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VMAX Family Installation and

Maintenance
Student Guide

Education Services
March 2015

Welcome to VMAX Family Installation and Maintenance.


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Revision Date: March 2015


Revision Number: MR-7CP-VMAXIM

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Course Overview

This course covers the installation and maintenance of the VMAX Family hardware systems
and components.

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Course Overview

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Course Overview

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Course Overview

This module focuses on an introduction to the VMAX Family of arrays.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

Previous VMAX models include the VMAX 10K, VMAX 20K and VMAX 40K.
VMAX3 with HYPERMAX OS (previously known as Enginuity) 5977 arrays include the VMAX
100K for Enterprise and commercial data centers, the VMAX 200K for most Enterprise data
centers, and the VMAX 400K for large-environment Enterprise data centers. For highdemand storage environments, where extremely low latency and high IOPS are required,
the VMAX3 Family can also be configured with all Flash. VMAX3 arrays are pre-configured
with array-based software and hardware configurations based on pre-packaged Service
Level Objectives (SLOs).

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

This table shows a comparison of all three previous VMAX Family systems.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

This table shows a comparison of all three VMAX3 Family systems.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

This table shows a comparison of all three previous VMAX Family systems.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

This table shows a comparison of all three VMAX3 Family systems.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

Enginuity 5876 Q4 2012 Service Release introduced a VMAX 10K Enhanced director board.
VMAX 10K (987) director board has an upgraded 6 core Westmere CPU, providing 6 CPU
cores per physical director compared to the 4 CPU cores on VMAX 10K (959). The new CPU
runs between 2.8 GHz and 3 GHz with Turbo mode enabled, while the VMAX 10K (959) CPU
is fixed at 2.4 GHz. There is no other hardware functional or user visible change to the
director board. The extra CPU cores are distributed evenly among the DA slices. These 6
physical cores are partitioned into 12 logical cores, allowing 8 logical cores for the backend
directors and 4 logical cores for the front-end directors. This process is accomplished by
using hyper threading on the cores. There is no intermixing of VMAX (959) directors and
VMAX 10K (987) directors within the same system.
Symmetrix VMAX 20K Engines contain two high speed 4 core Xeon CPUs, and up to 64 GB
of memory DIMMS for each Director, 128 GB per Engine. Each Director has a System
Interface Board (SIB) with 2 ports, each connecting to the dual Virtual Matrix, which
provide high availability for the Director interconnections. Symmetrix VMAX 40K
incorporates a new higher-performance engine. The new design uses six core Xeon turbo
CPUs, and offers up to 128 GB of memory DIMMS for each Director, 256 GB per Engine,
two-times more cache than VMAX 20K. Symmetrix VMAX 40K also delivers two-times more
bandwidth for demanding data warehousing and decision support environments. Additional
bandwidth is achieved by incorporating a Quad Virtual Matrix and PCI gen2 I/O throughout
the VMAX 40K Engine.
Intel Turbo Boost Technology 2.0 automatically allows processor cores to run faster
than the base operating frequency if theyre operating below power, current, and
temperature specification limits. The 2.8 GHz XEON operates at 3.066 GHz.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

The details shown here (cores, memory, and ports) are given per engine.
All of these scale up as engines are added.

And ALL engines support ALL the same software functions and I/O modules.
With up to 48 cores per engine, we have up to 384 cores in a single array!
CPU speeds are 2.1GHz, 2.6GHz, and 2.7Ghz for these engines.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

For the VMAX 40K (illustrated in this particular example), and for all prior Symmetrix systems, each
emulation slice (or instance) in the system had dedicated resources delivering a given service to a
given set of ports.
Note that in this diagram, each front-end slice maps to exactly 1 CPU core. And it also maps director
ports, which it has specific ownership of. Those ports are not shared with any other slice. In fact, the
names of the ports represent the slice that they are a part of.
With SRDF, each CPU core maps to a single slice and a pair of ports. However, because of the protocol
work, the CPU can only handle the I/O of a single port. So the second port is disabled.
To illustrate the point, we have mapped out the relationships between Port 0 of each FA slice on the
director, the logical slice itself, and the CPU core that the slice runs on.
Note that port 1 of each slice also maps to the same CPU core, though these additional ports have
been left blue on the slide.
This design is straightforward, and has been a part of Symmetrix design since the original system. It
keeps the software simple with the direct mapping to resources.

The challenge is that if one CPU in this system is overloaded, others that may be lightly loaded cannot
provide assistance. So the maximum utilization of each individual CPU core becomes an element that
needs to be balanced for optimal system performance. This can be especially challenging for host (FA)
resources.
One of the fundamental design changes in the next generation of VMAX systems is that the ports will
no longer be mapped directly to CPU resources.
With the new design, emulation slices have been expanded to have multiple CPU cores supporting a
single multi-threaded instance of an emulation and ALL of the ports that use that emulation on the
same director. As a result, there is only one instance of a given emulation type for each director.
These emulations are covered more in the VMAX Concepts module of this course.
Each system will ship from the factory with a default allocation of cores to the pools providing data
services. These can be adjusted at the time of installation, or later as an online change. Overall, this
will make it much easier to build balanced systems. The balance can be achieved by shifting the CPU
resources in each emulation to match the workload that needs to be supported. This will allow the
system to be adapted to configurations that have unbalanced hardware across engines.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

The numbering of the Storage Bays is different for a Standard Configuration than it is for
the VMAX 20K /VMAX Extended Drive Loop Configurations, or Capacity Configurations.
In the Extended Drive Loop Configurations, or Capacity Configurations, all Storage Bays to
the left of the System Bay are numbered from 1A -5A, and all bays to the right of the
System Bay are numbered from 1B-5B (when viewed from the from the front).
The Standard Configuration may have up to eight engines with up to 30 3.5 inch drives per
loop for Engines 3 to 6, and up to 45 3.5 inch drives for the remaining Engines 1, 2, 7 and
8. All Storage Bays to the left of the System Bay are numbered from 1A-2A, then 1C-3C,
and all bays to the right of the System Bay are numbered from 1B-2B, then 1D-3D (when
viewed from the front). Dense configurations do not include Storage Bay 5A or 5B, and
support up to 50 drives per loop.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

10

VMAX 40K

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

11

In VMAX 10K (987) with mixed Standard DAE and High Density DAE, Engine 1 may have up
to 65 drives per loop on port 1, and Engines 2, 3 and 4 may have up to 75 drives per loop
on port 1 of each backend processor (port 0 loops have 15 or 25 drives per loop). The Drive
Bay to the left of System Bay 1 is numbered 1A, and the Drive Bay to the right of System
Bay 4 is numbered 1B (when viewed from the from the front).
Note: Storage Bay 2B is not supported at VMAX 10K (987).

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

12

In VMAX 10K (987) with High Density DAE, Engines 1, 2, 3 and 4 may have up to 50 drives
per loop on port 1 of each backend processor (all port 0 loops have 25 drives per loop).
Dense VMAX 10K configurations do not support Storage Bays 1A and 1B.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

13

With EMC NAS VG2/VG8 Gateway using a Symmetrix array as back-end storage, the
gateway could only be connected via SAN.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

14

With the release of Symmetrix VMAX Enginuity 5876 2013 Q2 Service Release (SR), the
Integrated NAS VG50 Gateway can be installed in the same cabinet as VMAX 10K (987) and
directly connected to the VMAX front end directors. There is no Storage Area Network
required. This type of configuration is branded VMAX 10K File.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

15

In a single engine configuration system, bays are placed left to right (front facing) starting
with System Bay 1 through System Bay 8. Note that single engine/dispersed layouts allow
for System Bay 2 through 8 to be up to 82 feet (25 meters) from System Bay 1. This allows
for more flexibility within the customers data center.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

16

In a dual engine configuration system, bays are placed left to right (front facing) starting
with System Bay 1 through System Bay 4. Note that dual engine/dispersed layouts allow for
any System Bay 2 through 4 to be up to 82 feet (25 meters) from System Bay 1. This
allows for more flexibility within the customers data center.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

17

This module focused on an introduction to the VMAX Family of arrays.

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Module 1: VMAX Family Overview

18

This module focuses on the System Bay components of the VMAX family, including VMAX
10K, VMAX 20K, VMAX 40K and VMAX3 Arrays.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

This lesson covers the components and their locations of the VMAX 10K, 20K and 40K
arrays.

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Module 4: System Installation

VMAX 10K (987) System Bays (1 through 4) each have a single engine, two SPS trays, and
10 Standard, or 12 Dense Disk Array Enclosures (DAEs), or a mixture of DAE types, as
shown here. System Bay 1 includes Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS), a Service
Processor (Server) and Keyboard-Video-Mouse (KVM). System Bay 2 includes a MIBE.
VMAX 10K (987) does not support daisy chaining on SPS supported drive channels, where
vault drives are resident (DAEs 1, 2, 5 and 6).
VMAX 10K (987) Standard Configurations:
Engines 1, 2, 3 and 4 can add 2 more DAEs on each port 1 without SPS support, daisy
chained to a total of three DAEs, or 45 drives on each port 1.
With 8 redundant drive channels, Engines 1, 2, 3 and 4 can support 4x15 plus 4x45 drives
for a maximum of 240 drives per engine, a total of 960 drives. Note that adding 2 more
DAEs on each port 1 requires additional Storage Bays.
VMAX 10K (987) Dense Configurations:
Engines 1, 2, 3 and 4 can add 1 more DAE on each port 1 without SPS support, daisy
chained to a total of two DAEs, or 50 drives per loop, 300 drives per engine, a total of
1,200 drives. Note that VMAX 10K (987) Dense Configurations do not support Storage
Bays. The additional High Density DAEs are added to the System Bay.
VMAX 10K (987) Mixed Configurations:
Engines 1, 2, 3 and 4 can add 2 more DAEs on each port 1 without SPS support, daisy
chained to a total of three DAEs. Engine 1 must have a minimum of 4 Standard DAEs, so a
maximum of 360 drives. Engines 2, 3, and 4 may have up to 400 drives, a total of 1,560
drives. Note that adding 2 more DAEs on each port 1 requires additional Storage Bays.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

The high density system offering supports only 4 total bays, all of which are System Bays
with 300 drives per Engine, a total of 1,200 drives. Vault DAEs on port 0 are direct attached
and have SPS backup. Port 1 DAEs can be direct attached and support a single daisy-chain
DAE, but do not have SPS backup. It is important to pay special attention to changes in
DAE numbering for high density systems. In standard configurations, DAEs are numbered
1-10 from the bottom up. With the space savings in a high density configuration, we have
the ability to rack two additional high density drive DAEs in the System Bay. These two
DAEs are the first level of daisy-chaining off the direct A1 and B1 attached DAEs. In a
standard or mixed configuration, the first level of A1 and B1 daisy-chain DAEs would
normally be located in Storage Bay 1A at the very bottom. To keep the integrity of the DAE
numbering scheme, the daisy-chain for A1 DAE is numbered 31, and the daisy-chain B1
DAE is numbered 41 in the System Bay, where these high density DAEs are located.
Therefore, DAEs are numbered 1-4, 31, 41 in the lower half of the System Bay, and 5-10 in
the upper half of the System Bay for this type of configuration. Remaining the same, are
the locations of the KVM, UPS and Service Processor in System Bay 1. System Bay 2 will
still house the MIBE.
Note that even though the DAE count varies in standard, mixed and high density
configurations, DAEs 1,2, 5 and 6 are always direct attached Vault DAEs.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

The high density VMAX 10K File system offering supports the same drive count as the VMAX
10K high density system, 4 total bays, all of which are System Bays with 300 drives per
Engine (a total of 1,200 drives). In a mixed or standard DAE configuration, VMAX 10K File
system offering reduces the DAE count in Storage Bay 1 by 4. Engine 2 has a maximum of
one level daisy chain. Engines 1, 3,and 4 have two levels of daisy chain, so the standard
and mixed drive count is 900 standard drives (58 DAEs), and 1460 mixed (56 dense DAEs
4 Standard DAEs).

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Module 2: Bays and Components

VMAX 10K (987) System Bays (1 through 4) each have a single engine, two SPS trays and
Disk Array Enclosures (DAEs). System Bay 2, shown here, includes a MIBE. System Bays 3
and 4 only have a single engine, two SPS trays and DAEs.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

Enginuity 5876 Q4 2012 SR supports 3rd Party Racks for VMAX 10K (987). This solution is
designed to serve a broad range of conforming racks and enclosures. Customers will be
providing the racks and enclosures along with power distribution infrastructure for this
offering. EMC will be responsible for installing and servicing the EMC equipment only. EMC
does not install, service or warranty any non-EMC equipment. Systems will ship in shipping
racks specific for VMAX 10K (987) 3rd party racking systems. Once delivered, EMC field
engineers will un-rack the system and populate the 3rd party racks that comply with EMC
specifications.
Brand integrity will be maintained with a new 3U front engine bezel with company logo,
VMAX lettering and the blue flash light bar. Bezels will then be attached to every position
within the rack for proper air flow. System Bay and DAE kits provide rails, labels and FRU
bezels. These are sent to the site with the shipping rack. No doors or side panels are
required. It is important to note that each VMAX 10K (987) System Bay or Storage Bay
must be installed in a separate rack or enclosure. Installations MUST maintain relative
physical positions of supported VMAX 10K (987) configurations.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

Each VMAX 10K System Bay has one Engine, and each Engine contains two directors. Each
director has two 400W power supplies with fans, giving power redundancy at the director
level. From the front, you can see the four power supplies. Power supplies are available in
Standard and High Efficiency versions.
The VMAX 10K (987) features an enhanced engine from its predecessor. VMAX 10K (987)
systems will continue to support 1-4 Engine configurations. A minimum of 24 drives
(including spares) is required to cover vault rules. The supported maximum drive count for
each engine is 240 3.5 drives, 300 2.5 drives and 400 mixed drive configurations. Engine
cache size options are now 24GB, 96GB and 128GB.
The new engines will also contain two enhanced VMAX 10K (987) Directors, featuring an
upgraded chipset with 2.8GHz Westmere 6 Core CPUs. These 6 physical cores are
partitioned in 12 logical cores, allowing 8 logical cores for the backend directors and 4
logical cores for the front-end directors. This process is accomplished by using hyper
threading on the cores.
Finally, new VMAX 10K (987) directors will also support an enhanced Rev. E Bosco SIB
Fabric I/O Module. The Bosco chip is a custom EMC ASIC used to control the fabric, Rev. E
provides extra throughput. These new SIBs will only be supported for VMAX 10K (987)
directors.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

The names of the engine components and their physical locations are shown here; odd and
even directors each with Power Supplies, Backend I/O Modules, Management Modules, and
Front-end I/O Modules. In this example, because this is a single engine system, SIBs are
not required, and therefore, filler panels are located in the SIB slots. Four Front-end I/O
Modules are shown.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

The names of the engine components and their physical locations are shown here; odd and
even directors each with Power Supplies, Backend I/O Modules, Management Modules,
System Interface Boards (SIB), and Front-end I/O Modules. In this example, a System
Interface Board (SIB) is located in slot 0 because this is a multi-engine system.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

10

The Symmetrix VMAX 20K System Bay layout is different from the VMAX 40K layout. A
notable difference is that the VMAX 20K only has 2 MIBEs (one MIBE enclosure). As this
graphic depicts, the UPS is located in the middle of the System Bay rack, the Service
Processor is located in the middle of the lower half of the bay, and the MIBE enclosure is
located in the middle of the top half of the bay. The KVM is in the same place.
Engines are positioned in specific slots, called Enclosure Slots (ES), and there can be up to
eight for a System Bay. Other components include Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS), a
Service Processor (Server) and Keyboard-Video-Mouse (KVM).

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Module 2: Bays and Components

11

The Symmetrix VMAX 40K System Bay layout has changed from the VMAX 20K/VMAX
layout. Notable differences are the locations of the 2 MIBE enclosures and UPS. As this
graphic depicts, the UPS is now located at the top of the System Bay rack to make way for
the Service Processor. MIBE enclosure one is located in the middle of the lower half of the
bay, and MIBE enclosure two is located in the middle of the top half of the bay. The KVM is
in the same place.
Engines are positioned in specific slots, called Enclosure Slots (ES), and there can be up to
eight for a System Bay. Other components include Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS), a
Service Processor (Server) and Keyboard-Video-Mouse (KVM).

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Module 2: Bays and Components

12

The Symmetrix VMAX 40K System Bay 2 layout is different from the System Bay 1 layout.
Note that MIBEs are not required in System Bay 2, the Engines will be cabled to the MIBEs
in System Bay 1. A 1U Server and KVM are included, and the 1U Server does not run
SymmWin, it is a Remote Service Terminal provided so that the CE/IDE does not have to
travel from SB 2 to SB 1 when performing maintenance.
Engines are still positioned in specific slots, called Enclosure Slots (ES), and up to six
Engines may be configured in System Bay 2. Engines 4 and 5 will always be installed in
System Bay 1 (more details can be found in Module 3, Storage Bay and Cabling).

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Module 2: Bays and Components

13

A single Engine front view is shown here with two power supplies and four fans, also
referred to as blowers. VMAX 20K/VMAX has a single Engine with 2 SPSs and 2 MIBEs as a
minimum requirement. The VMAX 20K/VMAX uses 2.3 Gigahertz 4-core CPUs per director (4
per engine) with up to 64 GB per Director, 128 GB of memory per Engine, and 1,024 GB of
memory in an eight Engine Configuration.
The VMAX 40K Engine looks the same when viewed from the front , however, it has higher
performance with two Intel 6-Core 2.8Ghz CPUs per director (4 per engine), up to 128 GB
per Director, 256 GB of memory per Engine, and 2,048 GB of memory in an eight Engine
Configuration.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

14

Layouts of the VMAX 20K/VMAX Engine is shown on this slide. Note that the VMAX
20K/VMAX has double wide System Interface Boards (SIB), and each VMAX 20K/VMAX
director has only two QSFP connections, one to each of the two MIBEs.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

15

Layouts of the VMAX 40K Engine are shown in this slide.


The first layout shows the names of the components and their physical locations. These are
the Power Supplies, Backend I/O Modules, Management Modules, System Interface Boards
(SIB), and Front-end I/O Modules. Note that at VMAX 40K there are two SIBs per director,
each director has four QSFPs, one to each of the four MIBEs.
The second layout shows the locations of the odd and even directors within an Engine,
including their respective Front-end I/O Module assignments.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

16

There are two (2) Front-end I/O Module slots in an Engines Director. When installed, the
I/O Modules are known as Module 3 and Module 4 in VMAX 10K and known as Module 4 and
Module 5 in VMAX 20K/VMAX or VMAX 40K.

Fibre Channel Front-end I/O Modules support the interface to a front-end host or switch
connection. A Fibre Channel Front-end I/O Module supports 4 Fibre ports per module, with
each of the ports operating at 2Gb/s, 4Gb/s, or 8Gb/s. Green ON indicates low speed (2 or
4Gb/s), and Blue ON indicates supported high speed (8Gb/s).

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Module 2: Bays and Components

17

Beginning with Enginuity 5876 2013 Q3 SR (Enginuity 5876.251.161). Symmetrix VMAX


40K and VMAX 10K (987) offer 16 Gb/s Fibre Channel I/O Module support. A 16 Gb/s Fibre
Channel Front-end I/O Module supports 2 Fibre ports per module, with each of the ports
operating at 4Gb/s, 8Gb/s or 16Gb/s. Green ON indicates low speed (4 or 8Gb/s), and Blue
ON indicates supported high speed (16 Gb/s).
Small form-factor, pluggable transceivers (SFP+), part number 019-078-045, which are
designed for use in Fibre Channel links up to 16 Gb per second data rates over multimode
fiber and optical multi-mode four (OM4) fiber cables are required. OM4 cables are
recognized by their aqua color and provide extended distances up to a distance of 100
meters at higher bandwidth.
No SRDF, FTS, FLM and RecoverPoint support. No hardware compression support for VMAX
40K. A Fibre Channel switch is required (no direct-connect topology supported with the 16
Gb/sI/O module). Initiator fan-out support for 16 Gb/s Fibre Channel I/O Module is
available at: http://elabnavigator.EMC.com

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Module 2: Bays and Components

18

This I/O Module can run FCoE, iSCSI or GigE emulation. FCoE is a recently developed
network protocol that allows Fibre Channel (FC) frames to be transported over Ethernet.
The hardware I/O Module supports 10Gb/s speeds for front-end FCoE and iSCSI/GigE.

FCoE, iSCSI or GigE Front-end I/O Modules support the interface to a front-end FCoE or
iSCSI host, or the SRDF (GigE) connection to another Symmetrix VMAX 20K/VMAX, VMAX
40K or VMAX 10K system. An iSCSI/GigE Front-end I/O Module supports two (2) ports.
Until the introduction of this I/O Module, iSCSI and GigE could only run at 1 Gb/s speed.
The 10 Gb/s I/O Module can be shared by two emulation instances, each slice getting one
port (unlike each slice getting two ports on FC I/O Modules). The I/O Module emulations
can be configured as either iSCSI, GigE SRDF, FCoE or any combination of these types of
emulation.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

19

This I/O Module can run 1 GB/s iSCSI emulation and is capable of IPsec encryption. IPsec
provides added security by encrypting the data.
iSCSI Front-end I/O Modules support the interface to a front-end iSCSI host. An iSCSI
Front-end I/O Module supports two (2) ports; each individual port is able to operate at
1Gb/s.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

20

There are two (2) Front-end I/O Module slots in an Engines Director. When installed, the
I/O Modules are known as Module 4 and Module 5 in VMAX 20K/VMAX or VMAX 40K.
FiCON Front-end I/O Modules support the interface to a front-end host or switch
connection. A FiCON Front-end I/O Module supports 2 FiCON ports per module, with each of
the ports operating at 2Gb/s, 4Gb/s or 8Gb/s.
Note: VMAX 10K does not support FiCON.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

21

D@RE (Data at Rest Encryption) is used for backend connectivity and has the capability to
encrypt the data on the drives. D@RE encrypts all data on every drive with a unique key
per drive, in conjunction with the RSAs embedded Data Protection Manager. The
enterprise, or external, Data Protection Manager is an easy-to-use solution, which enables
the separation of the keys from the storage so that the array can be transported without
the keys inside of it to protect again malicious theft or loss. Either the embedded or
enterprise can be configured with D@RE at installation. It is also possible to migrate keys
from the embedded to the remote enterprise-wide version at any time after install.
Use of this module is an all-or-nothing approach: all backend modules in all Engines within
the System Bay are either equipped with encryption capable Backend I/O Modules or with
standard functionality. The Configure and Install New Symmetrix script will check for this.
Exchanging a single standard functionality Backend I/O Module for an encryption capable
module will result in issues during the replacement script, where the script will fail to load
the code. A Padlock Icon is displayed on the I/O Modules handle, indicating that this
module is D@RE.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

22

VMAX 10K (987) enclosures are populated, starting with System Bay 1, which holds Engine
#1 and consists of Directors 1 and 2. Director numbers are derived from the Engine
number. Dual-Initiator pairs are contained within the same Engines, while memory is
mirrored across Engines.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

23

VMAX 20K/VMAX enclosures are populated from the inside out, starting with enclosure #4,
which holds Engine #4 and consists of Directors 7 and 8. Director numbers are derived from
the Engine number. Dual-Initiator pairs are contained within the same Engines, while
memory is mirrored across Engines. VMAX SE only has a single Engine, however, it uses
enclosure #4, which holds Engine #4 and consists of Directors 7 and 8.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

24

VMAX 40K enclosures are populated from the inside out, starting with enclosure #4, which
holds Engine #4 and consists of Directors 7 and 8. Director numbers are derived from the
Engine number. Dual-Initiator pairs are contained within the same Engines, while memory
is mirrored across Engines. After installing Engines 4 and 5, you may disperse the System
Bay, adding System Bay 2. Engines 3 and 6 may be placed in SB 1 or SB 2, however, you
cannot add engines to System Bay 1 after you have implemented System Bay 2 for
dispersion. All the proceeding engine upgrades MUST be done in System Bay 2. All the
same rules for engine upgrades will still apply, as in the order of engines to be added.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

25

The next slides cover the Management Module. Within each Engine, two Management
Modules monitor and control the environment the Engine operates in. Three of the
Management Modules activities are: (1) Monitor the SPS units, (2) Reset the UPS if
required, and (3) Communicate with other Engines positioned in the same system.
Communication to several hardware components is provided through Ethernet. The
Ethernet port, as indicated by the number 4, could either be: (1) directly connected to the
Service Processor, or (2) connected to another Engine. The Management Module is directly
connected to the Service Processor, should it be positioned in either the highest or the
lowest Engine number in the system. Note that when performing an Engine upgrade
(adding an Engine), the Ethernet cables need to be moved accordingly. Engines are always
daisy-chained to their abutting Engines, positioned above and below. The Management
Module provides connectivity to the Service Processor and between Engines, as well as
server connectivity for reset purposes, USB connectivity for the System Bay door light, and
RS-232 connectivity to the server SPS.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

26

This Management Module performs the same function in VMAX 10K. However, the physical
location in the Engine is slightly different (see previous slide).

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

27

The Symmetrix VMAX 40K, VMAX 20K and VMAX 10K servers come with a KVM
(Keyboard/Video/Mouse) attached to them that runs the SymmWin and other utilities, e.g.
SMC and Call Home. The Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) will keep the Server, KVM, and
optional modem up and running in the event of an AC power failure. Preference over the
implementation of the ESRS Gateway has made modem setups a second choice.
In the event any of the KVM components fail, any regular VGA display, mouse, or keyboard
can be attached. The integrated keyboard does not need to be detached when a USB
keyboard is attached. They can work simultaneously, which could prove beneficial when the
tracker ball of the KVM keyboard is still in operation.
Clearly indicated in the illustration above, are the connections for the green (number 7) and
purple (number 6) Ethernet cables that are attached to the Management Modules of the
lowest and highest Engines (as discussed earlier in the Management Module section).
The Engine will have a blue Ethernet cable attached to the port indicated by (number 8).
Use this port for ESRS implementation, not the CS-Spare port.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

28

The UPS is to ensure that power to the server is uninterrupted during the vaulting process
and that the server is capable of performing a Call Home should phone service be available.
This is possible as the UPS supplies power to the Server, KVM, and Modem. The UPS
contains four status LEDs. (1) A green LED is lit during normal UPS operation to show AC
power is present, and (2) blinking indicates that the battery is charging. (3) An amber LED
(Battery ON) is lit when the UPS is operating on battery power. (6) A red LED (Replace
battery) is lit if the battery is detected to be low in capacity, or in an out of specification
condition. (5) Lastly, a power unbalanced indicator is used for an imbalance with 3-phase
power.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

29

To maintain shelf life, the internal battery in the UPS is disconnected. To reconnect it,
remove the front panel, remove the four screws, slide the battery pack out and connect the
red and black power cables.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

30

One Y-cable is used to help supply power to these three components with only 2x UPS
power OUT (PRI and SEC).
In the absence of a Y-cable, the UPS powers the modem and server. This still enables dial
home during power loss. The only benefit of the KVM being powered by the UPS, is that
without a UPS, in the event of Zone B power source failing, the KVM needs to be plugged
into the remaining Zone A power source by an onsite CE. This has no impact if connecting
remotely, as the KVM is not required when connecting remotely.
Note: KVM is not plugged into UPS unless there is a Y-cable. It is plugged into either the A
side PDU or the B side PDU. During power check (config & install new), KVM will power
down as the zones are tested if there is no Y-cable present. Simply plug the KVM into the
other power zone to continue display.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

31

The VMAX 40K, VMAX 20K/VMAX Standard Storage Bay supports 4Gb BE only. Each
Storage Bay contains 16 Standard DAEs, and each Standard DAE has two Link Control
Cards (LCC). Each LCC has one primary port attaching to the disk director, and one
expansion port allowing additional DAEs to be added (daisy chaining). Each additional
Standard DAE increments the loop by 15 (15 drive loop, 30 drive loop, and so on).
Each Engine contains two (2) BE Directors, each with two (2) QSFP BE I/O Modules (8 port
per director). There are 64 redundant disk channels/loops.
Storage Bays are fully cabled from factory as either direct connect, or daisy chained with
appropriate cabling. Daisy chaining support enables:
VMAX 20K/VMAX Capacity drive loops - up to 75 drives per loop (Not supported at
VMAX 40K)
VMAX 40K, VMAX 20K/VMAX Standard drive loops - up to 30 and 45 drives per loop

Max drive count of up to 2,400 drives with Standard Storage Bay

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

32

This slide shows the rear view of a Standard Storage Bay fully cabled and a fully populated
front view. Two types of Standard Storage Bay are required; direct-connect and daisy
chain. Each bay contains 16 Standard DAEs; each Standard DAE contains up to 15 drives,
giving a maximum total of 240 drives per bay.
The Storage Bay is shipped from the factory fully cabled at the LCC (Link Control Card) end.
All cables have both From and To labeling, showing all information needed to cable up a
system, or to trace a cable in the event troubleshooting is necessary. QSFP (Quad Small
Form-Factor Pluggable) cables are used to connect 4 DAE LCC Primary ports to one Backend
I/O Module. LCC-A Primary port connects to the odd Director, while LCC-B Primary port
connects to the even Director of the same Engine over the HSSDC (High Speed Serial Data
Connectors). The Expansion ports are used to add another level of daisy chaining. If a half
populated bay is ordered, it will contain blank space cards (already cabled) for future nondisruptive upgrades.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

33

In order to protect the DAEs and BBUs, and for visual enhancement, special covers with
spring latches are installed.
Please make sure to put these covers back after maintenance, and keep them with the bays
at all times.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

34

Pictured above is a rear view of half a Pod; two DAEs, four LCCs (Link Control Cards) and
four PS (Power Supplies).
As this is the rear view, both Power Supply A and LCC A are located on the left, and Power
Supply B and LCC B are on the right.
At the top of the LCCs, you find indicators showing the A and the B sides. A standard DAE is
shown here. Note the power cable color-coding.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

35

The VMAX 20K and VMAX 40K High Density Storage Bays support 4Gb BE only. Each High
Density Storage Bay contains 16 High Density DAEs, and each High Density DAE has two
Link Control Cards (LCC). Each LCC has one primary port attaching to the disk director, and
one expansion port allowing additional DAEs to be added (daisy chaining). An additional
High Density DAE increments the loop by 25 (25 drive loop, then 50 drive loop, and so on).
Each Engine contains 2 BE Directors, each with 2 QSFP BE I/O Modules (8 port per
director). There are 64 redundant disk channels/loops.
Storage Bays are fully cabled from the factory as either direct connect, or daisy chain with
appropriate cabling. Daisy chaining support enables VMAX 20K and VMAX 40K High Density
drive loops (up to 50 drives per loop, and maximum drive count of up to 3,200 drives with
High Density Storage Bay).

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

36

Customers can save valuable data center floor space by using the dense DAEs with High
Density Storage Bays. The dense DAEs are installed horizontally in the bay with SPS
carriers located, starting from the very bottom, every four (4) DAEs. A total of sixteen (16)
DAEs can be installed in the High Density Storage Bay, for a total of 400 drives. This yields
a maximum of 3,200 drives in a fully scaled dense system layout.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

37

Symmetrix VMAX 40K, VMAX 20K and VMAX 10K (987) systems will support dense drive
configurations utilizing dense 2U disk array enclosures (DAE). Each High Density DAE can
hold up to twenty-five (25) 2.5 drives. These 2.5 drives come in 100GB, 200GB, and
400GB sizes for Enterprise Flash, and 300GB and 600GB for 10K RPM SAS Drives. The High
Density DAE uses native Fibre Channel protocol. At the rear of the High Density DAE, there
are two (2) power supplies with onboard cooling, and two (2) Link Control Cards (LCC) used
for connectivity to the DA directors.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

38

VMAX 10K (987) does not support Storage Bay 2B (3rd level of daisy chaining). Storage
Bays 1A and 1B are only supported when the configuration is all Standard DAEs, or mixed
Standard DAE and High Density DAE. As long as there are a minimum of 4 Standard DAEs
in System Bay 1, then Storage Bays 1A and 1B can be configured with all High Density DAE,
all Standard DAEs, or a mixture of both.
1A and 1B contain up to twelve DAEs and enable first and second level daisy chaining (30
then 45 drive loops). Each High Density DAE contains up to 25 drives, giving a maximum
total of 300 drives in Storage Bays 1A and1B. Note that Storage Bays do not have SPS. If
both Zone A and Zone B power is lost, the disks will spin down.
New installs with 5876.159.102 do not support Storage Bay 2B or 1,080 drive
configurations shown here. Existing systems running 1,080 drive configurations can
upgrade to 5876.159.102 code, and the configuration will still be supported.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

39

VMAX 10K File is achieved by integrating the VNX gateway (VG50) into the VMAX 10K (987)
cabinet. In a High Density Drive configuration, in a Standard configuration, or Mixed
configuration of high density and standard drives, the VNX gateway will be placed in
Storage Bay 1A using the top of the bay. This space will be available by removing the top
four Disk Array Enclosures (DAEs) of this bay, which is done at the factory. Cabling from
the Data Movers to the Engine must be cabled as a field operation for Systems with
standard or mixed drive configurations.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

40

Each disk has a green and amber LEDs. The green LED lights intermittently to indicate disk
activity, while the amber LED is used to mark the drive and may be turned on manually or
by a replacement script. Note that SATA II drives (7.2K RPM) are, in reality, 3Gb/s adapted
to 4Gb/s Fibre Channel. Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) drives are 6Gb/s adapted to 4Gb/s
native Fibre Channel 4Gb backend speed used currently in the VMAX 40K, VMAX 20K/VMAX
and VMAX 10K. Drives have dual colored emblem labels.
The drive format has changed from 512 to 520 bytes per block for FBA, and from 520 to
528 bytes per block for AS400. So, drives cannot be moved between DMX and VMAX
systems.
Symmetrix VMAX 40K, VMAX 20K/VMAX and VMAX 10K drives are formatted at 520 byte
sectors (except for AS400, which is formatted at 528. The AS/400 was first introduced in
1987 and later renamed to eServer iSeries in 2000. In 2006, it was again renamed to
System i). The extra 8 bytes contain DIF (Data Integrity Field) data. DIF provides error
detecting code for each data block of 512 bytes. Immediately following the data are 2 bytes
of cyclical redundancy code (CRC) that is computed over the 512 bytes of data. Following
the CRC, are six bytes of DIF, referred to as the User Defined Tag (UDT). This field contains
the Logical Block Address (LBA) information for the block of data with which it is associated.
Note: NATIVE iSeries drive is formatted to 528. Emulation 2107-D910 drive is formatted to
528 (same as open systems).

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

41

Supported disk types and capacities for the Symmetrix VMAX 40K and 20K are shown here.
There is a maximum of 1024 hyper volumes per drive.
New 4 TB drives with VMAX 10K, VMAX 10K File, VMAX 20K and VMAX 40K arrays running
Enginuity 5876 Q3 2013 SR or later.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

42

Supported disk types and capacities for the Symmetrix VMAX 10K (987) are shown here.
There is a maximum of 1024 hyper volumes per drive. New 4 TB 7,200 RPM drives with
VMAX 10K, VMAX 10K File, and VMAX 40K arrays running Enginuity 5876 Q3 2013 SR or
later.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

43

Two Power Distribution Panels (PDPs), one for each zone, provide power to the Storage Bay
PDUs. The PDPs contain the manual AC power On/Off control switches, which are accessible
through the rear door. Single phase and 3-phase PDPs are available. PDPs are always single
phase in the VMAX 10K. Each zone has a minimum 4,800 volt ampere (VA) rating. Pre-site
planning is an essential step for both EMC and 3rd Party provided racking. Always refer to
the Physical Planning Guide. Refer to the new VMAX 10K (987) Physical Planning Guides
section that details specifications for conforming 3rd party racks.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

44

When installing VMAX 10K (987) in a 3rd party bay, the same power requirements found in
the EMC bay must be met (two independent AC power zones with 4800 VA minimum rating
for each zone). A minimum number of IEC 320-C13 outlets must be provided for each
independent zone (11 for a System Bay / 12 for a storage bay). There must be 200-240VAC
available at each IEC 320-C13 outlet, protected by breakers. Means must be available to
simultaneously switch On/Off all IEC 320-C13 outlets within a power zone (PDP serves
this purpose in EMC rack).

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

45

Standby Power Supplies (SPS) in a Symmetrix VMAX system are used for battery backup to
ensure that write cache can be vaulted in the event of an AC power failure. Symmetrix
VMAX systems with Enginuity 5876 Q4 2012 SR support a new Lithium Ion SPS option. The
2.2 kW Lithium Ion SPS offers many advantages over the current Lead Acid SPS.
The Lithium Ion batteries are about half the weight of the Lead Acid batteries. They also
charge faster and last longer and are capable of holding a charge for up to six months.
Another major advantage is that a Lithium Ion SPS Battery Pack can easily be replaced
without the removal the SPS Tray. The SPS Tray is the main housing of the SPS, which
contains the charging and switching hardware. To support this feature, the SPS Tray and
Battery Pack will be treated as two independent Field Replaceable Units (FRUs).
The new SPS Tray is electrically equivalent and fully compatible with the Lead Acid variety.
Therefore, all Symmetrix VMAX systems with Enginuity 5876 Q4 2012 SR or later can
support a full intermix of Lithium Ion and Lead Acid Standby Power Supplies. It is important
to note, however, that intermixing within a SPS enclosure is not supported for High Density
Storage Bays. Standard Storage Bays will support the intermix of technologies. In the case
of High Density Storage Bays, the enclosure housing two SPS need to be of the same type.
For example, in Storage Bay 1A both SPS 1A and 1B need to be either Lithium Ion or Lead
Acid, but cannot be both Lithium Ion and Lead Acid.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

46

When replacing the SPS Battery Pack via a replacement script, the script will instruct the
user when to remove the defective part and when to install the new part. The SPS Battery
Pack is replaced from the front of the Symmetrix System Bay or Storage Bay. They are
mechanically keyed to insure they are installed in the proper orientation.
When installing a Lithium Ion SPS Battery Pack, a mechanical color wheel is used to
indicate its position. Red indicates that the SPS Battery Pack is not installed, or not
properly engaged. Yellow indicates that the SPS Battery Pack is parked securely, but not
electrically connected to the SPS Tray. Green indicates that the SPS Battery Pack is fully
engaged and connected to the SPS Tray. Once the Battery Pack is fully engaged, the Power
LED should be illuminated green.
Note: The Symmetrix VMAX 40K systems include a cutout in the System or Storage Bay
SPS enclosure to ease SPS Battery Pack installation and removal.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

47

The green LED of the Standby Power Supply (SPS) indicates On-line Enabled if the LED is steady ON,
and indicates On-line and Charging if the LED is flashing. Please keep in mind that replacing a SPS
requires the use of the lift tool, as these components are heavy (29 kg or 65 lbs).
One SPS tray is required for every four Drive Enclosures, and contains 2 SPS units with a total of up to
eight SPS units to support up to 16 Drive Enclosures in the VMAX Storage Bay. If AC power fails to
both Zone A and Zone B, the SPS assemblies can maintain power for two, five minute periods to
allow the system to vault. Only then does the Symmetrix system shut down.
SPS Basic Facts:
ALL EMC Standby Power Supply (SPS) and Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) power parts have
sealed lead acid batteries
All Lead-Acid batteries have a shelf-life of 6-9 months
If not recharged within this 6-9 month period, permanent loss of battery capacity occurs
EMCs vendor recommends recharging SPS & UPS parts within 6 months
Battery shelf life is dependent upon:
The storage temperature (optimum temp=25C0)
Purity of lead in the batteries
Service Life:
Dependent on the environment and operating temperature
Charging mechanism
Number of charge cycles
Loss of capacity due to self discharge

If not periodically recharged, permanent loss of capacity occurs


APC & battery vendors recommend recharge within 6 months

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

48

This lesson covered the components and their locations of the VMAX 10K, 20K and 40K
arrays.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

49

This lesson covers the components and their locations of the VMAX 100K, 200K and 400K
arrays.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

50

Components in System Bay 1 of a single engine bay include Standby Power Supplies (SPSs)
to support the engine, a Fabric and SPSs to support it (in multi-engine systems only), one
engine, a Power Distribution Unit (PDU), a KVM (Keyboard, Video, Mouse), a set of Ethernet
switches (seen from the rear of the bay) and DAEs associated with the engine. System Bays
2 through 8 do not have the Fabric and its SPSs, KVM or Ethernet switches. A Work Tray is
included is System Bays 2 through 8 in place of the KVM. We will discuss these components
in more detail in upcoming slides.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

51

Components in System Bay 1 of a dual engine bay include Standby Power Supplies (SPSs)
to support the engines, a Fabric and SPSs to support it (in multi-engine systems only), one
or two engines, a Power Distribution Unit (PDU), a KVM (Keyboard, Video, Mouse), an
Ethernet switch and DAEs. System Bays 2 through 4 do not have the Fabric and its SPSs, a
KVM or a set of Ethernet switches. A Work Tray is included in System Bays 2 through 4 in
place of the KVM. We will discuss these components in more detail in upcoming slides.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

52

There are two directors per engine: an Even Director (for example, Director 2, 4, 6 or 8)
and an Odd Director (such as Director 1, 3, 5 or 7). A boot drive* is included in each
director, along with five cooling fans and redundant power supplies. Power Supply A is on
the bottom of each director and uses a gray connector. Power Supply B is on the top, using
a black connector.
*The boot drive is used to boot HYPERMAX OS 5977 onto the director. It holds emulation
binaries and contains firmware binaries for the devices in the system. It also contains the
directors error logs and some IMPL related configuration data. This is what the EEPROM
was in legacy systems. In legacy systems, the boot device was installed on the director
board and not removable, unless the director was removed from the chassis. In this
system, the 16GB boot drive is accessible and can be replaced while the director is online.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

53

Each director contains (16) DIMMs:


VMAX 400K = 16, 32, 64GB DIMMS
VMAX 200K = 16, 32, 64GB DIMMs
VMAX 100K = 16, 32GB DIMMs

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

54

The rear of the engine contains the Management Module Control Stations (Engine 1 only) or
the Management Modules (all other Engines), Flash modules, Back-end modules, Front-end
I/O modules, and Fabric-connect modules (SIBs). Slots are numbered 0 through 10 across
the top, and module types are slot-specific, as shown here.
In the event of a vault, the VMAX 100K, 200K and 400K systems use the flash SLICs, not
disk.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

55

The population of the given SLIC (System Line Interface Card) or Module depends upon the
SLIC type. As depicted through the animation of this slide, if we are populating the director
with a Vault SLIC, the first Vault SLIC would be seated into slot 0, the second in slot 6, the
third in slot 1 and finally the fourth in slot 7. when populating the director with a nonbifurcated I/O module, the population order would start with slot 2 followed by slot 3 then
slot 8 and finally slot 9. However, if we are populating the director with bifurcated* I/O
modules then the we start with slot 9 followed by slot 8 then slot 3 and finally slot 2.
*Bifurcated means split. Connection to each I/O module is 8 lanes of PCIe; either one
connects to all 8 lanes or bifurcated into 2 connections of 4 lanes each.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

56

Physical port numbering has not changed. When connecting to an I/O module, ports are
numbered 0 through 3 from top to bottom on the module. I/O modules with two ports (not
shown) are labeled Port 0 and 1 from bottom to top. Fabric ports are numbered 0 to 1 from
bottom to top as well. Fabric Port 0 connects to Fabric A. Fabric Port 1 connects to Fabric B.
Logical addressing of the physical ports are numbered left to right, bottom to top, across
the eight slots available for front-end and back-end connectivity. Ports 0, 1, 2, 3, 20, 21,
22, and 23 are reserved and not currently used. Slots 4 through 11 and 24 through 31 can
be used for front-end connectivity. Ports 12 through 19 are used for back-end connectivity.
On the SIB, ports 0 and 1 are used for connectivity to the fabric in each director. Port
numbers do not become available unless an I/O module is inserted in the slot.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

57

The VMAX systems include:


Two Management Module Control Stations (MMCSs), which are preinstalled in Engine 1. The
MMCS combines the management modules and control station hardware into a single
module and is used as the Service Processor.
Two Management Modules (MM) per engine (2 through 8), which provide management
ports that connect to the Ethernet switch in System Bay 1
Two GS900/16 Ethernet switches, which connect to every engine and the matrix (through
the a management port), and resides in System Bay 1 only

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

58

The Point-of-Service (POS) Work Tray eliminates the need for repeat trips between the KVM
in System Bay 1 and the bay being serviced. In the event of MMCS-1 failure, there is no
need to move the KVM cables to MMCS-2 in order to access the necessary replacement
script. From the Work Tray, service personnel can log onto MMCS-2 directly using its unique
IP address. If the KVM on System Bay one should have a failure, using the POS Work Tray
to connect to MMCS-1 or MMCS-2 can be also be done. Files can be transferred between the
system and the laptop without having to connect a USB storage device directly to the
MMCS. When logging in, SSC credentials can be copied from an email or Service Request on
the laptop and pasted into the login screen. When performing activities in the rear of the
system, an additional red Ethernet cable is accessible and connects to the second internal
Ethernet switch, saving time by avoiding going from the front of the bay to the rear to
complete steps and continue scripts.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

59

In VMAX Family systems, and if there is more than one engine in the layout, System Bay 1
will include two Matrix Interface Board Enclosures (MIBE A and MIBE B), which will connect
to the System Interface Boards (SIB A and SIB B) on every engine. SIBs are also only
present, if the layout includes more than one engine. The VMAX 100K and 200K systems
use two 12-port MIBEs, and the 400K uses two 18-port MIBEs.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

60

60-Drive DAE components include:


Fans = N+1 (three total) with adaptive cooling (if one fails, others will speed up to
ensure proper cooling)

LCC = Link Control Card - connectivity to disks


Disks = 60 Disks - 3.5, multiple sizes and speeds
PS = Power Supply - PSA and PSB for redundant power (each with dual power
connections from PDU)
ICM = Inter Connect Module (back-end modules connect to LCCs through the cable
connections to the ICM)
As marked in red above, all DAEs will be screwed into the rack per shipping
requirements. These 4 screws will need to be removed in order to service the given
DAE and/of its internal components.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 2: Bays and Components

61

The 60-Drive DAEs use 6 Gb SAS connectivity to connect to up to 60 drives. Redundant


power, and N+1 fan configuration is provided for high availability. When fully populated, the
DAE weighs 225 lbs (102 kg), and therefore, a lift tool is needed for replacements.

Drives currently available in the 60-Drive DAE include 200, 400, 800GB and 1.6TB EFD;
300GB 15K RPM; 300GB, 600GB and 1.2TB 10K RPM, and 2 and 4TB 7.2K RPM drives.
Always check release notes and emc.support.com for the latest supported drives.
In order to have isolation of RAID group members for High Availability (HA), DAEs have
been divided into four power zones. This allows RAID groups to be striped across the four
distinct power zones. Most failures will only impact one RAID member.
A minimum of 1 DAE is required for Raid 1, Raid 5 3+1 and Raid 6 6+2.
A minimum of 2 DAEs is required for Raid 5 7+1 and Raid 6 14+2.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

62

120-Drive DAE components include:


SSC = System Status Card - Responsible for environmental monitoring of the DAE
components

Fans = N+2 (10 total) with adaptive cooling (if one fails, others will speed up to
ensure proper cooling)
LCC = Link Control Card - connectivity to disks
Disks = 120 Disks - 2.5, multiple sizes and speeds
PS = Power Supply - PSA0/PSA1 and PSB0/PSB1 for redundant power
As marked in red above, all DAEs will be screwed into the rack per shipping
requirements. These 4 screws will need to be removed in order to service the given
DAE and/of its internal components.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

63

The 120-Drive DAEs use 6 Gb SAS connectivity to connect to up to 120 drives. N+1 power
and N+2 fan configuration is provided for high availability. When fully populated, the DAE
weighs 150 lbs (68 kg), and therefore, a lift tool is needed for replacements.

Drives currently available in the 120-Drive DAE include: 200, 400, 800GB and 1.6TB EFD;
300GB 15K RPM; 300GB, 600GB and 1.2TB 10K RPM drives. Always check release notes
and emc.support.com for the latest supported drives.

As with the 60-drive DAE, in order to have isolation of RAID group members for High
Availability (HA), DAEs have been divided into four power zones in the 120-drive DAE.
Again, this allows RAID groups to be striped across the four distinct power zones, and most
failures will only impact one RAID member.

A minimum of 1 DAE is required for Raid 1, Raid 5 3+1 and Raid 6 6+2.

A minimum of 2 DAEs is required for Raid 5 7+1 and Raid 6 14+2.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

64

VMAX Family systems introduce the new 2U PDU. This PDU combines PDP and PDU
functionality. There are 24 outlets per PDU broken up into six groups of four. Each group is
connected to a breaker. Breakers are accessed through the rear door. The power tees are
used to turn on (push in) or turn off (pull out) the power for that particular bank of ports on
the given PDU. The two blue triangles in the center are used to lock/unlock the PDU from
the rack. These are used in the event of rack-mounting and/or replacing a PDU. This PDU is
available in 3 power options: Three-Phase Delta, Three-Phase Wye and Single-Phase power.
Each outlet on a given breaker is responsible for a specific component. For example; PDU
Zone B, outlet 10 (breaker 3) is responsible for supplying power to the KVM. Wiring
diagrams are available through Simplified SymmWin verification scripts.
NOTE: Color-coding is for knowledge transfer only and does not reflect any documented
troubleshooting method.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

65

VMAX Family systems include Single- or Three-Phase power components where the ThreePhase Delta is the primary use case. Both the Three-Phase Delta and Three-Phase Wye
require two power drops/bay. The Single-Phase requires up to six power drops/bay,
although not all power drops need to be connected. Note that there are always two PDUs,
regardless of power component type.
Locate the EMC VMAX Family (100K, 200K, 400K) Best Practices Guide for AC Power
Connections (Single-phase and Three-Phase).

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Module 2: Bays and Components

66

System bays will always have SPS 3A and 3B. ONLY System Bay 1 will have SPS 1A and 1B,
which are cabled to both the engine and the fabric. SPS 3A and 3B are also cabled to both
the engine (odd) and the fabric. This is true in multi-engine systems only. In single engine
systems, SPS 3A and 3B support the engine only. The positioning of the SPSs is fixed,
meaning that SPS 3A and 3B will always populate the top of the given bay, regardless of
the presence of SPS 1A and 1B.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

67

SPS 2A and 2B are only present if/when there is a second engine in the same bay. SPS 2A
and 2B are used to power the even engine, where 3A and 3B are used to power the odd
engine and fabric along with SPS 1A and 1B.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

68

This lesson covered the components and their locations of the VMAX 100K, 200K and 400K
arrays.

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Module 4: System Installation

69

This module focused on the System Bay components of the VMAX family, including VMAX
10K, VMAX 20K, VMAX 40K and VMAX3 Arrays.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

70

This Lab covers identifying and locating components in a VMAX Family array and using the
graphics in the lab guide and the physical array to answer questions.

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Module 2: Bays and Components

71

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Module 2: Bays and Components

72

This module focuses the cabling and configuration of a VMAX 40K, VMAX 20K/VMAX, VMAX
10K and VMAX3 Family array.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

This lesson covers the cabling and configuration of the VMAX 10K, 20K and 40K arrays.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

Specific colors are used to indicate the Engines. This is very useful in order to retrace the
cables, which have colored sheathes with the same color scheme as the labels on the cable
guides. The Symmetrix VMAX 20K/VMAX and VMAX 40K uses octants (one of eight
segments) based on the number of Engines that can be placed in the System Bay. The
colors for the various octants are as follows:
Enclosure Slot 1 (Dir 1 and Dir 2): Pink
ES 2 (Dir 3 and Dir 4): Purple
ES 3 (Dir 5 and Dir 6): Orange
ES 4 (Dir 7 and Dir 8): Yellow
ES 5 (Dir 9 and Dir 10): Green

ES 6 (Dir 11 and Dir 12): Blue


ES 7 (Dir 13 and Dir 14): Red
ES 8 (Dir 15 and Dir 16): White
The cable sheathes for Engine upgrades will be in the SPS location. If the SPS is already
installed, then the cable sheathes will be in the open me first box.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

This configuration has only one Engine in the System Bay, which is located in Enclosure #4. The
graphic shows a front view.
Drive population is for the lower half of the cabinet of Storage Bays 1A (direct connect) and 2A (daisy
chain). This allows for a total of 240 drives in the whole system.
This Flexible configuration has two Engines in the System Bay, which are located in enclosures #4 and
#5. The graphic shows a front view.
Drive population is for fully populated Storage Bays 1A (direct connect) and 2A (daisy chain). This
allows for a total of 480 drives in the whole system.
A Standard VMAX configuration consists of no more than 30 drives per loop (one level of daisy
chaining) for the first four Engines, after which four more Engines may be installed.
An Extended drive loop configuration consists of no more than 75 drives per loop (four levels of daisy
chaining). A maximum of four Engines may be installed.
A Flexible configuration consists of no more than 30 drives per loop (one level of daisy chaining) for
the first four Engines, after which a decision must be made to expand the loops and commit to
becoming an Extended drive loop configuration, or adding Engine 5, and commit to becoming a
Standard VMAX configuration.
This Flexible configuration has three Engines in the System Bay, which are located in Enclosures #3,
#4, and #5. The graphic shows a front view. Drive population is for fully populated Storage Bays 1A
and 1B (both direct connect), as well as 2A and 2B (both daisy chain). This allows for a total of 720
drives in the whole system.
This Flexible configuration has four Engines in the System Bay, which are located in Enclosures #3,
#4, #5, and #6. The graphic shows a front view. Drive population is for fully populated Storage Bays
1A and 1B (both direct connect), as well as 2A and 2B (both daisy chain). This allows for a total of 960
drives in the whole system. This configuration compares to a DMX4500 with 30 drive loops.
<Continued on next page>

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

This configuration has not yet been designated as either a Standard VMAX configuration or
an Extended drive loop configuration. Flexible configurations consist of up to four Engines,
with each Engine supporting one direct connect Drive Bay, and no more than one level of
daisy chained Drive Bays, with up to 30 drives per loop. Flexible configurations, when
upgraded, become extended drive loop configurations when the second level of daisy
chaining is added to Enclosures 1 through 4, and will become Standard configurations when
the 5th enclosure is added.
This Standard configuration has five Engines in the System Bay, which are located in
Enclosures #2, #3, #4, #5, and #6. The graphic shows a front view. Drive population is for
fully populated Storage Bays 1A and 1B (both direct connect), half-filled Storage Bay 1C
(direct connect), and half-filled Storage Bays 2C and 3C (daisy chain), as well as fully
populated Storage Bays 2A and 2B (daisy chain). This allows for a total of 1,320 drives in
the whole system.
This configuration has been designated as a Standard configuration, as the 5th Engine has
been added.
This Standard configuration has six Engines in the System Bay, which are located in
Enclosures #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, and #7. The graphic shows a front view. Drive population
is for fully populated Storage Bays 1A, 1B, and 1C (all direct connect), as well as fully
populated Storage Bays 2A, 2B, 2C, and 3C (daisy chain). This allows for a total of 1,680
drives in the whole system.
This Standard configuration has seven Engines in the System Bay, which are located in the
Enclosures numbered 1 through 7. The graphic shows a front view. Drive population is for
fully populated Storage Bays 1A-2A, 1C-3C, 1B-2B, and half-filled bays 1D-3D. This allows
for a total of 2,040 drives in the whole system.
This Standard configuration has eight Engines in the System Bay, which are numbered from
1 to 8. The graphic shows a front view.
Drive population is for fully populated Storage Bays 1A-2A, 1C-3C, 1B-2B, and 1D-3D. This
allows for a total of 2,400 drives in the whole system.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

VMAX 20K supports Extended Drive Loop Configurations, or Capacity Configurations. They
have four dedicated quadrants, each quadrant has eight direct attach DAEs, requiring dual
eight port disk directors. Each quadrant contains up to 120 direct attach drives. Two direct
attach bays are installed in a fully populated VMAX Extended Drive Loop Configuration,
which require four Director pairs; 5&6, 7&8, 9&10, 11&12.
Note: VMAX 40K does not support this Extended Drive Loop Configuration or Capacity
Configuration.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

This VMAX 40K or VMAX 20K High Density System configuration has eight Engines in the
System Bay, which are numbered from 1 to 8. The graphic shows a front view. Drive
population is for fully populated Storage Bays 1A-2A, 1C-2C, 1B-2B, and 1D-2D. This allows
for a total of 3,200 drives in the whole system.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

This VMAX 40K or VMAX 20K mixed High Density DAE and Standard DAE System
configuration has eight Engines in the System Bay, which are numbered from 1 to 8. The
graphic shows a front view. Drive population is for fully populated Storage Bays 1A-2A, 1C2C, 1B-2B, and 1D-2D. This allows for a total of 2,720 drives in the whole system. Note
that Storage Bays may be mixed in any order, and only one level of daisy chaining is
supported.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

Enhanced cabling support allows for dispersed Storage Bay installations. Daisy Chain
(DC) cabinets may be attached via 10M cables where needed, providing approximately
12 ft (3.6 meters) of back-to-back separation. Daisy Chained (DC) Drive Bays only
direct attach, bays are not eligible for separation. Mixed configuration systems
maintain existing configuration rules for Dispersion, Drive Bay separation.
Cables are routed under the floor or through the top via an EMC-supplied Grid Runner, or a
customer-supplied cable trough, or both the Grid Runner and the customer-supplied cable
trough.
RPQ is required for separation only. Subsequent upgrades of standard DC bays do not
require RPQ. This applies to new Daisy Chain bays only. Separated DC bays can be installed
online. For additional details, please refer to the VMAX Series Physical Planning Guide
available from the Symmetrix Hardware Document Viewer: Start > VMAX > Procedure >
Site Preparation.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

New for the Symmetrix VMAX 40K hardware release, is footprint-friendly System Bay dispersion. Not
to be confused with Storage Bay separation, System Bay dispersion allows the user to split their
Symmetrix VMAX 40K in half. VMAX 40K supports up to 25 meters of physical cable length dispersion
between System Bays. This process helps utilize space in a customers data center when there is no
more floor space for additional Engines and their corresponding Storage Bays. Twenty five meters of
dispersion length can be either vertical or horizontal, meaning across the datacenter or through floors.
Engines are dispersed in two System Bays. Once dispersed, engines are populated in a specific order
to maintain serviceability. This means that you can only disperse engines starting at the next lowest
engine number. One key point to note is that once you have added System Bay 2, any future engine
upgrades MUST be done in System Bay 2. You cannot add engines to System Bay 1 after
implementing a dispersed System Bay 2.
It is important to note here that after adding an engine into System Bay 2, its corresponding Storage
Bays should be placed in its correct position with that System Bay. For example, we have a VMAX 40K
configured with System Bay 1 containing Engines 4 and 5, and one direct attached Storage Bay
(Storage Bay 1A) and a daisy chain Storage Bay (Storage Bay 2A). We also have a dispersed System
Bay 2 containing Engines 3 and 6 with a direct attached Storage Bay (Storage Bay 1B) to the
immediate right, if facing the front of the system. If we add Engine 2 and its corresponding direct
attached Storage Bay (Storage Bay 1C), the bay will be placed to the left (facing the front of the
system) of System Bay 2.
Each of these System Bays support a service interface. All maintenance is still done on the Service
Processor. System Bay 1 uses the Standard Service Processor. System Bay 2 uses a remote service
terminal with Remotely Anywhere connections back to the Service Processor.
There are some restrictions to be aware of when implementing a dispersed VMAX 40K. The most
important restriction to note is that you cannot add engines to System Bay 1 after you have
implemented System Bay 2 for dispersion. All the proceeding engine upgrades MUST be done in
System Bay 2. All the same rules for engine upgrades will still apply, as in the order of engines to be
added.
Another restriction to note is that, once a dispersed bay is implemented, there will not be an option to
split the system into two individual systems. Related to that note, once a dispersed bay is
implemented, EMC will not offer the option to recombine all equipment into a single System Bay. No
RPQs will be accepted for either of these restrictions.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

10

Shown here is a VMAX 40K with dispersed System Bay 2. In this example, taken from the
VMAX 40K Series Physical Planning Guide, Engines 4 and 5 are in System Bay 1, and
Engines 3 and 6, 2 and 7, 1 and 8 are installed in dispersed System Bay 2. Note that only
Direct Attach Bay 1A is connected to System Bay 1. Also note that the daisy chained
Storage Bays my be dispersed for System Bays 1 and 2.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

11

Each Pod has the capacity to hold up to four Standard DAEs (Disk Array Enclosures), two
SPS (Standby Power Supplies), also known as Battery Backup Unit (BBU), and (60) Fibre
disk drives, for a total of (240) disk drives per Cabinet.

Note: On direct-connect DAEs, the physical drives are Targets 0 E, e.g., Drive C0, C1,
...... CE. On daisy chained DAEs, the targets increment appropriately, e.g., Targets F 1D
(first daisy-chained Storage Bay), Targets 1E 2C (second daisy-chained Storage Bay),
Targets 2D 3B (third daisy-chained Storage Bay), Targets 3C 4A (fourth daisy-chained
Storage Bay).

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

12

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

13

The Symmetrix VMAX 10K may have up to four engines. Engines 1 and 2 may have up to
45 drives per loop (all port 0 loops have 15 drives per loop). Engines 3 and 4 may have up
to 60 drives per loop (all port 0 loops have 15 drives per loop). The Drive Bay to the left of
System Bay 1 is numbered 1A, and the Drive Bays to the right of System Bay 4 are
numbered 1B and 2B (when viewed from the from the front). The placement of Drive Bays
1B and 2B vary depending on System Bay dispersion (Disk Bay dispersion is not allowed).
Engines 1 and 2 can add 2 more DAEs without SPS support, daisy-chained to a total of
three DAEs or 45 drives
Engines 3 and 4 can add 4 more DAEs without SPS support, daisy-chained to a total of four
DAEs or 60 drives
Thus, with 8 channels, Engines 1 and 2 can support 4x15 plus 4x45 drives for a maximum
of 240 drives per engine. Engines 3 and 4 can support 4x15 plus 4x60 drives for a
maximum of 300 drives per engine, a total of 1,080 drives.
Dispersion Kit 106-886-058 for System Bay 3 includes 20 meter cables for both the
Ethernet (purple/green) and MIBE cables for both System Bays 3 and 4, and optical (sfp)
modules for the SIB for System Bay 3. The 20 meter cables are used for routing purposes;
maximum separation between the bays is physically 10 meters.
Dispersion Kit 106-886-052 for System Bay 4, contains optical (sfp) modules for the SIB for
System Bay 4 (cables have already been routed with System Bay 3 cables).

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

14

Shown here, is a VMAX 40K Engine. Note that each director has two System Interface
Boards (SIB). The port assignments for the Backend I/O Modules (which use QSFP type
connectors), the Front-end I/O Modules, and the SIB Modules are also shown.

Odd director SIB A1 connects to MIBE A1


Odd director SIB B1 connects to MIBE B1
Odd director SIB A2 connects to MIBE A2
Odd director SIB B2 connects to MIBE B2

Even director SIB A1 connects to MIBE A1


Even director SIB B1 connects to MIBE B1
Even director SIB A2 connects to MIBE A2
Even director SIB B2 connects to MIBE B2

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

15

Shown here, is a VMAX 10K Engine. Note that each director has two System Interface
Boards (SIB). The port assignments for the Backend I/O Modules (which use QSFP type
connectors), the Front-end I/O Modules, and the SIB Modules are also shown.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

16

The hardware guides for the four (4) Front-end I/O Modules are part of the kits, which are
usually found in the empty SPS frame for that particular Engine. The black inserts and the
blue clip-on parts need to be manually installed. This includes putting the labels on the blue
covers, for which there are specific locations (see the numbered items on this graphic). The
picture insert shows a front-end segment (black plastic) without the blue cover attached to
it. The host cables are inserted in the guides. The blue port numbering guides are clipped
on after the cables are in place. All host cables from each I/O Module should be routed to
the RIGHT. CAUTION! DO NOT route cables to the left. They will be trapped behind backend
cables if an upgrade is done. The cables should be routed through the lower opening in the
cable guide on the right side of the chassis. As the cables run vertically, they should be kept
to the right of all the cable guides so they are not behind any of the FRUs in the chassis. As
much as possible, tuck the cables securely to the right of each of the cable guides, all the
way to the bottom of the cabinet. If there is a Velcro retainer on the right, at the very
bottom of the cabinet (below the power connector), retain the cables there. See Primus
emc211131 for more detail.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

17

QSFP (Quad Small Form-Factor Pluggable) cables are used to connect 4 DAE LCC
connections to one Backend I/O Module, as shown in the example above. The cables
associated with an octant are labeled for connection to both the even and odd directors I/O
Modules 0 and 1 for the appropriate engine.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

18

The Standard Storage Bay is shipped from the factory fully cabled at the LCC (Link Control
Card) end. Pictured above is the cable guide showing the routing of the cables to their
appropriate LCC to allow easier and safer access to each FRU.
Note: Cable trays are added at installation, when necessary, for routing cables through
Storage Bays to the System Bay.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

19

The VMAX 10K (987) Port 1 drive loops are capable of having combinations of Standard and
High Density drive loops:
Standard configuration - 15, 30, or 45 drives per loop
Dense configuration 25 or 50 drives per loop (no second level daisy chaining, no Storage
Bays)
Mixed configuration 15, 25, 30, 40, 45, 50, 55, 65 or 75 drives per loop (Engine 1 cannot
have 75 drive loops, Engine 1 must include a Standard DAE, so 65 drive loop max)
Color-coded clips are to be used when installing daisy-chained DAEs. For A1, the clip is
orange; B1 is blue, C1 is yellow and D1 is green. These cable clips must be installed in the
field. These cable clips will help to ensure proper placement and routing of the cables, as
well as tracing for troubleshooting.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

20

Labels on the rear cabinet doors are displayed above. These labels have the same colorcoding that the cable clips on the previous page detailed, highlighting the daisy-chaining of
the loops in both the System Bay and the Storage (Drive) Bay.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

21

System Bays components are determined by Bay number. Each Bay contains DAEs, an
Engine and (2) SPS Trays. System Bay 1 contains a Server, KVM and UPS. System Bay 2
contains a MIBE. System Bays 3 & 4 are identical, and contain only engines, Standard
DAEs, and SPSs. Note that there is room for 12 high density DAEs in the System Bay,
however, to be consistent, only 10 Standard DAEs or 10 High Density DAEs are supported
in standard and mixed configurations.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

22

System Bays components are determined by Bay number. Each Bay contains DAEs, an
Engine and (2) SPS Trays. System Bay 1 contains a Server, KVM and UPS. System Bay 2
contains a MIBE. System Bays 3 & 4 are identical, and contain only engines, Standard
DAEs, and SPSs. Note that there is room for 12 high density DAEs in the System Bay,
however, to be consistent, only 10 Standard DAEs or 10 High Density DAEs are supported
in standard and mixed configurations.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

23

In a VMAX 10K (987) high density configuration, each Bay contains 12 high density DAEs,
an Engine and (2) SPS Trays. System Bay 1 contains a Server, KVM and UPS. System Bay 2
contains a MIBE. System Bays 3 & 4 are identical, and contain only engines, Standard
DAEs, and SPSs. Note that, to be consistent with mixed and standard configurations, the
DAE numbering remains the same for DAEs 1 through 10, and the additional daisy-chained
DAEs are labeled DAE 31 and 41.
Note: Even though the DAE count varies in standard, mixed and high density
configurations, DAEs 1,2, 5 and 6 are always direct attached Vault DAEs.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

24

The minimum VMAX 10K File configuration comes with two control stations and two data
movers. The maximum configuration supports up to four data movers.
Each data mover is directly connected to two Front-end Adapter (FA) ports on the VMAX
engine. This makes the implementation process simpler, as this is configured at the factory.
Since there is a minimum of two data movers, the initial configuration will require four FA
ports.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

25

Systems with High Density Drives (25-drive DAEs) include cables that are connected at the
factory from data movers to ports in Engine 1, System Bay 1. Systems with standard or
mixed drive configuration must be cabled as a field operation.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

26

The Installation Guide shows that when multiple engines are configured, the data mover is
cabled to separate engines.
In this example two engines are configured;
Data Mover 2 is cabled to director 1E port 0 and director 3E port 0
Data Mover 3 is cabled to director 2E port 0 and director 4E port 0
Data Mover 4 is cabled to director 1F port 0 and director 3F port 0
Data Mover 5 is cabled to director 2F port 0 and director 4F port 0

See the Installation Guide for 3 and 4 Engine configurations.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

27

There are four MIBEs in the VMAX 40K System Bay. Each director is cabled to MIBE 1A ,
MIBE 2A, MIBE 1B and MIBE 2B. There are two MIBEs in the VMAX 20K/VMAX and VMAX
10K System Bay. Each director is cabled to both MIBE A and MIBE B, and the layout is the
same for all MIBEs. A single MIBEs Port numbers and director assignments are shown
above (both VMAX and VMAX 10K are the same Directors 1-8). Cabling is done by
manufacturing, but during a replacement, careful attention must be paid to properly recabling the MIBE connections.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

28

Verify cables in System Bay 2 :


From:

To:

Director 3 SIB Port A

MIBE A Port 10

Director 3 SIB Port B

MIBE B Port 10

Director 4 SIB Port A

MIBE A Port 11

Director 4 SIB Port B

MIBE B Port 11

Connect cables from System Bay 2:

From:

To:

MIBE A Port 8

Director 1 SIB Port A

MIBE B Port 8

Director 1 SIB Port B

MIBE A Port 9

Director 2 SIB Port A

MIBE B Port 9

Director 2 SIB Port B

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

29

Connect cables from System Bay 3:


From:

To:

Director 5 SIB Port A

MIBE A Port 12

Director 5 SIB Port B

MIBE B Port 12

Director 6 SIB Port A

MIBE A Port 13

Director 6 SIB Port B

MIBE B Port 13

Connect cables from System Bay 4:

From:

To:

Director 7 SIB Port A

MIBE A Port 14

Director 7 SIB Port B

MIBE B Port 14

Director 8 SIB Port A

MIBE A Port 15

Director 8 SIB Port B

MIBE B Port 15

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

30

Note that a Single Engine VMAX 20K/VMAX or VMAX 40K has both cables in the lower port
of the Management Module.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

31

With the installation of a third Engine, that is Engine number 3, the green cable from
Management Module A of Engine 4 needs to be moved to the lowest number Engine
(Engine 3 in this example), and daisy-chained back to the port on Management Module A
of Engine 4. As a rule, the purple cable connected directly to the server is always connected
to Management Module B of the upper Engine, and the green cable connected directly to
the server is always connected to the Management Module A of the lowest number Engine.
The purple cable from Management Module B of Engine 4 needs to be daisy-chained down
to the port on Management Module B of Engine 3.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

32

When System Bays are dispersed there are two Service Processors, and a dispersion kit is
required to complete the Ethernet cabling.
The green cable attaches from the Service Processor in System Bay 1 to the lowest number
Engine in System Bay 1 (Engine 4 in this example). Next, it is daisy-chained back to the
port on the Management Module A of highest number Engine in System Bay 1 (Engine 5 in
this example). The cable must then go to the highest number Engine in the dispersed
System bay 2 (Engine 8 in this example), then the green Ethernet cable will daisy chain
down through the Engines to the lowest number (Engine 1 in this example) before returning
to the Service Processor in System Bay 2.
The purple cable attaches from the Service Processor in System Bay 1 to the highest
number Engine in System Bay 1 (Engine 5 in this example). Next, it is daisy-chained back
to the port on the Management Module A of lowest Engine number in System Bay 1
(Engine 4 in this example). The cable must then go to the lowest Engine in the dispersed
System Bay 2 (Engine 1 in this example), then the purple Ethernet cable will daisy chain up
through the Engines to the highest number (Engine 8 in this example) before returning to
the Service Processor in System Bay 2.
As a rule, the purple cable connected directly to the server is always connected to the
Management Module B of the highest number Engine, and the green cable connected
directly to the server is always connected to the Management Module A of the lowest
number Engine.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

33

Seen from the rear of the VMAX 10K system, the Management Modules on the left-hand
side of the Engines are Management Modules B, and are connected with each other
through PURPLE Ethernet daisy-chain cables. Management Modules A, placed on the righthand side of the Engines, are connected with one another through GREEN Ethernet cables.
Should the system contain two System Bays/Engines, that is Engine numbers 1 and 2, the
purple cable from Management Module B of Engine 1 needs to be moved to the highest
number Engine (Engine 2) and daisy-chained back to the port on the Management Module
B of Engine 1. As a rule, the purple cable connected directly to the server is always
connected to Management Module B of the highest number Engine.
With the installation of a third Engine, that is Engine number 3, the purple cable from
Management Module B needs to be moved to Engine 3 and daisy-chained back between
Engine 3, Engine 2 and Engine 1. With the installation of a fourth Engine, that is Engine
number 4, the purple cable from Management Module B needs to be moved to Engine 4
and daisy-chained back between Engine 4, Engine 3, Engine 2 and Engine 1. The green
Ethernet cable is always directly connected from the server to Management Module A of
Engine 1, and needs to be daisy chained to Management Module A of Engine 2, then
Engine 3, then Engine 4. As a rule, the green cable connected directly to the server is
always connected to the Management Module A of Engine 1.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

34

This lesson covers the cabling and configuration of the VMAX 10K, 20K and 40K arrays.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

35

This lesson covers the cabling and configuration of VMAX 100K, 200K and 400K arrays.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

36

Components in System Bay 1 of a single engine bay include Standby Power Supplies (SPSs)
to support the engine, a Fabric and SPSs to support it (in multi-engine systems only), one
engine, a Power Distribution Unit (PDU), a KVM (Keyboard, Video, Mouse), a set of Ethernet
switches (seen from the rear of the bay) and DAEs associated with the engine. System Bays
2 through 8 do not have the Fabric and its SPSs, KVM or Ethernet switches. A Work Tray is
included is System Bays 2 through 8 in place of the KVM. We will discuss these components
in more detail in upcoming slides.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

37

Components in System Bay 1 of a dual engine bay include Standby Power Supplies (SPSs)
to support the engines, a Fabric and SPSs to support it (in multi-engine systems only), one
or two engines, a Power Distribution Unit (PDU), a KVM (Keyboard, Video, Mouse), an
Ethernet switch and DAEs. System Bays 2 through 4 do not have the Fabric and its SPSs, a
KVM or a set of Ethernet switches. A Work Tray is included in System Bays 2 through 4 in
place of the KVM. We will discuss these components in more detail in upcoming slides.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

38

When a single engine system is ordered with one or two DAEs, the upgrade path is open. If
you choose to add daisy-chained DAEs, the system permanently becomes a single engine
bay. Additional DAEs can be added in single increments for increased capacity. If you
choose to add an engine and supporting DAEs, the system becomes a dual engine bay and
direct-attached DAEs can be added to support the second engine.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

39

The number of bays depends on the VMAX Family model, the customer requirements and
the space and/or organization of the customer data center. The layout of these bays also
have a couple of other factors involved, such as, What type of bays are they - single
engine or dual engine? What type of layout is the customer looking for? What does the
data center allow for - an adjacent, dispersed or mixed layout?

Lets take a look at the next few slides to review these options.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

40

In a single engine/adjacent layout configuration system, bays are placed left to right (front
facing) starting with System Bay 1 through System Bay 8. Note that single
engine/dispersed layouts allow for System Bay 2 through 8 to be up to 82 feet (25 meters)
from System Bay 1. This allows for more flexibility within the customers data center.
Directors are numbered sequentially, beginning with Engine 1 in System Bay 1, with each
engine containing two directors. The Even Director is on top, and the Odd Director is on the
bottom.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

41

In a dual engine/adjacent layout configuration system, bays are placed left to right (front
facing) starting with System Bay 1 through System Bay 4. Note that dual engine/dispersed
layouts allow for any System Bay 2 through 4 to be up to 82 feet (25 meters) from System
Bay 1. This allows for more flexibility within the customers data center.
Directors are still numbered sequentially. The thing to be careful about here is that
although the two directors per engine will still be Even Director on top and Odd Director on
bottom, the engine layout is the opposite. For example in System Bay 1 of a dual engine
system, Engine 1 (odd engine with Directors 1 and 2) will be on top, while Engine 2 (even
engine with Directors 3 and 4) will be below.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

42

Dispersion of System Bays 2 through 8 is supported in the VMAX3 Family of arrays. The
bays can be dispersed up to 25 meters from System Bay 1 to allow for flexibility in
configurations. The blue lines in this diagram represent multiple Infiniband and Ethernet
links.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

43

Dual engine configurations also support dispersion of Bays 2 through 4 up to 25 meters


from System Bay 1.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

44

Dual engine configurations also support dispersion of Bays 2 through 4 up to 25 meters


from System Bay 1.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

45

VMAX 100K and 200K systems are shipped with 12-port Infiniband (IB) switches, and VMAX
400K systems are shipped with 18-port Infiniband switches. Please refer to the EMC
VMAX Family VMAX 100K, 200K, 400K Installation Guide for cable routing best practices
with multiple bays. If system is ordered as a multi-engine config, IB switched are shipped
with order.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

46

Engine 1 includes two MMCSs (1 per director).


Engines on System Bays 2 through 8 include two management modules: Management
Module A (lower) that connects to the right (lime green) Ethernet switch, and Management
Module B (upper) that connects to the left (violet) Ethernet switch.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

47

Engine 1 includes two MMCSs (1 per director). The above diagram shows the MMCS cabling;
the part number, color coding and use of each cable/port.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

48

The cabling of each director to the Ethernet switches is very specific. This build-out slide
shows you the cabling of MMCS 1, MMCS 2 and Directors 3 and 4. Each of these cabling will
be marked with a From and To label to facilitate in any cabling that may need to be
completed. Unlike previous generations, these are now point-to-point connections.
Please note: Port 3 on each Ethernet switch is intentionally left unpopulated. Port 4 is used
to connect to the respective IB switch. (Ethernet switch B Port 4 to IB (Mibe) B and
Ethernet switch A Port 4 to IB (Mibe) A) Wiring diagrams are available thrrough Simplified
SymmWin verification scripts.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

49

Systems with adjacent layouts use three, five, or 8 meter copper cables to connect engines
back to the MIBE in the system bay. There are specific brackets and channels to be used for
certain cables. The middle vertical channel is used to route system cables (Ethernet, MIBE
and SAS).

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

50

As described on the cabling diagram, when routing cables, there are specific brackets for
certain cables. This build-out slide steps you through cabling a single engine/multi-bay
system. Note that as a part of the cable routing, you will also bolt the cabinets together to
avoid any individual movement of a single bay which could result in the cutting of the
cables which are routed between them.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

51

As described on the cabling diagram, when routing cables there are specific brackets for
certain cables. This build-out slide steps you through cabling a dual engine/multi-bay
system. Note that as a part of the cable routing, you will also bolt the cabinets together to
avoid any individual movement of a single bay which could result in the cutting of the
cables which are routed between them.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

52

VMAX Family arrays are more redundant than ever! Any one component can fail (IO
module, cable, ICM) and every director emulation (FA, EDS, DS, IM, etc.) still has access to
every drive. Here, we are laying out the cabling for a DAE 60. Notice where the ICMs and
primary and expansion ports are located, as we will see this differs from our other DAE
option on the next slide. Also, notice in this cabling diagram how the Odd Director is
connected to port zero of each DAE, where the Even Director is cabled to Port 1 of the each
DAE.

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Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

53

Here, we see the cabling for a DAE 120. Notice the difference in the layout of the ICMs and
primary and expansion ports when compared to the DAE 60 we just looked at. However, the
cabling remains the same with the Odd Director cabled to Port 0 and the Even Director
cabled to Port 1 of each DAE.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

54

This lesson covers the cabling and configuration of the of the VMAX 100K, 200K and 400K
arrays.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

55

This module focused on the cabling and configuration of a VMAX 40K, VMAX 20K/VMAX,
VMAX 10K, and the VMAX3 Family array.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

56

This Lab covers cabling a VMAX Family array utilizing proper documentation.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module: Module Name

57

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 3: Cabling & Configuration

58

This module focuses on installation of the a VMAX Family array.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

Be sure to use SolVe-Desktop to download the Symmetrix Procedure Generator. It is


recommended to download this before going to the customer site, as your network
connection is not guaranteed.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

http://www.corkc4.isus.emc.com/wiki/index.php/Symmetrix_Procedure_Generator

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

From https://support.emc.com, select Service Center. From the Service Center, select Get
and Manage Licenses, then, depending upon what license you are looking for, select VMAX
Series, VMAX3 Series or Symmetrix Performance Analyzer - SPA.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

Select new VMAX, then enter the License Activation Code (LAC). Note that for a new
system, the LAC is identical to the Symmetrix VMAX Serial Number. A license file will be
generated for you.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

The LAC file will be generated and made available for download and emailed to you, this file
is required during installation. This license activation file must be installed on your
Symmetrix VMAX system. Refer to the Symmetrix VMAX Administration Guide or Procedure
Generator for details on how to install a license file. Validate that the License file matches
the BIN file using the ELM Compare tool in SymmWin, the License file (on Desktop
SymmWin) should be stored in the C:\5875\user directory. SymmWin > Tools > ELM > ELM
Compare The user will be prompted to select the BIN file then the License Key file.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

To obtain Service Level Credentials you must login to http://slc.emc.com/psscm/. When


navigating to the Central Manager page you will first be prompted to provide your RSA
credentials (NT username and FOB password).

Once you specify the VMAX3 you need credentials for, the Duration, Activity and so on, the
created credential will be displayed on the screen and an email providing your credential
information will be auto generated/sent to you if you did check the Email box under your
Dispatch Preferences.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

Upon log in to Simplified Symmwin, Site Note and Tasks View Blocks are displayed. Across
the bottom left, you will see additional buttons for View Blocks that can be opened - System
Management, Site Info, Lock Management and Replacement Logs. On the lower right of the
screen, User and Role are displayed. Depending on the user access level, options will differ.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

SymmWin is a EMC proprietary GUI program running on the Service Processor. SymmWin
can also run on a standalone PC. It provides access to procedures for remote support
personnel. It also is used for maintenance activities on legacy Symmetrix/VMAX arrays.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

10

The number and type of kits shipped with the system is determined by the physical layout
of the system bays (adjacent or dispersed) and the number of DAEs in the system bays.
Although some tools are shipped with the system kits, additional tools are required to
complete installation.

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Module 4: System Installation

11

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

12

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

13

Ordering requirements for a Symmetrix VMAX 10K system are quick, simple and easy to
use via a Web portal interface:
Account teams submit the order
Manufacturing builds the VMAX 10K and runs the Configure Install New
Installer runs the Set-Up Script, when the script is complete, the array is ready to be
presented to the customer
Customer runs wizards in SMC, giving them the ability to configure the array for their
needs. End result is an array that has all pools and tiers defined, as well as applicable,
associated FAST policies.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

14

There is a new Ease of Use process being introduced for the VMAX 10K systems. Rather
than running the Configure & Install New Symmetrix script onsite, it will be run by
manufacturing using the Direct Express/Channel Express order details, prior to shipping the
system to the customer site. Using the Symmetrix Procedure Generator and a new script,
VMAX 10K Set-Up Script will prepare the system for customer use. This will allow a much
faster installation at the customer site. As the configuration is loaded at manufacturing,
there is no CCA (Change Control Automation) requirement for VMAX 10K installations,
however, VMAX 10K uses the same process as VMAX for upgrades. CE creates the UPG.BIN
and a CCA is required.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

15

The VMAX Family systems and components must acclimate to the operating environment
before applying power to ensure they do not experience changes in temperature and
humidity which could cause condensation to form. DO NOT apply power prior to the number
of hours specified in the table. Please also refer to the EMC VMAX Family VMAX 100K,
200K, 400K Installation Guides for more information.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

16

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

17

Each bay in the Symmetrix VMAX and has two power zones, A and B. Each power zone
needs to be connected to different PDUs at the customer site. Not having proper power
connections leaves the Symmetrix in a vulnerable state, and will cause the machine to vault
and go to an offline state and remain that way until sufficient power can be restored to the
unit.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

18

Each bay in the Symmetrix VMAX and has two power zones, A and B. Each power zone
needs to be connected to different PDUs at the customer site. Not having proper power
connections leaves the Symmetrix in a vulnerable state, and will cause the machine to vault
and go to an offline state and remain that way until sufficient power can be restored to the
unit.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

19

Each bay in the Symmetrix VMAX and has two power zones, A and B. Each power zone
needs to be connected to different PDUs at the customer site. Not having proper power
connections leaves the Symmetrix in a vulnerable state, and will cause the machine to vault
and go to an offline state and remain that way until sufficient power can be restored to the
unit.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

20

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

21

Each bay in the VMAX has two power zones, A and B. Each power zone needs to be
connected to different PDUs at the customer site. Not having proper power connections
leaves the Symmetrix in a vulnerable state, and will cause the machine to vault and go to
an offline state and remain that way until sufficient power can be restored to the unit. The
Power Connection Worksheet for the VMAX System is shown above, and can be found in the
Installation Manual. Complete this Worksheet to document the customers power setup for
each installed VMAX 40K, VMAX 20K/VMAX.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

22

The Power Connection Worksheet for the VMAX3 System is shown above and can be found
on SoLVe Desktop.

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Module 4: System Installation

23

Verify from the back of the system that all I/O modules are seated properly and that the
latch trigger is pressed in. Also, be sure that all power zone switches are pushed in the ON
position.

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Module 4: System Installation

24

Simplified Symmwin is used to run the Verify VMAX Setup script. Launch Simplified
Symmwin from the desktop and log in using your SSC credential and password.
Upon login, based on user credentials, Simplified Symmwin (or Symmwin for
PSE/Engineering) will be automatically launched rather than having to select as we are
doing here.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

25

To verify the system information, launch Simplified Symmwin and click on the Site Info
View Block. Next, go to the desktop of the KVM and verify the computer name. Be sure that
the computer name matches the serial number of the Symmetrix.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

26

The Verify VMAX Setup script verifies the configuration and status of the system hardware
and software.
Some script tasks include:
Taking the system offline verifies vault state and puts system back online
Checks cabling (power, MIBE, Ethernet, BE) and verifies FRUs (drives, memory, etc.)
Verifies Device Ready State
Verifies pools are set up properly
Starts ConnectEMC
Verifies MMCS connectivity
Schedules Battery Test
Checks GuestOS Services
Upon successful running of the script, the VMAX Family system is now available with all
directors online.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

27

The VMAX Config & Install New Script will perform a series of tasks to prepare the system
for customer use. For additional details, Procedure Generator and the Symmetrix
Installation Manual are available from the Symmetrix HW Document Viewer.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

28

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

29

EMC Secure Remote Support Gateway provides customers with secure, high-speed, and
proactive around-the-clock remote support of EMC platforms. Advanced security features
address federal and industry regulations to keep customers in compliance, while the IPbased connection accelerates time-to-resolution and lowers costs.
EMC installs the Gateway software on a dedicated, customer-provided server that becomes
the conduit for all communications between EMC and the customers information
infrastructure. Once installed, the Gateway monitors the customers EMC systems aroundthe-clock and automatically notifies the EMC Support Center of any system errors. If an
error is detected, an authorized and authenticated EMC support professional connects back
into the customers system based on their customized security and remote access settings
to diagnose and, if necessary, repair the EMC system.
Release 2.18 is called ESRS. The ESRS 1.xx implementation is called ESRS Gateway.
Starting with ESRS 2, EMC will collect connectivity test data from Symmetrix Device Clients
deployed at customer sites.
For more detail see the Release notes on Powerlink, or the Symmetrix Connectivity
Verification eLearning available at:
https://learning.emc.com/Saba/Web/Main/goto/464389298

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

30

To complete the install, you will test Call Home and set up EMC Secure Remote
Support for the customer site that allow it.
Note that if no network access is available, you must contact support for connect-in
testing.
ConnectEMC configuration is the same as on VMAX-2 for ESRS connections. It is only
configured on MMCS-1 and, when saved, will auto-sync MMCS-2. ESRS does require both
MMCSs to be deployed and devices will be deployed using the Add utility in ESRS
ServiceLink.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

31

When deploying the devices, they must be deployed as MMCS-1 and MMCS-2 respectively,
as shown here.

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Module 4: System Installation

32

Here, we can see an example of an ESRS remote connection with a VMAX3.

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Module 4: System Installation

33

With the ZBA-Global, you only need one modem for worldwide use, rather than a list of
different part numbers (depending on what country the modem is used in). This model has
approval in many countries, so you can ship one SKU (stock unit) virtually anywhere in the
world.
Go to www.multitech.com/globalmodem for more details.
Exchange of the modems between the machines is not supported. Although it is the same
modem, different part numbers are used because of the power and data cabling (listed
above).

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

34

The process to configure the VMAX 10K components for online operations after running the
VMAX 10K Set-Up Script is documented in the installation guide included with the
Symmetrix Hardware Document Viewer (available on https://support.emc.com). Steps
include powering on the Data Movers and Control stations. Monitor the boot process via
Hyper Terminal, accepting any default settings.
Connect both Control Stations MGMT ports to the customers external network. Network
Time Protocol (NTP) can be configured, as well as IP aliasing. As both the VMAX 10K and
the VG50 can be managed by Unisphere, a link and Launch feature is available to quickly
move from one to the other.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

35

To configure the VMAX 10K components for online operations, log into the Control Stations
and configure the Control Stations internal network settings and settings for the customers
network. Connect the CS 0 and CS 1 MGMT ports to the customers external network. From
your service laptop, connect a serial cable to the serial port on Control Station 0. On your
service laptop, configure a terminal emulator, like HyperTerminal or Putty, with a serial
connection with the settings of: nineteen thousand two hundred (19200) bits per second,
eight (8) data bits, parity NONE, one (1) stop bit, flow control NONE. Set terminal
emulation to ANSI. Typically, this is done by using COM 1. Power on Control Station 0 and
monitor the boot of the NAS gateway once it has completed and the login prompt appears.
Log in as the root user with password, nasadmin. Run the NAS External Network
Configuration script on CS 0 to configure the gateway for the customers network:#
/nas/tools/nas_extnetconfig then follow the script prompts to enter the IP address,
netmask, gateway, hostname,domain, and DNS server addresses for CS 0. Repeat the
process for CS 1.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

36

The process to configure Unisphere Link and launch feature is to the point the browser to
the UVMAX host and log in as administrator. Navigate to Administration, click the Link and
Launch wizard, and create the Client ID and Client Password. Then, add these same
credentials to EMC Unisphere, which is used by the VNX gateway. Point the browser to the
EMC Unisphere host (CS 0 IP address) and log in as root/nasadmin or nasadmin/nasadmin
with Scope set to Local. Navigate to Storage, and in the Configure Unisphere for VMAX task
list, click Register Unisphere for VMAX.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

37

The Link and Launch feature allows Unisphere for VMAX to be launched from Unisphere (for
VNX). Unisphere for VMAX can be running on the same host, or a different host than
Unisphere (VNX). Link and Launch establishes session-based credentials that enable you to
link to and launch the following Unisphere for VMAX (UVMAX) windows from within EMC
Unisphere: VMAX Dashboard, Symmetrix alerts, Symmetrix performance, VMAX Provision
Storage Wizard, and Symmetrix LUN view.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

38

The ConnectHome function automatically notifies the EMC service center or other service
providers if the system detects a serious problem with the NAS Gateway. ConnectHome
sends messages by using Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) to an EMC Secure
Remote Support (ESRS) monitoring client or ESRS gateway system, email, File Transfer
Protocol (FTP), or a modem. To configure ConnectHome, use Unisphere and login with the
username of root and password of nasadmin. The ConnectHome feature is a separate
configuration from ESRS for the VMAX.
From the task list, under Service Tasks, select Manage ConnectHome for File. Use the
dropdown list next to ESRS Priority, Email Priority, FTP Priority, or Modem Priority and set
one of them as Primary. You can optionally select a Secondary and Tertiary delivery
method. Complete remaining fields for the selected methods and click Apply.
Note: If you select ESRS Priority (recommended), click Manage ESRS Settings in the ESRS
Priority field. This link navigates directly to the Manage ESRS page for the primary Control
Station. To manage the ESRS on a standby Control Station, you must select Manage EMC
Secure Remote Support from the task list under Service Tasks.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

39

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

40

This module focuses on installation of the a VMAX Family array.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

41

This Lab covers downloading SolVe Desktop and familiarizing yourself with the interface. As
well as downloading an installation procedure.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

42

This Lab covers familiarizing yourself with the process of obtaining a service level credential
for access to a VMAX Family array by navigating and logging on to Central Manager and
generating a service level credential.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

43

This Lab covers performing an installation of a VMAX family array.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

44

This Lab covers invoking a permanent spare.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

45

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 4: System Installation

46

This module focuses on access to and navigation of Simplified Symmwin as well as running
scripted procedures, navigating through environmentals in SymmWin and gathering log
files.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 5: Management

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 5: Management

When multiple View Blocks are open, it may be difficult to read what is on the screen. To
expand a View Block to full screen for better viewing, click the right icon in the upper right
of the View Block. To return it to fit on the screen with the other View Blocks, click the icon
again.

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Module 5: Management

Notes can be added and deleted using the Site Note View Block.

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Module 5: Management

The Site Info View Block contains site-specific details such as system serial number, site
name, model and spare service type.

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Module 5: Management

The Tasks View Block displays completed, failed and pending tasks. Actions such as running
a script can be performed using the buttons on the lower left of the screen. Based on the
user and role, these actions will vary.

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Module 5: Management

Launch replacement scripts from the Tasks View Block. Reported failures will be displayed in
the Tasks View Block. Select the part type, and click Run to launch the script. In this
example, we have both a director power supply and a spare drive to replace. Complete the
replacement procedure for one component before launching another script. We have
chosen to replace the director power supply first.

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Module 5: Management

Details of Replacement Logs can be displayed using the Show Details button.

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Module 5: Management

The System Management View block provides access to configuration, verification,


management and recovery procedures. Clicking on a selection will launch a script for the
desired procedure. Based on the user credentials, options in System Management will differ.

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Module 5: Management

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Module 5: Management

10

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Module 5: Management

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With SymmWin open if you navigate to the Tools dropdown and select Environmental this
will bring up the Environmental Tools window. From this window you can run many different
system checks as shown here.

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Module 5: Management

12

By selecting the Alarms tab and clicking Read Alarms, the system will report back the status
of many different Modules.

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As another example, here we have selected the Power tab, System Bay tab and Cabling tab.

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Module 5: Management

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Module 5: Management

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Module 5: Management

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To gather logs from SymmWin, click the Create Legacy Logall Zip Files icon Zip Log Files
Create Legacy Logall Zip and choose a date range.

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Module 5: Management

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Module 5: Management

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To gather logs from Solutions Enabler, from a command prompt run symcfg discover and
then symaudit list sid <sid number> > audit.log. Then search for your audit.log file.

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Module 5: Management

19

To gather logs from Unisphere for VMAX select the System tab and choose Audit Log.

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Module 5: Management

20

To gather STP data from a VMAX3 array, double-click the gosservice icon on the desktop
choose vAPP Manager check off TOOLS-0 and or TOOLS-1 and select Next.

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Module 5: Management

21

Once the TOOLS you selected appears, highlight it and click Connect. Choose Yes to
proceed

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Module 5: Management

22

From the Appliance Info tab and under the Operations section of the dashboard choose
Export Log File STP Yes

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Module 5: Management

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Module 5: Management

24

This module focused on access to and navigation of Simplified Symmwin as well as running
scripted procedures, navigating through environmentals in SymmWin and gathering log
files.

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Module 5: Management

25

This Lab covers familiarizing yourself with the Simplified SymmWin GUI.

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Module 5: Management

26

This module focuses on ESD best practice and the four methods used to run scripts for all
FRUs, on VMAX 40K, VMAX 20K/VMAX, VMAX 10K and VMAX3 Family arrays using
Simplified SymmWin.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

This lesson covers ESD best practices, identifying and running scripts for Field Replaceable
Units (FRUs) and listing some special FRU considerations.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

Please take note of ESD precautions before replacing Symmetrix FRUs. Store all printed
circuit boards in anti-static bags. Use a ground strap whenever you handle hot replaceable
parts. Store all printed circuit boards in anti-static bags. You must use the ESD kit when
handling directors, DIMMs, and I/O modules. If an emergency arises and an ESD kit is
unavailable, follow the procedures under Procedures without an ESD kit in the maintenance
manual.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

With a dispersed configuration, bays may be separated up to 25 meters from System Bay 1.
Replacement scripts are run from System Bay 1. However, the component being replaced
may be in another bay. Locating the bay can be a tedious task; serial numbers are
displayed inside the doors on the front of the bays only. If a component is replaced from
the rear (for example, an I/O module), finding the correct bay can be difficult in large data
centers.
VMAX3 Family arrays have front and rear lightbars to assist in locating the desired bay.
Using the lightbars to identify the proper bay is especially useful to non-EMCers cabling
front-end connections. Unisphere for VMAX console provides the ability to blink the
lightbars on the desired bay. The rear lightbar blinks in parallel with the front for
identification from the rear of the cabinet, which is where the front-end cables are
connected.
EMC PSE and remote support personnel have access to blink the lightbars through
Symmwin.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

Like System Bay 1, the dispersed System Bay will have a 1U server and KVM for servicing
purposes. This service interface is the Remote Service Terminal. The Remote Service
Terminal allows for field personnel to connect to the primary System Bays Service
Processor. This connection is made through Ethernet from System Bay 1 to the dispersed
System Bay. There are two Remotely Anywhere icons on the Remote Service Terminal that
allow for a connection to the SP-Primary or SP-Secondary.
Using the Remote Service Terminal will help eliminate travel back and forth to the Primary
System Bay while running SymmWin scripts.
Both 1U servers are identical in hardware, but, run different software images. Always
remember to check part numbers, as the two 1U server part numbers will differ.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

When accessing a VMAX3 system it is important to determine where youre work would best
be completed from. For example, if you have a service call to replace a drive in a dispersed
system located in a DAE in system bay 4, it may be easier and more efficient to complete
this task from the point of service work tray located in the same bay as the given FRU.
Refer to Tools section on IPSwitcher Tool to see how we make this connection.
A red Ethernet cable and standard 220 volt IEC C13 power cable are attached to the Work
Tray to attach a service laptop to the system. Service personnel must supply an adapter
plug or cable for connectivity to the power connector. An IEC C14 connector is attached to
connect the cable to the tray. A NEMA 5-15R connector is needed to connect to the laptop.
This connector is standard on all North American laptops. Other locations may require an
IEC C14 to NEMA 5-15R adapter for connectivity. These adapters must be purchased
separately for the CE Tool Kit. Do not leave these adapters onsite, as they are part of the
CE Tool Kit.
When servicing dispersed bays using the Work Tray in dark sites, it may be necessary to
keep a laptop onsite for connectivity.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

The Point-of-Service (POS) Interface on the VMAX 100K, 200K, 400K systems is intended to
offer an alternative way to control the Service Processor (SP) without using the KVM. The
POS Interface can reduce the time to run replacement scripts and reduce human errors, as
compared to use of the KVM.
On VMAX3 systems, the KVM is connected to the Service Processor (SP) on MMCS-1 in
System Bay 1, but System Bays 2 through 8 have no KVMs and may be dispersed up to 25
meters from Bay 1. This makes use of the KVM time-consuming and error-prone, since the
CE has to travel back and forth up to five times between the location of the bad FRU and
Bay 1 with the KVM each time having to remember instructions from the script.
The POS Interface solves this problem by providing an Ethernet connection and a power
cord on a Work Tray in System Bays 2 through 8 for the CE to connect a laptop or tablet
PC. This allows the CE to connect with the SP, using Remotely-Anywhere (RA), similar to
how someone can dial in remotely and control the SP. Thus, replacement scripts and other
tasks can be performed at any bay in the system.
The use of the POS Interface can eliminate all of the cabling and un-cabling of KVM cables
and thereby reduce the likelihood of damaging or dislodging a cable. When MMCS-1 is not
available for any reason, a CE can use a POS Interface to connect his/her laptop or tablet
and use RA to point to the IP address of MMCS-2. When the script on MMCS-2 has restored
the condition of MMCS-1, RA can be restarted pointing to the IP of MMCS-1. The same
sequence of switching between SPs is being used, but without disturbing cables.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

Download IPSwitcher from support.emc.com and install on the service laptop for connectivity from the
POS Work Tray. Be sure to disable your wireless adapter. Once you have selected the Connect To SP
button the IP Address will be changed on the local service laptop. The IPSwitcher Tool launches your
Internet Explorer browser. It will populate the browser URL with the correct path and port number to
automate the connection to the MMCS. For example: https://172.16.255.252:9519/ would be the
connection IP if we were to click Connect to SP in the above picture. Once you have completed your
work it is important to properly disconnect by clicking the Disconnect From SP button. This will set
your laptops NIC back to the EMC standard default setting of DHCP.
A. Product Select- Used to select the product you wish to connect to. Selections to date are VMAX and
VNX
B. Local Ethernet Network Card.- This field is the physical network card on the local field service
laptop.
The local field service laptop connection will default to the laptops onboard Ethernet card
C. MMCS Connection Selects which MMCS you wish to connect to. Options offered currently are
MMCS-1and MMCS-2. This choice is for which MMCS module the user wishes to connect to.
D. VMAX Internal Subnet Connection This drop down provides the user with an option to select
either the 172.16.255 or 172.17.255 subnets. (See section 3) Allowing flexibility to connect to
either subnet in the event that one of the VMAX3 internal subnets are offline.

E. Connect/Disconnect Button When selected utility will change the local service laptop network IP
address and start the Remotely Anywhere session.

* Netmask will not be required for a point to point connection.

Note: On some laptops, this may need to be launched with a right click using run as admin and may
require the user to change from https to http.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

By clicking Connect to SP on the IPSwitcher tool, RemotelyAnywhere will automatically be


launched to <IP address>. You also have the option of using EMCRemote.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

10

CE refers to people that are on site, which are: CSE_REP, CSE_MNT, CSE_UPG, CSE_ENG,
CSE_ERS, and ASP_DSK.
PSE refers to people in the PSE lab, which are: PSE_REP, PSE_MNT, PSE_UPG, PSE_ENG,
ENG_REP, and ENG_ENG.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

11

This exercise will lead you through a Director Power Supply replacement script. After
logging in, select the Tasks View block to display the available tasks to be run. Highlight the
task to be performed by single clicking it, and then clicking on the Run button.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

12

Step 1 of the component replacement script is to make sure you want to proceed with the
replacement task previously selected. In this example, you have the option to continue
executing the replacement script for the Director Power Supply by selecting the Next
button, or abort the script by selecting the Cancel button. Select Next to advance the
script.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

13

As the script continues to process steps, progress can be observed at the status box in the
lower left corner of the display.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

14

The Confirmation page contains an image to indicate the location of the component, any
status information the CE should be aware of, and any notifications needing to be confirmed
with the customer. Again, there is the opportunity to halt the script, if the wrong
component was identified or if the customer will have data access impacted by proceeding
with the script.
The Roll on to Zoom check box enables the zoom function displayed in the next slide.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

15

By placing the cursor over the highlighted component in the photo, Zoom enlarges the view
for easier identification.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

16

The Replace component page gives the CE several very useful tools to proceed with the
component replacement. There is a link to a replacement animation showing the sequence
for disconnect, removal, replacement and reconnect steps. In this replacement, a link to a
wiring diagram is also provided. Depending on the scope of the replacement, other
documentation or diagrams may also be provided.
A sequence of check boxes is provided to guide the CE through all necessary steps to
replace the component.
The next several slides contain examples of the animation and the wiring diagram.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

17

In this animation, the steps to replace the power supply are displayed as a visual aid.
1. Disconnect the power cables to the director power supply.

2. Use the orange tab to remove the faulty director power supply.
3. Insert the new director power supply.
4. Reconnect the power cables to the director power supply.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

18

A wiring diagram is viewed by selecting the wiring diagram link.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

19

After all steps to the component replacement have been performed, and the step boxes are
checked, select the Finish button to proceed with the script.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

20

Again, as the script continues to process steps, progress can be observed at the status box
in the lower left corner of the display.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

21

The Summary page contains a message that the script has completed successfully and any
status info the CE should be aware of.
If the script is not completed successfully, the user will not see the Summary page.
A Red Box or fault page will be displayed with error codes and status for the fault, as well
as a pointer to the script end log.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

22

Replacement logs will display all important information about the component replacement.
A sample page follows this slide.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

23

Sample replacement log information.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

24

Script log history file and location.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

25

There are special considerations with certain FRU activities. Here are some examples that
we will look at.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

26

The most important thing to remember in the event of an MMCS-1 failure is to replace
MMCS-1 before any other failed component!

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

27

Any attempted repair task for MMCS-1 related components from MMCS-1 will generate a
warning reminder to switch to and run the task from MMCS-2.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

28

When connected to Secondary MMCS-2 you will notice the gadget box is now yellow and
displays that your are, in fact, connected to the Secondary MMCS-2. The Site Info page will
also display which MMCS is currently communicating with the VMAX.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

29

After logging into MMCS-2, select the Tasks view, highlight the MMCS-1 replacement task
and then select the Run button.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

30

When MMCS-2 is in Elevated mode, the yellow box on the MMCS desktop turns red as an
indicator. MMCS-2 can now run the limited number of maintenance tasks allocated to it.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

31

The typical task replacement sequence will now execute, first identifying the task to
complete. Select Next.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

32

EMC Certified Data Erasure is an automated erasure of failed disks, in conjunction with
Permanent Sparing, before they are removed from the Symmetrix cabinet. The feature is
not manually started, it is an automatic process that follows successful Permanent Sparing.
CE is dispatched to replace the failed disk (now a failed spare) after the erase feature has
completed. The Spare replacement script checks that the erase process is complete. If Disk
erasure is successful, the CE provides a Certificate to the customer, if the erasure is not
successful, the customer retains the drive.
Its important to differentiate between EMC Certified Data Erasure Service and the Data
Erase Appliance. The appliance is a separate server with DAEs (disk cages) that allows for
LC-FC and ATA disk erasure outside the Symmetrix. This appliance can be used for disks
that have been removed from Symmetrix, CLARiiON, or Celerra frames.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

33

When replacing an SPS, safety procedures must be followed. Perform an initial visual
inspection for signs of acid leakage (evidenced by white salty residue or visible wetness).
The SPS may need to be partially removed from the system in order to determine the
presence of a leak. If a leak is detected, put on acid-resistant gloves and goggles.
If there is no evidence to indicate that a release has occurred, slide out the SPS and inspect
surrounding surfaces for signs of leakage. If any visible sign of a leak is discovered,
carefully remove the SPS and place it in a spill-containment bag or similar containment
unit. The SPS module should be repackaged in the cardboard container and then placed in
the containment bag. Gloves/goggles should have been provided to Customer Engineers as
part of their tool kit. Contact your manager if you do not have these items.
See web based training MR-5WN-LEADACID Replacing a Lead-Acid Battery Backup Unit or
Primus emc200897 for more detail.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

34

Follow Service Notes for collecting required information, removing the server, installing the
replacement server and restore server settings and files to reconfigure the replacement
server

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

35

This lesson covers ESD best practices, identifying and running scripts for Field Replaceable
Units (FRUs) and listing some special FRU considerations.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

36

During this lesson the Loop ID and Enclosure ID on the Link Control Card are discussed, as
well as how the Loop ID and Enclosure ID are set, and how they can be used for
troubleshooting.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

37

The Storage Bay is shipped from the factory fully cabled at the LCC (Link Control Card) end.
All cables have both From and To labeling, showing all information needed to cable up a
system, or to trace a cable in the event troubleshooting is necessary. QSFP (Quad Small
Form-Factor Pluggable) cables are used to connect 4 DAE LCC Primary ports to one Backend
I/O Module. LCC-A Primary port connects to the odd Director, while LCC-B Primary port
connects to the even Director of the same Engine over the HSSDC (High Speed Serial Data
Connectors). The Expansion ports are used to add another level of daisy chaining.
All SPS in the Symmetrix are monitored. In a Storage Bay, each Pod contains two SPS and
4 DAEs, each with two power supplies and two LCCs. Two of the eight LCCs in a POD
monitor SPS status using an RJ-11 cable. SPS status is sent from the LCC to the director
over the HSSDC data cable.
LCCs A and B are clearly labeled on the rear of the DAE. You can see the RJ11 port used for
SPS monitoring, the Primary and Expansion ports used for daisy chaining, the link speed,
Loop ID and Enclosure ID are indicated with LEDs.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

38

Symmetrix VMAX 40K systems will support dense drive configurations utilizing dense 2U
disk array enclosures (DAE). Each dense DAE can hold up to twenty five (25) 2.5 drives.
These 2.5 drives come in 100GB, 200GB, and 400GB sizes for Enterprise Flash and 300GB
and 600GB for 10K RPM SAS Drives. The dense DAE uses native Fiber Channel protocol. At
the rear of the dense DAE there are two (2) power supplies with onboard cooling, and two
(2) Link Control Cards (LCC) used for connectivity to the DA directors.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

39

The Symmetrix VMAX Storage Bays green and blue LED numbering is shown here. The LED
layout shows the system as seen from the rear.
Both green and blue LEDs are positioned on the LCCs, of which there are two (2) on each
DAE (LCC-A and LCC-B). The green LED is set by the system. The blue LED is the Enclosure
ID setting, and has a recessed push-button switch located between the three clock-wise
rotating arrows. In order to read the new switch setting, you must reset the LCC by
reseating the LCC card, or power cycling the whole Storage Bay. The numbers that are not
within a colored circle are indicating the DAE number.
Note: Power cycling the whole Storage Bay can only be performed during a new install,
where there is no data present. Power cycling the whole Storage Bay during online
upgrades may cause DU/DL.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

40

The numbering of the green and blue LEDs for both the System Bay 1 and the lower half of
Drive Bay 1A for a Symmetrix VMAX 10K/VMAXe are shown (Same pattern for Drive Bay
1B). The Enclosure ID for the direct-connect Drive Enclosures are always 0, while the
Enclosure ID for the first loop expansion is 1, and the second loop expansion 2. The LED
layout shows the System Bay 1 as seen from the rear. The numbers that are not within a
colored circle are indicating the Drive Enclosure number.
Note: System Bay 1 LEDs would also apply if looking at System Bay 3.

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Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

41

Note that in the VMAX 10K (987) High Density configuration there is only one level of daisy
chaining and DAE 3-1 and 4-1 are added to keep the vault DAE numbering consistent,
where 5 and 6 are always located above the Engine. There are up to 4 System Bays, there
are no Storage Bays in a VMAX 10K (987) High Density configuration.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

42

The Enclosure ID is the level of daisy-chain, 0 for direct-attach or 1 for first level of daisy.
The dual 7-segment display, or link as it is marked, is the logical port from the DS that is
attaching to this DAE/LCC.
The example picture is of DAEs 4 and 5 from a single-engine VMAX3. Showing connection
from port 17 for both the direct-attach (0) and daisy-chain (1) DAEs and both in good
status.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

43

This lesson covered the Loop ID and Enclosure ID on the Link Control Card, as well as how
the Loop ID and Enclosure ID are set, and how they can be used for troubleshooting.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

44

This module focuses on ESD best practice and the four methods used to run scripts for all
FRUs, on VMAX 40K, VMAX 20K/VMAX, VMAX 10K and VMAX3 Family arrays using
Simplified SymmWin.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

45

This Lab covers replacing various components in VMAX Family arrays.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

46

This Lab covers downloading the IPSwitcher Tool and using it to connect through a VMAX3
POS work tray.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

47

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

48

Upon completion of this module you should be able to navigate to websites necessary for
getting support, downloading Enginuity code, download and utilize the Simplified SymmWin
Simulator, create a SymmWin Procedure Generator, download and navigate the VMAX
Family System Viewer and assemble and operate the Alum-A-Lift Tool.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

During this lesson, the EMC Online Support site at https://support.emc.com and E-lab
navigator are covered, including downloading Enginuity Code (includes SymmWin), and
locating, downloading, and using EMC Procedure Generator.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

To support the transition to EMC Online Support site (at https://support.emc.com), all
downloads required for this course will come from EMC Online Support, where possible.
Some references may be made to Powerlink, Global Services (GS), Symmipedia and the
Service Partner Web until all tools have transitioned. Since December 8, 2012, the release
of additional functionality to the new EMC Online Support site further enables the transition
from Powerlink Support. The EMC Online Support site can be tailored to your preferences.
Select Support by Product to narrow the search results.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

In this example, Support By Product was selected, VMAX 10K (987) was chosen, and as Add
to my products was selected, you can see that VMAX 10K (987) is now listed under My
Products for easy future access. After selecting VMAX 10K (987) from Find a Product or My
Products list, you can choose to view documentation, Advisories, White Papers, Tools,
issues, or, as in this example, Downloads.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

The tools discussed in this module can be accessed externally on the EMC Online Support
site at https://support.emc.com. The Enginuity 5876.159.102 download is shown here.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

The numbers that define an Enginuity level have specific meaning. In this example, the 58
represents the VMAX hardware, 76 is the microcode family, 268 is the field release level to
the microcode, and 174 is the field release to the service processor code.

Non-disruptive microcode upgrade and load capabilities are currently available for the
Symmetrix.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

During this lesson, the EMC Online Support site at https://support.emc.com and E-lab
navigator were covered, including downloading Enginuity Code (includes SymmWin), and
locating, downloading, and using EMC Procedure Generator.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

During this lesson we will cover how and where to download the Simplified SymmWin
Simulator.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

It is recommended that you navigate to through SolVe Desktop and download the desktop
Simplified SymmWin Simulator in order to familiarize yourself with the GUI while not having
to be on a production machine.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

This lesson covered how and where to download the Simplified SymmWin Simulator.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

10

During this lesson we will cover the SymmWin Procedure Generator.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

11

** Procedure generator is frequently updated. Be sure to always download the latest


procedure generator.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

12

Click on the Symmetrix Procedure Generator link. Scroll about half way down the page to
get to the downloading link illustrated above.
** Procedure generator is frequently updated. Be sure to always download the latest
procedure generator.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

13

After the Symmetrix Procedure Generator has been downloaded and the SymmWin folder
has been updated, launch SymmWin (5875 shown here). At Enginuity 5875 from
5875.139.93 and below, to create a procedure you need to manually enter the information
to start the script. Once logged in, select Procedures then Enter and Run procedure. In the
Module name field, type CreateProc, in the Procedure field, type run(), as shown above.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

14

During this lesson we covered the SymmWin Procedure Generator.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

15

During this lesson we will cover downloading the VMAX Family System Viewer.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

16

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

17

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

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Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

19

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

20

During this lesson we covered downloading the VMAX Family System Viewer.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

21

This lesson covers evaluating the need for a lift tool, and assembling and operating the lift
tool.

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Module 7: Tools

22

Acute back injuries can be the immediate result of improper lifting techniques or lifting
loads that are too heavy for the back to support. Back disorders are one of the leading
causes of disability for people in their working years. Back disorders result from exceeding
the capacity of the muscles, tendon, discs, or the cumulative effect of several contributors.
The best form of accident control is prevention, using this lift tool to reduce or eliminate the
potential of back injuries. As per Alum-a-lift, their lift tool is a device used for lifting,
lowering, moving, positioning, and holding objects too heavy for the unaided human.
This translates for EMC into removing and adding switches, replacing DMX Series and
VMAX Standby Power Supplies (SPS), as well as adding Drive Enclosures and VMAX
Engines. The lift tool is to assist those who need to work with the aforementioned
components and have no help from colleagues. It is not a company policy, but rather to the
customer engineers discretion, to use the lift tool when handling the various components.
The load limit is an important item listed on the lift nameplate. This load limit is based not
only on lift capacity, but also on factors such as reach and stability. The lift carries different
load ratings depending on how it is configured. If the fork set is attached directly to the
lifts lower mast assembly, it is capable of handling components weighing up to 400 lbs. If
the upper mast assembly is installed, the lift is capable of handling components weighing up
to 115 lbs.

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Module 7: Tools

23

The lift tool is delivered in two (2) cases. The first case consists of the following parts, seen
clock-wise starting a the top-right position: Left leg (3), right leg (2), roller forks (8), base
(1), main fork (8), and accessories including a hand wheel (6). The second case contains
the following parts, seen from top to bottom: Upper mast (7), sliding forks (8), lower mast
(4), and handles (5).

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

24

Follow the assembly instructions completely before using the Alum-a-lift. Once done, the lift
should be disassembled by following these instructions in reversed order.
Step 1: Build the base. Slide the legs (2)+(3) onto the base (1) so that the threaded studs
penetrate the hole in each side of the base (1). Using the hand knobs, tighten the legs (2)
(3) down securely.
Step 2: Attach the mast. Place the lower mast (4) onto the base (1). Engage the large ubolt in the hook on the rear of the base (1). Swing the two threaded studs into the slots in
the bottom of the lower mast (4). Tighten wing nuts to secure connection. Note: finger
tighten only. Remove the two handles (5) from their storage clips and insert them into the
holes on the sides of the lower mast (4). The handles (5) are threaded, and one is to be
screwed into the other. Should the power tool not work, a wheel (6) can be installed to
bring up or lower the fork with the component strapped to it.
Step 3: Install the upper mast assembly. Two tabs exist in the upper mast (7) for
attachment to the lower mast (4). Align the tabs with the holes in the lower masts carriage
and secure with included ball lock pins.
Step 4: Install the fork set. The fork set (8) can be configured four different ways. It can be
set up for side-to-side unloading or front-to-back unloading. Both of these configurations
can be set up for use with roller forks or simple sliding forks. First, the main fork assembly
is attached to the upper mast assembly (7) using the included ball lock pins. Next, the four
remaining pieces are configured according to the desired use. The lift is now ready for use.
Detailed instructions are included in one of the two shipping cases.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

25

Insert and lock the lift tray (labeled 8). Be sure the lift is square with the rack before
operating.
http://www.cs.isus.emc.com/csweb2/sym/symcsp068b.pdf

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

26

This lesson covered evaluating the need for a lift tool, and assembling and operating the
lift tool.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

27

During this module we covered how to navigate to websites necessary for getting support,
downloading Enginuity code, download and utilize the Simplified SymmWin Simulator,
create a SymmWin Procedure Generator, download and navigate the VMAX Family System
Viewer and assemble and operate the Alum-A-Lift Tool.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

28

This Lab covers downloading the Simplified SymmWin Simulator and using it to familiarize
yourself with the GUI

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 7: Tools

29

This is a continuation of the lab covering replacing various components in VMAX Family
arrays.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

30

This module focuses on identifying the VMAX Family Emulations and the Vaulting process
and differences between VMAX Family models.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

During this lesson, we will define the different VMAX Family Emulations.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

HYPERMAX OS provides a range of emulations that operate between the array, host,
management and back-end functions. The Infrastructure Management (IM) emulation
enables the separation of infrastructure tasks and emulations. By separating these tasks,
emulations can focus on I/O specific work only, while IM manages and executes common
infrastructure tasks, such as environmental monitoring, Field Replacements Unit (FRU)
monitoring and Vaulting. Enginuity Data Services (EDS) is a new middle layer used to
separate front-end and back-end communications. It acts as a translation layer between the
front end, which is what the host knows about, and the back end, which is the layer that
reads, writes and communicates with physical storage in the VMAX array.
Please refer to the EMC VMAX Family with HYPERMAX OS Product Guide for more
information.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

HYPERMAX OS combines industry-leading high availability, I/O management, quality of


service, data intergrity validation, storage tiering, and data security with an open
application platform. It features the first real-time, non-disruptive storage hypervisor that
manages and protects embedded services by extending VMAX high availability to services
that traditionally would have run external to the array. It also provides direct access to
hardware resources to maximize performance. The hypervisor can be non-disruptively
upgraded.
HYPERMAX OS runs on top of the Dynamic Virtual Matrix leverage its scale-out flexibility of
cores, cache, and host interfaces. The embedded storage hypervisor reduces external
hardware and networking requirements, delivers higher levels of availability and
dramatically lowers latency.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

During this lesson, we defined the different VMAX Family Emulation types.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

During this lesson, the definition of Vaulting is described as well as the benefit of Vaulting.
How Global Memory is Vaulted and configuration specifics are also discussed.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

Power Vault is a feature available at DMX 3 and above. As cache size, disk size and power
requirements increase, the time required to destage data increases. Power Vault was
designed to limit the time necessary to power off the box on battery power. Underwriters
Laboratories Inc. (UL) requires that if a data center loses power, all components within that
data center must shut down after five minutes of battery hold up time. Power Vault allows a
Symmetrix to power down within that time.
Power Vault saves global memory to specific vault drives on power down. On power up, the
data is loaded to cache so that it may be destaged to the correct location.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

10

The vault image is fully redundant, contents of global memory above the vault line are
saved twice to independent disks. Each available Disk Director writes 16MB chunks of data
to PV devices and stores a CRC in that Directors NVD. It is important to understand that we
may access the same region of memory twice for the save because of contention or other
issues.
The access to Global Memory during Vault is the same as accessing Global Memory during
normal I/O. The mirrored memory does not know anything about vaulting and vaulting
doesnt know anything about mirrored memory.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

11

Vault Save saves all of Global Memory above a specified address called the Vault Line. The
word address is fixed by Enginuity and may vary from Enginuity version to Enginuity
version. All data above the Vault Line is saved during a Vault operation.

The Vault Save must prevent access to Global Memory above the Vault Line during a save
in order to guarantee that all Directors see the Global Memory image consistently. If a
director attempts to write above the Vault Line when we are in Vault Save, memory access
errors are logged.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

12

The VMAX 40K Vault hyper is 9GB, VMAX 20K Vault hyper consists of 5.0GB, 4.5GB for
vaulting and 0.5GB for overhead. VMAX 10K Vault hyper is 9GB, but half the number per
engine. Vault drives are eligible for permanent sparing if there is an available spare of the
same speed, block size and capacity as the failing drive. Starting with Enginuity 5875,
Power Vault devices can also be placed on Enterprise Flash Drives (EFD) besides SATA and
Fibre Channel drives.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

13

The engines have internal flash modules for their storage needs, which mean:
No vault space on the customer drives (which also changes the drive minimums per engine)

Vault continues to be mirrored across directors/engines

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

14

During this lesson, the definition of Vaulting was described as well as the benefit of
Vaulting. How Global Memory is Vaulted and configuration specifics were also discussed.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

15

This module focused on identifying the VMAX Family Emulations and the Vaulting process
and differences between VMAX Family models

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

16

This is a continuation of the lab covering replacing various components in VMAX Family
arrays.

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 6: Field Replaceable Units (FRUs)

17

This course covered the installation and maintenance of the VMAX Family hardware systems
and components

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

18

Copyright 2015 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Module 8: VMAX Family Concepts

19