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All In

All In Once Upon a Time Historical notes for the material on All In

Once Upon a Time

Historical notes for the material on All In

Jack Carpenter

Contents

Introduction

3

Running the Aces

4

Table Bluff Shift

5

A Random Act

6

451 Stack

7

Poor Uncle Joe

8

Hustler’s Rip

9

Hybrid Stack

11

The Ultimate False Deal

12

Pseudo Hand Muck

13

Direct Switch

14

General Utility Control

15

Multiple Card Switch

16

One Two Switch

17

Retention Switch

18

Spread Switch

19

Toss Palm

20

Barstool Steal

21

Tip for the Diagonal Palm Shift

22

2nd Dealing Tips

23

Bottom Dealing Tips

24

Imagine

25

Touch My Heart

26

The Vanishing

27

Four

28

Card Matrix

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Jack Carpenter

Introduction

Well hello there, Before I finish this glass of single malt whisky, let me welcome you to All In. As the name implies, this project runs the gamut from gambling demos to moves to magic tricks, and even legitimate techniques for the gaming table. I’m All In. But one cannot be truly all in without paying respect to the greats. They have laid the foundation from which we work on, imparting tools and inspiration. I am forever grateful and indebted. And that’s where this document comes in. Follow me on a journey to explore the origins of everything you’ll see on All In. Card moves are often born in the shadows—let my cigar tip illuminate the way.

All the best, and all in,

Jack Carpenter

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Running the Aces

Ed Marlo’s The Other Method contained the technique of planting the left thumb on a specific card in an unsquared deck to acquire a break during the squaring procedure. It was published in the October, 1967 issue of The New Tops (Vol. 7, No. 10).

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Table Bluff Shift

Collapsing a break to automatically anglejog the cards above was part of Cliff Green’s An Imperceptibe “Get-

Ready” in Professional Card Magic (1961).

Ed Marlo published a technique to maintain jogs in a tabled spread as the Delayed Spread Control in his

book, Control Systems (1952).

Putting all four Aces in as one comes from Bob Veeser’s Bluff Shift, published in Ed Marlo’s manuscript,

The Multiple Shift (1960).

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The disarming finesse of riffling the deck while holding a break was used by a magician simply named Elliot, within Elliot’s Zircon Card Trick in The

Magician Annual (1909).

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A Random Act

The Zarrow Shuffle was published in the July, 1957 issue of The New Phoenix magazine (No. 346) as Full Deck Control by a Riffle Shuffle. A more exhaustive description of the shuffle can be found in David Ben’s

Zarrow—A Lifetime of Magic (2008)

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S.W. Erdnase described a one-handed Bottom Deal in Expert at the Card Table (1902). The wrist turnover aspect of the deal was introduced by Ed Marlo as the One Hand Stud Second in

Seconds, Centers, and Bottoms (1959). As the

name suggests, Marlo’s technique was a Second Deal. Tony Kardyro applied the wrist turnover to a Bottom Deal in his Undercover section of The New Tops (Vol. 26, No. 9).

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451 Stack

Ernest Earick’s A Hand for Mr. Scarne can be found in issue 6 of

Penumbra (2003).

While the concept of the Second Deal is old, it wasn’t commonly described in print. Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin detailed a push-off

handling in Les trickeries des Grecs

devoile (1861, English translation 1863), and John Nevil Maskelyne detailed a strike technique in

Sharps and Flats (1894).

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My own OBLITER-ACE-ION was published in issue 2

of Labyrinth (1994).

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Poor Uncle Joe

Daryl’s Combo Count is a central part of his Cardboard Chameleons routine, from The

Greater Magic Video Library Volume 13 (1986).

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Tommy Tucker released The Six Card Repeat Mystery in Charles Eastman’s

Expert Manipulative Magic (1933).

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Hustler´s Rip

The Monte Hype Move was described in Jean

Eugène Robert-Houdin’s Les trickeries des Grecs

devoile (1861, English translation 1863).

The basis for John Hamman’s Gemini Count is Karl Fulves’ Center Pull-Out from issue 21 of

Epilogue (1974).

My palm vanish is related to the Tent Vanish variant Dai Vernon published as part of his Slow-Motion Four Aces routine in the series 6, no. 2 issue of Stars of Magic (1950). An even closer relative is Joel Givens‘ Rubbed Out from issue 60 of The Trapdoor (1996).

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The Flustration Count has its roots in Hindu Shuffle displays, such as in Harris Solomon’s Nomolos from the May, 1938 issue of The Jinx (Issue 44). The modern small-packet Flustration Count was published by Norm Houghton within his Colour Blind routine in the June, 1955 issue of Ibidem (No. 1).

The Erdnase Break can be found as part of the S.W.E. Shift in S.W. Erdnase’s Expert at

the Card Table (1902).

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Hustler´s Rip (cont.)

Trevor Lewis released his Monte Plus (or Hallucination) in the June, 1978 issue of

Apocalypse (Vol. 1, No.

6). In the following issue, Ken Krenzel added the upjog addition, calling it Monte Plus Plus.

Paul Harris released a Monte-based, off-balance transposition where the money card changes places with the loser cards. It was called Double Monte and can be found in Super Magic (1977).

The torn corner ruse for Three- Card Monte can be found in Scarne

Explains Why You Can’t Win (c.

1933), written by Audley Walsh.

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Using a folded corner as a decoy for its torn counterpart was part of Gordon Bean’s Corner Kick from issue 2 of

Penumbra (2002).

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Hybrid Stack

Riffle stacking cards was described in the context of cheating at Nap by John Nevil Maskelyne in

Sharps and Flats (1894).

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The Ultimate False Deal

The Biddle Steal was a part of Elmer Biddle’s Trancendent in the April, 1947 issue of Genii (Vol. 11, No. 8).

Bill Kalush has tracked down a manuscript that mentions—without describing—the Bottom Deal and Center Deal from the 16th century:

Olivier Gouyn’s Le Mespris &

Contennement De Tous Ieux De Sort Compose Oliuier Gouyn De

Poictiers (1550). S.W. Erdnase’s Bottom Deal and grip were taught

in Expert at the Card Table (1902).

Charles Jordan used his then- unnamed Jordan Count in The Phantom Aces within Thirty Card

Mysteries (1919).

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Pseudo Hand Muck

This tabled switch has its roots in Jack Merlin’s Hop

Off the Bottom from

Merlin’s original, the switched out cards were placed on top of the pack, similar to what has become known as the Jinx Switch. Jerry Hartman varied the technique to place the cards on the table next to the deck in his Stack Knack from the Autumn, 1985 issue

of Richard’s Almanac (Volume 3).

And

a Pack of Cards (1927). In

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Direct Switch

The Direct Switch has a related set of actions to Allan Ackerman’s Oops Addition from The Cardjurer (2012).

Art Altman claimed to have created the Altman Trap in 1956, but it wasn’t published until inclusion in Ed Marlo’s

Advanced Fingertip

Control (1970).

Collapsing a break to automatically anglejog the cards above was part of Cliff Green’s An Imperceptible

“Get-Ready” in Professional Card

Magic (1961). For a tabled version, please see Table Bluff Shift in volume one of All In.

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Al Leech’s pick-up is described in Pseudo Color Change from Super Card

Man Stuff (1965).

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General Utility Control

The finesse of hiding a packet under a clean edge was published by Ed Marlo as The Razor’s Edge in Marlo’s Magazine Volume 3 (1979).

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Ditching cards on top of a spread was part of Ron Wilson’s Highland Hop from the May, 1968 issue of Genii (Vol. 32, No. 9).

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Multiple Card Switch

The Stanyon Count was published as The False Count (Second Method) in the April, 1920 issue of Stanyons Magic (Vol. 15, No. 7).

The first time the Stuart Gordon Turnover hit the page, it wasn’t under his name. Ken Simmons published it in Riffling The Pasteboards (1986), within his Ace-Bitiously Yours routine. While Stuart Gordon had been showing the move around since the early ‘70s, he never published it. Two years after Mr. Simmons’ booklet, the move was published under Mr. Gordon’s name as a part of Slow-Motion Larry in Larry Jennings’ The Cardwright (1988), written by Mike Maxwell. And recently with the release of David Ben’s anthology of Herb Zarrow, Zarrow—A Lifetime of Magic (2008), we learn that Mr. Zarrow was using an almost identical technique at least a decade or more before Mr. Gordon.

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What is commonly referred to as the Illogical Double Lift is actually one of Ed Marlo’s KM Moves. This version of the KM Move was published under Single Card Exchanges in Marlos Magazine Volume 1 (1975).

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One Two Switch

Shooting cards away from the pack by curling the index finger is a technique Ron Johnson used in a false cut called Johnson’s Cut, described in Ed Marlo’s Marlo in Spades (1947).

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Retention Switch

Jerry Sadowitz has a move that switches an outjogged card for the bottom card of the deck within his Ipcress routine from Contemporary Card Magic (1984). Mr. Sadowitz’s move was from a squared deck, rather than a spread, and he credited Gordon Bruce’s routine Way Out from the May, 1982 issue of Pabular magazine (Vol. 7, No. 4) for his inspiration.

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Spread Switch

The Spread Switch has roots in a move from Adrian Plate’s The Disappearing Card where a jogged card is pulled back on the deck as the right hand comes over to take it. It was taught in The Magician Annual (1907).

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Toss Palm

S.W. Erdnase described his Bottom Palm—First

Method in Expert at the Card Table (1902).

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Barstool Steal

Pushing a bottom card forward during a palm was described as Transformations. Two Hands. Second Method. S.W. Erdnase’s

Expert at the Card Table (1902).

Ed Marlo’s Misdirection Palm was published in The Cardician (1953).

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Stealing the top card of an outjogged double in this manner is similar to Aaron Fisher’s Revolution No. 9 from The Paper Engine (2002).

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Tip for the Diagonal Palm Shift

The Diagonal Palm Shift was published in S.W. Erdnase’s

Expert at the Card Table (1902).

Like myself, Arthur Finley also pulled up his sleeves during the Diagonal Palm Shift, although he palmed the card into his right hand. Details of his move can be found in Stephen

Minch’s The Vernon Chronicles

Volume 1 (1987), called The Arthur Finley Diagonal Palm Shift.

Ellis Stanyon used the action of pulling up the sleeves as cover for a shift—a two- handed Pass—and published it as Stanyon’s Pass in Connection with Sleeves in the September 1914–September 1919 issue of Stanyon’s Magic (Vol. 14, No. 12).

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2nd Dealing Tips

The Flop Second, along with several other Second Deal touches were first detailed in my book, Modus Operandi (1992).

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Bottom Dealing Tips

Many of the techniques taught here were detailed in two examinations of the Bottom Deal: Notes on the Strike Bottom Deal, and Notes on the Stud Bottom Deal. They can be found in my book, Modus Operandi (1992), written by Stephen Hobbs.

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Imagine

R.W. Hull’s A Mental Card Mystery was published in Eye Openers (1932), although Hull’s The Three of Clubs from the Card Clairvoyance section of John Northern Hilliard’s Greater Magic (1938) is the routine upon which most versions are based, as it uses a duplicate card.

The basis for the Top Change was published in Jean-Nicholas Ponsin’s

Nouvelle Magie Blanche

Devoilee (1853, English Translation 1937). The technique seems to have been around much longer though, as it was described in an anonymous notebook circa 1800 that was transcribed by Will Houstoun and published as The Notebook (2009). The End Grip handling of the Top Change was published as Le Temps Four Aces in Jean Hugard and Fred

Braue’s Expert Card Technique (1940).

Henry Christ’s Reverse was published as part of his Fabulous Ace Routine in Cliff

Green’s Professional Card Magic (1961).

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Touch My Heart

This routine shares some conceptual similarities with Peter Duffie’s Crystal Clear Transpo from Card

Secrets Unlocked (2005).

Gilles-Edme Guyot published the card transposition plot

in Nouvelles Recreations Physiques et Mathematiques

(1740, English translation by Jean Hugard 1941) as Les Cartes Changeantes Sous la Main.

The turnover used is reminiscent of what has become known as the Wild Card Move, which dates back to a Johann Hofzinser trick called Thought

from Hofzinser’s Card Conjuring

(1910, English translation 1931).

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The Double Lift was described as a bar bet in Richard Neve’s

A Merry Companion; or Delights for the Ingenious (1716).

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The Vanishing

Herb Zarrow’s Block Addition was described

in The Vernon Chronicles Volume 3 (1989),

written by Stephen Minch.

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The Elmsley Count was published—although unnamed—in Alex Elmsley’s marketed effect

The Four Card Trick (1959).

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Four

The plot of one four-of-a- kind changing into another was published by Reginald

Scot in The Discoverie of

Witchcraft (1584), called How to deliver out foure aces, and to convert them into foure knaves.

Bill Goodwin’s Spectator Cuts to the Aces was taught on his DVD, Reflection (2009).

The Top Card Cover Pass was created by Clinton Burgess and described briefly in the December, 1900 issue of Stanyon’s Magic magazine (Vol. 1, No. 3). Using the concept as a false cut was pioneered by Joseph Cottone, whose Cottone’s Spider-Grip False Cut appeared in More

Card Manipulations Series 3 (1940),

written by Jean Hugard. The Slip Cut used in Four closely resembles Edward Marlo’s V. Slip Cut No. 3 from Expert Card Conjuring Part One (1968), written by Alton Sharpe.

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Card Matrix

The four-object assembly was described using sugar cubes in a trick aptly called Sugar, in Edwin

Sachs’ Sleight of Hand (1877).

Peter Kane used cards for the task with his The Chink-a-Chink Aces in

A Further Card Session (1975).

Joe Berg described laying a double on the table in Here’s New Magic (1937).

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The Rub-a-Dub Vanish was published as part of William H. McCaffrey’s Card In The Pocket II from John Northern

Hilliard’s Greater Magic

(1938). Johnny Thompson asserts that the technique was the creation of Charlie Miller.

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