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Learning Experience Plan

Grade level: 9th

Subject: ELA
Unit: Literary Devices used in The Great Gatsby

Length of LEP: 25 minutes

Topic: Setting in The Great Gatsby


Content/ Literacy Standards:
RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RL.9-10.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings.
Learning Experience Outcomes

Learning Experience Assessments

Students will:

Identify the time period and location


settings of the novel The Great

Gatsby.
understand the significance of the

location settings in the novel.


connect the time period setting in
the novel to the historical context of

Input Worksheet
Group discussion and class share-out
(Each group must share answer in
order for group members to receive

credit)
Class Discussion and note- taking
(Each student must submit the notes

that time period.


they took during class discussion
Curriculum Integration (Does this lesson correlate with any other content area?)
Students will learn about the time period and the location settings of the novel The Great
Gatsby. They will also learn and understand the significance of the settings relating to the
historical background of the United States during the 1920s.
Materials
Procedures/Strategies
- White
Day 1
board and

Sponge Activity (activity that will be done as students enter the room to get

marker

them into the mindset of the concept to be learned) 3 minutes

- Blank piece

Students will be given a piece of paper as they walk into the

classroom.
Tell students:

of paper for

"Sponge

Last week, we went over the plot and summary of The Great

Activity"

Gatsby, the novel you've read over the winter break. For the next

- "Input"

three days, we will be examining the literary devices that were used

Worksheet

in the novel. Today, we will begin with the setting.


Directions will be written on the board: In the paper given, write a list

- "Check for

Understandi

of things that you know about the 1920s time period in the United

ng"

States.
Examples:
End of World War I
Called the Roaring 20s (because of growing economy)
Prohibition of alcohol
Women's right to vote
Mass production of cars
Bootlegger

Worksheet
- Homework
Worksheet
- Evaluative
Criteria (4)

Anticipatory Set (focus question/s that will be used to get students thinking
about the days lesson)

As the students work on the "Sponge Activity," ask the question:

What was the United States like during the 1920s time period?
Walk around the classroom to help students come up with answers.

Activating Prior Knowledge (what information will be shared with/among


students to connect to prior knowledge/experience) 2 minutes

Ask students to share some things from their lists with the class.

What do they already know about the time period of the1920s?


Point out that the 1920s was a time of change in the United States.

Direct Instruction (input, modeling, check for understanding) 10 minutes


Input: 4 minutes

Hand out definition worksheet to each students.


Allow students 3 minutes to read and annotate the definitions in the

worksheet with a peer.


Tell students to be prepared to volunteer or to be picked on to share
the definition of a term without looking at the paper.

Modeling: 4-5 minutes


Class discussion: relating the terms on the "Input" worksheet with

scenes and settings in the novel.


Ask students to provide vivid descriptions for each example from the

book and explain how the examples connect to the terms.


In order from top to bottom on the term list, ask students to

volunteer and share out their thoughts and answers.


Example Answers:
The Valley of Ashes: Where Myrtle and George Wilson's

shop locates
West Egg: Where Gatsby's house and parties locate
East Egg: Where Tom's house locates
The Roaring 20s: Most live in city settings rather than farm.
Prohibition: Gatsby became rich by being a bootlegger,

selling alcohol illegally


Ask all students to take note on the "Input" worksheet, which will be
collected by the end of class.

Check for Understanding: 2 minutes


Hand out worksheet to students
Ask students to read the direction: Match the following pictures with

the term that defines the scene


Ask students to take 1 minute to work on the worksheet and remind
them that the worksheet will be collected by the end of the class, but
don't actually collect it (tell them they can use as reference for

homework by end of class).


Walk around the classroom to get a general sense of students'
understanding on the taught materials based on working with the
worksheet.

Guided Practice (how students will demonstrate their grasp of new


learning) 5 minutes

Group discuss on why do they think the settings of the novel is so

significant to the story.


Ask one person from each group to share their answer to the class.

Example answer: The story of the novel sets during the period of
prohibition, Gatsby obtained his wealth from being a bootlegger, selling
alcohol illegally to the people.
Independent Practice (what students will do to reinforce learning of the
lesson) 2 minutes

Pass out homework worksheet to the class.


Read direction with the students:
Imagine that you are someone who lives in the 1920s time period,
you can be a bootlegger, a car fixer, a woman, etc. Write a diary
entry (at least 2 paragraphs) to explain how life is like living in the

United States during that time period.


Ask students if they have any question and make sure the class
understands the assignment. Make it clear that the instructor will be
available to answer any question through email.

Closure (action/statement by teacher designed to bring lesson


presentation to an appropriate close) 2 minute

Conclude with: "Today we examined the time and location settings


of the novel. Tomorrow, we will look at the Green Light symbol from

The Great Gatsby. "


Thanks students for their effort and dismiss the class.
Collect the "Input" paper before students leave the classroom.

References: http://www.varsitytutors.com/englishteacher/fitzgerald,
http://blogs.cofc.edu/american-novel/2015/02/03/prohibition-in-the-great-gatsby/

Learning Experience Plan


Subject: ELA
Unit: Literary Devices used in The Great Gatsby

Grade level: 9th


Length of LEP: 25 minutes

Topic: Symbolism in The Great Gatsby


Content/ Literacy Standards:
RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as
well as inferences drawn from the text.
RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the
course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details;
provide an objective summary of the text.
Learning Experience Outcomes
Students will:

Learning Experience Assessments

identify the use of the Green Light

symbol in The Great Gatsby.


define the idea of an American Dream.
connect the Green Light to the
American Dream and explain how The
Great

Gatsby

presents

this

idea

Green Light cutout


Class share-out discussion on an image
of a typical American Dream scene (every
student must share what they wrote down
in order to be marked down for credit).
Short reflection

through the use of symbolism.


Curriculum Integration (Does this lesson correlate with any other content area? Describe.)
Students will learn how to analyze an important symbol used in The Great Gatsby. They will also
learn about the significance of the American Dream in the society during the 1920s period.
Materials
Procedures/Strategies
- White board and
marker
- The Light Bulb
Hook worksheet
with evaluative

Day 1
Sponge Activity (activity that will be done as students enter the room to get
them into the mindset of the concept to be learned) 5 minutes

Students will be given a worksheet, which requires students to write a

criteria

long-term goal on a light bulb cutout, they will then color it green. We

- The Light Bulb

will ask 3-4 students to share their goal with the class. We will then

activity example

connect the green light symbol to the American Dream.

- The Light Bulb


cutout

Distribute the worksheet with directions:

- Green color
pencil

1) On the light bulb cutout, write a long term goal that you would like to

- Tape

achieve in the future (Ex. Buying a house, buying a car...)

- The American
Dream picture

2) Color the light bulb green

with evaluative

3) Tape the light bulb somewhere around the classroom where you will be

criteria

able to see in your seat from a distance

- Video:
https://www.youtub
e.com/watch?
v=EJ3qTEH_HiY
- Reflection sheet
with evaluative
criteria

Ask students to work on the activity independently for 5 minutes.


Walk around the classroom and be prepared to help students come
up with goals.

Anticipatory Set (focus question/s that will be used to get students thinking
about the days lesson)

- Exit Slip with

Write down the question: Why is the Green Light such an important

symbol in The Great Gatsby?


Ask students to think about this question as they work on the Sponge

evaluative criteria
- Homework

Activity

Assignment
Worksheet with
evaluative criteria

Activating Prior Knowledge (what information will be shared with/among


students to connect to prior knowledge/experience) 4-5 minutes

Tell students to be prepared to share their goals with the class in

order to receive credit.


Point out that the Green Light represents Gatsbys goals in The Great
Gatsby.

Direct Instruction (input, modeling, check for understanding) 12-13 minutes


Input: 3-4 minutes

Have a 30-60 seconds class discussion on the phrase American


Dream
Ask: Have you ever heard of the phrase American Dream? Where

did you heard/ seen it?


Hand out a picture of the ideal image of The American Dream
Write the direction on the board:
Looking at the image shown, write down some of the things that are
included in a typical "The American Dream" scene (1 minute)
Tell students to independently study the image
The students must be prepared to share out their answers (1 minute)
Some possible answers:

- Pets
- White picket fence
- House
- Children
- Garden
- Spouse
- Car

Give the students the definition of the American Dream: The


American Dream is an American social ideal that stresses equal
opportunities and successful social statuses.

Model- 7 minutes

Play green light clip from Movie: https://www.youtube.com/watch?

v=EJ3qTEH_HiY
Begin class discussion by writing down the discussion questions on

the board (may not be able to talk about every question):


Think about what Ms. Chen just taught you about the American
Dream. Can you see how the green light symbol in Gatsby can
represent that?
Example answer: The Green Light is what Gatsby looks toward to
reflect on what he wants in life. In his case, he wants to become

wealthy and win Daisys heart back.


Can anyone tell me what Gatsbys American Dream was? Did he
reach it?
Example answer: Gatsbys American Dream was to become rich
and win Daisys affection. He did not reach it because Daisy
ended up leaving, Gatsby went in grave with none of his money
nor care from his lover.

Nick Carraway, at the end of the novel, laments the loss of the
American Dream. Do you think this is true?
Example answer: I think that this is true, because even though
Gatsby worked hard, he was unable to reach his American
Dream.

Have students share out thoughts and engage the conversation to

involve more participations.


Remind students to use evidence and example from the text to
support their answers.

Check for Understanding- 2 minutes

Write direction on board: Take a few minutes to reflect on what you


just learned and respond to the prompt.
Prompt: Using evidence from The Great Gatsby, what is an American

Dream? Provide an example.


Ask students to take out a piece of paper and take 2 minutes to have
a short reflection on the information taught based on answering the
prompt question.

Guided Practice (how students will demonstrate their grasp of new learning)
2 minutes

A class discussion will be led by an instructor based on a question

asked to check for student understanding.


Ask students the question: How does the green light connect to the
ideal of the American Dream?

Example answer: The green light symbolizes what Gatsby wants in life
and it is his drive to work hard to reach those goals. The American Dream
is what people wants in life and it is the idea that drives them to work
hard.

Allow students to share out their thoughts to the class.

Independent Practice (what students will do to reinforce learning of the


lesson) 1 minute

Pass out homework worksheet to the class.


Read the homework assignment with the class: Illustrate a picture or
describe in words something/ someone that functions as the green
light. In other words, what is a symbol that represents the American
Dream for you/ others/ fictional characters? Please provide an

explanation response (at least 3 sentences).


Ask students if they have any question and make sure the class
understands the assignment. Make it clear the instructor will be
available to answer any question through email.

Closure (action/statement by teacher designed to bring lesson presentation


to an appropriate close)

Conclude with: Today, we looked at the Green Light symbol from


The Great Gatsby and related it to the idea of the American Dream.
Tomorrow, we will examine the different characters in The Great

Gatsby.
Lastly, say: Amazing work today everyone, just before you leave, can
someone answer the question: Why is the Green Light such an

important symbol in The Great Gatsby? for me?


Point to the board where the question was left from the Sponge

Activity
Collect the reflection sheet before the students leave the classroom.

References: Maus Learning Experience Plan

Learning Experience Plan


Grade level: 9th

Subject: ELA
Unit: Literary Devices used in The Great Gatsby

Length of LEP: 25 minutes

Topic: Characters in The Great Gatsby


Content/ Literacy Standards:
RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RL.9-10.3
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations)
develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or
develop the theme.
Learning Experience Outcomes

Learning Experience Assessments

Students will:

identify some of the main

Input Worksheet (Identifying the

characters in the novel The Great

narrator and the protagonist of the

Gatsby.
point out the characteristics of these

story).
Input Worksheet (Using descriptive

characters.
understand how the characteristics

vocabularies and languages to identify


each character and point out the

of the characters contribute to

physical and mental characteristics of

enhance the relationship between

characters.

these main characters).


Input Worksheet (Describe the
relationship each character have with

other characters in the story).


Curriculum Integration (Does this lesson correlate with any other content area?)
Students will learn how to identify the characteristics of different characters in the novel.
They will also understand the way in which personalities may contribute to the different
types of relationship building in the society.
Materials
Procedures/Strategies
- loose leaf
Day 1
paper

Sponge Activity (activity that will be done as students enter the room to get

- white

them into the mindset of the concept to be learned) 2 minute

board and

Students will be asked to quickly take a seat after entering the

classroom. Ask students to take out a loose leaf paper.


Tell them: I will give you one minute to make a list of something, list

marker
- Input
Worksheet

as much as possible and the person (or persons) who can list the

- Evaluative

most will receive two extra credit points on the homework

Criteria

assignment tonight.
Once students are ready , say: "list as many as you can, characters

from the novel The Great Gatsby."


Example answers:
Nick Carraway
Jay Gatsby
Tom Buchanan
Daisy Buchanan
Myrtle Wilson
Jordan Baker
George Wilson
Owl Eyes
Klipspringer
Meyer Wolfsheim
Anticipatory Set (focus question/s that will be used to get students thinking
about the days lesson)

Write the definition of "Character" on the board as students walk into

the classroom.
Character- The particular combination of things about
a person or place, esp. things you cannot see, that make
that person or place different from others. A person represented in a

movie, play, or story.


Emphasize that the lesson topic is on characters

Activating Prior Knowledge (what information will be shared with/among


students to connect to prior knowledge/experience) 1 minute

Ask students to count the amount of characters they have on the list.
The students with the most characters listed will be given extra credit

on tonight's homework.
Have the students with most characters listed read out their answers.
See how many characters can students already identify from reading
the novel and from previous lessons.

Direct Instruction (input, modeling, check for understanding)


Input: 4 minutes

Give students worksheet that focuses on three of the main

characters in the novel.


Characters: Nick Carraway, Jay Gatsby, and Daisy Buchanan
Identify these characters as the main ones in the story
Ask students to fill in the first column of the blank chart.
Ask students to write down definition of a narrator and a protagonist
Give the definition of:
Narrator- a person who tells the story, especially a character who
recounts the events of a novel or narrative poem.
Protagonist- the leading character or one of the major characters in a
drama, movie, novel, or other fictional text.

Modeling: 7 minutes
Ask students to identify the narrator and the protagonist of the story.
Create a chart on the board. Draw seven bubbles and write in them
the names of characters: Nick, Gatsby, Daisy, Tom, George, Myrtle,
Jordan

Tell students to come up and draw a line between characters to


identify and demonstrate the relationship between each character.
Class discussion on the characters.
Discussion Questions:
- Who do you think is an interesting character in the story? Use

evidences to explain why you think so.


Example Answer: Gatsby, someone who looks like he knows exactly what
he wants in life. But, in the end, only to realize what he held on to are all
empty dreams. For example, Gatsby wanted the love of Daisy, but Daisy's
love was never worth all his struggles.
- How do you think the characteristics of the characters enhances
the relationship between one character and another?
Example Answer: Because Nick is a trustworthy friend, Gatsby develops a
friendship with him and allows him to know his secret love of Daisy. Also,
allows him to be the one to build that bridge between him and his lover.
Check for Understanding: 3 minutes
Ask students to give put their thumbs up and demonstrate their level

of understanding on the materials just taught.


Ask students to fill out the rest of the "Input" worksheet and tell them

that it will be collected by the end of the class.


Walk around to see if any student struggle with working on the
worksheet to determine class understanding. Provide more help for
the students if felt uncomfortable with the information taught.

Guided Practice (how students will demonstrate their grasp of new learning)
3 minutes

Class discussion on the difference between all the characters in the


story.

Independent Practice (what students will do to reinforce learning of the


lesson) 2 minutes

Tell students: For homework, pick a character from the novel the
Great Gatsby. Create a fake Facebook page for that character. You

may include whatever you want on the profile such as pictures,

relationship status, friends, and short bio- descriptions.


Hand out the evaluative criteria for this homework assignment.
Ask students if they have any question and make sure the class
understands the assignment. Make it clear that the instructor will be
available to answer any question through email.

Closure (action/statement by teacher designed to bring lesson presentation


to an appropriate close) 1 minute

Conclude with: "Today we examined characteristics and the


relationships of characters in the novel. This is the end of the unit,
but tomorrow, we will start watching clips from the movie "The Great
Gatsby" and start the unit on comparing and contrasting literary

works and the movie adaptations of those stories."


Thanks students for their effort and dismiss the class.
Collect the "Input" paper before students leave the classroom.
References: http://www.storyboardthat.com/teacher-guide/the-great-gatsby-by-fscott-fitzgerald