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NITTE MEENAKSHI INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (AN AUTONOMOUS INSTITUTION, AFFILIATED TO VTU, BELGAUM AND ACCREDITED BY
NITTE MEENAKSHI INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
(AN AUTONOMOUS INSTITUTION, AFFILIATED TO VTU, BELGAUM AND ACCREDITED BY NBA, NEW DELHI)
YELAHANKA, BANGALORE – 560064
As on 01/10/2013
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
COURSE CONTENT, SCHEME OF TEACHING AND EXAMINATION
FOR III TO VIII SEMESTER B.E PROGRAMME
(AUTONOMOUS SCHEME)
2010 Batch

Vision and Mission of Department

Vision:

To empower students of Computer Science and Engineering Department to be technologically

adept, innovative, self-motivated and responsible global citizen possessing human values and

contribute significantly towards high quality technical education with ever changing world.

Mission:

The Department of Computer Science and Engineering strives to prepare students for

professional career and higher studies by providing conducive teaching – learning, research

environment and entrepreneurship with leadership skills, enabling them to serve the engineering

profession and society.

PEOs:

1: Excel in Professional career by acquiring knowledge in mathematics and computer science & engineering principles.

2: Graduates are capable of pursuing higher education and research

3: Adapt to technological advancements by engaging in lifelong learning with leadership qualities, professional ethics and soft skills.

POs A Graduates will be in a position to apply knowledge of mathematics, physics, and
POs
A
Graduates will be in a position to apply knowledge of mathematics, physics, and
chemistry and allied engineering subjects as applicable to Computer Science and
Engineering.
B
Graduates will have the ability to identify, formulate and design solutions in the
areas of Computer Science and Engineering
C
Graduates will demonstrate the abilities to design and develop algorithms and
implement them with analysis and interpretation of data
D
Graduates are able to address the challenges of complex and computation
intensive problems
E
Graduates will have the ability to visualize and work independently or in teams
F
Graduates are able to adopt any modern engineering tool or software for
analyzing and solving various computer engineering problems
G
Graduates will have knowledge of professional and ethical responsibilities
H
Graduates are able to communicate effectively.
I
Graduates will be able to incorporate the understanding of impact of social,
cultural and global aspects in their professional practice
J
In the fast changing scenario of technical and business eco system, the graduates
will understand the need for quality, timeliness, life-long learning and adopt
themselves accordingly
K
Graduates will have the knowledge of contemporary issues and able to apply
various software engineering approaches for project management
L
Graduates will understand the impact of professional engineering solutions in
environmental contexts and the need for sustainable development.

SEMESTER: III

Sl.N

Subject code

Subject Name

Teaching

Teaching Hours/Week

Examination

Credits

o

Dept.

L

#

#

T

P#

S#

CIE *

SEE **

Total

1

10MAT31

Engineering Mathematics-III

Maths

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

2

10CS/IS32

Electronic Circuits

ECE/CSE

3

-

-

-

50

50

100

3

3

10CS/IS 33

Logic Design

ECE /CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

4

10CS/IS 34

Discrete Mathematical Structures

Maths/CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

5

10CS/IS 35

Data Structures

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

6

10CS/IS 36

Introduction to Unix and Shell Programming

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

7

10CSL/ISL37

Data Structures Lab

CSE

0

0

3

-

50

50

100

1.5

8

10CSL/ISL38

Electronic Circuits & Logic Design Lab

ECE/CSE

0

0

3

-

50

50

100

1.5

 

TOTAL

400

400

800

26

SEMESTER: IV

Sl.N

Subject code

Subject Name

Teaching

Teaching Hours/Week

Examination

Credits

o

Dept.

L

#

#

T

P#

S#

CIE *

SEE *

Total

1

10MAT41

Engineering Mathematics –IV

Maths

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

2

10CS/IS42

Graph Theory

Maths/CSE

3

-

-

-

50

50

100

3

3

10CS/IS43

Analysis and Design of Algorithms

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

4

10CS/IS44

Object Oriented Programming

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

5

10CS/IS45

Microprocessor

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

6

10CS/IS46

Computer

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

Organization and Architecture

7

10CSL/ISL47

Microprocessor Lab

CSE

0

0

3

-

50

50

100

1.5

8

10CSL/ISL48

Object Oriented Programming Lab

CSE

0

0

3

-

50

50

100

1.5

 

TOTAL

400

400

800

26

SEMESTER: V

Sl.No

Subject code

Subject Name

Teaching

 

Teaching Hours/Week

 

Examination

 

Credits

Dept.

L

#

T

#

P

#

S

#

CIE

SEE

Total

 

1 10CS/IS51

Computer Networks – I

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

 

2 10CS52

Computer Graphics with OpenGL

CSE

3

-

-

-

50

50

100

3

 

3 10CS/IS53

Operating Systems

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

 

4 10CS/IS54

Data Base Management Systems

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

 

5 10CS/IS55

Formal Languages and Automata Theory

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

 

6 10CS56X

Program Elective – A

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

 

7 10CSL57

Computer Graphics Laboratory

CSE

0

0

 

3

-

50

50

100

1.5

 

8 10CSL58

DBMS Lab

 

0

0

 

3

-

50

50

100

1.5

 

TOTAL

400

400

800

26

 

Group-A(Program Elective) V sem

   
 

Subject

 

Subject Name

L#

T#

 

P#

   

S#

 

code

     
 

1 10CSE561

Internetworking with TCP/IP

4

-

 

-

 

-

 

2 10CSE562

Fundamentals of digital image processing

4

-

 

-

 

-

 

3 10CSE563

Introduction to Embedded Systems

4

-

 

-

 

-

 

4 10CSE564

Unix System Programming

4

-

 

-

 

-

SEMESTER: VI

Sl.N

Subject

 

Subject Name

 

Teaching

 

Teaching Hours/Week

 

Examination

 

Credits

 

o

code

   

Dept.

L

#

 

#

T

P

#

S

#

CIE

SEE

Total

 

1

10CS/IS61

Software Engineering

   

CSE

4

   

-

 

-

-

 

50

50

100

 

4

 

2

10CS62

Compiler Design

   

CSE

4

   

-

 

-

-

 

50

50

100

 

4

 

3

10CS/IS63

Computer Networks – II

   

CSE

4

   

-

 

-

-

 

50

50

100

 

4

 

4

10CSH64

Operations Research

   

CSE

4

   

-

 

-

-

 

50

50

100

 

4

 

5

10CS65X

Program Elective – B

   

CSE

4

   

-

 

-

-

 

50

50

100

 

4

 

6

10CSO66X

Open Elective– C

   

CSE

3

   

-

 

-

-

 

50

50

100

 

3

 

7

10CSL67

System Software Lab

   

CSE

0

   

0

3

-

 

50

50

100

 

1.5

 

8

10CSL68

Computer Networks Laboratory

 

CSE

0

   

0

3

-

 

50

50

100

 

1.5

 

TOTAL

400

400

800

 

26

 

Group-B(Program Elective) VI sem

     
 

Sub Code

Subject Name(Pre-Requisite)

L#

T#

P#

S

     

Group-C(Open Elective) VI sem

 

#

   

Subject

   

Subject Name

 

L

 

P

T S

 
 

1 10CSE651

Cryptography

(10CSE561)

and

Network

Security

4

       

-

- -

code

   

#

 

#

# #

 
       

1

 

10CSO661

 

E-Commerce

 

3

     
 

2 10CSE652

Digital image processing – algorithms and applications – 1 (10CSE562)

4

-

- -

   

-

- -

2

 

10CSO662

 

Decision Support System

3

 

-

- -

 
 

3 10CSE653

Microcontroller based Systems

 

4

-

- -

   

3

 

10CSO663

 

Business Intelligence and Its Applications

3

 

-

- -

 

(10CSE563)

   
 

4 10CSE654

Advanced Database Management System

4

-

- -

     

SEMESTER: VII

Sl.N

Subject

Subject Name

Teaching

 

Teaching Hours/Week

 

Examination

 

Credits

o

code

Dept.

   

L

#

 

#

T

P

#

S

#

CIE *

SEE **

Total

1

10CS71

Java & J2EE

CSE

   

4

   

-

-

-

50

50

100

 

4

2

10CS72

Cloud Computing

CSE

   

4

   

-

-

-

50

50

100

 

4

3

10CS73

Object Oriented Modeling and Design

CSE

   

4

   

-

-

-

50

50

100

 

4

4

10CSH74

Entrepreneurship Development, Management and IPR

CSE

   

3

   

-

-

-

50

50

100

 

3

5

10CSE75X

Program Elective – D

CSE

   

4

   

-

-

-

50

50

100

 

4

6

10CSO76X

Open Elective – E

CSE

   

3

   

-

-

-

50

50

100

 

3

7

10CSL77

Java and J2EE Lab

CSE

   

0

   

0

3

-

50

50

100

 

1.5

8

10CSL78

Object Oriented Modeling & Design Lab

CSE

   

0

   

0

3

-

50

50

100

 

1.5

9

10CSP79

Project Preliminary/Technical Seminar

CSE

   

-

   

-

4

-

50

--

50

 

-

 

TOTAL

450

400

850

 

25

 

Group-D(Program Elective) VII sem

   
 

Sub Code

Subject Name(Pre-Requisite)

L#

T#

P#

S#

   

Group-E(Open Elective) VII sem

 

1

10CSE751

Information Security (10CSE651)

4

 

-

- -

   

Subject

   

Subject Name

 

L

T

P S

 

2

10CSE752

DIP – algorithms and applications – II

4

 

-

- -

 

code

 

#

#

# #

(10CSE652)

 

1 10CSO761

Building Enterprise

 

3

-

- -

 

3

10CSE753

Real-time Systems (10CSE653)

4

 

-

- -

 

Applications

 

4

10CSE754

Data Warehousing and Data Mining

4

 

-

- -

   

2 10CSO762

Neural Networks and Fuzzy

3

-

- -

 

5

10CSE755

Mobile Computing

4

     

Logic Systems

 

-

- -

 

3 10CSO763

Software Project Management

3

-

- -

 

6

10CSE756

Adhoc Wireless and Sensor Networks

4

     

-

- -

 

4 10CSO764

Genetic Algorithms

 

3

-

- -

 

7

10CSE757

Service oriented Computing

4

       

-

- -

 

SEMESTER: VIII

Sl.N

Subject

Subject Name

Teaching

 

Teaching

 

Examination

Credits

o code

Dept.

Hours/Week

L#

T#

P#

S#

CIE

SEE

Total

 

1 10CS81

Parallel Programming Principles

CSE

3

-

2

-

50

50

100

4

 

2 10CSE82X

Program Elective – F

CSE

4

-

-

-

50

50

100

4

 

3 10CSP83

Internship/ Minor Project/ Self study Course

-

-

-

-

8

50

50

100

2

 

4 10CSP84

Project

CSE

0

0

30

-

50

50

100

13

 

TOTAL

200

200

400

23

* Continuous Internal Evaluation, ** Semester End Examination, #L-Lecture, T-Tutorial, P-Practical, S-Self Study

 

Group-F (Program Elective) VIII sem

Sub Code

Subject Name(Pre-Requisite)

L#

T#

P#

S#

1 10CSE821

Computer and Cyber Security (10CSE751)

4

-

-

-

2 10CSE822

Advanced image and video processing (10CSE752)

4

-

-

-

3 10CSE823

Embedded Networking and Security (10CSE753)

4

-

-

-

4 10CSE824

Distributed Systems and Transaction Processing

4

-

-

-

5 10CSE825

Storage Area Networks

4

-

-

-

6 10CSE826

C# and .Net

4

-

-

-

III Semester Subjects Department: Computer Science and Engineering Course Type: Programme Core Course Title:
III Semester Subjects
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Engineering Mathematics - III
Course Code: 10MAT31
L-T-P: 4-0-0
Credits: 04
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Unit-I
10 hours
Combinatorics: The Sum and Product Rules, Permutations and Combinations, Generalized
permutations and Combinations, The Inclusion-exclusion Principle, Generalized Inclusion-
Exclusion Principle, ordinary Generating Functions, Partitions of Integers and Their Generating
Functions, exponential Generating Functions.
Unit-II
10 hours
Fourier series: Euler’s formulae, Dirichlet’s conditions for Fourier series expansion, change
of interval, Even and odd function, half range series, Practical harmonic analysis.
Fourier Transforms: Definition, Complex Fourier transforms, Cosine and Sine transforms,
Properties, Inverse Fourier transforms.
Unit – III
10 hours
Errors, absolute, relative and percentage errors.
Solution of transcendental equation – iteration method, Aitken’s ∆ 2 process, Secant method,
Newton Raphson method
Finite differences – forward, backward, central,
Interpolation, Newton’s forward and backward formulae, Newton’s divided difference formulae
and Lagrange’s formula for unequal intervals and inverse interpolation by Lagrange’s formula
Unit – IV
Evaluation
of derivatives
using Newton’s
forward
and
backward
10 hours
difference interpolation
formulae Numerical Integration by Trapezoidal, Simpson’s 3
1
and 8 3 rule, .
Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations: Taylor’s series method, Modified Euler’s
method, Runge-Kutta 4 th order method
Unit – V
8 hours
Linear algebra: Rank of a matrix, Consistency of linear system of equation, Gauss elimination,
Gauss Siedel methods, LU decomposition, Solution of Tridiagonal system, Eigen values and
Eigen vectors, Largest Eigen value by Power method.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Higher engg. mathematics by B V Ramana, Tata Macgrawhill, 2007
2. Advanced Engg. Mathematics by Erwin E Kreyszig, 8 th edition, Wiley.
3. Introductory methods of numerical analysis, by S S Sastry, PHI India
4. Combinatorics, by V.K.Balakrishnan, Schaum’s Outlines, Tata McGraw-Hill.
CO Description CO 1: Students will be able to apply the concepts, analyze the importance
CO
Description
CO 1:
Students will be able to apply the concepts, analyze the importance and applications
of Fourier analysis
CO 2:
Students solve problems using
different situations
numerical techniques and are able to apply them for
CO 3:
Students are able to solve problems using combinatorial techniques.
IV. Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Engineering Mathematics-III course maps majorly to
A to C program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
S
M
CO2
S
M
M
CO3
S
M
M
Fig 1: Mapping of Course outcomes to Program outcomes
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Assignment Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering Course Type: Programme Core Course Title: Electronic circuits Course Code:
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Electronic circuits
Course Code: 10CS32
L-T-P: 3-0-0
Credits: 03
Total Contact Hours: 36 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Should have knowledge about the basic concepts of electronics
UNIT – I
8 Hrs
Diode Applications and BJT: Load Line Analysis, Sinusoidal Inputs; Half-wave Rectification,
Full-wave Rectification, Clippers, Clampers, BJT-Introduction, Transistor Construction,
Transistor Operation, Common-Base Configuration, Transistor Amplifying Action, Common-
Emitter Configuration, Common-Collector Configuration.
UNIT – II
7 Hrs
Transistor Biasing and AC Models: Voltage Divider Bias, Accurate VDB Analysis, VDB Load
Line & Q Point, Two-Supply Emitter Bias, Other Type of Bias, Base-Biased Amplifier, Emitter
Biased Amplifier, Small Signal Operation, AC beta, AC Resistance of The Emitter Diode, Two
Transistor Models, Analyzing an Amplifier.
UNIT – III
7 Hrs
Voltage Amplifiers, CC and CB Amplifiers: Voltage Gain, The Loading Effect of Input
Impedance, Multistage Amplifiers, Swamped Amplifier, Two-Stage Feedback, CC Amplifier,
Output impedance, Cascading CE & CC, Darlington Connections, Voltage Regulation, The
common-Base Amplifier.
UNIT – IV
7 Hrs
Field Effect Transistors and MOSFET: Introduction, Construction and Characteristics of JFETs,
Transfer Characteristics, Depletion-Type MOSFET, Enhancement-Type MOSFET, CMOS.
UNIT – V
7 Hrs
Non Linear Op-Amp Circuits: Comparators with Zero Reference, Comparators with Nonzero
References, Comparators with Hysteresis, Window Comparator, The Integrator, Waveform
Conversion, Waveform Generation, Triangular Generator, The 555 Timer, Astable Operation of
the 555 Timer.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Electronic Principles, Albert Malvino & David J Bates, 7th Edition, TMH, 2007.
2. Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, Robert L. Boylestad, Louis Nashelsky, 9th Edition,
PHI/Pearson Education, 2006.
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, Robert L. Boylestad, Louis Nashelsky, 9th Edition,
PHI/Pearson Education, 2006.
2. Electronic Devices and Circuits, David A. Bell, 4th Edition, PHI, 2006.
Course outcomes (COs) CO Description CO 1: Understand the applications of various electronic components like
Course outcomes (COs)
CO
Description
CO 1:
Understand the applications of various electronic components like diodes and
transistors
CO 2:
Evaluate the important parameters related to transistor biasing and various AC models
CO 3:
Analyze types of voltage amplifiers and MOSFET
CO 4:
Illustrate the working of non linear op amp circuits
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Electronic circuits course maps majorly to A ,B ,D ,E,J,K,L program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
S
CO2
S
M
S
M
CO3
M
S
S
CO4
S
Fig 1: Mapping of Course outcomes to Program outcomes
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Assignment Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering Course Type: Programme Core Course Title: Logic Design Course Code:
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Logic Design
Course Code: 10CS33
L-T-P:4-0-0
Credits: 04
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Students should have knowledge of basic concepts of electronics.
Self study: Binary System: Digital computer and Digital systems, Binary numbers, numbers
based conversion, Octal and Hexadecimal numbers, complements, binary codes, binary storage
and registers, Binary logic, integrated circuits.
UNIT – I
12 Hrs
Boolean algebra and logic gates: Basic definition Axiomatic definition of Boolean algebra,
Basic theorem and properties of Boolean algebra, Boolean Functions, Canonical and standard
forms, other logic operations, Digital logic gates, IC digital logic families.Introduction to HDL(
from digital principles and applications, Donald P Leach, Albert Paul Malvino & Gautham saha,
6 th edition-2.5)
Simplifications of Boolean functions: The map method, 2, 3 and 4 variable map, product of
sum implications, NAND and NOR implementation, Don’t care conditions, determination and
selection of prime implicates, Simplification by Quine Mc Clusky Method.
HDL implementation models ( from digital principles and applications, Donald P Leach, Albert
Paul Malvino & Gautham saha, 6 th edition-3.11)
UNIT – II
8 Hrs
Combinational logic: Introduction design procedure, Adders, Subtractions, code conversion
analysis procedure, multilevel NOR circuits, Multilevel NAND circuits, Exclusive OR and
Equivalence. (Text book -2) Combinational Logic, MSI and LSI: Introduction, Binary parallel
Adder, Decimal Adder, Magnititude comperators, Decoders, Multiplexers, Read only memories,
programmable logic Array.
UNIT – III
9 Hrs
Sequential Logic: Introduction, Flip Flops, Triggering of FlipFlops, Flip flop excitation tables
Registers: Types of registers SISO,SIPO,PISO,PIPO, Applications of shift registers Counters:
Asynchronous Counters, Decoding Gates, synchronous Counter, Changing the counter modulus,
Decade and resettable counters, Counter design as a synthesis problem, a digital clock.
UNIT – IV
9 Hrs
Design of Sequential circuits: Model selection, state transition diagram, state synthesis table,
design equations and circuit diagrams, Implementation using ROM, Algorithmic state machines,
state reduction techniques, Analysis and design of Asynchronous sequential circuits.
UNIT – V
10 Hrs
D/A Conversion and A/D Conversion: Variable, Resistor Networks, Binary Ladders, D/A
Converters, D/A Accuracy and Resolution, A/D Converter-Simultaneous Conversion, A/D
Converter-Counter Method, Continuous A/D Conversion, A/D Techniques, Dual-Slope A/D Conversion, A/D Accuracy and
Converter-Counter Method, Continuous A/D Conversion, A/D Techniques, Dual-Slope A/D
Conversion, A/D Accuracy and Resolution. Digital Integrated Circuits: Switching Circuits,
7400 TTL, TTL Parameters, TTL Overview, Open-collector Gates, Three-state TTL Devices,
External Drive for TTL Loads, TTL Driving External Loads, 74C00 CMOS, CMOS
Characteristics, TTL-to-CMOS Interface, CMOS-to TTL Interface.
TEXT BOOK
1.Digital Principles and Applications, Donald P Leach, Albert Paul Malvino & Goutam Saha, 6th
Edition, TMH, 2006.
2.Digital logic and computer design, M Morris Mano, Prentice-Hall of India.
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Fundamentals of Digital Logic with Verilog Design, Stephen Brown, Zvonko Vranesic, TMH,
2006.
2. Fundamentals of Logic Design, Charles H. Roth, Jr., 5th Edition, Thomson, 2004.
3. Digital Systems Principles and Applications, Ronald J. Tocci Neal S. Widmer, Gregory L.
Moss, 10th Edition, PHI/Pearson Education, 2007.
NOTE : Assignment test to be conducted for the self study syllabus
Course outcomes (COs)
CO
Description
CO 1:
Understand binary number system, logic gates, Boolean laws
CO 2:
Simplify the Boolean equations using k-map and tabulation method and design
different combinational circuits
CO 3:
Design and implement different sequential circuits with flip flops,registers and counters
CO 4:
Design and implement analog to digital and digital to analog convertors
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
LOGIC DESIGN course maps majorly to a,b,f, i and j
program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
S
CO2
S
S
M
S
M
CO3
S
M
M
M
CO4
S
S
S
Assessment Method Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks Surprise Test – Tutorials
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Tutorials Test
10 Marks
-
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Discrete Mathematical Structures
Course Code: 10CS34
L-T-P:4-0-0
Credits: 04
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
UNIT I
: Fundamentals of Logic
10 Hours
Basic Connectivities and Truth Tables, Logical Equivalence: The laws of Logic, Logical
Implication: Rules of Inference, The use of Quantifiers, Rule of universal Specification and
Generalization.
UNIT II : Relations
10 Hours
Cartesian Products and Relations, properties of Relations Computer Recognition: Zero-One
matrices and Directed Graphs, Partial Orders: Hasse Diagrams, Equivalence Relations and
Partitions, Lattices.
UNIT III : Functions
10 Hours
Functions: Plain and One-to-one, Onto Functions: Stirling Numbers of the Second kind, Special
Functions, The Pigeonhole Principle, function composition and Inverse functions.
UNIT IV : Groups and Rings
10 Hours
Algebraic Structures, Semigroups and Monoids, definition, examples and Elementary Properties,
Homomorphism, Isomorphisms and cyclic Groups, cosets and Lagrange’s theorem, The Ring
Structure: Definition and Examples , Ring Properties and Substructures.
UNIT V : Rings and coding theory
8 Hours
Ring Homomorphism and Isomorphism, Integers Modulo n,.
Elements of Coding Theory, The Hamming Metric, The Parity-Check and Generator Matrices,
Group Codes: Decoding with Coset Leaders Hamming matrices.
TEXT BOOK: Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics by Ralph P.Grimaldi and
B.V.Ramana, 5 th Edition, Pearson Education.
Chapters: Unit I: 2.1 to 2.5, Unit II: 5.1, 7.1 to 7.4 , 7.6, Unit III: 5.2 to 5.6, Unit IV: 15.1 to
15.5, 13.1, 13.2, Unit V: 13.3, 13.4, 15.7 to 15.11
REFERENCES:
1. Discrete Mathematical Strucures by Kolman, Busby and Ross, 4 th edition, P.H.I. 2. Discrete
1. Discrete Mathematical Strucures by Kolman, Busby and Ross, 4 th edition, P.H.I.
2. Discrete Mathematical Structures by Trembly and Manohar.
CO
Description
CO 1
Students analyze basics knowledge gained by mathematical logic, functions and
relation and apply them
CO 2:
Students are able to apply concepts of coding theory and model different situations
CO 3:
Students will be able to apply the concepts acquired for different purposes
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Discrete Mathematical Structures course maps majorly to
A, B to C program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
S
S
CO2
S
S
S
CO3
S
S
S
Fig 1: Mapping of Course outcomes to Program outcomes
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Assignment Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering Course Type: Programme Core Course Title: Data Structures Course Code:
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Data Structures
Course Code: 10CS35
L-T-P: 4-0-0
Credits: 04
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Students should have basic knowledge of C programming constructs and should be able
to write basic C programs
UNIT – I
10 Hrs
Structures and Unions: Introduction, Defining a Structure, Declaring Structure Variables,
Accessing Structure Members, Structure Initialization, Copying and Comparing Structure
Variables, Operations and Individual Members, Array of Structures, Arrays within Structures,
Structures within Structures, Structures and Functions, Unions, Size of Structures. Pointers --
Introduction ,Understanding Pointers, Accessing the Address of a Variable, Declaring Pointer
Variables, Initialization of Pointer Variables, Accessing a Variable through the Pointer, Chain of
Pointers, Pointer Expressions, Pointer Increments and Scale Factor, Pointers and Arrays, Pointers
and Character Strings, Array of Pointers, Pointer as Function Arguments, Functions Returning
Pointers, Pointers to Functions, Pointers and Structures . Dynamic Memory Allocation –
Introduction, Dynamic Memory Allocation, Allocating a Block of Memory: Malloc, Allocating a
Multiple Blocks of Memory: Calloc, Releasing the Used Space: Free, Altering a size of Block:
Realloc. File management: Command line arguments
UNIT – II
10 Hrs
The Stack: Definition and Examples— Primitive operations, example
Representing Stacks in C – Implementing the POP operation, testing for exceptional conditions,
implementing the PUSH operation An Example: Infix, Postfix, and Prefix – Basic definitions
and examples, evaluating a postfix expression, program to evaluate a postfix expression,
converting an expression from infix to postfix, program to convert an expression from infix to
postfix.
Recursion: Recursive Definition and Processes— factorial function, multiplication of natural
numbers. Fibonacci sequenc, binary search. Recursion in C – factorial, Fibonacci numbers,
binary search, recursive chains Writing Recursive Programs – Towers of Hanoi
UNIT – III
10 Hrs
Queues: The Queue and its Sequential Representation – C Implementation of Queues, Insert
Operation, Priority Queue, Array Implementation of a Priority Queue. Lists: Linked Lists –
Inserting and Removing Nodes from a List, Linked Implementation of Stacks, getnode and
freenode Operations, Linked Implementation of Queues, Linked List as a Data Structure,
Examples of List Operations, List Implementation of Priority Queues, Header Nodes. Lists in C
– Array Implementation of Lists, Limitations of the Array Implementation, Allocating and
Freeing of Dynamic variables, Linked Lists using Dynamic Variables, Queues as List in C,
Examples of List Operations in C, Noninteger and Nonhomogeneous Lists, Comparing the
Dynamic and Array Implementations of Lists, Implementing Header Nodes
UNIT – IV 9 Hrs Lists contd.: Other List Structures -- Circular Lists, Stack as
UNIT – IV
9 Hrs
Lists contd.: Other List Structures -- Circular Lists, Stack as a Circular List, Queue as a Circular
List, Primitive Operations on Circular Lists, Header nodes, Addition of Long Positive Integers
Using Circular Lists, Doubly Linked Lists, Addition of Long Integer Using Doubly Linked Lists.
Binary Trees—Operations on Binary Trees, Applications of Binary Trees
UNIT – V
9 Hrs
Trees contd.: Binary Tree Representations – Node Representation of Binary Trees, Internal and
External Nodes, Implicit Array Representation of Binary Trees, Choosing a Binary Tree
Representation, Binary Tree Traversal in C, Threaded Binary Trees.
Representing Lists as Binary Trees– Finding the kth Element, Deleting an Element,
Implementing Tree-Represented Lists in C, Constructing a Tree-represented List
Trees and Their Applications — C Representations of Trees, Tree Traversals, General
Expressions as Trees, evaluating an expression tree, Constructing a Tree.
Text Books
1. Programming in ANSI C:E Balagurusamy, Third edition, TATA McGraw HILL
2. Data Structure using C, Aaron M. Tenenbaum, Yedidyah Langsam &Moshe J. Augenstein,
Pearson Education/PHI, 2006
Reference Books
1. Data Structures A Pseudo code approach with C, Richard F. Gilberg and Behrouz A.
Forouzan, Thomson, 2005.
2. Data Structures & Program Design in C, Robert Kruse & Bruce Leung, Pearson Education,
2007.
Course outcomes (COs)
Having successfully completed the course, student will be able to:
CO
Description
CO 1:
Write C programs using structures, unions, dynamic memory allocation functions and
command line arguments
CO 2:
Describe and simulate various linear data structures like stacks, queues, linked lists
using static and dynamic allocation and use them in solving problems.
CO 3:
Simulate nonlinear data structures like binary search tree and threaded binary trees and
use them in designing applications like sorting, expression trees etc.
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs) Data structures course maps majorly to
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Data structures course maps majorly to B,C and D program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
M
S
CO2
M
S
S
M
CO3
S
M
S
M
Fig 1: Mapping of Course outcomes to Program outcomes
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Tutorials Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Introduction to Unix and Shell
Programming
Course Code: 10CS36
L-T-P:4-0-0
Credits: 04
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Students should have knowledge of C And C++.
UNIT – I
10 Hrs
Introduction The operating System, UNIX Operating System, Features of UNIX, Architecture of
UNIX, Accessing UNIX, Common Commands, Command Structure, Flexibility of Command
Usage, Getting Help.General Purpose Utilities cal, date, echo, printf, bc, script, passwd, who,
uname, tty, sty.File System The File, File name, Parent-child Relationship, Pathnames, UNIX
file system
UNIT – II
9 Hrs
Handling Ordinary File cat, cp, rm, mv, more, lp, file, wc, od, cmp, comm, diff, Converting
between DOS and UNIX, Compressing and Archiving Files.Basic File Attributes Listing file
attributes,
Listing Directory attributes, File Ownership, File Permission, Changing file
permission, Directory Permissions, Changing File Ownership.More File Attributes File systems and Inodes, Hard Links,
permission, Directory Permissions, Changing File Ownership.More File Attributes File systems
and Inodes, Hard Links, Symbolic Links, The Directory, Default file and Directory Permissions,
Modifications and Access time, Locating files.
UNIT – III
9 Hrs
The Shell: Shell offerings, Pattern matching, Escaping and Quoting, Redirection, Pipes, tee
command, Command Substitution, Shell variable.Customizing Environmental Variables: The
Shells, Environmental Variables, aliases.Regular Expressions: Searching for pattern, Basic
Regular Expression, Extended Regular Expression, Interval Regular Expression, The Stream
editor.Essential Shell Programming
UNIT – IV
10 Hrs
The Process: Process Basics, Process Status, System Processes, Mechanism for process creation,
Internal and External Commands, Process states and Zombies, Running jobs in background,
Reducing the job priority, Killing processes.Simple Filters, awk – An Advanced Filter
UNIT – V
10 Hrs
Perl: The master manipulator, Perl preliminaries, chop function, variables & operators, String
handling functions, lists & arrays, foreach:
looping through a list, split: splitting into a list or
array, join, grep, associative arrays, subroutines.Essential System Administration: The System
Administer Login, Administrator’s Privileges, Maintaining Security, User Management, Startup
and Shutdown.
Text Books
1. UNIX – Concepts and Applications, Sumitabha Das, 4th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, 2006.
Reference Books
1. UNIX and Shell Programming, Behrouz A. Forouzan and Richard F.Gilberg, Thomson, 2005.
2. UNIX & Shell Programming, M.G. Venkateshmurthy, Pearson Education, 2005.
Course outcomes (COs)
CO
Description
CO 1:
Ability to understand the Unix Operating System and the working of the built in
commands available in unix.
CO 2:
Analyze the working of the user defined commands and will be able change the
permissions associated with files.
CO 3:
Understanding the concept of Shell and the different usage of the commands in shell.
CO 4:
Ability to program in AWK language
CO 5:
Identify and analyze various perl programs and administrator priveleges
Introduction to Unix and Shell Programming course maps majorly to B, C, D, E and
Introduction to Unix and Shell Programming course maps majorly to B, C, D, E and K
program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
CO2
M
S
M
S
CO3
S
M
S
CO4
S
M
S
CO5
S
S
S
M
S
Fig 1: Mapping of Course outcomes to Program outcomes
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Lab Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Data Structures Laboratory
Course Code: 10CSL37
L-T-P: 0-0-3
Credits: 1.5
Total Contact Hours: 24 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Students should have basic knowledge of C programming constructs and should be able
to write basic C programs
Design and Implement programs for the following Data Structure Concepts.
Pointer applications, dynamic memory allocation Stack simulation and its applications, Simple
queue, Circular queue, Singly linked list, Circular list, Doubly linked list and Binary Search
Trees .
CO Description CO 1: Write C programs using structures, unions, dynamic memory allocation functions and
CO
Description
CO 1:
Write C programs using structures, unions, dynamic memory allocation functions and
command line arguments
CO 2:
Implement various linear data structures like stacks, queues, linked lists using static
and dynamic allocation and their applications
CO 3:
Implement nonlinear data structure binary search tree
Data structures Laboratory course maps majorly to
B,C,D and E program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
M
S
CO2
M
S
S
M
CO3
S
M
S
Assessment Method
Experiment Writeup + Execution + Viva - 15 Marks
Lab Record Wirting
Lab Internals Test
Surprise Test
- 10 Marks
- 15 Marks
- 10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering Course Type: Programme Core Course Title: Electronic Circuits And Logic
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Electronic Circuits And Logic Design
Laboratory
Course Code: 10CSL38
L-T-P: 0-0-3
Credits: 1.5
Total Contact Hours: 24 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Should have basic knowledge about the basics of electronics and basic concepts in logic
design
Part A
1. Design a circuit for Full Adder.
2. Design a circuit for Conversion of BCD to Excess – 3 codes.
3. Application of MUX/DEMUX.
4. Application of Decoder.
5. Design of 3 bit Synchronous Counter.
6. Design of Asynchronous Counter.
7. Design of Ring Counter/Johnson Counter.
8. Design of Sequence generator.
Part B
1. Half Wave Rectifier with and without capacitor filter. Determine Ripple factor.
2. Full Wave Rectifier with and without capacitor filter. Determine Ripple factor.
3. OPAMP Application as Inverting Amplifier.
4. OPAMP Application as Non Inverting Amplifier
5. OPAMP Application has clamper circuit.
6. Schmitt trigger.
7. R – 2R ladder.
8. Analog to digital converter.
Note: In SEE, student has to pick a lot for question that contains subsections from Part-A and
part-B and has to execute both the subsections compulsorily.
Course outcomes (COs)
CO
Description
CO 1
Implement BCD to excess 3 convertor , synchronous counter , asynchronous counter
and ring counter
CO 2
Design and implement multiplexer , demultiplexer and decoder
CO 3 Determine ripple factor for half wave and full wave Rectifier , Design and
CO 3
Determine ripple factor for half wave and full wave Rectifier , Design and implement an
op-amp as inverting , non-inverting and clamper circuit
CO 4
Design and implement D\A converter
Electronic Circuits And Logic Design Laboratory maps majorly to A,C,E,H,I,J,K program
outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
M
M
M
CO2
S
M
S
S
CO3
S
S
S
M
CO4
M
S
Fig 1: Mapping of Course outcomes to Program outcomes
Assessment Method
Experiment Writeup + Execution + Viva - 15 Marks
Lab Record Wirting
Lab Internals Test
Surprise Test
- 10 Marks
- 15 Marks
- 10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
IV Semester Subjects Department: Computer Science and Engineering Course Type: Programme Core Course Title: Engineering
IV Semester Subjects
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Engineering Mathematics - IV
Course Code: 10MAT41
L-T-P: 4-0-0
Credits: 04
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Course Content
Unit – I
10 hours
Probability – Random experiments, sample paces, event, axioms, addition and multiplication,
conditional probability, independent events, Baye’s theorem.
Random variable, discrete probability distribution, continuous random variables, continuous
probability distribution, graphical interpretation
Unit – II
Joint distribution, expectation, variance, standard deviation, covariance
Binomial, Poisson, Normal, hyper geometric relations, gamma distribution
8 hours
Unit – III
10 hours
Population and sample, sampling with and without replacement, sampling distribution of means,
sample
variance.
Unbiased
estimate,
reliability,
confidence
intervals
for mean statistical
hypothesis, testing of hypothesis, Type I and II errors, one tailed, two tailed tests, t - distribution,
χ 2 – test, and test for goodness of fit.
Unit – IV
10 hours
Curve fitting by least square method (straight line, parabolic), correlation, regression, multiple
regression
Stochastic process, n – step transitional probabilities, regular, ergodic matrices, stationery
distribution, classification of states, and Markov chain with absorbing states.
Unit - V
10 hours
Pure
birth
process,
death
process,
birth
and
death
process,
Markovian
queuing
model,
M/M/1:∞/FIFO and M/M/c:∞/FIFO model. Open queuing networks, closed queuing networking.
Games, strategies, Games with and without saddle point, Principal of dominance, graphical
method.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Probability and statistics, by Murray R Spiegel, J Schiller, R Alu Srinivasan, Schaum’s outline
series, second edition
2. Operations research by Richard Bronson & Govindasami Nadimuthu, Schaum’s outline
series, second edition
3. Higher engg. mathematics by B V Ramana, Tata Macgrawhill, 2007
CO Description CO 1: Students are able to apply different problems concepts of probability ,distributions
CO
Description
CO 1:
Students are able to apply
different problems
concepts
of probability ,distributions and sampling to
CO 2:
Students will be able to solve problems and model situations using techniques of
Markov process, queueing and game theory
CO 3:
Students will be able model using statistical tools like curve fitting, hypothesis testing
and stochastic process
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Engineering Mathematics-IV course maps majorly to
A to C program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
S
M
CO2
S
M
M
CO3
S
M
M
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Assignment Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering Course Type: Programme Core Course Title: Graph Theory Course Code:
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Graph Theory
Course Code: 10CS42
L-T-P: 3-0-0
Credits: 03
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
UNIT – I
8 Hrs
Introduction to Graph Theory: Graphs and Graph Models, Connected Graphs, Common
Classes of Graphs(no proof for the theorems), Multigraphs and Digraphs, The Degree of a
Vertex, Regular graphs, Degree Sequences and Matrices for graphs(no proof for the theorems),
Problems on Isomorphic graphs.
UNIT – II
8 Hrs
Trees: Bridges, Trees, The minimum Spanning Tree problem and the number of spanning trees
(no proof for the theorems), Cut-vertices, Problems on fundamental circuits.
UNIT – III
6 Hrs
Traversability and Matching: Eularian Graphs, Hamiltonian Graphs, Problems on Matching.
UNIT – IV
6 Hrs
Planarity and Coloring: Planar Graphs, The four Color Problem, Vertex coloring and Edge
coloring(no proof for the theorems).
UNIT – IV
8 Hrs
Distances and Domination: The centre of a Graph, Channel assignment Problems, Problems on
Domination Number of a graph(no theorems).
TEXT BOOK: Introduction to Graph Theory by Gary Chartrand and Ping Zhang, Tata
McGraw-hill Edition 2006.
Chapters: Unit I: 1.1 to 1.4, 2.1 to 2.4, 3.1, Unit II: 4.1 to 4.4, 5.1 and 5.3, Unit III: 6.1,
6.2(only theorems 6.6, 6.7, 6.8, 6.11), 8.1, Unit IV: 9.1, 10.1 to 10.3, Unit V: 12.1 (no
proof for the theorem 12.5), 12.5, 13.1
REFERENCE:
1. A Text Book of Graph Theory and its Applications by B.Sooryanarayana and G.K.Ranganath,
S.Chand Publications
2. A Text book of Graph Theory by R.Balakrishnan and K. Ranganathan, Springer.
CO Description CO 1: Students understand basic concepts of graph theory through definitions, examples and
CO
Description
CO 1:
Students understand basic concepts of graph theory through definitions, examples and
problem solving
CO 2:
Students are able to prove and verify the results available
CO 3:
Students will be able to apply the techniques applied for modeling different situations
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Graph Theory course maps majorly to
A to C program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
M
S
CO2
S
M
S
CO3
S
M
S
Fig 1: Mapping of Course outcomes to Program outcomes
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Assignment Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department : Computer Science and Engineering Course Type : Programme Core Course Title: Analysis and
Department : Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type : Programme Core
Course Title: Analysis and Design of Algorithms
Course Code: 10CS43
L-T-P: 4-0-0
Credits:04
Total Contact Hours:48 Hrs
Duration of SEE : 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Students should have knowledge of C or C++ language
• Students should know the usage of summation formulae, recurrences in maths
UNIT I
08 Hrs
Introduction: What is an Algorithm? Fundamentals of Algorithmic problem solving, Important
Problem Types, Fundamentals Data Structures. Fundamentals of Analysis of Algorithm
Efficiency:
Analysis
Mathematical
Analysis
Framework, Asymptotic Notations and Basic Efficiency Classes,
of Non recursive and Recursive Algorithms, Example-Fibonacci
Numbers
UNIT II
10 Hrs
Brute Force: Selection Sort and Bubble sort, Sequential Search and Brute-Force String
Matching, Exhaustive Search.
Divide and Conquer : Merge sort, Quick Sort, Binary Search, Binary tree traversals and related
properties, Multiplication of Large integers and Strassen’ Matrix Multiplication.
UNIT III
10 Hrs
Decrease and Conquer: Insertion Sort, Depth First Search, Breadth First Search, Topological
Sorting. Transform and Conquer: Gaussian Elimination, Balanced Search Trees, Heaps and
Heap sort.
UNIT IV
10 Hrs
Space and Time Tradeoffs: Sorting by counting, Input Enhancement in String Matching
(Horspools Algorithm), Hashing, B-Trees. Dynamic Programming: Computing a Binomial
Coefficient, Warshall’s and Floyd’s Algorithms, the Knapsack Problem and Memory functions.
UNIT V
10 Hrs
Greedy Technique: Prim’s Algorithm, Kruskal’s Algorithm, Djikstra’s Algorithm, Huffman
Trees. Limitations of Algorithm Power: P, NP and NP- Complete Problems Coping with the
Limitations of Algorithm Power: Backtracking: n-Queens Problem, Subset-Sum Problem
Branch and Bound: Knapsack Problem
Text Book:
1. Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Algorithms, Anany Levitin, 2 nd Edition,
Pearson
education, 2007
Reference Books
1. Computer Algorithms by Horowitz E., Sahini S.,Rajasekaran S., Galgotia Publications, 2001
2. Introduction to Algorithms, Thomas H., Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronal L. Rivest, Clifford Stein,
2. Introduction to Algorithms, Thomas H., Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronal L. Rivest,
Clifford Stein, 2 nd Edition, PHI ,2006
Note:
i) For SEE, students should answer five questions, selecting at least one question from each
unit
ii) The Lab components will be provided as part of the assignment, students will have to
execute them and evaluation will be done by the teacher as a component of the CIE.
Course outcomes (COs)
Having successfully completed the course, student will be able to:
CO
Description
CO 1:
Understand and use asymptotic notations to analyze the performance of algorithms
CO 2:
Identify and analyze various algorithm design techniques
CO 3:
Understand and evaluate algorithms under various algorithm design techniques
CO 4:
Solve problems by applying appropriate algorithm design techniques
CO 5:
Analyze the efficiency of various algorithms.
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
ADA course maps majorly to A,B,C,D program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
M
CO2
S
S
CO3
S
S
S
S
CO4
S
S
S
S
M
M
CO5
S
S
M
Assessment Method Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks Lab Conduction – Lab
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Lab Conduction –
Lab Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Object Oriented Programming
Course Code: 10CS44
L-T-P: 4-0-0
Credits: 04
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Procedure Oriented Programming skill in ‘C’ language, especially in structure and union
constructs is strongly recommended. Basic knowledge of file handling and command line
arguments are required.
10 Hrs
UNIT – I
An Overview of C++ : The origins of C++, What is object –Oriented Programming ?,Some
C++ Fundamentals, Introducing C++ Classes, Function Overloading, Operator Overloading ,
Inheritance, Constructors and Destructors ,The C++ keywords ,The General Form of a C++
Program.
Classes and Objects : Classes, Structures and Classes Are Related, Unions and Classes are
Related, Friend Functions, Friend Classes, Inline Functions, Parameterized Constructor , Static
Class Members, When Constructors and Destructors Are Executed, The Scope Resolution
Operator, Nested Classes, Local Classes, Passing Objects to functions, Returning Objects, Object
Assignment
Arrays, Pointers, References, and the Dynamic Allocation Operators: Arrays of Objects,
Pointers to Objects ,Type Checking C++ Pointers ,The this Pointer, Pointers to Derived Types,
Pointers to Class Members, References, C++’ s Dynamic Allocation Operators ,The Placement
Forms of new and deleteArrays, Pointers, References, and the Dynamic Allocation
Operators: Arrays of Objects, Pointers to Objects ,Type Checking C++ Pointers ,The this
Pointer, Pointers to Derived Types, Pointers to Class Members, References, C++’ s Dynamic
Allocation Operators ,The Placement Forms of new and delete
UNIT – II
10 Hrs
Function Overloading, Copy Constructors, and Default Arguments: Function Overloading,
Overloading Constructor Functions ,Copy constructors, Finding the Address of an Overloaded
Function ,The overloaded Anachronism, Default Function Arguments, Function Overloading and
Ambiguity, The Three Steps of Overload Resolution.
Operator Overloading: Creating a Member Operator Function, Operator Overloading Using a Friend Function, Overloading new
Operator Overloading: Creating a Member Operator Function, Operator Overloading Using a
Friend Function, Overloading new and delete, Overloading Some Special Operators,
Overloading the Comma Operator
UNIT – III
10 Hrs
Inheritance : Base-Class Access Control, Inheritance and Protected Members, Inheriting
Multiple Base Classes, Constructors, Destructors, and Inheritance, Granting Access, Virtual Base
Classes
Virtual Functions and Polymorphism: Virtual Functions, The Virtual Attribute Is Inherited,
Virtual Functions Are Hierarchical, Pure Virtual Functions, Using Virtual Functions, Early vs
Late Binding.
UNIT – IV
10 Hrs
Templates: Generic Functions, Applying Generic Functions, Generic Classes, The typename
and export Keywords, The Power of Templates
Exception Handling: Exception Handling Fundamentals, Handling Derived-Class Exceptions,
Exception Handling Options, Understanding terminate() and unexpected(), the uncaught_
exception() Function, The exception and bad exception Classes, Applying Exception Handling
UNIT – V
8 Hrs
The C++ I/O System Basics: Old vs. Modern C++ I/O,C++ Streams, The C++ Stream Classes,
Formatted I/O, Overloading << and >>,Creating Your Own Manipulator Functions
C++ File I/O: <fstream> and File Classes, Opening and Closing a File, Reading and Writing
Text Files Unformatted and Binary I/O, More get() Functions, getline(),Detecting EOF, The
ignore() Function, Peek() and putback(),flush(),Random Access ,I/O Status, Customized I/O and
Files
TEXT BOOK
1. The Complete Reference C++, Herbert Schildt, 4th Edition, TMH, 2005.
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. C++ Primer, Stanley B. Lippman, Josee Lajoie, Barbara E. Moo,4th Edition, AddisonWesley,
2005.
2. Object-Oriented Programming with C++, Sourav Sahay, Oxford University Press, 2006.
Course outcomes (COs)
Having successfully completed the course, student will be able to:
CO
Description
CO 1:
Distinguish between top-down and bottom-up programming approach and apply
bottom-up approach to solve real world problems
CO 2: Interpret the difference between static and dynamic binding. Apply both techniques to solve
CO 2:
Interpret the difference between static and dynamic binding. Apply both techniques to
solve problems
CO 3:
Analyse generic data type for the data type independent programming which relate it to
reusability.
CO 4:
Interpret and design the Exception Handling Techniques for resolving run-time errors
and handle large data set using file I/O
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Object Oriented Programming course maps majorly to B, D , E
program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
S
M
CO2
S
S
M
CO3
S
S
M
CO4
S
S
S
Fig 1: Mapping of Course outcomes to Program outcomes
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Assignment Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering Course Type: Programme Core Course Title: Microprocessor Course Code:
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Microprocessor
Course Code: 10CS45
L-T-P: 4-0-0
Credits: 04
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Students should have knowledge of basics of electronics.
• Students should have knowledge of basic concepts in logic design.
UNIT – I
12 Hours
Introduction Evolution of Microprocessors, 8086 microprocessor family, 8086 Internal
Architecture, 8086 Signal Descriptions, Physical memory organizations of 8086, General Bus
operations in 8086, Special processor activities in 8086, Maximum mode 8086 system &
timings, Minimum mode 8086 system & timings.
Instruction Set & Assembler Directives Machine language Instruction and formats, addressing
modes of 8086, Instruction Set & Assembler directives of 8086.
UNIT – II
08 Hours
Data Transfer Operations: External data moves, code memory read PUSH and POP opcodes,
data exchanges.
Logical operations: Byte-level logical operations, bit-level logical operations, rotate operations.
Arithmetic operations: Flags, incrementing and decrementing, addition, subtraction,
multiplication and division, decimal arithmetic.
Jump and call instructions: Jump and call program range, jumps, calls and subroutines, interrupts
and returns. Simple 8086 Programs
UNIT – III
08 Hours
Structure of Assembly language programs, Programming with assemblers,. Programs on Strings,
Procedures & macros String Instructions, Subroutine and Macros, Writing & using procedures,
Writing & using assembler macros
Stacks and Interrupts Introduction to Stack, Stack structure in 8086, Simple programs using stack
UNIT – IV
10 Hours
Interrupts & Interrupt service routines, Hardware & software interrupts, Vectored & non
vectored interrupts, 8259 priority interrupt controller, Timings & delays routines, Interface and
Case Studies Semi Conductor memory interfacing, Dynamic RAM interfacing, Interfacing
input/output ports, Internal Architecture of 8255, Modes of operations, Analog/Digital &
Digital/Analog Converters interfacing ,architecure of 8259 interrupt controller
UNIT – V
10 Hours
ARM Introduction: Processor Design Tradeoffs, The Reduced Instruction set Computer, The
ARM Architecture : The Acorn RISC Machine, Architectural Inheritance, The ARM
Programmer’s Model, ARM Development Tools, Example and Exercise. ARM Assembly
Language Programming Data Processing Instructions, Data Transfer Instructions, Control Flow
Instructions, Writing simple Assembly Language Programs, Example and Exercises
TEXT BOOKS: 1 Microprocessor Interfacing by Douglas V Hall revised 2nd Edition [Tata McGraw Hill]
TEXT BOOKS:
1 Microprocessor Interfacing by Douglas V Hall revised 2nd Edition [Tata McGraw Hill]
2 Advanced Microprocessors and Peripherals by A K Ray and K M Bhurchandi [Tata McGraw
Hill]
3 ARM System on Chip Architecture 2nd Ed, Published 2000 : Steve Furber, Addison Wesley.
(Chap 1: 1.5,1.6, Chap 2: 2.1-2.5, Chap: 3.1-3.5)
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Advanced Microprocessors & IBM-PC assembly Language Programming, K. Udaya Kumar
& B.S. Umashankar, TMH 2003.
2. Microprocessor Architecture, Programming, and Applications with the 8085, Publisher:
Prentice Hall Author: Ramesh S Gaonkar, Edition: 5
Course outcomes (COs)
COs
Description
CO 1:
Understand the architecture of 8086 microprocessor and learn the instruction set
CO 2:
Design software and hardware programs using assembly language programming
CO 3:
Analyze the working of special purpose processors like 8255, 8259 and understand
interfacing external devices like memory
CO 4:
Design simple programs using ARM assembly level programming
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Microprocessor course maps majorly to a,b,f, i,j,k program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
M
CO2
S
S
M
M
M
CO3
M
M
M
CO4
S
S
M
M
S
S
S
S
Assessment Method Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks Surprise Test – Assignment
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Assignment Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Computer Organization and
Architecture
Course Code: 10CS46
L-T-P: 4-0-0
Credits: 4
Total Contact Hours: 48
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks:50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Student should have prior knowledge of Logic Design, Electronic Circuits
• Student should have prior knowledge of Computer Concepts
UNIT – I
10 Hrs
Basic Structure of Computers: Computer Types, Functional Units, Basic Operational Concepts,
Bus Structures, Performance – Processor Clock, Basic Performance Equation, Pipelining and
Superscalar Operation,Clock Rate, Instruction set: CISC and RISC,Compiler, Performance
Measurement, multiprocessors and multi computers, Historical Perspective
Machine Instructions and Programs: Basic Input.Output Operations(2.7 Only), Input/Output
Organization: Accessing I/O Devices, Interrupts – Interrupt Hardware, Enabling and Disabling
Interrupts, Handling Multiple Devices, Controlling Device Requests, Exceptions.
UNIT – II
10 Hrs
Direct Memory Access, Buses, Interface Circuits, Standard I/O Interfaces(Introduction) The
Memory System: speed-size and cost, cache memories(5.5.3 & 5.5.4 is not there), Performance
consideration(5.6.4 is not there)
UNIT – III
Virtual Memories ,Arithmetic:
10 Hrs
Addition and Substraction of signed numbers, Design of Fast
Adders, Multiplication of positive Numbers, Signed Operand Multiplication, Fast Multiplication,
Integer Division, Floating-point Numbers and Operations
UNIT – IV
10 Hrs
Basic Processing Unit: Some Fundamental Concepts, Execution of a Complete Instruction,
Multiple Bus Organization, Hard-wired Control, Microprogrammed Control ,Pipelining:Basic
Concepts,Data Hazards,Instruction Hazards.
UNIT – V Embedded 8 Hrs System: Examples of Embedded Systems, Processor Chips for embedded
UNIT – V
Embedded
8 Hrs
System:
Examples
of
Embedded
Systems,
Processor
Chips
for
embedded
Applications,
A
simple
Microcontroller,
Programming
considerations,I/O
device
timing
Constraints, Reaction Timer- An example.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Computer Organization, Carl Hamacher, Zvonko Vranesic, Safwat Zaky, 5th Edition, TMH
2. Computer Architecture and Organization, John P. Hayes, 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill Series
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Computer Organization & Architecture, William Stallings, 7th Edition, PHI, 2006
2. Computer Systems Design and Architecture, Vincent P. Heuring & Harry F. Jordan, 2nd
Edition, Pearson Education, 2004
3. Computer Systems Architecture – M.Moris Mano, IIIrd Edition, Pearson/PHI
4. Computer Organization – Car Hamacher, Zvonks Vranesic, SafeaZaky, Vth Edition,
McGrawHill.
5. Computer Organization and Architecture – William Stallings Sixth Edition, Pearson/PHI
Course outcomes (COs)
Having successfully completed the course, student will be able to:
CO
Description
CO 1:
Identify Computer system components
CO 2:
Analyze the Memory system, speed, size and cost
CO 3:
Solve Virtual memories & Arithmetic
CO 4:
Demonstrate the Instruction execution concept
CO5:
Analyze Embedded systems, examples
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Computer Organization and Architecture course maps majorly to A to G program
outcomes
POs
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
COs
CO1 M S CO2 S M CO3 M S S M S CO4 M M
CO1
M
S
CO2
S
M
CO3
M
S
S
M
S
CO4
M
M
S
M
CO5
S
M
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Assignment Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Microprocessor Laboratory
Course Code: 10CSL47
L-T-P: 0-0-3
Credits: 1.5
Total Contact Hours: 24 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Should have basic knowledge about the basics of electronics and basic concepts in logic
design
Part A
1. Program on searching and sorting,
2. Macros and Procedures(subroutines)
3. Data conversions
4. Strings
5. Recursion
6. Number generation (8-bit, 16-bit)
7. File(Read and write)
Part B (Using Interfacing concepts)
i) Programs on logic controller, 7-segment display, stepper motor interface,
8X3 Keypad, DAC interface
ii) Programs on ARM interface.
Note: Out of the exercises executed in the regular laboratory classes, each students will be
Note: Out of the exercises executed in the regular laboratory classes, each students will be
allotted one question from Part A and one question from Part B, by taking lots in the SEE ,
which he has to execute individually.
Course outcomes (COs)
Having successfully completed the course, student will be able to:
COs
Description
CO 1:
Implement programs related to Searching , sorting and strings
CO 2:
Implement programs using Macro , procedure and files
CO 3:
Implement Data conversion , number generation, parity checking
CO 4:
Interface hardware device to 8086 processor
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Microprocessor Laboratory maps majorly to A,B,F,I,J,K program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
M
S
M
S
CO2
S
M
CO3
S
M
M
M
M
CO4
S
M
S
Assessment Method
Experiment Writeup + Execution + Viva - 15 Marks
Lab Record Wirting
Lab Internals Test
Surprise Test
- 10 Marks
- 15 Marks
- 10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering Course Type: Programme Core Course Title: Object Oriented Programming
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Object Oriented Programming Laboratory
Course Code: 10CSL48
L-T-P: 0-0-3
Credits: 1.5
Total Contact Hours: 24 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Procedure Oriented Programming skill in ‘C’ language, especially in structure and union
constructs is strongly recommended. Basic knowledge of file handling and command line
arguments are required.
PART A
Design and Implement programs using the following OOP concepts
Function Overloading, operator overloading, inheritance, Constructors & destructors, friend
functions, friend classes, arrays, Pointers, references & the dynamic allocation operators,
function overloading, Copy constructors & default arguments, operator overloading, Inheritance,
virtual functions & Polymorphism, Templates, exception handling, C++ I/O System basics, file
I/O.
PART B
Implement a mini project individually which includes at least five of the OOP features
mentioned above.
Note: Each student will be allotted one question by lots in the SEE, which he has to execute
individually. Mini project will be assessed for 10 marks in CIE.
Course outcomes (COs)
Having successfully completed the course, student will be able to:
COs
Description
CO 1:
Apply and implement major object oriented concepts like message passing, function
overloading, operator overloading and inheritance to solve real-world problems.
CO 2:
Use major C++ features such as Templates for data type independent designs and File
I/O (Sequential and random file) to deal with large data set
CO 3:
Analyze, design and develop solutions to real-world problems applying OOP
Concepts of C++ (mini project)
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs) Object Oriented Programming laboratory maps majorly
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Object Oriented Programming laboratory maps majorly to B, D, E
program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
M
S
CO2
S
M
S
CO3
S
M
S
Assessment Method
Experiment Writeup + Execution + Viva - 15 Marks
Lab Record Wirting
Lab Internals Test
Surprise Test
- 10 Marks
- 15 Marks
- 10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
V Semester Subjects Department: Computer Science and Engineering Course Type: Programme Core Course Title: Computer
V Semester Subjects
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Computer Networks-I
Course Code: 10CS51
L-T-P:4-0-0
Credits: 04
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Students should have knowledge of basic Internet usage.
• Students should have knowledge of graph theory, set theory and probability.
UNIT – I
9 Hrs
Data Communications and Fundamentals Introduction: Data Communications; Networks; The
Internet; Protocols and Standards; Network Models: Layered tasks; The OSI Model and the
layers in the OSI model; TCP / IP Protocol Suite, addressing.
UNIT – II
10 Hrs
Physical
Layer
and
Media
Data
and
Signals:
Analog
and
digital
signals;
Transmission
impairment; Data rate limits; Performance; Digital Transmission: Digital-to-Digital conversion;
Transmission modes. Bandwidth Utilization: Multiplexing; Spread spectrum. Transmission
Media: Twisted pair cable, Coaxial cable, Fiber-Optic cable, Radio waves, Microwaves,
Infrared.
UNIT – III
10 Hrs
Data Link Layer Error Detection and Correction: Introduction to error detection / correction;
Block coding; Linear block codes; Cyclic codes, Checksum. Data Link Control: Framing; Flow
and Error control; Protocols; Noiseless channels; Noisy channels; HDLC; Point-to-point Protocol
- framing, transition phases.
UNIT – IV
10 Hrs
Data Link Layer Continued Multiple Access, Ethernet: Random Access; Controlled Access;
Channelization. Wired LAN's:Ethernet: IEEE standards; Standard Ethernet and changes in the
standard; Fast Ethernet; Gigabit Ethernet. Wireless LANs: lEE 802.11; Bluetooth. Connection of
LANs: Connecting devices; Backbone Networks; Virtual LANs
UNIT – V
9 Hrs
Other
Technologies
Cellular
telephony;
SONET/SDH:
Architecture,
Layers,
Frames;STS
multiplexing, ATM
TEXT BOOK
1. Behrouz A. Forouzan: Data Communications and Networking, 4th Edition, Tata McGraw-
Hill, 2006. (Chapters of the book: 1,2,3,4,6,7,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18)
REFERENCE BOOKS 1. William Stallings: Data and Computer Communication, 8th Edition, Pearson Education, 2007. 2.
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. William Stallings: Data and Computer Communication, 8th Edition, Pearson Education, 2007.
2. Larry L. Peterson and Bruce S. David: Computer Networks - A Systems Approach, 4th
Edition, Elsevier, 2007.
3. Andrew S. Tanenbaum: Computer Networks, 4th Edition, PHI.
4. Internetworking With TCP/IP, Douglas Comer, volume 1, Prentice-Hall Publisher, 2005
5. Nader F. Mir: Computer and Communication Networks, Pearson Education, 2007.
Note: Instructor shall assign group activity for developing team work and to test on self
learning aspect.
Note: Instructor shall assign group activity for developing team work and to test on self
learning aspect.
Rubrics doe software lab evaluation (2013-14) – V Semester
Performance
Low
Medium
High
indicators
Relating theoretical
concept with practical
Improper mapping of
theory concepts with
practical problem
solving approaches
Moderate mapping of
theory concepts with
practical problem
solving approaches
Efficient mapping of
theory concepts with
practical problem
solving approaches
Creativity
Unable to interpret the
result from the
derived output
Approximately
predicts and defends
problem outcomes
Can predict and
defend problem
outcomes
Effective formulation
of strategies
Has no coherent
strategies for problem
solving
Has some strategies
for problem solving
but does not apply
them consistently
Formulates strategies
for solving problems
Visualization of the
results
Result not presented
in readable form/front
end not user friendly
Some aspects of result
presentation/ front end
appreciable
Result presented in
readable form/ front
end user friendly
Presentation and
communication skills
Disorganized and
ineffective
presentation
Organized, but
ineffective
Effective organized
presentation
presentation
COs
Description
CO 1:
Able to differentiate between OSI and TCP/IP models and identify the responsibility of
each layer.
CO 2:
Understand the concept of data and signal, data transmission and data conversion.
CO 3:
Describe block coding techniques and different data link layer protocols.
CO 4:
Understand multiple access techniques and working of Bluetooth, backbone networks
CO 5:
Describe the architecture of cellular telephony and working principle of ATM networks
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs) Computer Networks-1 course maps majorly to
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Computer Networks-1 course maps majorly to A, B, C and D program outcomes
POs
A
B C
D E
F G
H
I J
K L
COs
CO1
S
S
CO2
S
S
S
M
CO3
S
S
M
CO4
S
S
CO5
S
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Software Lab –
10 Marks
Quiz Test
-
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: : Computer Graphics with OpenGL
Course Code: 10CS52
L-T-P: 3-0-0
Credits: 03
Total Contact Hours: 36hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Students should have knowledge of C ,C++, visual Basic or Java language
• Should be able to write basic C or C++ programs
• Students should g have knowledge of geometry , graphs and matrix
UNIT – I
6 Hrs
Overview: Computer Graphics & Open GL
Graphs and Charts, Computer-Aided Design, Virtual-Reality Environments, Data Visualizations,
Education andTraining,Computer Art. Entertainment, Image Processing, Graphics User Interfaces. Video
Display Devices, Raster Scan Systems, Graphics Networks, Graphics on the Internet, Graphics software,
Introduction of Open GL; Coordinate Reference Frames, Specifying a tow-Dimensional World-
Coordinate Reference Frame in Open GL, OpenGL Point functions, OpenGL line function, Line –
drawing Algorithm, Parallel Line algorithms, Setting frame buffer values, OpenGL curve functions,
Circle generating algorithms, Ellipse generating algorithms
7 Hrs

UNIT – II

Open GL Primitives & Attributes Pixel addressing and object geometry, Fill-Area Primitives, Polygon Fill Areas, OpenGL Polygon Fill, Area functions, OpenGL Vertex arrays, Pixel –Array Primitives, OpenGL Pixel array functions, Character Primitives, OpenGL Character Functions, OpenGL Display Lists, Open GL Display-Window Reshape Functions; OpenGL state variables, Color and gray scale, OpenGL color functions, Point Attributes, Line Attributes,General Scan Line Polygon-Fill Algorithm

8 Hrs

UNIT – III

Geometric Transformations Basic Two-dimensional Geometric Transformations, Matrix Representation and Homogeneous Coordinates, Inverse Transformations, Two Dimensional Composite Transformations, Other Two Dimensional transformations, Raster Methods for Geometric transformations, OpenGL Rater Transformations, Transformations Between Two dimensional coordinate Systems, Geometric transformations in Three dimensional Space, Three dimensional Translation, Three dimensional Rotation, Three dimensional Scaling, Composite Three dimensional Translation, Other Three dimensional Translation, Transformations

UNIT – IV

Viewing The Two-Dimensional Viewing Pipeline, The clipping window, Normalization and view port transformation., OpenGL Two-Dimensional Viewing functions, Clipping algorithms, Two- Dimensional point clipping., Two-Dimensional line clipping; Over view of Three-dimensional Viewing concepts, The Three-dimensional Viewing pipeline, Three-dimensional Viewing – coordinate parameters, Transformation from word to viewing coordinates, Projections transformation, Orthogonal projections, Oblique parallel projections, Perspective Projections, Open GL Three-dimensional viewing functions.

8 Hrs

UNIT – V

Lighting and Interaction Light sources, Surface lighting effects, Basic illuminations models; Graphical input data, Logical classifications of input Devices, Input functions for Graphical data, Interactive picture – constructions techniques, Virtual –reality environments, Open GL interactive input –device functions, Open GL menu functions, Designing a graphical user interface. Properties of light, Color models;

7 Hrs

TEXT BOOK

1. Computer Graphics with OpenGL, 3/E Donald D Hearn & Prentice Hall.

REFERENCE BOOKS

M. Pauline Baker, Publisher:

1. OpenGL Programming Guide, VI edition, Jackie Neider, Tom Davis, Mason Woo. Shreiner, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company

2. Interactive Computer Graphics A Top-Down Approach with OpenGL -Edward Angel, 5th Edition, Addison-Wesley, 2008.

3. Computer Graphics Using OpenGL – F.S. Hill,Jr. 2nd Edition, Pearson Education, 2001. 4. Computer
3.
Computer Graphics Using OpenGL – F.S. Hill,Jr. 2nd Edition, Pearson Education, 2001.
4.
Computer Graphics – James D Foley, Andries Van Dam, Steven K Feiner, John F Hughes,
Addison-wesley 1997.
Course outcomes (COs)
CO
Description
CO 1:
Explain applications, principles ,commonly used and techniques of computer graphics,
e.g., the graphics pipeline, and Bresenham algorithm for speedy line and circle
generation.
CO 2:
Gain proficiency with OpenGL, a standard specification defining a cross-language,
cross-platform API for writing applications that produce 2D and 3D computer graphics.
CO 3:
Develop a facility with the relevant mathematics of computer graphics, e.g.2Dand3D
rotations using vector algebra, transformations and projections using homogeneous co
ordinations
CO 4:
Analyze computer graphic algorithms for clippings, and viewing concepts on 2Dand3D
CO 5:
Apply C and C++ OpenGL programming in modeling 2D and 3D objects., e.g., hidden
line and surface removal, shading, and rendering.
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Computer Graphics with Open GL course maps majorly to A, B, D, F and K program
outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
S
CO2
M
M
CO3
S
CO4
M
S
M
CO5
S
S
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test – Tutorials Test- 10 Marks 10 Marks ----------------------- Total = 50 Marks Department:
Surprise Test –
Tutorials Test-
10 Marks
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Operating Systems
Course Code: 10CS53
L-T-P:4-0-0
Credits: 04
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Students should have knowledge of C and C++
UNIT – I
10 Hrs
Introduction: What operating systems do; Computer System organization; Computer, System
architecture; Operating System structure; Operating System operations; Process management;
Memory management; Storage management; Protection and security; Distributed system;
Special purpose systems; Computing environments. Process Management: Basic concept;
Process scheduling; Operations on processes; Inter process Communication Multithreaded
Programming: Overview; Multithreading models; Thread Libraries; Threading issues.
UNIT – II
10 Hrs
Process Scheduling: Basic concepts; Scheduling criteria; Scheduling algorithms; Multiple-
Processor scheduling; Real time scheduling, Algorithm evaluation. Process Synchronization:
Synchronization, The Critical section problem; Peterson’s solution; Synchronization hardware;
Semaphores; Classical problems of synchronization; Monitors.
UNIT – III
10 Hrs
Deadlocks: System model; Deadlock characterization; Methods for handling deadlocks;
Deadlock prevention; Deadlock avoidance; Deadlock detection and recovery from deadlock.
Memory Management Strategies: Background; Swapping; Contiguous memory allocation;
Paging; Structure of page table; Segmentation. Virtual Memory Management: Background;
Demand paging; Copy-onwrite; Page replacement; Allocation of frames; Thrashing.
UNIT – IV
9 Hrs
File System: File concept; Access methods; Directory structure; File system mounting; File
sharing;
Protection.
Implementing
File
System:
File
system
structure;
File
system
implementation;
Directory
implementation;
Allocation
methods;
Free
space
management.
Secondary Storage Structures, Protection: Mass storage structures; Disk structure; Disk
attachment; Disk scheduling; Disk management; Swap space management.
UNIT – V
9 Hrs
System Protection: Goals of protection, Principles of protection, Domain of protection, Access
matrix,
Implementation
of
access
matrix,
Access
control,
Revocation
of
access
rights,
Capability-Based systems. Case Study: The Linux Operating System: Linux history; Design principles; Kernel modules;
Capability-Based systems. Case Study: The Linux Operating System: Linux history; Design
principles; Kernel modules; Process management; Scheduling; Memory management; File
systems, Input and output; Interprocess communication.
TEXT BOOK
1. Abraham Silberschatz, Peter Baer Galvin, Greg Gagne: Operating System Principles, 7 th
edition, Wiley-India, 2006.
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. D.M Dhamdhere: Operating systems - A concept based Approach, 2 nd Edition, Tata McGraw-
Hill, 2002.
2. P.C.P. Bhatt: Operating Systems, 2nd Edition, PHI, 2006.
3. Harvey M Deital: Operating systems, 3rd Edition, Addison Wesley, 1990.
Course outcomes (COs)
CO
Description
CO 1:
Understand Process concept and Process scheduling
CO 2:
Analyze Scheduling algorithms and formulate solutions for critical section problem
CO 3:
Describe System model for deadlock, Methods for handling deadlocks and memory
management strategies
CO 4:
Define File ,directory and learn various Access methods and implementation
CO 5:
Learn Case Studies of Linux Operating System
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Operating Systems course maps majorly to C, D, H, J, K program outcomes
Pos
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
Cos
CO1
M
CO2
S
S
M
M
CO3
S
S
M
S
S
CO4
S
M
CO5
M
M
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Lab Conduction – 10 Marks Lab Test - 10 Marks ----------------------- Total = 50 Marks
Lab Conduction –
10 Marks
Lab Test
-
10 Marks
-----------------------
Total = 50 Marks
Department: Computer Science and Engineering
Course Type: Programme Core
Course Title: Database Management Systems
Course Code: 10CS54
L-T-P:4-0-0
Credits: 04
Total Contact Hours: 48 hrs
Duration of SEE: 3 hrs
SEE Marks: 50
CIE Marks: 50
Prerequisites:
• Student should know data structuring concepts
• Students should know elementary programming
• Student should have the exposure to the concepts of computer organization
UNIT – I
10 Hrs
Introduction; An example; Characteristics of Database approach; Actors on the screen; Workers
behind the scene; Advantages of using DBMS approach; A brief history of database applications;
when not to use a DBMS. Data models, schemas and instances; Three-schema architecture and
data independence; Database languages and interfaces; The database system environment;
Centralized and client-server architectures; Classification of Database Management systems.
Using High-Level Conceptual Data Models for Database Design; An Example Database
Application; Entity Types, Entity Sets, Attributes and Keys; Relationship types, Relationship
Sets, Roles and Structural Constraints; Weak Entity Types
UNIT – II
10 Hrs
ER Diagrams, Naming Conventions and Design Issues; Relationship types of degree higher than
two. Relational Model Concepts; Relational Model Constraints and Relational Database
Schemas; Update Operations, Transactions and dealing with constraint violations; Unary
Relational Operations: SELECT and PROJECT; Relational Algebra Operations from Set Theory;
Binary Relational Operations : JOIN and DIVISION; Additional Relational Operations;
Examples of Queries in Relational Algebra;
UNIT – III
10 Hrs
SQL Data Definition and Data Types; Specifying basic constraints in SQL; Schema change
statements in SQL; Basic queries in SQL; More complex SQL Queries. Insert, Delete and
Update statements in SQL; Specifying constraints as Assertion and Trigger; Views (Virtual
Tables) in SQL; Additional features of SQL; Database programming issues and techniques;
Embedded SQL, Dynamic SQL; Database stored procedures and SQL / PSM.
UNIT – IV
9 Hrs
Informal Design Guidelines for Relation Schemas; Functional Dependencies; Normal Forms
Based on Primary Keys; General Definitions of Second and Third Normal Forms; Boyce-Codd
Normal Form. Properties of Relational Decompositions; Algorithms for Relational Database Schema Design; Multivalued
Normal Form. Properties of Relational Decompositions; Algorithms for Relational Database
Schema Design; Multivalued Dependencies and Fourth Normal Form; Join Dependencies and
Fifth Normal Form; Inclusion Dependencies; Other Dependencies and Normal Forms.
UNIT – V
9 Hrs
The ACID Properties; Transactions and Schedules; Concurrent Execution of Transactions; Lock-
Based Concurrency Control; Performance of locking; Transaction support in SQL; Introduction
to crash recovery; 2PL, Serializability and Recoverability; Lock Management; The write-ahead
log protocol; Checkpointing; Recovering from a System Crash; Media Recovery; Other
approaches and interaction with concurrency control.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Elmasri and Navathe: Fundamentals of Database Systems, 5th Edition,
Addison-Wesley,
2007
2. Raghu Ramakrishnan and Johannes Gehrke: Database Management Systems, 3rd Edition,
McGraw-Hill, 2003.
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Silberschatz, Korth and Sudharshan: Data base System Concepts, 5th Edition, Mc-GrawHill,
2006.
2. C.J. Date, A. Kannan, S. Swamynatham: A Introduction to Database Systems, 8 th Edition,
Pearson education, 2006.
Course outcomes (COs)
COs
Description
CO 1:
Able to apply the concepts and design database for given information system.
CO 2:
Develop database programming skills in SQL.
CO 3:
Apply the concepts of Normalization and design database which possess no anomalies.
CO 4:
Able to write application programs considering the issues like concurrency control,
recovery and security.
Mapping of Course outcomes (COs) to Program outcomes (POs)
Database Management System course maps majorly to A, B program outcomes
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
POs
COs
CO1 S CO2 S M CO3 S CO4 S Assessment Method Midterm Test (Avg. of
CO1
S
CO2
S
M
CO3
S
CO4
S
Assessment Method
Midterm Test (Avg. of 2 Tests) – 30 Marks
Surprise Test –
Tutorials Test-
10 Marks