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Lesson Plan Template

Name: Nazsoni Otero


Title: Structure and Properties of Matter
Grade: K-3rd
Subject Area: Science
Length of lesson: 45
minutes

1.NEWMEXICOACADEMICCONTENTSTANDARD(S):

PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter


Different kinds of matter exist and many of them can be either solid or liquid,
depending on temperature. Matter can be described and classified by its
observable properties. (2-PS1-1)
PS1.B: Chemical Reactions
Heating or cooling a substance may cause changes that can be observed.
Sometimes these changes are reversible, and sometimes they are not. (2PS1-4)

2. OBJECTIVE(S):
Objective(s)
Students will define
reversible and
irreversible

What Students will learn


Students will learn the
meaning of reversible
and irreversible

Students will discuss


what causes reversible
and irreversible changes
in matter

Students will learn that


cooling and heating and
applying water can
cause changes in
matter.

Students will identify


examples of matter that
have gone through
reversible changes and
examples of matter than
have gone through
irreversible changes

Students will learn that


when we rip paper it
has gone through an
irreversible change and
when we open a soda
bottle it has gone
through a reversible
change.

I Can . . . statement
I can tell you that
reversible is when we
change something and
make the change go
back and irreversible is
when the change
cannot go back.
I can tell you that
reversible and
irreversible changes can
be caused by heating
something, cooling
something, or getting
something wet.
I can provide you with
examples of matter that
go through irreversible
and reversible
changes.

3. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
How can my students distinguish between reversible and
irreversible changes in matter?
4. LESSON SUMMARY:

We will begin the lesson with exploring the concept of reversible


and irreversible changes in matter. First, I will ask students if they
know anything about reversible and irreversible. If there is no
response, I will provide students with definition of reversible and
irreversible. We will then discuss how states of matter can go
through reversible and irreversible changes.
Then we will move into the examples of reversible and irreversible
changes in matter. I will hold up a piece of paper and rip it in half.
Then students will discuss whether this was reversible or
irreversible. Then use 6 connecting blocks and break it half. Do the
same with this example. Then hold up a soda can and a soda bottle.
Ask the students to make a prediction about which will be reversible
and which will be irreversible. Open both and discuss the results.
Then students will work together to fill out the page in their booklet
titled: Changing Matter.
5. RESOURCES:

Projector
Matter Booklet (pg. 9 & 10)
Pencil
Pencil (to break)
Pen with a cap
Piece of Paper
4 connecting blocks per student
Can of Soda
Bottle of Soda
Exit Ticket

6. LESSON COMPONENTS:
a. INTRODUCTION/ READINESS

To begin, the teacher will ask students to table talk about what we
learned in science yesterday (properties of matter). After students
have time to table talk, one student from each table will share with
the whole class what they discussed during their table talk and
what they remember from science yesterday.
b. DIRECT INSTRUCTION (I DO)

Then we will move into todays lesson on reversible and irreversible


changes in matter.

Ask students about their prior knowledge on reversible and


irreversible. Allow students to share their prior knowledge and ask
students how what they learned about the properties of matter
yesterday will connect to reversible and irreversible (the properties
of matter are what will change and go back or not).
Use what they know to provide a definition of reversible and
irreversible. ReversibleMaking a change to something and then
making the change go back. Irreversiblemaking a change to
something and the change cannot be undone. Students will write
these definitions in their matter booklet (pg. 9).
Then the teacher will ask the students based on these definitions if
we broke a pencil in half if it would reversible or irreversible. Once
the question is posed, allow time for the students to discuss with
their elbow partner and then ask students to share what they
decided. After the students share, break the pencil and ask the
students if this is reversible or irreversible and then explain why
that this is irreversible, because the pencil cannot go back without
adding another material like tape.
Then the teacher will ask the students based of the definitions if
we took the cap off a pen if it would be a reversible or irreversible
change. Once the question is posed, allow time for the students to
discuss with their elbow partner and then ask students to share
what they decided. After the students share, take the cap off the
pen and ask the students if this is reversible or irreversible and
then explain why this is reversible, because the pens cap can go
back on the penthe change can can be undone.

c. GUIDED PRACTICE (WE DO)


Then we will move into the examples of reversible and irreversible
changes in matter.
Ask student to tear out a piece of paper from their notebook and
hold it out in front of them. Then instruct them to tear the paper in
half, and you will do the same. Then students will discuss whether
this was reversible or irreversible and how the properties of the
matter changed. Then pass out 4 connecting blocks to each student
and have them break it half, while you do the same. Then students
will discuss whether this was reversible or irreversible. Then hold up
a soda can and a soda bottle. Ask the students to make a prediction
about which will be reversible and which will be irreversible. Open

both and discuss the results. Then pose the question to students:
What causes these changes in matter? Open the room for
discussion.
d. INDEPENDENT PRACTICE (YOU DO)
Then we will move into the students working with their elbow
partner to fill out the table in their Matter Booklet. Project the
booklet on the screen and discuss how to fill out the table. Use the
examples from the guided practice to show students where the
reversible change will go and where the irreversible change will go.
Then let students work together to fill out the table. Students will
identify at least three examples of both reversible and irreversible
changes in matter. Kindergartners will all have a buddy who is older
to help with writing, if needed. Students can draw a picture or write
the words to fill out their booklets. While students are filling out
their booklet, circulate the room and ensure that everyone is filling
out the table correctly.
e. CLOSURE
To end the lesson, we will review what reversible and irreversible
mean and then one buddy will share one example that they
identified with the whole class.
f. ASSESSMENT
For the assessment, students will answer a quick question as their exit
ticket to demonstrate their knowledge of reversible vs irreversible.
Read the question to all the students: Is melting an ice cube a
reversible or irreversible change? and inform them that they will circle
whether the example is reversible or irreversible. Then pass out the
exit ticket and provide 3-4 minutes for students to answer the
question.
g. ADAPTATIONS FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS AND STUDENTS
WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
There are no students in my class who are English learners. There
are couple of students who have difficulty writing due to special
needs, so one adaptation is to hand out typed notes and have them
highlight the key points (definitions and vocabulary words). One
adaptation I have for the kindergartners is pairing them will an older
buddy to help with writing, if needed. There is one kindergartner
who is still learning his letters, so he is paired with a buddy who
writes the words for him in highlighter and he traces the words. The

kindergartners and first graders are also allowed to draw pictures to


illustrate the reversible and irreversible changes in the matter
booklet table.
7. REFLECTION:
As I taught this lesson, I was very impressed with the students
ability to connect their prior knowledge to make the necessary
connections to make meaning of reversible and irreversible
changes. When I asked the students what they thought reversible
meant, I had one student provide an example of their reversible
backpack. I was pleasantly surprised, because I was not anticipating
examplesespecially from kindergartners. From this example my
other students were able to come up with a working definition of
reversible. This was great, because it handed over more control to
the students.
The lesson was coherent because it connected with what we did in
science the day before and the lesson for the next day. We plan a
whole unit on matter and the different parts of matter that we
wanted to teach on. The science from the previous weeks focused
on force, students made connections from the force unit to this
lesson. When I asked the students what creates these reversible
and irreversible changes in matter, one student made the
connection that force can make these changes. I was completely
blown away and hadnt made this connection myself. I think this
shows why it is so important to provide time for students to connect
to their prior knowledge and ask them to share with the class. None
of the other students had thought about this on their own, but made
the connection when their classmate brought it to their attention.
Something I need to improve on for future lessons is including more
visuals. The guided practice provided some visuals, but I could have
included written directions. I had a student who had a freak out
moment because he did not know what to do, I felt that I gave the
directions clearly, but he was not paying attention during this part
of the instruction, so he felt lost because he couldnt easily look at
what to do. I gave all the directions verbally, which meant I had to
repeat the directions a couple of times. I could have avoided this if I
provide visual instructions.
Another thing the I had to correct during the lesson was I provided
the students with too spaces to provide examples in their matter
booklet. I had to adjust my requirements of how many examples to
include based on time restrictions. I gave them a table with space

to fill out five and realized very quickly by walking around that
asking them to do five was too much, so I had to stop the class and
let them know to only focus on getting three done. I thought this
was appropriate because the students were also engaged in
conversations with students at their group table about different
examples of reversible and irreversible changes. One of the
conversations was about if piercing ears was reversible or
irreversible and the students couldnt decide on their own, so they
asked me my opinion. From this question we were able to talk about
whether the matter (ear) had changed when the hole closed. We
came to the agreement that it was irreversible, because the ears
matter changed because scar tissue was added to the ear. This was
great conversation and connected to what mattered to them, but
because of this conversation we were not able to do all five
examples.
I met the objectives of my lesson. The students were able to define
and differentiate between reversible and irreversible changes. All of
the students answered the exit ticket question correctly. Along with
answer the question correctly, all the students were able to provide
several examples of both reversible and irreversible changes. I
collected their booklets at the end of the lesson, so I could ensure
this and address any misconceptions their might have beenbut
there were none.
8. RESOURCES:
Kessler, James H., and Patricia M. Galvan. Inquiry in Action:
Investigating Matter through Inquiry. Washington, D.C.?: American
Chemical Society, 2005. Print.
Crashcoursekids. "Matter Compilation: Crash Course Kids." YouTube.
YouTube, 02 June 2016. Web. 09 Oct. 2016.
Changes." YouTube. YouTube, 22 Jan. 2014. Web. 09 Oct. 2016.