195

101

94

27

180

118

77

127

121

68

13

Hingna

Bhansoli

91

466

236

230

44

56

290

384

82

168

162

298

14

Hingna

Khadki

157

690

359

331

89

10

155

458

232

407

406

283

15

Hingna

Kinhi

42

173

85

88

18

72

114

59

91

90

82

16

Hingna

Mandawa

245

840

483

357

87

167

491

516

324

615

600

15

225

17

Hingna

Lakhamapur

57

223

118

105

28

219

147

76

135

135

88

18

Hingna

Pohi

87

343

186

157

45

15

85

234

109

198

194

145

19

Hingna

Pipardhara

142

603

302

301

71

324

449

154

402

377

25

201

20

Hingna

Katangdhara

140

614

308

306

62

230

431

183

312

308

302

21

Hingna

Kirmati

31

145

71

74

22

12

86

59

77

74

68

22

Hingna

Degma kh

173

732

373

359

73

53

159

456

276

421

135

286

311

23

Hingna

Kanholi

43

209

117

92

26

145

139

70

129

124

80

24

Hingna

Datala

50

208

109

99

22

153

55

108

96

12

100

Annexure-V

No_H
H
2947

AN. V-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE V Demographic Details

Sr. No

Taluka

Villages
Devalipeth

No_H
H
11

TOT_
P
35

TOT_
M
19

TOT_
F
16

P_0
6
3

P_S
C
9

P_S
T
17

P_LI
T
22

P_IL
L
13

TOT_WO
RK_P
22

MAINWOR
K_P
22

MARGWO
RK_P
0

NON_WO
RK_P
13

25

Hingna

26

Hingna

Dhanoli

109

414

220

194

48

346

298

116

156

44

112

258

27

Hingna

Tembhari

423

1556

850

706

297

279

76

1190

366

593

557

36

963

28

Hingna

Waranga

27

14

13

27

19

13

13

14

29

Hingna

Kotewada

291

1496

813

683

149

47

212

1126

370

729

449

280

767

30

Hingna

Gumgaon

1097

5250

2675

2575

547

277

606

4165

1085

2072

2050

22

3178

31

Hingna

Khairi bk

413

1882

973

909

190

227

123

1432

450

972

886

86

910

32

Hingna

Salaidabha

370

1566

828

738

184

46

296

1159

407

701

532

169

865

33

Hingna

Sirul

531

2078

1083

995

311

457

20

1564

514

779

612

167

1299

34

Hingna

Turkmari

185

759

405

354

94

73

79

592

167

307

262

45

452

35

Hingna

Dongargaon

10118

22110

615
8
100
4
398

2845

22618

9504

2568

4454

3525

929

7618

1205

580
8
186
0
510

16009

1231

519
0
165
6
365

31081 10391 18854

6307

1936
2
5765

1583

853

1125

970

155

1311

Sub Total
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)

Annexure-V

Bori (CT)

2896

Borkhedi

556

4147
2
1207
2
2436

Pipardol

11

39

23

16

24

18

21

18

17

21

Vathoda

39

188

90

98

28

79

141

47

103

92

11

85

Jangeshwar

76

373

192

181

54

31

263

110

185

162

23

188

Junapani

15

63

34

29

61

47

16

30

30

33

Dhawalpeth

75

461

216

245

88

298

163

257

238

19

204

Tarsi

112

453

237

216

68

33

271

320

133

282

53

229

171

Deoli (Gujar)

222

947

484

463

112

231

259

674

273

607

598

340

AN. V-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE V Demographic Details

Sr. No

Taluka

45

Nagpur
(Rural)
46
Nagpur
(Rural)
47
Nagpur
(Rural)
48
Nagpur
(Rural)
49
Nagpur
(Rural)
Sub Total
Grand Total

Villages

No_H
H
78

TOT_
P
349

TOT_
M
175

TOT_
F
174

P_0
6
40

P_S
C
0

P_S
T
47

P_LI
T
249

P_IL
L
100

TOT_WO
RK_P
215

MAINWOR
K_P
214

MARGWO
RK_P
1

NON_WO
RK_P
134

Wakeshwar

105

448

235

213

61

37

174

284

164

251

217

34

197

Mohgaon

97

437

221

216

65

32

183

303

134

177

141

36

260

Mhasala

25

15

10

12

11

14

17

17

4596

7721

6274

1447

10570

22283

4292

33188

Khapari
Subhedar
Bothali

4289

18291 9460

14407 59763 31570

8831

2554 2739 2512

28193 7744 8547 8670

13695

44776 14987 26575

Note: HH: Household, TOT_P: Total Population, TOT_M: Total Male, P_06: Population 0-6, M_06: Male 0-6, F_06: Female 0-6, P_SC: Population SC, PST:
Population ST, MAIN_WORK_P: TOT_WORK_P: Total Workers Population, Main workers Population, MARGWORK_P: Marginal Workers, NON_ Work_ P: Non
Workers

Annexure-V

AN. V-3

ANNEXURE VI
INFRASTRUCTURE DETAILS

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE VI Infrastructures Details

ANNEXURE VI
INFRASTRUCTURES FACILITIES
Water

S.
No
1

Village
Name
Sukali

Taluka

Education

Medical

Drain Communi
age
cation
NIL
NIL

Transport
ation
BS,A/MA

Hingna

NIL

2
3

Khapa kh
Gangapur

Hingna
Hingna

GPPS,GPS,PPS,PMS,P
SS,GEC
NIL
NIL

NIL
NIL

TWUT,UCW,HP,R/
C
UCW
UCW,R/C

4
5

Hingna
Hingna

NIL
GPPS,GPS,GMS

NIL
NIL

Amgaon
Bidganeshpur
Chicholi

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS

NIL

7
8

Kohala
Murzari

Hingna
Hingna

GPS
GPPS,GPS

NIL
NIL

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS

NIL

10

Khapri
(Moreshwar)
Pipri

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS

11

Devali

Hingna

12

Bhansoli

13

NIL
NIL

NIL
NIL

PBS
NIL

BTPR,G
KR,FP
GKR,FP
FP

NIL
TWT,CW,HP,R/C

NIL
OKD

NIL
NIL

OKD

NIL

NIL
BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,FP

NIL
ACS

TWT,UCW,HP,T/P/
L
UCW,T/P/L
UCW,HP

NIL
BS,PBS,A/
MA,TX
BS,A/MA

NIL
NIL

NIL
NIL

NIL
BS,A/MA

NIL
NIL

OKD

NIL

BS,A/MA

NIL

TWT,UCW,HP,T/P/
L
TWT,UCW,HP

OKD

NIL

A/MA

FP
BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,FP

GPPS,GPS

NIL

UCW,HP

NIL

NIL

NIL

BTPR,FP

NIL

Hingna

GPPS,GPS

NIL

TWUT,UCW,T/P/L

OKD

NIL

BS

NIL

Khadki

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS

NIL

TWT,UCW,HP

OKD

NIL

PBS,A/MA

14

Kinhi

Hingna

GPPS,GPS

NIL

TWUT,UCW

NIL

NIL

BS

15

Mandawa

Hingna

GPPS,GPS

NIL

TWT,UCW

OKD

NIL

BS,A/MA

16

Lakhamapur

Hingna

GPPS,GPS

NIL

UCW,T/P/L

OKD

NIL

BS

17

Pohi

Hingna

GPPS,GPS

NIL

UCW,HP,R/C

OKD

NIL

TX

BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,G
KR,FP
FP

18

Pipardhara

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS

NIL

TWT,UCW,R/C

OKD

NIL

BS,A/MA

NIL

19

Katangdhar
a
Kirmati

Hingna

GPPS,GPS

NIL

TWT,UCW

OKD

NIL

A/MA

Hingna

NIL

NIL

UCW,HP,R/C

NIL

NIL

NIL

BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,G

20

Annexure-VI

Road

Bank/
Society
NIL
NIL
NIL

ACS

ACS
NIL

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL

NIL
NIL

Power
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
NIL
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,

AN. VI-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE VI Infrastructures Details

S.
No

Village
Name

Taluka

Education

Medical

Water

Drain Communi
age
cation

Transport
ation

21

Degma kh

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS

PHSC

TWT,UCW,HP

OKD

NIL

BS,A/MA

KR,FP
FP

NIL

22

Kanholibara

Hingna

Datala

Hingna

PHC,PHSC,M/CWC,TB,H
A,DP,VH,FWC
NIL

TWT,TWUT,CW,UC
W,HP,T/P/L
UCW,HP,R/C

NIL

23

GPPS,GPS,PPS,GMS,P
MS,GSS,GSSS
GPPS,GPS

NIL

PO,SPO,
P/TO
NIL

BS,A/MA,T
X
TX

BTPR,G
KR,FP
GKR,FP

COM,CO
P,ACS
NIL

24

Devalipeth

Hingna

NIL

NIL

UCW,HP,R/C

NIL

NIL

NIL

FP

NIL

25

Dhanoli

Hingna

GPPS,GPS

NIL

TWUT,UCW

OKD

SPO

BS

NIL

26

Tembhari

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS

NIL

TWT

OKD

NIL

BS,A/MA

BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,FP

27

Waranga

Hingna

NIL

NIL

UCW

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

28

Kotewada

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS

PHSC

OKD

NIL

BS,A/MA

29

Gumgaon

Hingna

PHSC,DP,VH

NIL

PO,P/TO

30

Khairi bk

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS,PMS,G
SS,GSSS
GPPS,GPS,GMS,PMS

NIL

TWT,CW,UCW,HP,
TW/B,R/C
TWT,CW,UCW,HP,
TW/B,R/C
TWT,UCW,HP,R/C

OKD

NIL

BS,A/MA,T
X
BS,A/MA

BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,G
KR,FP
GKR,FP

31

Salaidabha

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS

PHSC

TWT,UCW,HP,R/C

OKD

PO,P/TO

32

Sirul

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS

PHSC

OKD

NIL

33

Turkmari

Hingna

GPPS,GPS,GMS

NIL

TWT,CW,UCW,HP,
TW/B,R/C
TWT,UCW,HP

OKD

34

Dongargaon

Hingna

NIL

NIL

UCW

35

Borkhedi

Nagpur
(Rural)

GPPS,GPS,GMS,GSS

36

Pipardol

NIL

37

Vathoda

38

Jangeshwar

Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)

Annexure-VI

PHC,PHSC,
M/CWC,TB,HA,
DP,VH,FWC
NIL

Road

Bank/
Society

NIL

ACS

Power
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
EAD,EAG
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
EAG

BTPR,FP

COM,CO
P,ACS
NIL

BS,A/MA

FP

ACS

BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,FP

ACS

PO,P/TO

BS,A/MA,T
X
BS,A/MA

NIL

NIL

NIL

BTPR,FP

NIL

TWUT,CW,UCW,H
P

OKD

PO,SPO,
P/TO

BS,RS,A/
MA,TX

BTPR,FP

ACS

ED,EAG,
EC,EA

UCW

NIL

NIL

NIL

FP

NIL

NIL

BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,G
KR,FP

NIL

ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA

GPS

NIL

TWUT,UCW,HP

NIL

NIL

NIL

GPPS,GPS

NIL

TWUT,CW,UCW,H
P

OKD

NIL

BS

NIL

NIL

AN. VI-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE VI Infrastructures Details

S.
No
39

Village
Name
Junapani

40

Dhawalpeth

41

Tarsi

42

44

Deoli
(Gujar)
Khapari
Subhedar
Bothali

45

Wakeshwar

46

Mohgaon

47

Mhasala

43

Taluka

Education

Medical

Water

Transport
ation
NIL

Road

UCW,HP,T/P/L

Drain Communi
age
cation
NIL
NIL

Power

GKR,FP

Bank/
Society
NIL

Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)
Nagpur
(Rural)

GPPS

NIL

GPPS,GPS

NIL

TWUT,UCW,HP

OKD

NIL

BS

GKR,FP

NIL

ED,EAG

GPPS,GPS

NIL

TWUT,UCW,HP

OKD

NIL

TX

BTPR,FP

NIL

ED,EAG

GPPS,GPS,PPS,GMS

NIL

TWT,UCW,HP

OKD

NIL

BS,A/MA

COP

UCW,HP,TW/B

NIL

NIL

BS

BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,FP

PHSC

TWUT,UCW,HP

OKD

NIL

BS

NIL

GPPS,GPS

NIL

TWUT,UCW,HP

OKD

NIL

BS

NIL

ED,EAG

GPPS,GPS

NIL

OKD

NIL

BS

NIL

ED,EAG

NIL

NIL

TWUT,UCW,HP,TW
/B
UCW

NIL

NIL

NIL

BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,G
KR,FP
BTPR,G
KR,FP
FP

ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG,
EC,EA
ED,EAG

GPPS,GPS

NIL

GPPS,GPS

NIL

NIL

NIL

ED,EAG

Note: GPPS: Govt Pre-Primary School, GPS: Govt Primary School, GMS: Govt Middle School, GSS: Govt Secondary School, PPS: Private Secondary School, GSS:
Govt Senior Secondary School, GEC-Govt Engineering College, PHSC: Primary Heallth Sub Centre, MA/CWC: Maternity And Child Welfare Centre, TB:TB Clinic HA:
Hospital Allopathic, DP: Dispensary, VH :Veterinary Hospital, FWC: Family Welfare Centre, TWT: Tap Water-Treated ,TWUT: Tap Water Untreated, CW: Covered
Well, UCW: Uncovered Well, HP :Hand Pump, TW/B: Tube Wells/Borehole, S: Spring, R/C :River/Canal, T/P/L: Tank/Pond/Lake, OKD: Open Kuccha Drainage, PO:
Post Office, SPO: Sub Post Office, P/TO : Post And Telegraph Office, BS: Public Bus Service, PBS: Private bus service, A/MA: Auto/Modified Autos, TX: Taxi, BTPR:
Black Topped (pucca) Road, GKR: Gravel (kuchha) Roads, FP: Foothpath, COM: Commercial Bank, COP :Cooperative Bank, ACS: Agricultural Credit Societies, ED:
Power Supply For Domestic ,EAG: Power Supply For Domestic ,EC: Power Supply For Commercial, EA: Power Supply For All

Annexure-VI

AN. VI-3

ANNEXURE VII
LANDUSE PATTERN

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE VII Landuse Pattern

Sr.no

Village Name

Taluka

Total
Geographical
Area

Forest
Area

ANNEXURE VII
LANDUSE PATTERN
Area under
Barren &
NonUnAgricultural cultivable
Uses
Land
Area

Sukali

Hingna

334.12

4.31

67.07

13.41

7.98

7.97

233.38

Khapa kh

Hingna

214.31

34.35

33.74

20.95

20.52

7.3

97.45

Gangapur

Hingna

139.11

2.38

17.71

119.02

Amgaon

Hingna

135.69

7.5

13.83

11.12

13.54

89.7

Bid-ganeshpur

Hingna

162.49

8.63

22.99

14.5

91.97

24.4

Chicholi

Hingna

639.38

90.19

8.15

0.8

1.02

18.21

15.26

15.55

33

457.2

Kohala

Hingna

338.48

10.53

0.9

28.42

34.48

47.95

216.2

Murzari

Hingna

236.5

2.63

33.73

24.16

155.98

20

Khapri (Moreshwar)

Hingna

400.92

1.75

10.68

1.95

8.85

7.7

24.36

345.63

10

Pipri

Hingna

171.83

0.61

9.8

34.86

4.8

21.19

10.95

89.62

11

Devali

Hingna

185.27

0.53

7.59

26.86

2.85

20.61

10.98

115.85

12

Bhansoli

Hingna

416.44

53

8.59

95.55

5.2

66.1

188

13

Khadki

Hingna

372.71

7.69

99.78

26.24

239

14

Kinhi

Hingna

226.94

37.14

60.16

24.64

105

15

Mandawa

Hingna

717.08

17.34

196.79

121.2

189.95

191.8

16

Lakhamapur

Hingna

341.31

20.03

83.83

70.95

166.5

17

Pohi

Hingna

713.64

47.08

646.46

18.1

18

Pipardhara

Hingna

719.18

56.36

153.82

2.94

10.66

491.4

19

Katangdhara

Hingna

391.95

53.68

33.41

2.46

288.4

20

Kirmati

Hingna

422.31

13.68

10.2

1.34

3.74

5.9

387.45

21

Degma kh

Hingna

816.39

211.88

3.51

21.24

3.67

25.84

86.7

30.57

432.98

22

Kanholibara

Hingna

1607.21

244.02

211.32

179.65

4.59

137

43.63

787

Annexure-VII

Permanent
Pastures
and Other
Grazing
Land Area

Land Under
Miscellaneous
Tree Crops
etc. Area

Culturable
Waste
Land Area

Fallows
Land
other
than
Current
Fallows
Area

Current
Fallows
Area

Net Area
Sown

AN. VII-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE VII Landuse Pattern

Sr.no

Village Name

Taluka

Total
Geographical
Area

Forest
Area

Area under
NonAgricultural
Uses

Barren &
Uncultivable
Land
Area

Permanent
Pastures
and Other
Grazing
Land Area

Land Under
Miscellaneous
Tree Crops
etc. Area

Culturable
Waste
Land Area

Fallows
Land
other
than
Current
Fallows
Area

Current
Fallows
Area

Net Area
Sown

23

Datala

Hingna

187.27

12.28

7.59

3.2

21.62

0.2

142.38

24

Devalipeth

Hingna

309.91

7.26

24.52

10.11

17.21

250.81

25

Dhanoli

Hingna

1013.44

493.52

15.84

20.32

79.1

60.66

344

26

Tembhari

Hingna

246.42

22.75

223.67

27

Waranga

Hingna

275.76

0.47

17.03

14.58

11.75

6.3

9.58

216.05

28

Kotewada

Hingna

365.07

46.08

300.99

29

Gumgaon

Hingna

254.38

59.22

18.56

176.6

30

Khairi bk

Hingna

627

10.93

16.43

24.76

15.32

3.42

25.35

21.91

34.35

474.53

31

Salaidabha

Hingna

634.17

2.76

64.88

86.97

479.56

32

Sirul

Hingna

521.88

5.38

100.19

19

162.72

234.59

33

Turkmari

Hingna

224.28

4.01

145.57

1.82

69.88

34

Dongargaon

Hingna

314.32

19.72

48.45

35.9

20.27

12

177.98

Sub Total

14677.16

1468.33

1834.73

206.17

926.53

70.08

767.5

774.48

776.91

7852.43

35

Borkhedi

Nagpur(Rural)

290.27

93.79

42.23

61.1

93.15

36

Pipardol

Nagpur(Rural)

294.23

11.54

18.22

58.97

205.5

37

Vathoda

Nagpur(Rural)

363.33

17.08

16.44

31.46

18.4

15.35

264.6

38

Jangeshwar

Nagpur(Rural)

404.01

123.04

6.3

152.75

27.9

6.32

87.7

39

Junapani

Nagpur(Rural)

572.88

1.68

472.51

6.09

7.1

79.5

40

Dhawalpeth

Nagpur(Rural)

452.84

0.4

24.9

80.25

139.89

207.4

41

Tarsi

Nagpur(Rural)

655.62

2.93

157.02

78.65

102.02

315

42

Deoli (Gujar)

Nagpur(Rural)

357.14

4.47

25.72

7.97

9.23

5.45

304.3

43

Khapari Subhedar

Nagpur(Rural)

326.65

10.4

6.01

23.44

9.3

273.5

44

Bothali

Nagpur(Rural)

470.41

94.55

21.38

123.96

90.21

13.48

126.83

Annexure-VII

AN. VII-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE VII Landuse Pattern

Sr.no

Village Name

Taluka

Total
Geographical
Area

Forest
Area

Area under
NonAgricultural
Uses

Barren &
Uncultivable
Land
Area

Permanent
Pastures
and Other
Grazing
Land Area

Land Under
Miscellaneous
Tree Crops
etc. Area

Culturable
Waste
Land Area

Fallows
Land
other
than
Current
Fallows
Area

Current
Fallows
Area

Net Area
Sown

45

Wakeshwar

Nagpur(Rural)

410.01

82.47

32.42

56.51

40.2

10.6

187.81

46

Mohgaon

Nagpur(Rural)

329.14

34.58

20.31

54.94

93.82

30.51

94.98

47

Mhasala

Nagpur(Rural)

172.75

75.93

1.77

19.9

68.15

Sub Total

5099.28

217.75

726.19

405.99

427

309.11

231.23

473.59

2308.42

Grand Total

19776.44

1686.08

2560.92

612.16

1353.53

70.08

1076.61

1005.71

1250.5

10160.85

Annexure-VII

AN. VII-3

ANNEXURE VIII
ELECTRIC & WATER BILL

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE VIII Electric & Water Bill

Annexure-VIII

AN-VIII-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (24000 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE VIII Electric & Water Bill

Annexure-VIII

AN-VIII-2

ANNEXURE IX
AMBIENT AIR QUALITY

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IX AMBIENT AIR QUALITY

Ambient Air Quality (AAQ-1) Project site


Date

PM10
g/m

PM2.5
3

g/m

SO2
g/m

NOX
3

g/m

CO
3

mg/m

Ozone
3

g/m

NH3
g/m

1/1/2016

44.9

17.3

17.07

9.6

0.55

15.3

22

2/1/2016

54.8

17.5

17.02

12.5

0.51

15.8

23

8/1/2016

58.3

17.4

16.83

14.9

0.59

15.9

22

9/1/2016

51.2

18.1

16.96

10.4

0.58

16.2

27

15/1/2016

58.6

18.4

15.36

15.3

0.6

16.9

28

16/1/2016

53.4

18.6

15.96

13.1

0.61

17.2

29

22/1/2016

60.8

18.5

16.03

10.9

0.59

18.1

30

23/1/2016

59.7

18.8

15.96

9.8

0.59

17.3

31

29/1/2016

64.8

20.3

16.78

9.5

0.6

16.2

33

30/1/2016

59.7

20.8

16.53

9.3

0.61

16.9

36

5/2/2016

54.8

19.6

17.02

8.6

0.62

18.5

35

6/2/2016

50.3

18.2

16.47

9.4

0.63

17.4

36

12/2/2016

57.9

21.3

17.56

12.6

0.64

16.3

22

13/2/2016

52.2

22.7

16.41

10.9

0.64

17.8

27

19/2/2016

57.3

23.4

17.96

13.1

0.65

18.3

27

20/2/2016

54.7

25.2

16.45

9.6

0.65

22.3

28

26/2/2016

61.8

23.9

15.07

10.4

0.66

22.6

32

27/2/2016

59.7

24.2

15.06

13.1

0.67

23.1

32

4/3/2016

59.7

25.1

15.56

11

0.63

21.6

30

5/3/2016

54

28.1

15.48

13.1

0.55

20.5

31

11/3/2016

52

19.2

17.72

13.9

0.59

19.7

34

12/3/2016

55

24.3

17.72

9.1

0.59

25.6

33

18/3/2016

44.9

24.5

15.45

10

0.6

21.2

38

19/3/2016

64.8

24.2

16

10

0.6

22.1

46

Min
Max

44.9
64.8

17.3
28.1

15.06
17.96

8.6
15.3

0.51
0.67

15.3
25.6

22.0
46.0

Avg

56.05

21.23

16.43

11.25

0.61

18.87

30.50

64.8

26.77

17.85

15.12

0.67

24.45

42.32

th

98

Annexure-IX

AN-IX-1

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IX AMBIENT AIR QUALITY

Ambient Air Quality (AAQ-2) Khapri village


Date

PM10
g/m

PM2.5
3

g/m

SO2
g/m

NOX
3

g/m

CO
3

mg/m

Ozone
3

g/m

NH3
g/m

6/1/2016

44

15.4

12.29

12.33

0.22

12.9

22

7/1/2016

49

13.2

12.31

11.98

0.2

13.1

21.6

13/1/2016

55

13.8

13.56

11.46

0.21

14.6

25

14/1/2016

48

13.1

13.49

11.78

0.21

16.2

26

20/1/2016

51

13.7

13.78

11.06

0.22

16.9

28

21/1/2016

56

15.9

13.46

11.49

0.21

17.2

27

27/1/2016

53

17.2

13.78

11.46

0.2

18.1

30

28/1/2016

51

16.8

14.01

11.08

0.2

17.3

31

3/2/2016

48

14.2

14.09

10.79

0.19

16.2

30

4/2/2016

47

16.4

14.43

10.49

0.19

16.9

36

10/2/2016

52

16.9

12.97

10.46

0.18

18.5

35

11/2/2016

49

13.7

12.45

10.29

0.185

17.4

33

17/2/2016

53

15.4

13.45

11

0.185

16.3

25

18/2/2016

49

14.8

13.98

11.23

0.18

17.8

27

24/2/2016

54

16.4

13.49

11.56

0.181

18.3

27

25/2/2016

49

15.9

13.03

11.45

0.183

19.2

28

2/3/2016

55

15

13.49

11.49

0.184

19.9

32

3/3/2016

53

16.6

14.16

11.46

0.18

20.1

32

9/3/2016

48

17.9

14.19

11

0.19

21.6

30

10/3/2016

54

16.3

14.93

11.46

0.19

20.5

33

16/3/2016

52

16.2

14.09

11.09

0.185

19.7

34

17/3/2016

46

15.4

13.85

12.09

0.184

21.6

36

23/3/2016

48

13.4

13.49

12.04

0.182

20.5

33

24/3/2016

47

14.2

14.09

12.08

0.19

19.7

36

Min

44.0

13.1

12.29

10.29

0.18

12.9

21.6

Max

56.0

17.9

14.93

12.33

0.22

21.6

36.0

Avg

50.46

15.33

13.62

11.36

0.19

17.94

29.90

th

55.54

17.57

14.7

12.21

0.22

21.6

36.0

98

Annexure-IX

AN-IX-2

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IX AMBIENT AIR QUALITY
Ambient Air Quality (AAQ-3) Mandwa village
Date

PM10
g/m

PM2.5
3

g/m

SO2
g/m

NOX
3

g/m

CO
3

mg/m

Ozone
3

g/m

NH3
g/m

1/1/2016

48

19.8

15.23

9.7

0.78

14.3

22

2/1/2016

53

10.5

15.49

9.63

0.71

13.1

23

8/1/2016

49

10.9

15.49

9.45

0.75

14.6

25

9/1/2016

54

10.5

15.02

8.49

0.779

15.2

28

15/1/2016

51

10.2

15.01

8.16

0.76

15.6

28

16/1/2016

49

10.7

14.56

8.17

0.74

15.9

29

22/1/2016

52

10.4

14.229

8.75

0.69

16.5

30

23/1/2016

51

10.3

14.76

8.74

0.68

18.2

31

29/1/2016

53

11.6

14.73

8.19

0.64

18.6

33

30/1/2016

47

11.8

14.09

8.43

0.65

18.9

33

5/2/2016

44

12.9

14.72

8.46

0.61

14.5

35

6/2/2016

48

14.2

14.7

8.45

0.65

14.4

38

12/2/2016

45

14.9

14.82

8.09

0.64

15.6

25

13/2/2016

41

16.4

14.93

8.56

0.69

17.8

27

19/2/2016

39

16.9

14.08

7.79

0.62

18.3

27

20/2/2016

51

17.7

14.73

7.63

0.64

20.3

28

26/2/2016

47

18.2

14.76

7.85

0.65

20.9

32

27/2/2016

47

17.9

14.08

7.16

0.62

21.6

32

4/3/2016

53

17.7

13.34

8.02

0.61

21.6

30

5/3/2016

49

17.4

13.49

8.45

0.63

20.5

33

11/3/2016

52

18.1

13.76

8.16

0.64

21.1

34

12/3/2016

46

17.8

13.79

8.49

0.67

18.5

36

18/3/2016

43

17.6

13.49

8.79

0.64

17.4

38

19/3/2016

47

17.4

14.24

7.79

0.65

16.6

36

Min

39.0

10.2

13.34

7.16

0.61

13.1

22.0

Max

54.0

19.8

15.49

9.7

0.78

21.6

38.0

Avg

48.29

14.66

14.48

8.39

0.67

17.50

30.54

th

53.54

19.06

15.49

9.67

0.78

21.6

38.0

98

Annexure-IX

AN-IX-3

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IX AMBIENT AIR QUALITY

Ambient Air Quality (AAQ-4) Kirmiti village


Date

PM10
g/m

PM2.5
3

g/m

SO2
g/m

NOX
3

g/m

CO
3

mg/m

Ozone
3

g/m

NH3
g/m

4/1/2016

51

10.8

16.1

10

0.6

14.6

22

5/1/2016

60.8

17.2

16.8

19.2

0.5

14.9

27

11/1/2016

59.7

16.4

15.9

18.1

0.5

14.6

25

12/1/2016

54.8

16.9

16.4

18.7

0.4

13.3

26

18/1/2016

61.3

20.7

17.2

21.9

0.4

15.9

28

19/1/2016

57.9

18.4

17.4

19.6

0.4

16.2

29

25/1/2016

60.2

19.8

16.8

18.2

0.45

14.1

30

26/1/2016

57.3

16.4

16.4

16.9

0.49

13.3

31

1/2/2016

54.7

15.9

15.7

14.8

0.48

16.2

31

2/2/2016

60.8

20.1

17.3

20.9

0.47

15.9

33

8/2/2016

59.7

19.6

16.8

20.2

0.49

13.3

35

9/2/2016

51

17.4

17.8

8.2

0.48

13.5

31

15/2/2016

56

17.9

18.2

8.7

0.47

17.9

25

16/2/2016

54

16.8

17.9

8.9

0.47

18.3

27

22/2/2016

54

17.2

18.2

8.2

0.46

17.9

27

23/2/2016

58

16.9

17.9

0.49

15.3

28

29/2/2016

55

16.4

16.9

11.5

0.47

12.3

30

1/3/2016

51

18.2

17.3

13

0.51

21.6

30

7/3/2016

57

16.4

18.2

14.2

0.52

18.3

30

8/3/2016

51

17.3

17.9

15.3

0.53

21.3

33

14/3/2016

49

16.2

16.8

16.2

0.54

19.7

34

15/3/2016

46

14.9

16.3

15.8

0.59

19.1

34

21/3/2016

58

19.5

17.3

16.6

0.58

19.6

35

22/3/2016

53

19.2

16.8

16.2

0.56

19.9

34

Min

46.0

10.8

15.7

8.2

0.4

12.3

22.0

Max

61.3

20.7

18.2

21.9

0.6

21.6

35.0

Avg

55.47

17.35

17.10

15.01

0.49

16.54

29.79

th

61.07

20.42

18.2

21.44

0.60

21.46

35

98

Annexure-IX

AN-IX-4

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IX AMBIENT AIR QUALITY
Ambient Air Quality (AAQ-5) Gangapur Village
Date

PM10
g/m

PM2.5
3

g/m

SO2
g/m

NOX
3

g/m

CO
3

mg/m

Ozone
3

g/m

NH3
g/m

6/1/2016

54

12.9

16.2

10.9

0.119

11

22

7/1/2016

51

11.8

15.9

11.8

0.122

13.9

23

13/1/2016

53

12.7

16.3

11.4

0.106

15.2

25

14/1/2016

54

13.9

16.9

8.7

0.118

14.6

23

20/1/2016

49

14.8

17.2

9.1

0.98

15.9

28

21/1/2016

51

15.7

16.8

10.9

0.108

15.9

29

27/1/2016

57

16.3

17.3

11.8

0.97

15.3

29

28/1/2016

56

16.9

17.8

10.4

0.95

16.5

31

3/2/2016

53

17.6

18.5

9.3

0.95

15.6

33

4/2/2016

51

18.2

19.1

10.4

0.84

16.9

33

10/2/2016

53

18.8

19.4

8.9

0.74

17.5

35

11/2/2016

49

17.9

18.9

9.3

0.85

17.4

33

17/2/2016

52

19.1

19.5

10.4

0.76

16.3

25

18/2/2016

49

18.3

19.3

11.2

0.81

21.3

27

24/2/2016

45

18.8

18.8

10.9

0.75

21.6

27

25/2/2016

53

19.1

19.1

13.4

0.78

21.2

28

2/3/2016

49

18.5

18.7

15.3

0.76

22.6

32

3/3/2016

51

19.2

18.3

13.9

0.58

21.9

32

9/3/2016

56

18.7

18.9

14.4

0.64

21.6

30

10/3/2016

49

17.9

19.4

15.9

0.59

20.5

33

16/3/2016

47

18.4

18.6

15.2

0.62

21.6

34

17/3/2016

51

19.2

18.3

15.8

0.63

20.3

35

23/3/2016

55

18.6

18.81

15.4

0.72

14.7

33

24/3/2016

47

18.4

18.6

15.2

0.62

21.6

36

Min

45.0

11.8

15.9

8.7

0.10

11.0

22.0

Max

57.0

19.2

19.5

15.9

0.98

22.6

36.0

Avg

51.46

17.15

18.19

12.08

0.63

17.95

29.83

th

56.54

19.2

19.45

15.85

0.98

22.28

35.54

98

Annexure-IX

AN-IX-5

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IX AMBIENT AIR QUALITY

Ambient Air Quality (AAQ-6) Buttibori Village


Date

PM10
g/m

PM2.5
3

g/m

SO2
g/m

NOX
3

g/m

CO
3

mg/m

Ozone
3

g/m

NH3
g/m

4/1/2016

63

21.8

17.1

21.4

0.79

14.6

25

5/1/2016

60

16.1

18

17.5

0.74

14.9

25

11/1/2016

62

16.5

17.9

18.1

0.75

14.6

25

12/1/2016

65

20.3

17.6

12.6

0.62

15.3

28

18/1/2016

67

17.1

18.2

15.6

0.63

15.9

28

19/1/2016

68

18.3

17.8

16.8

0.6

16.2

29

25/1/2016

62

19.8

18.1

17.2

0.59

18.1

30

26/1/2016

63

18.1

17.9

17.8

0.62

17.3

31

1/2/2016

65

17.9

17.4

19.2

0.6

16.2

33

2/2/2016

67

16.4

16.3

20.1

0.48

16.9

33

8/2/2016

59

16.9

15.9

14.6

0.55

17.3

35

9/2/2016

60

17.7

16.1

15.2

0.59

17.5

35

15/2/2016

57

17.9

15.8

16.3

0.6

17.9

25

16/2/2016

54

18.4

16.3

15.1

0.62

18.3

27

22/2/2016

60

20.1

16.9

15.3

0.52

17.9

27

23/2/2016

69

18.5

17.1

17.8

0.65

20.3

29

29/2/2016

62

20.1

17.9

17.4

0.68

22.3

30

1/3/2016

67

17.4

18.2

16.6

0.71

21.6

30

7/3/2016

61

17.9

17.9

15.5

0.67

22.3

30

8/3/2016

60

18.3

18.1

14.3

0.68

21.3

33

14/3/2016

59

18.2

17.8

15.7

0.6

19.7

32

15/3/2016

62

20

16

17.1

0.59

19.1

38

21/3/2016

64

21

16.1

18.3

0.58

19.6

36

22/3/2016

65

22.9

16.3

19.6

0.63

19.9

36

Min

54.0

16.1

15.8

12.6

0.48

14.6

25.0

Max

69.0

22.9

18.2

21.4

0.79

22.3

38.0

Avg

62.54

18.65

17.20

16.88

0.63

18.13

30.42

th

68.54

22.39

18.2

20.80

0.77

22.3

37.08

98

Annexure-IX

AN-IX-6

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IX AMBIENT AIR QUALITY
Ambient Air Quality (AAQ-7) Bhansuli Village
Date

PM10
g/m

PM2.5
3

g/m

SO2
g/m

NOX
3

g/m

CO
3

mg/m

Ozone
3

g/m

NH3
g/m

6/1/2016

58

12.9

16.2

16.9

0.104

16.3

21

7/1/2016

63

13.4

16.9

19.1

0.079

17.2

23

13/1/2016

59

13.8

16.3

19.2

0.112

18.9

25

14/1/2016

54

12.7

17.3

19.4

0.073

18.3

28

20/1/2016

58

14.4

18.2

19.6

0.082

21.2

28

21/1/2016

59

15.2

17.9

19.8

0.073

16.9

29

27/1/2016

57

16.3

18.4

15.3

0.088

18.1

30

28/1/2016

61

14.5

18.1

17.4

0.071

17.3

31

3/2/2016

53

16.6

19.2

13.9

0.084

16.2

33

4/2/2016

57

16.8

19.5

15.2

0.083

16.9

33

10/2/2016

61

14.9

19.4

16.7

0.081

18.5

35

11/2/2016

62

16.2

19.1

14.4

0.079

17.4

38

17/2/2016

63

12.7

19.3

10.4

0.088

20.6

25

18/2/2016

59

13.6

19.7

12.3

0.074

25.3

29

24/2/2016

51

15.3

18.3

12.9

0.071

25.6

30

25/2/2016

58

14.9

18.9

12.3

0.095

19.2

31

2/3/2016

48

13.2

17.9

10.3

0.082

19.9

32

3/3/2016

53

14.9

19.3

11.7

0.074

20.1

32

9/3/2016

54

18.3

18.8

16.7

0.082

20.6

30

10/3/2016

58

19.1

19.4

15.2

0.079

19.3

33

16/3/2016

56

20.2

18.9

16.3

0.094

19.8

34

17/3/2016

53

19.9

19.3

15.7

0.074

20.1

36

23/3/2016

55

18.3

18.7

16.6

0.085

19.7

39

24/3/2016

58

19.1

19.4

15.2

0.094

19.1

36

Min

48.0

12.7

16.2

10.3

0.071

16.2

21.0

Max

63.0

20.2

19.7

19.8

0.112

25.6

39.0

Avg

57.0

15.72

18.52

15.52

0.08

19.27

30.88

63

20.06

19.61

19.71

0.11

25.46

38.54

th

98

Annexure-IX

AN-IX-7

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IX AMBIENT AIR QUALITY
Ambient Air Quality (AAQ-8) Tembhari village
Date

PM10
g/m

PM2.5
3

g/m

SO2
g/m

NOX
3

g/m

CO
3

mg/m

Ozone
3

g/m

NH3
g/m

1/1/2016

48.9

14.3

15.4

16.1

0.101

17.2

21

2/1/2016

51.3

14.9

16.1

15.8

0.095

17.9

22

8/1/2016

43.7

13.8

16.4

16.3

0.084

13.2

25

9/1/2016

47.9

14.8

15.9

18.2

0.09

19.6

25

15/1/2016

57.3

15.9

17.1

21.2

0.085

19.9

28

16/1/2016

54.7

16.1

16.7

18.4

0.102

20.2

29

22/1/2016

53.9

17.2

17.3

21.9

0.087

18.1

29

23/1/2016

48.7

14.9

16.8

19.2

0.101

17.3

31

29/1/2016

47.2

13.9

16.1

18.4

0.086

20.6

33

30/1/2016

51.1

15.3

15.8

18.7

0.092

21.3

32

5/2/2016

52

16.9

15.9

8.6

0.096

21.6

35

6/2/2016

49

17.7

16.1

9.4

0.095

20.3

38

12/2/2016

53

17.9

15.8

12.6

0.094

22.3

25

13/2/2016

64.3

19.7

17.2

19.3

0.105

23.1

26

19/2/2016

58.7

21.4

15.7

21.2

0.115

24.6

30

20/2/2016

61.4

19.8

16.1

19.8

0.113

25.1

31

26/2/2016

63.8

22.6

17.3

22.9

0.104

19.9

32

27/2/2016

53

17.4

18.2

13.1

0.124

20.1

32

4/3/2016

61.7

21.3

16.9

19.4

0.121

21.6

30

5/3/2016

58.3

18.7

16.2

18.7

0.108

20.5

33

11/3/2016

62.3

22.1

17.3

23.3

0.095

19.7

34

12/3/2016

59.7

21.6

16.8

19.4

0.092

15.1

36

18/3/2016

52.1

19

15.4

8.6

0.083

13.4

22

19/3/2016

43.7

20

15.4

9.8

0.084

14.5

30

Min

43.7

13.8

15.4

8.6

0.083

13.2

21.0

Max

64.3

22.6

18.2

23.3

0.124

25.1

38.0

Avg

54.07

17.80

16.41

17.10

0.10

19.46

29.54

th

64.07

22.37

17.79

23.12

0.12

24.87

37.08

98

Annexure-IX

AN-IX-8

Proposed Formaldehyde production unit (2400 MT/Day), at Plot No. C-6, MIDC Industrial
Area, Butibori, Dist.- Nagpur, Maharashtra
ANNEXURE IX AMBIENT AIR QUALITY

Ambient Air Quality (AAQ-9) Vadgaon village


Date

PM10
g/m

PM2.5
3

g/m

SO2
g/m

NOX
3

g/m

CO
3

mg/m

Ozone
3

g/m

NH3
g/m

4/1/2016

52.41

16.1

16.8

10.84

0.101

11

21

5/1/2016

41.22

19.9

15.2

9.06

0.95

13.1

22

11/1/2016

41

20.6

10.3

8.96

0.84

14.6

25

12/1/2016

51

21.7

18.7

8.93

0.74

16.2

23

18/1/2016

44

22.3

18.5

10.25

0.85

16.9

26

19/1/2016

46

22.6

11.3

9.04

0.106

18.1

29

25/1/2016

50

20.6

11.9

9.08

0.87

17.3

25

26/1/2016

53

20.9

12.3

8.89

0.103

16.2

31

1/2/2016

61

21.7

12.9

8.91

0.076

16.9

33

2/2/2016

53

22.3

17.6

8.93

0.109

18.5

32

8/2/2016

42

19.6

16.9

8.96

0.69

17.4

31

9/2/2016

53.52

19.9

14.1

8.95

0.95

17.8

33

15/2/2016

51.37

18.8

18.6

10.36

0.72

18.3

25

16/2/2016

52.98

18.1

18.3

9.01

0.69

19.2

26

22/2/2016

51.73

19.9

18.2

9.08

0.73

19.9

30

23/2/2016

49.84

22.9

18.8

9.1

0.68

20.1

31

29/2/2016

51

20.6

18.5

9.14

0.72

21.6

30

1/3/2016

58.56

22.3

18.7

9.23

0.78

19.7

32

7/3/2016

51

20.3

17.9

9.3

0.68

19.1

30

8/3/2016

49

19.9

13.6

9.31

0.82

22

33

14/3/2016

48.77

19.7

13.7

9.26

0.78

25

31

15/3/2016

47.92

20.6

12.7

9.27

0.6

21

33

21/3/2016

48.91

21.3

13.2

9.21

0.68

20.6

33

22/3/2016

46.4

21.7

12.7

8.89

0.71

20.6

31

Min

41

16.1

10.3

8.89

0.076

11.0

21.0

Max

61

22.9

18.8

10.84

0.95

25.0

33.0

Avg

49.82

20.60

15.48

9.25

0.62

18.38

29.00

th

59.88

22.76

18.75

10.62

0.95

23.62

33.0

98

Annexure-IX

AN-IX-9