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UTC GENERAL EDUCATION LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE (Four page limit)

PRELIMINARY INFORMATION
Candidate:
Christina Martin

Date developed:
September 2016

Lesson Title:
Investigation of Forces
Grade Level: 3
Number of students: 24
Unit/theme:
Sound

Date of lesson:
November 11, 2016
Knowledge domain/subject:
Science
Period/time/estimated duration:
One class period

Where in the unit does this lesson occur?


End

Structure(s) or grouping for the lesson (all that apply):


Small Group

**USE COMPLETE SENTENCES IN RESPONDING TO ALL OF THE FOLLOWING LESSON PLAN ELEMENTS**

INFORMATION ABOUT THE CONTEXT:


In our classroom, there are 13 female students and 11 male students. One student has a 504 plan due to major hearing loss. This
student will have several accommodations. The student will always be placed at the front of the room or nearest to the teacher. The
student will also be given a FM system that the instructor will comply with at all times in order for the student to hear effectively in
the classroom. There are 2 students with IEPs; these students have been diagnosed with ADHD. These students will be allowed to
sit on stability balls at specific times during the lesson. They will also have a Velcro strip placed on their desk in order to help with
their sensory needs. During times in which they have to work in groups they will be placed with strong peer support in which they
are able to work effectively. Finally, our class has two ELL students. The teacher will provide videos with Spanish subtitles shown in
class. Audio books and tapes in the first language of each ESL student will be provided. Peer support and teacher made picture
cards will accompany each lesson and concept covered in class.

RESOURCES, MATERIALS, TECHNOLOGY, EQUIPMENT FOR THE LESSON:


White board
Scientific notebook
Strings of different lengths

CENTRAL FOCUS:
Investigate how the pitch and volume of a sound can be changed.

JUSTIFICATION/RATIONALE:
This is an important extension of our investigation of force.

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF CHILDREN


Students prior knowledge is formed from their everyday experiences with sound. Many of these students have learned some of
these concepts in music class.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE(S):
Teacher:
The student will be able to explain science concepts in relation to sound.
The student will be able to cite examples of how the volume of a sound can be changed.
The student will be able to identify the difference between volume, sound, and pitch.
Student:
I can explain what sound is using my vocabulary words.
I can tell examples of how volume of a sound can be changed.
I can identify the difference between volume, sound, and pitch.

CONTENT STANDARDS
GLE 0307.11.3 Investigate how the pitch and volume of a sound can be changed.

ACADEMIC LANGUAGE DEMANDS


LANGUAGE FUNCTION: Investigate
Language Demand:
(VOCABULARY)
Tier 1: Investigate
Tier 2: Volume, sound, pitch.
(DISCOURSE)
Students will investigate how the pitch and volume of a sound can be changed.
LANGUAGE SUPPORT:
Think-pair-share
Exit ticket

PLAN FOR ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING


Diagnostic/pre-assessment: A pre-test will be given prior to starting the unit.
Formative assessment/feedback to learners: Exit ticket. Circulate and listen.
Summative assessment (if any): A post-test will be given at the end of the unit.

EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING:


Exceed expectations: Students understand and are able to explain the difference between volume, sound, and pitch. Student can
then give examples of each and how they have seen them in their own lives.
Meets expectations: Students understand and are able to explain the difference between volume, sound, and pitch.
Below expectations: Student cannot explain the explain the difference between volume, sound, and pitch.

PROCEDURES FOR THE LESSON

LIST THE HIGHER-ORDER (CRITICAL) QUESTIONS YOU WILL ASK STUDENTS IN THIS LESSON:
What is the loudness or softness of a sound?
What is the lowness or highness of a sound?

BEGINNING:
Take the class outside to the playground. Have the students bring notebooks and pencils. Ask them to sit as quietly as they can and
listen to their surroundings. Instruct them to close their eyes to help them concentrate. What do they hear? Have them write their
ideas down and categorize which sounds are loud and quiet, or which sounds have high or low pitches. Then have your students
share their findings with the class.
Discuss essential questions and have students write answers on white boards while doing think-pair-share.
MIDDLE:
Divide the class into small groups and give each group several different lengths of string. Have two students hold the ends of one
string and have another student pluck it. What do they see? What do they hear? Then have them repeat the activity using different
lengths of string. What happens to the sound? What happens to the vibrations? Students can record their observations in a chart
and share what they learned with the whole class.

END:
Have students complete an exit ticket describing the difference between volume, sound, and pitch.

DIFFERENTIATION/EXTENSION (How will you provide successful access to the key concepts by all the students at their ability
levels?)
Supporting students with special needs:
For our student with hearing loss we will give instructions via the FM system, and allow the students to communicate questions
either in writing or if possible by verbally answering the question. For our students with ADHD collaborative learning will give them
the opportunity to get up and move around in the classroom, hopefully giving them the ability to better concentrate in discussion.
Strong peer support and pictures and videos in the childrens first language will be provided for the ELL students.
Challenging experienced learners: Students will be given the chance to further research this topic on an iPad or computer. This will
allow these students to find how magnet affect something that interest them (i.e. cars, weather, sports, etc.)
Facilitating a classroom environment that supports student learning: The classroom has stability balls, Velcro strips, multilingual
audio books and print books, etc. All of these things contribute to student learning. The environment of the room will invite
childrens curiosity and encourage exploration along with the freedom to ask questions. Positive feedback will be given to
encourage and develop student learning.
Extension:
I will meet with students how seem to be struggling with the material and we will work together to see how we can help the
students become more successful in their understanding of the material.

WHAT Ifs:
What if students find the material too easy?
If the material seems to be too easy for students we will begin to discuss motion and force at a deeper level. We will discuss motion
and force when it comes to more complicated objects such as cars and trains.
What if students cannot stay focused during the activity and end up having outside discussions with other group members?
The teacher will be walking around in order to see if students are on track. The teacher will discuss what is happening with each
group and what they learning through their investigations.

REFERENCES:
https://educators.brainpop.com
Developed in part from the work of Dr. D. Johnson & Dr. E. Stevens, Roberts Wesleyan College, Teacher Education Dept.